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Uniting ARCCAW members across Alberta Winter 2014

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Scaffolding apprentices lend a hand with
renovations to Edmonton’s admin building
Bigger and Better
New improvements to the International
Training Centre in Las Vegas

On the Level
Updates to the health and wellness plans
PM#40063788
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* With respect to 20V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 20 volts. Nominal voltage is 18.
*With respect to 12V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 12 volts. Nominal voltage is 10.8.
† Actual run time varies depending on battery type and heat setting
Copyright ©2013 DEWALT. The following are examples of trademarks for one or more DEWALT power tools and accessories: the yellow and black color scheme; the
“D”-shaped air intake grill; the array of pyramids on the handgrip; the kit box configuration; and the array of lozenge-shaped humps on the surface of the tool.
* With respect to 20V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 20 volts. Nominal voltage is 18.
*With respect to 12V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 12 volts. Nominal voltage is 10.8.
† Actual run time varies depending on battery type and heat setting
Copyright ©2013 DEWALT. The following are examples of trademarks for one or more DEWALT power tools and accessories: the yellow and black color scheme; the
“D”-shaped air intake grill; the array of pyramids on the handgrip; the kit box configuration; and the array of lozenge-shaped humps on the surface of the tool.
DEWALT HEATED WORK JACKETS. DESIGNED FOR CONSTANT WEAR
HEATED WORK JACKETS
The jackets, when used with a DEWALT 20V MAX* or 12V MAX* battery, are capable of providing hours of core body
warmth and continuous heat

. Each jacket offers a water- and wind-resistant outer shell, an LED controller with
3 temperature settings plus pre-heat mode, and at least 3 core body heating zones. The heating power is
transferred from the battery to the jacket by a USB power source that is also capable of charging
up to 2 electronic devices that are USB-compatible. Tailored Tough to DEFROST any Worksite.
CORDLESS FRAMI NG NAI LER
XR
®
CORDLESS FRAMING NAILER. NO GAS CELLS, NO GAS CELL FUMES, JUST CORDLESS POWER.
DEWALT’s 20V MAX* XR
®
LITHIUM ION Battery System combined with advanced Brushless Motor
technology supply the power and extreme runtime professional users demand without the additional
cost and annoying fumes of gas fuel cells. Mechanical rather than gas operation offers consistent
performance at temperatures as low as -15°C and as high as 50°C with minimal cleaning/service
requirements. Sequential operating mode allows for precision placement and the bump operating
mode provides the user with production speed. Get off your Gas and Get DEWALT. Guaranteed Tough.
* With respect to 20V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 20 volts. Nominal voltage is 18.
† Based on results using the 20V MAX* Premium XR Lithium Ion 4.0 Ah high capacity battery pack (DCB204)
Copyright ©2013 DEWALT. The following are examples of trademarks for one or more DEWALT power tools and accessories: the yellow and black color scheme;
the “D”-shaped air intake grill; the array of pyramids on the handgrip; the kit box configuration; and the array of lozenge-shaped humps on the surface of the tool.
DCN690M1
000HH-Dewalt-DPS.indd 1 1/16/14 2:51:51 PM HH_Winter14_p02-03.indd 2 1/24/14 2:27:07 PM
LOW
MEDIUM
HIGH
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HIGH
33
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* With respect to 20V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 20 volts. Nominal voltage is 18.
*With respect to 12V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 12 volts. Nominal voltage is 10.8.
† Actual run time varies depending on battery type and heat setting
Copyright ©2013 DEWALT. The following are examples of trademarks for one or more DEWALT power tools and accessories: the yellow and black color scheme; the
“D”-shaped air intake grill; the array of pyramids on the handgrip; the kit box configuration; and the array of lozenge-shaped humps on the surface of the tool.
* With respect to 20V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 20 volts. Nominal voltage is 18.
*With respect to 12V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 12 volts. Nominal voltage is 10.8.
† Actual run time varies depending on battery type and heat setting
Copyright ©2013 DEWALT. The following are examples of trademarks for one or more DEWALT power tools and accessories: the yellow and black color scheme; the
“D”-shaped air intake grill; the array of pyramids on the handgrip; the kit box configuration; and the array of lozenge-shaped humps on the surface of the tool.
DEWALT HEATED WORK JACKETS. DESIGNED FOR CONSTANT WEAR
HEATED WORK JACKETS
The jackets, when used with a DEWALT 20V MAX* or 12V MAX* battery, are capable of providing hours of core body
warmth and continuous heat

. Each jacket offers a water- and wind-resistant outer shell, an LED controller with
3 temperature settings plus pre-heat mode, and at least 3 core body heating zones. The heating power is
transferred from the battery to the jacket by a USB power source that is also capable of charging
up to 2 electronic devices that are USB-compatible. Tailored Tough to DEFROST any Worksite.
