VICTOR VALLEY

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Victor Valley welcomes new businesses, industries Retail, commercial expansions create profit centers

Destination for Business
SPONSORED BY THE VICTOR VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE | 2014

Location, industrial assets draw manufacturers to Victor Valley

A Global Destination Take Flight at SCLA
Offering a wide range of services including aircraft painting, maintenance, repair and overhaul, aircraft delivery and flight testing.

(760) 243-1900 www.victorvillecity.com

At Hilton Garden Inn® hotels you’ll find everything you need to be self-sufficient and productive, right where you need it. Designed for the individual business traveler and the weekend leisure guest, Hilton Garden Inn provides the finest quality of essential services and amenities. It’s value engineered from the ground up and dedicated to guest comfort. To you it’s a hotel, to us it’s an obsession.

Room Amenities
• King Bed or Double Queen Evolution Guest Room featuring Garden Sleep System adjustable bed with crisp white duvet • In-room amenities include 42” plasma TV, refrigerator, microwave, Keurig coffee maker, iron/ironing board, hairdryer, two phones, comfortable sitting chair and ottoman, and an ergonomic work desk • Complimentary high-speed Internet access • 24-hour business center • Swimming pool, whirlpool and fitness center • 24-hour convenient mart • On-property restaurant and bar • Meeting and event space available up to 7,500 square feet to accommodate any size event

We will be delighted to cater your next wedding, quinceanera, business meeting and so much more!

12603 Mariposa Rd. • Victorville, CA 92395 (760) 952-1200 Phone • (760) 952-3156 Fax

www.victorville.stayhgi.com

VICTOR VALLEY
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
ON THE COVER From advanced materials to aviation production, manufacturing powers the local economy in Victor Valley. Photo by Michael Conti

CONTENTS

2014 EDITION | VOLUME 6

5 OVERVIEW

32 ECONOMIC PROFILE

6

BUSINESS CLIMATE

24 10
All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste. PLEASE

GOOD TO GROW
Victory Valley welcomes new businesses, industries

14

RETAIL

HERE COMES THE BOOM
Retail, commercial expansions create profit centers that leverage growing consumer demand

RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

10

INDUSTRIAL APPEAL

20
24 26
EDUCATION

16

TRANSPORTATION

DESTINATION FOR BUSINESS

PLENTY OF DRIVE

20

TRAINING GROUND
LIVABILITY

Air, rail and roadways enhance Victor Valley’s logistical appeal

ENERGY

28

SUSTAINABLE VISION

HEALTH CARE

A DIFFERENT WORLD

PRESCRIPTION FOR GROWTH
Victor Valley hospitals expand services, facilities to meet patient needs

WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY

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VICTOR VALLEY
2014 EDITION VOLUME 6

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

EDITOR | EMILY McMACKIN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS | NAN BAUROTH, CARY ESTES, BILL LEWIS, JOHN MCBRYDE, SUE SIENS, GARY WOLLENHAUPT CONTENT COORDINATOR | JESSICA WALKER BOEHM STAFF WRITER | KEVIN LITWIN PROOFREADING MANAGER | RAVEN PETTY LEAD DESIGNER | KACEY PASSMORE SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS | STACEY ALLIS, LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, JAKE SHORES, VIKKI WILLIAMS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS | JACKIE CIULLA, LINDSEY HIGGINS, MATT WEST CREATIVE TECHNOLOGY ANALYST | BECCA ARY LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER | MICHAEL CONTI SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS | JEFF ADKINS, BRIAN McCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS | WENDY JO O’BARR, FRANK ORDOÑEZ, MICHAEL TEDESCO COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN | ALISON HUNTER INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER | JERRICA LUGO SALES SUPPORT PROJECT MANAGER | SARA QUINT SALES SUPPORT COORDINATOR | CHRISTINA MORGAN AD PRODUCTION MANAGER | KATIE MIDDENDORF AD TRAFFIC ASSISTANTS | KRYSTIN LEMMON, PATRICIA MOISAN WEB PROJECT MANAGER | DAVID DAY WEB DEVELOPER I | NELS NOSEWORTHY WEB DESIGNER II | RICHARD STEVENS DIGITAL PROJECT MANAGER | JILL RIDENOUR DIGITAL PRODUCTS DESIGNER | ERICA LAMPLEY

CHAIRMAN | GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER | BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT | RAY LANGEN SENIOR V.P./SALES | TODD POTTER SENIOR V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT | JEFF HEEFNER SENIOR V.P./OPERATIONS | CASEY HESTER SENIOR V.P./JOURNAL DIGITAL | MICHAEL BARBER V.P./SALES | JAREK SWEKOSKY V.P./CONTENT OPERATIONS | NATASHA LORENS MEDIA TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR | CHRISTINA CARDEN PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR | JEFFREY S. OTTO WEB SERVICES DIRECTOR | ALLISON DAVIS CONTROLLER | CHRIS DUDLEY SENIOR ACCOUNTANT | LISA OWENS ACCOUNTS PAYABLE COORDINATOR | MARIA McFARLAND ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE COORDINATOR | DIANA IAFRATE IT DIRECTOR | DANIEL CANTRELL

MITSUBISHI CEMENT CORPORATION
5808 State Hwy. LUCERNE VALLEY CA 92356 (760) 248-7373

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY | KRISTY GILES HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER | PEGGY BLAKE

Victor Valley Economic Development is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Victor Valley Chamber of Commerce. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by email at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Victor Valley Chamber of Commerce 14174 Green Tree Blvd. • Victorville, CA 92395 Phone: (760) 245-6506 • www.vvchamber.com VISIT VICTOR VALLEY ECONOMIC DEvELOPMENT ONLINE AT WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY ©Copyright 2014 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent.

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The Association of Magazine Media Custom Content Council

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Please recycle this magazine.

4 || VICTOR VALLEY

OVERVIEW

7 Reasons to Live, Work in Victor Valley
AFFORDABILITY, ACCESSIBILITY AND ENVIRONMENT RANK AMONG THE REGION’S TOP ADVANTAGES
1. Affordability.
distribution operations, the region provides a wealth of options, including the Global Access-Victorville development at the Southern California Logistics Airport. The complex offers logistics and industrial space, along with an aviation and air cargo facility.

Victor Valley is one of the most affordable regions in Southern California to live, work and do business. The region offers inexpensively priced land, labor and utilities.

7. Natural Attractions.
Located in the Mojave Desert in the midst of mountains, dunes and trails, Victor Valley has a limitless supply of recreational activities.

2. Housing. The housing

market is reasonably priced and diverse, with properties ranging from ranch-style homes to lakeside condos.

6. Workforce. With its

3. Accessibility.

Victor Valley’s location puts it in proximity to the amenities of bigger cities, as well as major ports, airports and highways. Businesses in the region can reach a population of more than 20 million people and most western markets within a three-hour drive.

manufacturing heritage and network of colleges and technical schools, Victor Valley offers a workforce with expertise in production and a high level of training.

For more information, contact: Victor Valley Chamber of Commerce 14174 Green Tree Blvd. Victorville, CA 92395 (760) 245-6506 www.vvchamber.com

127

15

Victor Valley

4. Environment. The

region is known for clean air, low humidity and more than 300 days of sunshine. Its environment makes it ideal for tapping into solar power and other natural resources. From using alternative energy to power plants to conserving the local water supply, the region makes sustainability a high priority.

S AN B E R N AR D I N O
58

Adelanto
138

40 15
247

Apple Valley Victorville 247 Hesperia San Bernardino
62 62

Lake Havasu

210

5. Industrial Sites.

For companies looking for largescale sites for manufacturing and

WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY

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BUSINESS CLIMATE

GOOD TO GROW
VICTOR VALLEY WELCOMES NEW BUSINESSES, INDUSTRIES
VICTOR VALLEY’S MANY ADVANTAGES AND AMENITIES MAKE IT A TOP SPOT FOR BUSINESSES TO RELOCATE OR EXPAND. THE REGION IS HOME TO A MASTER-PLANNED GLOBAL ACCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LOGISTICS AIRPORT. UNITED FURNITURE INDUSTRIES, DR PEPPER SNAPPLE GROUP AND OTHER FIRMS ARE CREATING HUNDREDS OF JOBS.

6 || VICTOR VALLEY

O
By Sue Siens

nce known worldwide as home to the late actors Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, today the booming Victor Valley region of Southern California is making its mark as a globally preferred location for businesses looking to relocate or expand. The High Desert communities of Victorville, Apple Valley, Adelanto and Hesperia offer a pro-growth climate for businesses that includes available, affordable property; incentives for new development; a cooperative atmosphere among local governments; and convenient air, rail and interstate access.

the most inexpensively priced utilities in all of Southern California,” says Keith C. Metzler, assistant city manager for the City of Victorville and executive director of the Victor Valley Economic Development Authority. “For these reasons, we experienced manufacturing,

Positioned for Growth
Few areas of the country can boast the Victor Valley’s consistent growth rate that has continued to rise despite the recent recession. The area’s population of 440,000 residents is growing at about 2.2 percent annually. “We’re seeing consistent growth here in the Valley for good reason,” says Jason Lamoreaux, president of HomeSource Lamoreaux Residential Group. “One of our strengths is our affordability rate. The percentage of people who can afford to purchase a home here is at 77 percent, as compared with only about 12 percent in the Los Angeles basin.” Not only does this create a more stable, less transient workforce, “developers and employers can afford to purchase homes here, become involved with the community, and continue to invest and bring new business expansion,” Lamoreaux says. Substantial investment by local governments in public infrastructure and utility systems has also positioned the area for growth. “In addition to land and skilled labor that is affordably priced, Victorville offers industrial wastewater services, reclaimed water services, and electrical and natural gas services that are among

Homes in Victor Valley are known for their affordability.

distribution and aerospace expansion during a time that has been considered one of the worst economic recessions.”

Development Draws Industries
One of the Victor Valley’s biggest assets is its master-planned Global Access development at the Southern California Logistics Airport (SCLA), which encompasses 2,500 acres of the airport, 60 million square feet of diverse development at the Southern California Logistics Centre and 3,500 acres of planned space for facilities with multimodal or rail access needs. Only minutes from Interstate 15, and less than 100 miles from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, SCLA is strategically centered to provide air
WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY

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Median Home Prices
Source: California Association of Realtors, 2013

$439,590

$479,690

$198,890

Los Angeles

Orange County

San Diego

San Bernardino County (includes Victor Valley area)

Riverside County/Palm Springs area

Population Increase from 2000 to 2010

77%
Victor Valley

$310,020

$677,660

The Victor Valley’s total population of 440,000 residents is growing at about 2.2 percent annually.

12%
Los Angeles

81%
Victorville

75%
Adelanto

27%
Apple Valley

44%
Hesperia

The percentage of people who can afford to purchase a home in the Victor Valley is at 77 percent, compared with only about 12 percent in the Los Angeles basin. Source: HomeSource Lamoreaux Residential Group

Source: U.S. Census Bureau figures

cargo services and interstate accessibility within a three-hour drive of more than 26 million people. “In the last 12 months, we have seen major investments in companies operating at the Southern California Logistics Airport,” Metzler says. Two firms at SCLA – Pacific Aerospace Resources and Technologies LLC and Leading Edge Aviation Services – are expanding to accommodate the largest of aerospace customers. Both companies are working with The Boeing Co. to provide maintenance upgrades and exterior paint jobs to newly manufactured planes. The

planes will be flown to SCLA for finishing services before being delivered to airlines such as American Airlines, Air Canada and Qatar Airways, Metzler says. Other developments include hundreds of new jobs created by United Furniture Industries, which manufactures Simmons Upholstery, and an expansion by beverage giant Dr Pepper Snapple Group. The airport also partners with universities, colleges and technical schools in the area to facilitate job training.

Cooperation Is Key
Cooperation among local governments is helping to create

a competitive edge for business recruitment and expansion in the Victor Valley. “We are fortunate to have municipalities that work well together, are pro-growth and offer a business-friendly environment,” Lamoreaux says. “If developers or businesses have questions or need assistance, the cities work together to find solutions. They also offer incentives to encourage development.” Metzler agrees, noting the importance of making sure that industries “see a region of communities that have a common goal and common interests.”

8 || VICTOR VALLEY

REGIONAL COLLABORATION

Joining Forces
VICTOR VALLEY CITIES TEAM UP TO ATTRACT NEW DEVELOPMENT
The High Desert cities of Adelanto, Apple Valley, Barstow, Hesperia and Victorville, along with portions of San Bernardino County, are joining forces to market the area’s development opportunities to business and industry prospects. Representatives from these communities recently attended the International Council of Shopping Centers’ Annual Conference in Las Vegas – one of the world’s largest gatherings of retail and commercial development professionals – to showcase the Victor Valley’s commercial appeal. The group, known as Opportunity High Desert, also touted the region at the Western Regional ICSC show in San Diego. “Our collective efforts allow us to showcase the entire High Desert as a population of more than 400,000 versus individual city populations,” says Doug Robertson, Victorville city manager. Regional attendance at the shows led to interest from one major restaurant chain, which is considering five locations in the High Desert for new sites. “Our presence at the shows as a team was definitely noticed by the retail and business community,” Robertson says. For more than 30 years, local governments have jointly hosted High Desert Opportunity, the region’s largest business conference, focused on promoting area businesses and exploring new opportunities for development. Opportunity High Desert served as a major sponsor of the event in 2013, which attracts about 80 exhibitors and 1,000 attendees annually, including business leaders and real estate executives from California and the western U.S. “As we continue to see success as a result of our cooperative efforts, the five cities of the High Desert are looking at other opportunities to market to warehousing, manufacturing, and industrial sectors,” Robertson says. – Sue Siens

Master Developer of the Largest Industrial Park in the Victor Valley
• Land Sales, Build-to-Suit and Lease-Back Opportunities • From 3,500 to 1.5 Million Square Feet Available • Infrastructure in Place: Water, Power, Waste Treatment, Fiber Optics • Most Active Industrial Developer in the High Desert Region • More than 3 Million Square Feet Built to Date • Dedicated to Growing the Victor Valley Community
“We consider the Stirling team a valued business partner and believe their extensive real estate expertise, personal integrity, and commitment to meet their clients’ needs would be an asset to any real estate decision.” Arthur C. Garcia, Jr., Director of Real Estate Newell-Rubbermaid

(949) 462-0909

www.stirlingdevelopment.com

(909) 418-2100
www.cbre.com

INDUSTRIAL APPEAL

Destination for Business
GLOBAL ACCESS CENTER DRAWS TOP MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION FIRMS

D
By Bill Lewis

iverse companies, such as Boeing, GE Aviation, Leading Edge Aviation, Dr Pepper Snapple Group and United Furniture Industries, are finding success at Global Access-Victorville located at the Southern California Logistics Airport (SCLA). So are other companies at the top of their industries, including Red Bull, Mars Chocolate, Newell Rubbermaid, Pratt & Whitney Aviation and Pacific Aerospace Resources & Technology. “We’ve evolved to attracting the most recognized national

and international companies,” says Keith Metzler, assistant city manager for Victorville and executive director of the Victor Valley Economic Development Authority. Those companies see the advantages of being part of Global Access, the region’s largest fully integrated development. It includes three divisions – the Southern California Logistics Airport, Southern California Logistics Centre (SCLC) and the planned Southern California Rail Complex. These developments offer opportunities on thousands of acres that were part of the former George Air Force Base.