CORDLESS FRAMI NG NAI LER
XR
®
CORDLESS FRAMING NAILER. NO GAS CELLS, NO GAS CELL FUMES, JUST CORDLESS POWER.
DEWALT’s 20V MAX* XR
®
LITHIUM ION Battery System combined with advanced Brushless Motor
technology supply the power and extreme runtime professional users demand without the additional
cost and annoying fumes of gas fuel cells. Mechanical rather than gas operation offers consistent
performance at temperatures as low as -15°C and as high as 50°C with minimal cleaning/service
requirements. Sequential operating mode allows for precision placement and the bump operating
mode provides the user with production speed. Get off your Gas and Get DEWALT. Guaranteed Tough.
* With respect to 20V MAX*, maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 20 volts. Nominal voltage is 18.
† Based on results using the 20V MAX* Premium XR Lithium Ion 4.0 Ah high capacity battery pack (DCB204)
Copyright ©2013 DEWALT. The following are examples of trademarks for one or more DEWALT power tools and accessories: the yellow and black color scheme;
the “D”-shaped air intake grill; the array of pyramids on the handgrip; the kit box configuration; and the array of lozenge-shaped humps on the surface of the tool.
DCN690M1
000HH-Dewalt-DPS.indd 1 1/16/14 2:51:51 PM HH_Winter14_p02-03.indd 3 1/24/14 2:28:16 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014
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Executive Secretary Treasurer’s REPORT
Martyn A. Piper
Little Things Make
a Big Difference
s we now enter a new year it would
seem timely to refocus ourselves on
the “Big Picture” mission and con-
sider all the bite size pieces that fit together
as ways to achieve the end goal of meeting our
members’ needs and providing quality service
to both our contractors and owners.
Work is an overriding concern for most of
our members. Consistent, reliable and sta-
ble work for fair compensation - reflecting a
fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work. Shifts and
work schedules that benefit our members’
lifestyles, allowing for space away from the
job to refresh and revitalize and spend time
with family and friends. Travel provisions that
eliminate and minimize the time spent driv-
ing, and commutes that are efficient, fast and
safe. High performance from skilled trades-
people that convince and confirm for con-
tractors and owners alike that employing our
Union’s members is the best proposition when
it comes to hiring labour. High skill levels
which are the result of our Union’s world class
training that guarantees efficiency and safety
at our work sites.
Eliminating drugs and alcohol from work
sites and camps, thereby minimizing the con-
fusion, tension, acrimony, time and noise
about testing protocols, lifestyle, rehabilita-
tion - and most importantly - ensuring a safe
work site for all. We say we are our Brother’s
keeper, then let’s live up to that by encourag-
ing abstinence at work, directing members
to the professional support systems avail-
able, and commit ourselves as Union mem-
bers toward a fit, healthy, and happier life and
workforce.
Safety is everyone’s business. An injury
to any one of our members is one injury too
many. There are many ways we can improve on
our track record. Getting to Zero is not just a
company prerogative, it has to be ours as well.
Every one of us can make a difference by wear-
ing the proper PPE, performing hazard assess-
ments, ensuring tools and equipment are in
good working order, reporting unsafe acts,
being the eyes and ears for both ourselves and
others, not taking risks and being alert at all
times, and just simply being in the moment at
all times while working.
Productivity and Timeliness – These are
the geese that lay golden eggs! These are two
of the main issues that often convince own-
ers about which workforce to select. A minute
here, a minute there - it all adds up. It’s true
that sometimes work is not well planned or
a job has to be done several times through
no fault of our members. However, there are
things we can control such as observing start
and quit times, break times and producing at
optimum levels. Just because another trade
or group of workers conducts themselves
differently is no reason to for us to emulate
unproductive behavior. We win work by our
performance. I talk to enough contractors
and owners to know that performance and
A
productivity are the keys through the door to
more work for our members.
Organizing, Recruitment and Market
Share are three intertwined elements. We
can never stop organizing non-union contrac-
tors and companies. Each and every member
has an obligation to get permission to work
non-union and assist in organizing non-union
companies to increase our market share.
Every member has an obligation to always
be encouraging all carpenters, scaffolders,
ISM/drywallers, millwrights and industrial
workers to join our family of working men
and women. We always have to be welcom-
ing women, minorities, youth, aboriginals,
and all workers, to join a Union such as ours.
Increasing the unionization rate benefits you,
benefits our members, benefits other workers,
and benefits all workers in society.
Getting involved politically is not a one-
time activity as elections roll around. Political
involvement must be ongoing. Join the politi-
cal party of your choice. Get out and meet
your aldermen, Councilors, MLA or MP. Work
to understand the issues that affect you and
your Union. Inevitably your actions will ben-
efit to us all. Don’t be shy, pick up the phone,
go visit, participate in social activities – just
get involved.
And so, these are a few nuggets to consider
as 2014 gets underway. Good luck and good
health to each of you and your families
HH_Winter14_p04-05.indd 4 1/27/14 2:48:12 PM
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Edmonton 780-471-3200
Fort McMurray 780-743-1442
Calgary 403-283-0747
Carpenters Training Centre 780-455-6532
Carpenters Health and Welfare 780-477-9131
Carpenters Pension 780-477-9131
Industrial Workers 403-283-0747
Millwright Local 1460 780-430-1460
Local Union 1325 and 2103 Dispatch 1-888-944-0818
Published For:
Alberta Regional Council of
Carpenters & Allied Workers
15210 – 123 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta T5V 0A3
Tel: (780) 474-8599 / Fax: (780) 474-8910
www.albertacarpenters.com
Published by:
Venture Publishing Inc.
10259 – 105 Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 1E3
Toll-free: 1-866-227-4276
Phone: (780) 990-0839
Fax: (780) 425-4921
www.venturepublishing.ca
Publisher
Ruth Kelly
AssociAte Publisher
Joyce Byrne
ArccAW editor
Martyn A. Piper
director oF custom content
Mif Purvis
editor
Jordan Wilkins
Art director
Charles Burke
AssociAte Art director
Andrea deBoer
AssociAte Art director
Colin Spence
Production coordinAtor
Betty Feniak Smith
Production techniciAns
Brent Felzien, Brandon Hoover
contributing Writers
David DiCenzo, Cory Haller, Tricia Radison,
Cory Schachtel ,Matt Smith
contributing PhotogrAPhers
And illustrAtors
Bufy Goodman, Ryan Girard, Jordan Wilkins
Vice-President, sAles
Anita McGillis
AdVertising rePresentAtiVe
Kathy Kelley
sAles AssistAnt
Julia Ehli
Contents©2014byARCCAWInc.
Nopartof thispublicationshouldbereproduced
withoutwrittenpermission.
Important Phone Numbers
20
Winter 14
Contents
14
on the coVer:
Edmonton’s admin building needed
improvements and a scaffolding
apprentice class stepped up
PHOTO: Ryan Girard
hArdhAt WINTER 2014
FEATURES
11 First years lucky
A scaffolding apprentice class
comes through during repairs
to the administrative building
By David DiCenzo
14 bigger and better
The ITC in Las Vegas expands to offer
more programs to more members
By Tricia Radison
18 the show must go on
Local 2103 members were among the
many workers who made last summer’s
Calgary Stampede possible.
20 trade Winds to success
The most recent millwright group
continues the program’s success
By Cory Schachtel
22 fit@work
Stop overthinking your routine
By Matt Smith
DEPARTMENTS
4 note from the executive
secretary treasurer
By Martyn Piper
6 site lines
Skills Canada dates; Habitat for Humanity’s
Union Built Home; Christmas Party photos
10 on the level
By Robert Provencher
24 geared up
25 KidZone

26 meet the instructor
27 meet the Apprentice
28 training and Apprenticeship report
By Len Bryden
29 local 1460 millwrights report
By Bob Hugh
30 Parting shot
31 training & events; in memoriam
HH_Winter14_p04-05.indd 5 1/27/14 2:49:37 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014
The Alberta Carpenters Training Centre (ACTC) will
once again play host to the Edmonton Regional Skills Canada Competi-
tion. On April 12, high schools students interested in carpentry will get
the chance to show their skills and learn from some of the best instruc-
tors in the business at the ACTC. Those successful in the regional
competition will move on to the Provincial Skills Canada Competition
at the Edmonton Expo Centre on May 14 and 15 to compete against
selected post-secondary students in the trade. And, as always, the
ACTC will have its Try-a-Trade booth set up at the Expo Centre to give
curious students the opportunity to attempt basic carpentry under
the supervision of an instructor.
Union members are always quick to lend a hand to fellow
workers, even for those in different industries. This was apparent when
retired Brother Ron Gouthro visited United Food and Commercial Work-
ers (UFCW) on the picket line in Fort McMurray, offering his RV as accom-
modation for those braving the elements. The Alberta Regional Council
of Carpenters and Allied Workers (ARCCAW) also donated coffee and
supplied over 200 pieces of chicken for the picketers. The UFCW was
thankful for the ARCCAW’s support and relayed a message from the front
lines: “Thank you so much for the support and the chicken.”