Access Granted
Global Access offers unique assets, says Anita Tuckerman, director of asset services for Stirling Development, the company selected to redevelop the base property. SCLA operates a world-class aviation and air cargo facility on 2,500 acres that is capable of serving domestic and international needs. The airport boasts one of the longest runways in the country. At 15,050 feet long, it can handle any airplane flying today. Also on 2,500 acres is the Southern California Logistics Centre, the complex where top

10 || VICTOR VALLEY

Counterclockwise from bottom left: United Furniture Industries assembles sofas, loveseats and home furnishings at the Southern California Logistics Centre; Leading Edge Aviation Services paints more than 200 aircraft a year at the Southern California Logistics Airport.

manufacturing and distribution firms have set up operations, and where plans are underway for 60 million square feet of diverse development. Southern California Rail Complex is a planned 3,500-acre rail and multimodal complex. “It’s definitely a team effort – we all work together,” Tuckerman says of Stirling, airport officials, the city of Victorville and the businesses on the property. Stirling has invested millions of dollars in phase one of the property’s redevelopment, which includes construction of 3 million square feet of industrial space to date. The firm was so confident

that it built a 1 million-squarefoot facility “on spec” before the tenants were confirmed. “It was a huge leap of faith – the size of 17 football fields,” she says. “We were the first to build a spec building of that size to be LEED Gold certified.”

Perfect Location
United Furniture Industries sees several advantages to being part of Global Access and SCLC, says Jim Dye, the company’s general manager. These include state and county economic benefits the company received in return for locating in a designated industrial zone. Local

officials also made the permitting process “seamless,” Dye says, and Victorville is within a day’s travel of West Coast and inland markets. Communities in the Victor Valley benefit, too, he adds. “Manufacturing is good for the High Desert because it creates so many jobs,” Dye says. “For every employee you have, you’ve spawned another employee outside to support you.” UFI has 200 employees, but that will change. The company is growing, and Dye says some of the credit is due to its central location. “We have some big expansion plans in the next 12 months because of demand and the

STAFF PHOTOS BY Michael Conti

WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY

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customer base we’re building on the West Coast,” he says. Leading Edge Aviation Services is thriving at SCLA as well. The company paints more than 200 aircraft per year for airlines including American, United, Air Canada, Hawaiian and Mesa, as well as for Boeing and Northrop Grumman. When American and US Airways merged, they chose Leading Edge to paint their planes in their new colors. The company’s facility is big enough to handle two Boeing 747-400s. “SCLA is a great location for us,” says Alicia Castle, sales and marketing manager for Leading Edge. “It’s a short ferry flight from LAX (Los Angeles airport), where

many of our customers do maintenance on their fleets. Victorville offers great weather to facilitate aircraft painting. Additionally, our Victorville location has a stable workforce with little turnover.” All the pieces are in place for more success at the Victorvillebased development, says Metzler, including a new, $30 million wastewater treatment facility. It was built to accommodate the Dr Pepper Snapple Group, but it has ample capacity for more users. “We have the infrastructure to plug other industrial users in as well,” Metzler says. “We have all of the essentials required by industry to help them succeed.”

A GLOBAL EDGE Located minutes from Interstate 15 at the former George Air Force Base, Victor Valley’s 8,500-acre Global Access development at the Southern California Logistics Airport offers competitive advantages for manufacturers and distributors, including: ÌÌ 2,500 acres of airport access, with a Foreign Trade Zone and a 15,050-foot-long runway. ÌÌ 2,500 acres of industrial space at the Southern California Logistics Centre, with an additional 60 million square feet of development underway. ÌÌ 3,500 acres of planned space for facilities with multimodal or rail access needs. ÌÌ W   astewater treatment facility for industrial users with a capacity of 2.5 million gallons a day. ÌÌ S   trategic location less than 100 miles from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and within a three-hour drive of more than 26 million people. ÌÌ San Bernardino County incentives, including tax-exempt bonds.

Medicare, PPOs, IEHP Members, Workers’ Compensation and Most Insurances Accepted

By the Numbers

850,000
Size of Dr Pepper Snapple Group’s manufacturing and distribution center at SCLC, a facility that serves as its Western hub


18805 Bear Valley Rd. (located in Jess Ranch Market Place next to Best Buy) Apple Valley, CA 92308 760-247-4480 tel 760-355-4884 fax

20%
Percentage of U.S. consumers Dr. Pepper Snapple Group reaches with beverage products bottled and packaged at SCLC

40M+
Average amount of cases of soft drinks, fruit juice and other beverage brands Dr Pepper Snapple Group distributes annually from SCLC

www.ballardrehab.com

12 || VICTOR VALLEY

INDUSTRIAL PARKS

Open for Industry
PRODUCTION THRIVES IN VICTOR VALLEY CITIES, INDUSTRIAL PARKS
A growing number of the world’s leading companies are discovering the advantages of doing business in Victor Valley. They know that with a location close to West Coast and inland markets, fast access to interstates and mainline rail service, and a permitting process that welcomes new businesses, investing in the Valley is a smart choice. In Apple Valley, one of the four most populous cities located in Victor Valley, businesses are finding plenty of room to grow. “Industry analysts like the Boyd Company, the Kosmont Companies, the Rose Institute and the California Retail Survey rank Apple Valley among the most business-friendly cities in California,” says Orlando Acevedo, the city’s economic development manager. That has attracted businesses such as the Walmart Distribution Center, Fresenius Medical Care’s Tru Blu Logistics Center and aircraft supplier Reid Products. Apple Valley also includes the Airport Business Park, which comprises more than 2,800 acres adjacent to the Apple Valley Airport and less than 5 miles from Interstate 15. In Victorville, the 233-acre Foxborough Industrial Park offers quick access to markets via I-15, Interstate 40, U.S. Highway 395 and State Route 18. Located in the former Bear Valley Road Redevelopment Project Area, it also has mainline railroad access via the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad. In addition, Victorville Municipal Utility Services’ 17-megawatt electric co-generation plant was built exclusively for Foxborough’s industrial users. The park’s attributes have attracted global companies at the top of their industries, including Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., ConAgra Foods and Church & Dwight, which operate distribution centers there. Nutro Products also has a manufacturing and distribution center at Foxborough. Adelanto has five industrial parks that accommodate the needs of business and industrial users. Sites in the parks, which are adjacent to or near the Southern California Logistics Airport, range from 3 to 30 acres, and many are undergoing improvements. Businesses at Adelanto’s industrial parks include makers of fiberglass boats, pools and other products; distribution companies; an auto crash testing company; a custom fixtures manufacturer; and firms like Scott Turbon Mixer, which makes stainless steel mixers and mixing systems for a range of markets. – Bill Lewis

WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY

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RETAIL

Here Comes the Boom

RETAIL, COMMERCIAL EXPANSIONS CREATE PROFIT CENTERS THAT LEVERAGE GROWING CONSUMER DEMAND

C
By Nan Bauroth

onsumers are making a big comeback in Victor Valley. Desirable demographics, interstate frontage and availability of sites are driving retail and commercial expansion in cities throughout the region. In addition to the renovated Mall of Victor Valley, several Walmart Supercenters are arriving, while the AutoPark at Valley Center in Victorville continues its rapid growth. “The greatest asset the Mall of Victor Valley has to offer is our regional location in one of the fastestgrowing areas in California,” says Eddie Hernandez, marketing manager for the mall. “This market is expected to grow 8.5 percent over the next five years.” The mall has expanded its mix with Macy’s, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Red Robin and a remodeled JCPenney. A facelift at the historic Green Tree Inn and a new $10 million In-Shape Health Club in Victorville are also contributing to the retail draw. “We’re building the biggest club in our system,” says Michelle Clark, spokeswoman for In-Shape Health Clubs. Located in a former Costco site, the new fitness center will feature 70,000 square feet of amenities. “We were very lucky to get such a good location and property,” Clark says.

Shopping Booms in Apple Valley
Apple Valley’s retail growth is off the charts. “We’ve had explosive retail growth over the last several years,” says Apple Valley Town Manager Frank Robinson. “We have the second-largest retail inventory in the region, with more than three million square feet, and the second-lowest vacancy rate of only 6.9 percent.” Red Robin, Best Buy, Bed Bath & Beyond, Ulta Beauty and Cinemark Movies have all opened in the town. Before, residents had to travel 26 miles for these opportunities. “Ulta read the tea leaves and realized the demos were so good, particularly in Apple Valley because there’s a lot of disposable income,” Robinson says. The influx of new retailers has brought with it a boost in sales tax revenues. “Money that used to leave here is staying,” Robinson says, adding that revenues have risen for 12 consecutive quarters. “That’s been a real safety net for Apple Valley during this difficult economy.” Apple Valley voters recently passed a ballot measure allowing a new Walmart Supercenter to be built. Construction will soon begin on the Yucca Loma Bridge that will span the Mojave River, providing a third east-west corridor into the area.

14 || VICTOR VALLEY

Left to right: Apple Valley is home to a Target and a SuperTarget; The Mall of Victor Valley in Victorville recently expanded its mix of stores.

“That will spawn development because there is a lot of undeveloped land,” Robinson says. The Fountains at Quail Ridge, designed as a mini Victoria Gardens featuring an open-air shopping experience, is one project getting a lot of inquiries. “Our next focus is higher-end grocery stores like Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods, along with more sit-down restaurants such as steakhouses and seafood,” Robinson says.

Untapped Potential in Hesperia
The 14 miles of commercially zoned frontage along Hesperia’s Interstate 15 corridor is also a retail lure. “Our biggest asset in terms of retail growth is location,” says Hesperia City Manager Mike Podegracz, noting the highway is a major corridor to Las Vegas and points north for recreation in the Sierras. “Vehicle counts are 200,000 daily.” A third interchange, to provide greater commercial access, will open in the fall of 2014. According to Podegracz, tremendous construction activity is underway for Phase II of the High Desert Gateway Center developed by Lewis Retail Centers, which also developed Phase I, anchored by a SuperTarget. In addition, all the pads

at a new Walmart Supercenter are being developed. Tenants signed include a Panda Express. Podegracz says that the development’s businesses have all exceeded their sales projections. Hesperia recently streamlined its development review process, enhancing its reputation as a business-friendly city. Podegracz also notes a recent KosmontRose Institute Study, citing Hesperia as one of the least expensive cities in California to do business. In Robinson’s view, this retail influx dispels the notion that the Victor Valley region cannot sustain high-end retailers selling quality goods. “We have 440,000 people in this region, and they are all consumers,” he says.

NEW RETAILERS IN VICTOR VALLEY

Dick’s Sporting Goods, Victorville Dollar General, Victorville In-Shape Health Club, Victorville Macy’s, Victorville Walmart, Victorville Pier 1, Hesperia Walmart, Hesperia Best Buy, Apple Valley

RETAIL

Here Comes the Boom

RETAIL, COMMERCIA L EXPANSIONS CREATE PROFIT CENTERS THAT LEVERAGE GROWING CONSUMER DEMAND

Dollar General, Apple Valley
Left to right: Apple Valley has both a Target and a SuperTarget.; The Mall of Victor Valley expanded its lot of undevelope offerings. The Fountains d land,” Robinson says. at developed. Tenants as a mini Victoria Quail Ridge, designed signed include Panda Express. a open-air shopping Gardens featuring an Podegracz says developmen experience, NEW RETAILERS that the project getting t’s businesses is one IN a lot have all exceeded their THE VICTOR “Our next focus of inquiries. sales VALLEY Hesperia recently projections. stores like Trader is higher-end grocery streamlined Dick’s Sporting its along with more Joe’s and Whole Foods, development review process, sit-down restaurants reputation as enhancing its Goods, Victorville such as steakhouse a business-fri endly city. Podegracz also s and seafood,” Robinson says. notes a recent Rose Institute Macy’s, Victorville KosmontStudy, citing Hesperia as one of the least Untapped Potential expensive cities In-Shape Health in Hesperia California to in do business. Club, The 14 miles Victorville In Robinson’s frontage along of commercially zoned view, this retail dispels the Hesperia’s Interstate influx notion that corridor is also Wal-Mart, Hesperia the Victor 15 region cannot a retail lure. sustain high-end Valley “Our biggest selling quality asset in terms retailers goods. growth is location,” Pier 1, Hesperia of retail “We have 440,000 says Hesperia Manager Mike people in City and they are Podegracz, Best Buy, Apple all consumers,” this region, highway is a major corridornoting the he says. Valley and points to Las Vegas north Ulta, Apple Valley Sierras. “Vehicle for recreation in the counts are 200,000 daily.” Dollar General, A third interchange Apple Valley , to provide commercial greater access, will open in the of 2014. fall According to Podegracz, construction tremendous activity is underway Phase II of the for High Center developed Desert Gateway by Lewis Retail which also developed Centers, Phase I, anchored a SuperTarge by DIGITAL MAGAZINE t. In a new Wal-Mart addition, all the pads at Supercenter Read it online are being or on your tablet quickly in Victorville recently

onsumers are making a big comeback in the Victor Valley. Shopping Booms Desirable demograph in Apple Valley ics, interstate frontage and Apple Valley’s availability retail growth of sites are driving retail “We’ve had and commercia explosive retail is off the charts. expansion in several years,” l growth over region. In addition cities says the last Frank Robinson. Apple Valley Town to the renovatedthroughout the Valley, several Manager “We have the Mall of Victor Wal-Mart Supercente inventory in while the AutoPark the region, with second-largest retail rs are arriving, square feet, more than three at Valley continues its and the second-lowe million rapid growth. Center in Victorville only 6.9 percent.” st vacancy rate “The greatest of asset the Mall Red Robin, offer is our Best Buy, regional location of Victor Valley has to Beauty and Cinemark Bed Bath & Beyond, Ulta growing areas in Movies in California,” one of the fastesttown. Before, marketing manager says Eddie Hernandez, residents had have all opened in the these opportuniti to travel 26 for the mall. expected to miles for “This market es. grow 8.5 percent is “Ulta read the tea over the next The mall has leaves and realized five years.” were so good, Sporting Goods,expanded its mix with the demos particularly Macy’s, Dick’s there’s Red Robin and a lot of disposable in Apple Valley because JCPenney. A a remodeled facelift at the income,” Robinson The influx of and a new $10 historic Green new says. retailers million In-Shape Tree Inn boost in sales Victorville tax revenues. has brought with it a Health Club are also “Money that “We’re building contributing to the retail in used to leave Robinson says, draw. here is staying,” Michelle Clark, the biggest club in our system,” says 12 consecutive adding that revenues spokeswom Clubs. Located an for In-Shape have risen for quarters. “That’s in Health net for Apple been a real center will featurea former Costco site, Valley during safety the new fitness this Apple Valley “We were very 70,000 square feet of amenities. voters are also difficult economy.” Mart Supercenter set to vote on and property,” lucky to get such a good a Wal. Constructio location Clark says. Yucca Loma n will soon begin Bridge that on the will providing a third east-west span the Mojave River, corridor into “That will spawn 14 || VICTOR VALLEY the area. developmen t because there is a

C

By Nan Bauroth

Ulta, Apple Valley

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STAFF PHOTOS BY Michael Conti

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TRANSPORTATION

Plenty of Drive
AIR, RAIL AND ROADWAYS ENHANCE VICTOR VALLEY’S LOGISTICAL APPEAL

T
By Kevin Litwin

he largest Walmart Distribution Center in the U.S. is located in the Town of Apple Valley and serves the entire Los Angeles market. Also in Apple Valley is Fresenius Medical Care, which operates a huge distribution center that ships dialysis medical supplies throughout the western U.S.

“These two large companies wouldn’t have chosen us if it weren’t for our convenient roadway systems and access to major interstates, including Interstate 15,” says Apple Valley Town Manager Frank Robinson. “I-15 is a key connector between the lower Los Angeles Basin and all points north into Las Vegas, Utah and eventually to Canada.” Logistical advantages and well-connected transportation

infrastructure make Victor Valley ideal for manufacturers and companies that ship products. The region offers direct access to major highways such as I-15, U.S. 395 and State Route 18, and is also convenient to nearby connectors, including Interstates 40, 215 and 10 as well as Highway 58. Freight train service is available through the Union Pacific railway, and a 1-mile rail track in Hesperia connects area businesses to the

16 || VICTOR VALLEY

Fresno

Clovis

Distance to Markets from Victor Valley
Businesses in Victor Valley can reach a population of more than 20 million people within a three-hour drive and ship products to eastern and western markets easily via highway connections to I-10, I-40 and I-15.

15
TO LA S VEG A S

VICTORVILLE APPLE VALLEY HESPERIA LOS ANGELES LONG BEACH
P ORT O F LO S ANGE L E S P O RT O F LO NG B E ACH L . A. I NT ’ L AI RP O RT

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40

IRVINE
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10

S AN DI E GO I NT ’ L AI RP O RT

SAN DIEGO

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P O RT O F S AN DI E GO

Interstate System Union Pacific Railroad Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway

BNSF railway, allowing them to bring goods up from Long Beach and Los Angeles and ship to points east all the way to Chicago. Hesperia also has 200 acres of industrial-zoned property adjacent to the 1-mile track. Victor Valley’s transportation assets also include three airports – one in Apple Valley and one in Hesperia in addition to the Southern California Logistics Airport (SCLA) in Victorville.

“SCLA offers business air cargo services and is a place where Boeing brings its manufactured planes to be outfitted with special equipment,” Robinson says. “For example, if Qatar Airways or Air Canada decides to purchase a 777, it’s faster for Boeing to manufacture a stock model and then have it upgraded and modified at SCLA, where the upgrade equipment can be tested. Boeing conducts a lot

of equipment operations at SCLA.”

Upgrades to Roads
Several road upgrade projects are occurring in Victor Valley that could bring more business to the region, especially manufacturing and distribution/warehousing companies. One major project, completed in June 2013, is Ranchero Road Underpass that offers motorists access beneath the Burlington Northern railroad

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via I-15,” Podegracz says. “We’re also talking with San Bernardino County to eventually widen Ranchero Road from two to four lanes in several areas.”

Roads to Success
Road upgrades have also been taking place in Victorville where an I-15/La Mesa/Nisqualli Road Interchange opened in August 2013 between Bear Valley Road to the south and Palmdale Road (State Route 18) to the north. Also on the drawing board for Victor Valley is a Yucca Loma Bridge project that will cross the Mojave River and provide a new east-west connector across the Victor Valley. “Bridge construction is scheduled for 2017 if funding is secured,” says Jane Dreher, public information officer with the San Bernardino Associated Governments. Dreher adds that another key construction initiative affecting Victor Valley is an I-15/I-215 Devore Interchange project, which broke ground in 2013 and will ultimately reduce congestion and improve all freeway operations through the Devore Interchange at the southern base of the Cajon Pass.

The I-15/La Mesa/Nisqualli Road Interchange has improved traffic circulation in Victorville since it opened in August 2013.

tracks at Ranchero Road and Santa Fe Avenue in Hesperia. “The underpass is contributing positively to our entire quality of life by alleviating traffic in the southern corridor of our city,” says Mike Podegracz, Hesperia city manager. “The Ranchero Road Underpass features six lanes positioned underneath the tracks to allow motorists good access to east Hesperia and southern Apple Valley and beyond.” Also occurring in Hesperia is an I-15/ Ranchero Road Interchange project that broke ground in January 2013 and is scheduled for completion in October 2014. “Hesperia has good available commercial and industrial property, and the Ranchero Road Interchange will allow ideal access to that property

Redding

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Roseville Santa Rosa Petaluma Davis 80 Sacrame nto Napa Vacaville Fairfield 5 Vallejo Lodi Concord Berkeley o Oakland Stockton Daly City Alameda Livermore San Mateo Hayward Redwood City Fremont Modesto Sunnyvale Milpitas Turlock Santa Clara Santa Cruz

San Francisc

San Rafael

TRANSPORTATIO N

San Jose

Merced

Salinas

Fresno Clovis

Plenty of Drive
AIR, RAIL AND ROADWAYS ENHANCE VICTO LOGISTICAL R VALLEY’S APPEAL
he largest “These two Walmart large companies wouldn’t have Distributio chosen us if n weren’t it Center in the U.S. roadwayfor our convenient is located systems and in the access to major interstates Town of Apple Valley and , including serves Interstate 15,” Angeles market. the entire Los Town Managersays Apple Valley Also in Apple Valley is Fresenius Frank Robinson. “I-15 is a key Medical Care, which connector between the lower Los operates a huge distributio Angeles Basin n center that all points north and dialysis medical ships into Las Vegas, Utah and eventually supplies throughou to Canada.” t the western Logistical U.S. advantages and well-conne cted transporta 16 || VICTOR VALLEY tion

Distance to

Businesses in Victor and ship products Valley can reach a population to eastern of more than and western 20 million people markets easily within a three-hour via highway connections drive to I-10, I-40 and I-15.

Markets from Victor

Valley

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TO LAS VEGAS

15 VICTO RVILLE

LOS ANGEL ES LONG BEACH
L.A. INT’L AIRP ORT P ORT OF LOS ANGELES P ORT OF LONG BEACH

APPLE VALLE 40 Y HESPE RIA

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SAN DIEGO INT’L AIRP ORT P ORT OF SAN DIEGO

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SAN DIEGO

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By Kevin Litwin

Interstate System Union Pacific Railroad Burlington Northern Santa

infrastruct ure make ideal for manufactu Victor Valley rers and companies that ship products. The region offers major highways direct access to such as I-15, 395 and State U.S. Route 18, and convenient is also to nearby including Interstates connectors, 40, 215 and 10 as well as Highway 58. Freight train service is available through the Union Pacific railway, a 1-mile rail and track in Hesperia

Fe Railway

connects area businesses BNSF railway, to the Airport (SCLA) allowing them bring goods in Victorville to up from Long “SCLA offers . tested. Boeing and Los Angeles Beach business air services conducts a cargo of and ship to lot east all the equipment points Boeing and is a place where operations way brings its manufactu at SCLA.” Hesperia also to Chicago. planes to be has 200 acres Upgrades outfitted with red of industrialto Roads equipment zoned property special ,” Robinson adjacent to Several road says. the 1-mile example, if track. Qatar Airways “For are occurring upgrade projects Victor Valley’s Air Canada or in Victor Valley transporta decides to assets also could bring tion that purchase include three a 777, it’s faster more airports – one in Apple region, especially business to the for Boeing manufactu to Valley and re a in Hesperia and distributio manufacturing one and then have stock model in addition n/warehou to the Southern California companies it upgraded sing . One major modified at and Logistics project, SCLA, where completed in June 2013, upgrade equipment the Ranchero Road is can be offers motorists Underpass that access beneath
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High Desert Corridor Coming to Victor Valley
Transportation planners are considering building a freeway, or a freeway and railway, that would stretch from Antelope Valley to San Bernardino and connect Central Valley, Antelope Valley, Las Vegas and Los Angeles. The High Desert Corridor is proposed to traverse through several towns in Victor Valley, allowing travelers to bypass some of the busiest freeways in Los Angeles County. Cost is projected at about $5 billion, and the target for breaking ground on the project is 2016.

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STAFF PHOTOS BY Michael Conti

The Southern California Logistics Airport is one of three airports located in Victor Valley.

RANCHO
MOTOR COMPANY
Serving the High Desert Since 1971 15425 DOS PALMAS RD. • VICTORVILLE, CA 92392 • (866) 416-7220
Rancho Motor Company is the only Chevrolet Cadillac dealer in the High Desert. Proudly serving our community since 1971. We are a third-generation family-owned and operated business, employing more than 100 people. With two locations to serve you offering new Chevrolets and Cadillacs, certified pre-owned vehicles and standard pre-owned for sale. Our service center employs GM-certified technicians to maintain and repair your car. We operate the only dealer-owned collision and paint service center in the High Desert. Come Visit Us Today! www.RanchoMotors.com 15425 Dos Palmas Rd., Victorville, CA 92392 (Off Palmdale at Park Ave.) Collision Center (760) 536-4543 • Sales, Service & Parts: (866) 416-7220
Disclaimer: Advertised price on like MSRP, in-stock from dealer located in CA within three days of purchase. New vehicles only, excludes leases.

ENERGY
Nine Walmart facilities in San Bernardino County are powered by solar panels, including the Apple Valley Distribution Center.

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SUSTAINABLE VISION
RENEWABLE ENERGY, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT THRIVE IN VICTOR VALLEY

A

By Gary Wollenhaupt s the sun beats down on the roof of the Walmart Distribution Center in Apple Valley, the photovoltaic panels turn light into electricity. The solar power project is the retailer’s largest, one of the many examples of companies in Victor Valley tapping into natural resources to boost sustainability as well as their businesses. The High Desert region receives more than 300 days of sunshine per year, making it a perfect spot for solar power. But local companies are also harnessing wind energy and conserving the local water supply for long-term sustainability. “Walmart has company-wide sustainability goals, one of which is being supplied 100 percent by renewable energy,” says spokesperson Rachel Wall. “We have made significant strides toward accomplishing this goal by outfitting nearly 120 of our California stores with rooftop solar, including the Apple Valley Distribution Center and eight other stores in San Bernardino County. Walmart’s solar efforts in California are expected to generate up to 70 million kilowatt hours of clean, renewable energy per year – enough to power more than 5,400 homes.” Another solar project in Newberry Springs, the largest of its kind in the state, generates 1.5 MW of AC power from 12 large concentrator photovoltaic panels that cover 27 acres. Using tracking technology to follow the sun, the panels feed power into the distribution network for Southern California Edison, providing 500 homes with renewable energy. Additional solar projects are generating power in Adelanto and Victorville. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s Adelanto Solar Project will generate 10 MW in the Mojave Desert.
WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY

Renewable Resources
Completed in early 2010, Walmart’s Apple Valley Distribution Center solar project uses more than 5,300 ground-mounted solar panels that cover a nearly seven-acre field and supply 1 megawatt (MW) of electricity, which is the equivalent of powering 175 homes.

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The project, built on a 42-acre site at the Adelanto Switching Station, will generate electricity to meet the needs of 3,300 homes a year for up to 25 years. The Victorville power plant is a unique hybrid of natural gas and solar parabolic mirror technology that supports the state of California’s goal of increasing the percentage of renewable energy. The project incorporates natural gasfired generating capacity as well as a solar steam turbine system to generate

vice president of process technology and sustainability for CEMEX. Victor Valley College built a solar power plant using a concentrator photovoltaic system that generates 1 MW to power campus facilities. The micro-generating system is connected to the utility grid and produces about 30 percent of the college’s electricity demands. The college is developing a curriculum around this innovative solar technology, including installation, operations and maintenance.

Conserving for the Future
The Mojave Water Agency launched the Regional Recharge and Recovery (R3) project to sustainably manage the water supply for the Victor Valley region. This project delivers State Water Project water from the California Aqueduct in Hesperia to recharge sites along the Mojave River in Hesperia and southern Apple Valley. It’s an example of conjunctive use, or the coordinated use of surface water and groundwater supplies to conserve and distribute water resources. The $53 million project features recharge sites along the Mojave River, production wells, and pipeline for delivery. These efforts help protect local groundwater basins and provide water for the region in dry seasons. Phase 1 of the project is complete with the capacity to deliver 15,000 acre-feet per year for local use, and Phase II, set for completion in 2015, will offer an additional 40,000 acre-feet per year. “The project was designed around the needs of a coalition of diverse stakeholders, and they wanted a comprehensive water supply project that would provide a drought-proof and sustainable water supply to the entire Victor Valley region,” says Kirby Brill, general manager. “This project is a shining example of the growing spirit of collaboration in our region.”

CEMEX USA’s cement plant and quarry in Victor Valley is home to several wind turbines.

electrical output of 570 MW. Three more solar power projects are planned for Apple Valley, after the town’s development code was changed to allow solar farms in more areas. Other regional businesses are taking sustainability seriously. Cement giant CEMEX USA commissioned four wind turbines to power its cement plant in Victorville and quarry in Apple Valley. The turbines generate 6.2 MW in what is the second wind turbine installation at a CEMEX facility. The power from the wind turbines power 1,500 households and produce 6 percent of the facility’s energy consumption. “Wind power reduces the carbon footprint of our operations and stabilizes our power costs in a highly volatile energy market,” says Kevin Kelley,

Learn more about Victor Valley’s thriving renewable energy industry at www.businessclimate.com/victor-valley.

22 || VICTOR VALLEY

Tapping Into the Sun
The Victorville power plant uses a hybrid of natural gas and a solar steam turbine system to generate

The Adelanto Solar Project will generate 10 MW for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power — enough electricity to power 3,300 homes a year for as many as 25 years.

570 MW
of electricity.

The Victor Valley region receives more than 300 days of sunshine per year, making it a perfect spot for tapping into solar power.

Four wind turbines help power CEMEX USA’s plant in Victorville and quarry in Apple Valley, generating enough energy to power 1,500 households.

= 100 homes

Walmart debuted its first solar project at the Apple Valley Distribution Center in 2010. The project includes more than 5,300 ground-mounted solar panels covering nearly seven acres.

The state’s largest solar project in Newberry Springs generates 1.5 MW of power from a 12-panel, 27-acre system, powering up to 500 homes in the Southern California Edison distribution network.

EDUCATION

Training Ground
Victor Valley College’s Regional Public Safety Training Center offers students state-of-the-art training in firefighting, law enforcement and emergency medical services.

REGION PREPARES STUDENTS FOR TOP JOBS IN MANY FIELDS

24 || VICTOR VALLEY

A
By Kevin Litwin

$30 million Regional Public Safety Training Center opened in 2013 in northern Apple Valley, an extension campus of Victor Valley College, offering training to students in programs such as fire science, firefighting, administration of justice, law enforcement, correctional guard training and emergency medical services. Along with a shooting range, the center has a prop yard with a derailed train car and buildings for practicing rescues, as well as a four-bay fire apparatus facility and classrooms for aspiring firefighters, police officers, paramedics and emergency medical technicians. “The Regional Center allows us to recreate many real-life scenarios in a controlled environment, including a five-story training tower where live fires can be set so trainees can react to such an emergency situation,” says Bill Greulich, director of marketing and public relations at Victor Valley College. Victor Valley College is one of many universities and colleges in the High Desert that are preparing students for the region’s in-demand jobs. The college also offers programs in areas such as construction technology, aviation mechanics, welding, respiratory therapy, phlebotomy and solar thermal installation. “We track metrics and reach out to area companies to make sure that our curriculum is connected to what the business community really needs,” says James Johnson, contract and community education program manager at Victor Valley College. “For classroom sessions, we usually use professionals in the specific industries to teach these courses, and if they find valued students in the classroom, the industry trainers will often try to recruit those top students to work at their respective companies. Our goal is to provide quick training for students, then get them to work.”

High Marks
Other universities in the region include Azusa Pacific University, which is ranked among the top 200 universities nationwide

by U.S. News & World Report, and the University of La Verne, as well as Brandman University and Park University in Barstow, both of which offer virtual classes and have been recognized nationally for their online programs. Additional higher education options include California State University San Bernardino, Four-D College vocational nursing school in Victorville and San Joaquin Valley College in Hesperia, which helps students train for careers in business, health-care and technical fields, allowing them to complete programs in as little as seven months. Young students in Victor Valley can get hands-on experience in science and math at the Lewis Center for Educational Research in Apple Valley. The Lewis Center oversees a K-12 charter school known as the Academy for Academic Excellence that is in the Apple Valley Unified School District. The campus has a NASA-affiliated observatory with a radio telescope as well as a T-40 jet flight simulator used for aviation instruction. “We have graduated 16 high school classes at the academy and now operate a second school, the Norton Space & Aeronautics Academy in San Bernardino, that accommodates students in grades K-7,” says Rick Piercy, president and CEO of Lewis Center for Educational Research. “We have a rigorous curriculum and help kids develop a great interest in science and mathematics. Our students graduate well educated, which is necessary for the High Desert to attract businesses to our area that will rely on highly trained and highly qualified individuals.” Piercy says NASA sends technicians to the Academy for Academic Excellence to instruct students on science projects. “By having an actual NASA telescope on campus, students have worked on projects that include searching for water on the moon, overseeing a three-month study where a satellite eventually impacted the moon, and tracking synchrotron radiation emissions from Jupiter,” he says. “The 1,400 students at the academy are involved with many hands-on exploration endeavors, which helps make education more fun.”

Victor Valley College
ÌÌ Part of the California Community College system ÌÌ Offers two-year degrees and certificate programs as well as online classes in industry concentrations that include construction technology, aviation mechanics, welding, respiratory therapy, phlebotomy and solar thermal installation ÌÌ Home to a 1-megawatt solar plant that utilizes innovative photovoltaic system technology, as well as a state-of-the-art Regional Public Training Safety Center

STAFF PHOTO BY Michael Conti

WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY ||

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LIVABILITY

A Different World
VICTOR VALLEY OFFERS ACTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO THE HUSTLE AND BUSTLE OF NEARBY L.A.

I

By Cary Estes f you want to see the movie stars, you can stay in Los Angeles. But if you want to get away from the bright lights of the big city and see actual stars in the sky, they are visible less than 100 miles from L.A. in the desert region of Victor Valley. Grand vistas are among the many benefits of taking the short ride “up the hill” – as the locals say – through the San Bernardino Mountains and into the Mojave Desert, where Victor Valley is located. There you will find affordable housing, breathtaking scenery and outdoor activities ranging from horseback riding to mountain climbing to stargazing. “Victor Valley is not far from L.A., but it feels like a different world,” says Brian Tucker, executive director of the Inland Empire Tourism Council. “You have the clean air, open spaces, beautiful landscapes, gorgeous sunsets and all of these outdoor adventures. And at night you can see a sky full of stars. It’s really a highlight of Southern California.” Apple Valley. “We have smaller city lots, but people can also spread out. You can own your own ranch. There’s property where horses are allowed. And there’s a wonderful feeling of community. That’s one of the best things about our area. It feels like neighborhoods, rather than just a place to live. People live here to get out of the congestion of the L.A. basin.” Though Victor Valley’s four cities are all located within 15 miles of each other, each community has distinctive characteristics, Yule says. Victorville is the largest of the cities. Its central location within Victor Valley has made it the region’s primary retail center. Along with The Mall of Victor Valley, another popular attraction is the California Route 66 Museum. Hesperia offers a wide variety of

A Close-Knit Community
Given all the advantages Victor Valley has to offer, it should come as no surprise that the area has experienced steady growth in recent years. Many people are drawn to the lower housing costs and larger lots that can be found in the region’s four primary cities: Victorville, Apple Valley, Hesperia and Adelanto. “It’s a tremendous value,” says Carroll Yule, broker and owner of Shear Realty in Victorville and

26 || VICTOR VALLEY

Silverwood Lake State Recreation Area in Hesperia is one of many favorite hiking spots in Victor Valley.

housing opportunities, from custom-built villas overlooking Hesperia Lake to large-lot subdivisions. Hesperia Lake Park is a popular location for family picnics and fishing. Apple Valley maintains more of a rural and western feel, complete with ranches, horse farms and numerous recreational opportunities, including a full range of programs at its Aquatic Center, park and municipal golf course. It’s also becoming a hot spot for restaurants and retail, and features two movie complexes. Though Adelanto is the smallest of the four communities, it boasts one of the Victor Valley’s most popular entertainment attractions – the High Desert Mavericks minorleague baseball team, an affiliate of the major-league Seattle Mariners.

Outdoor Escapes
But perhaps the best selling point of the Victor Valley region is the Valley itself, along with its surrounding mountains, trails and even ski resorts in the Big Bear, Wrightwood and Snow Valley areas. “Just about anything you want to do outdoors, they’ve got it there,” Tucker says. Locally, one of the most popular locations is Mojave Narrows Regional Park in Victorville. Within the park’s lush plant growth and acres of waterways are more than 1,500 species of wildlife. “You drive down this road and it just opens up into this huge expanse of park land,” Tucker says. “They have special events throughout the year, as well as fishing, boating, hiking and camping. It’s a real

jewel in the High Desert.” There are plenty of opportunities to enjoy all the outdoor activities, because Victor Valley has an average of more than 300 days of sunshine each year. In addition, a variety of cultural events are offered by the High Desert Center for the Arts and San Bernardino County Fair. “You’re right in the heart of Southern California with the ability to live, work and play within the whole desert region,” Tucker says. “The lifestyle you get in Victor Valley for the money is pretty nice.”

Read more about the region’s high quality of life at www.businessclimate. com/victor-valley.

STAFF PHOTO BY Jeff Adkins

WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY

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HEALTH CARE

Prescription for Growth
VICTOR VALLEY HOSPITALS EXPAND SERVICES, FACILITIES TO MEET PATIENT NEEDS

THE AREA’S HOSPITALS INCLUDE VICTOR VALLEY GLOBAL MEDICAL CENTER, DESERT VALLEY HOSPITAL AND ST. JOSEPH HEALTH, ST. MARY.

HEALTH-CARE PROVIDER KAISER PERMANENTE AND ST. JOSEPH HEALTH, ST. MARY ARE BUILDING NEW FACILITIES IN THE REGION.

EACH CARE CENTER IS ENHANCING ITS TREATMENTS AND SERVICES TO BETTER SERVE PATIENTS AND SPEED UP RECOVERY TIME.

28 || VICTOR VALLEY

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By John McBryde n a close-knit region like Victor Valley, health care can seem more like a family than an industry. That’s certainly how things are approached at Victor Valley Global Medical Center (VVGMC), one of three hospitals and several medical facilities serving the High Desert area. The 101-bed acute-care facility has been taking care of residents here since 1967, when it was founded as Victor Valley Community Hospital. “We have a very unique gift in our staff,” says Lovella Sullivan, marketing director for VVGMC. “The feeling we have is more of a family atmosphere, so teamwork doesn’t begin to describe how we interact with each other. That spills over into patient care and services to the community, as well as how we treat our vendors and patient family members. It’s such an amazing time at the hospital, with all the things that we have on the horizon.”

Expansions in Service, Facilities
The horizon looks bright for much of health care in the High Desert. VVGMC is working to implement a senior-focused portion of its emergency room, as well as enhancing its centers of excellence for maternity care, orthopedics and vascular services. Desert Valley Hospital in Victorville has implemented a 3-D robotic surgery program that makes surgeries

Along with providing electrophysiology services for cardiac care, Desert Valley Hospital uses technologies like the da Vinci 3-D Robotic Surgical System.
DESERT VALLEY HOSPITAL: DESERT VALLEY HOSPITAL

RECENT ACCOLADES

Victor Valley Global Medical Center was one of 44 hospitals to rank in the top 5 percent in the nation for excellence in both gynecologic surgery and maternity care in 2012, according to Healthgrades. St. Joseph Health, St. Mary was one of only five percent of hospitals in the nation to
STAFF PHOTOS BY Michael Conti

be designated a Baby-Friendly hospital by Baby-Friendly USA . Desert Valley Hospital was named a top 100 hospital by Truven Health Analytics for its excellence in patient care and earned an “A” in patient safety from the Leapfrog Group.
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and their recovery times go much smoother, while Kaiser Permanente has broken ground for a new medical building at its High Desert medical offices location. A new hospital is underway for the High Desert. St. Joseph Health, St. Mary, founded in 1956, is constructing a new $261 million Victorville campus on Amargosa Road. “It’s a true campus,” says Randy Bevilacqua, vice president of strategic services for St. Mary. “There are nearly 100 acres we have to work with, and the project is scheduled to be built out over a 20-year period. The hospital is being built to accommodate growth so it can expand to more than 300 beds over a period of time.” The first phase of the project calls for a 128-bed acute-care hospital built to accommodate trauma services, an outpatient surgery building and a medical office. Future phases will add parks and open space, retail, hotels, wellness facilities and a spiritual care center. Desert Valley Hospital, a 148-bed acute care hospital that opened in Victorville in 1994, is also

enhancing its services with the recent installation of its da Vinci 3-D Robotic Surgical System. “It actually works better than our human wrist does, so the functionality is at a very high level,” says Dr. Margaret Peterson, Desert Valley’s CEO. “It’s a minimally invasive surgical procedure, which makes recovery for the patient much faster than if they had an open procedure. “It’s very exciting that we are able to provide this type of service to residents of the High Desert,” she continues. “We’re the only medical facility in the area with the latest version of this particular piece of equipment.” Desert Valley Hospital is also the region’s only provider of electrophysiology services for heart care, Peterson adds. This program is directed at caring for patients who need implantable pacemakers and defibrillators as well as the ability to correct lifethreatening heart rhythms. Kaiser Permanente, a leading health-care provider with medical offices in Victorville as well as several other cities in San Bernardino County, is also growing in the region. The provider recently broke

Kare Medical Group
OPEN MON.- FRI. 8 A.M.-5 P.M. • CLOSED WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS Our goal is to provide optimum quality health care in a friendly and caring environment to the Victorville, Apple Valley, Adelanto and surrounding areas. The ethnic diversity in our office reflects the ethnic diversity of our practice.

Our patient age ranges from birth to adult, including a large geriatric population.

Commitment

• Treating chronic conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, COPD and arthritis • Laceration repairs, incision and drainage, nail removal, F.B. removal, and skin tag removal • DOT physicals, well-woman exams, general physicals and CHDP physical exams

Services

We are located at 15080 7th St., Ste. 6 in Victorville, California, just off the 15 freeway.

(760) 243-7330 • (760) 243-6900 fax

ground on an 8,700-square-foot primary care building in Victorville adjacent to its Park Avenue medical office building that will feature nine new physician offices and 16 exam rooms.

Accolades for Patient Care, Safety
All three hospitals in Victor Valley have also been recognized nationally for their attention to patient care and safety. Victor Valley Global Medical Center, which was purchased by KPC Global in October 2012, received gynecologic surgery and maternity care excellence awards from Healthgrades. St. Joseph Health, St. Mary and Desert Valley Hospital were also cited by Healthgrades for their patient safety excellence, both ranking in the top 10 percent in the country for their prevention of infections, medical errors and other complications. “The awards recognition is certainly an honor,” Peterson says of Desert Valley, which operates a medical group in addition to its hospital. “What it really tells the community is that we provide a service that is at a very high-quality level.”

Proud to support Victor Valley Economic Development

Victor Valley Federal Credit Union
15445 8th St. • Victorville, CA 92395 760-245-7170 • www.vvfcu.org

VISIT OUR ADVERTISERS
AAA Auto Club of Southern California www.aaa.com Alaska USA Federal Credit Union www.alaskausa.org Ballard Rehabilitation www.ballardrehab.com CEMEX www.cemexusa.com City of Victorville www.victorvillecity.com Desert Valley Hospital www.dvmc.com Heritage Victor Valley Medical Group www.hvvmg.com Hilton Garden Inn www.victorville.stayhgi.com Kare Medical Group Mitsubishi Cement Corporation www.mitsubishicement.com Rancho Motor Company www.ranchomotors.com Shear Realty www.shearrealty.com Southwest Gas Corporation www.swgasliving.com/vvcc St. Mary Medical Center www.stmaryapplevalley.com Stirling Development www.stirlingdevelopment.com Victor Valley Federal Credit Union www.vvfcu.org

CEMEX USA has been a proud member of the Victorville community since 1917. Together, we will continue

BUILDING THE FUTURE.
www.cemexusa.com

WWW.BUSINESSCLIMATE.COM/VICTOR-VALLEY

|| 31

Ad Index
31 AAA AUTO CLUB OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 4 ALASKA USA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 12 BALLARD REHABILITATION 23 SOUTHWEST GAS CORPORATION 31 CEMEX 12 ST. MARY MEDICAL CENTER C2-C3 CITY OF VICTORVILLE 9 STIRLING DEVELOPMENT C4 DESERT VALLEY HOSPITAL 2 HERITAGE VICTOR VALLEY MEDICAL GROUP 1 HILTON GARDEN INN 30 KARE MEDICAL GROUP 31 VICTOR VALLEY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 4 MITSUBISHI CEMENT CORPORATION 19 RANCHO MOTOR COMPANY 31 SHEAR REALTY

ECONOMIC PROFILE
Population
Victor Valley:

Major Population Centers
Victorville:

Top Production-Based Employers

440,000
Income
Median Household Income:

120,336
Hesperia:

92,062
Apple Valley:

$49,002
Regional Labor Force

70,700
Adelanto:

31,239
Barstow: 1,000 + 200 + 100 +

130,000
$ Cost of Living

23,033

Average for Victor Valley cities: 96 Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif. metro: 123 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif. metro: 133 Orange County, Calif. metro: 143

 Walmart Distribution Center  Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, Plastipak Packaging, Pacific Aerospace Resources and Technologies, Leading Edge Aviation Services, United Furniture Industries, CEMEX, General Atomics  TXI-Riverside Cement Company, Mitsubishi Cement Corporation, Arizona Pipeline Company, Northwest Pipe Company, Robar Enterprises, Nutro Products, Church & Dwight, Newell Rubbermaid, Goodyear Tires

Income and Housing
$$ Per Capita Income: Median Home Sale Price: $$ Estimated Rent for a 2BR Apartment:

$19,410

$112,833

$850

Sources: U.S. Census QuickFacts, FindTheData, Sperling's Best Places

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