Shelter From the Rain
A Special Visit
Calgary’s mayor, Naheed Nenshi, stopped by the Calgary
Airport project last year and thanked all the Brothers and Sisters from
Ellis Don for their work on the project. The new airport is scheduled to
open October 2015 with manpower peaking at 175 Union carpenters and
50 Union scaffolders over the course of the project.
Site Lines
News in Brief
A roundup of news and events
from around the region
Skills Set
HH_Winter14_p06-09.indd 6 1/27/14 2:52:54 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014
Christmas Celebrations
Local 1
3
2
5
Local 210
3
Local 1
4
60
HH_Winter14_p06-09.indd 7 1/27/14 2:53:32 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014
Site Lines News in Brief
A roundup of news and events
from around the region
Construction is almost complete on
Habitat for Humanity’s (HFH) second
Union Built Home, but there is still time to
come out and lend a hand. HFH Edmon-
ton’s president and CEO, Alfred Nikolai,
says building trades members from across
the province have enjoyed working on the
project, having heard overwhelmingly posi-
tive feedback. “Every shift makes a differ-
ence and it’s a really rewarding experience,”
says Nikolai. “I’ve heard many say that this is
the best thing they’ve ever done.”
The house is currently at the drywall
stage, since this is a non-jurisdictional
build, members are invited to volunteer
throughout the entire process regard-
less of the stage of the build and their
particular trade. So far there has been 236
eight-hour volunteer shifts on the house,
with most of them coming from union
members, Nikolai says. In addition, many
union members have donated materials
and money to HFH.
The expected completion date for the
On the Home Stretch
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home, which is located in south Edmonton, is
late spring; perfect timing for the young family to
move in. The Union Built Home is a 1,500 square
foot, three bedroom house with a finished base-
ment. For more information, or to volunteer for
the Union Built Home, visit hfh.org/volunteer/
unionbuilthome.
HH_Winter14_p06-09.indd 8 1/27/14 2:54:07 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014
Local 1325 members and Aluma Systems administration teamed
to create an award-winning float in Fort McMurray’s Christmas Parade.
The team crafted a reindeer made entirely out of scaffolding. “We started
from the legs and worked our way up,” recalls Mike Mayuk, a project
manager with Aluma Systems. “We let our imaginations go and I think it
worked out well.”
Their effort earned them first place in the parade and a cash prize of
$500 that the team donated to the Kids Forever Foundation. Mayuk says
it took around eight hours to complete, but it was well worth it when he
saw the reaction of the children watching the parade. “I was actually driv-
ing the truck that was pulling the reindeer so it was really great to see the
kids’ faces. I think they really enjoyed it.”
The float was special for the team at Aluma, too, as they dedicated it
to the memory of Ian Jessome, an Alumna employee who died recently
battling cancer.
Ahead of the Pack
Results from last November’s EAE Scaffolding Industry Consul-
tation 2013 Employee Survey are now with the Government of Alberta.
Thank you to the members
who participated in the survey
and voiced their opinion
against labeling scaffolding as a
“Designated Occupation.”
This group of non-union
scaffold employers looks to
completely undercut the value and standards that the Alberta Regional
Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers and our industry partners
have long fought for. Their attempt to deregulate the scaffold industry
will do nothing more than enshrine their ability to train to a lower level,
employ people whose skills are far below our members’ skills and, ulti-
mately, reduce their own costs. As a Union, we need to stand together
to oppose this “Designated Occupation” in the scaffolding industry.
The results from the survey are currently with the Alberta Appren-
ticeship and Industry Training Board and are expected to be published
this spring. For more information visit albertacarpenters.com.
Oppose Designation
www.ab.bluecross.ca/group
When it comes to the
health of your employees…
it’s important to have a plan.
Alberta Blue Cross delivers the group benefits
that employees prefer, and the value your
business needs.
Call us today for a confdential, no-obligation
quote or talk to your plan advisor.
ABC 83188 2014/01
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Edmonton 780-498-8500
Lethbridge 403-328-6081
Grande Prairie 780-532-3507
Calgary 403-294-4004
Medicine Hat 403-529-5550
Red Deer 403-347-7999
Toll free 1-866-513-2555
HH_Winter14_p06-09.indd 9 1/27/14 2:54:27 PM
10 HARDHAT WINTER 2014
on the level
n beHAlf of THe boARD of TRusTees I Am
pleased to announce the following changes to the Alberta
Carpenters and Allied Workers Health and Wellness Plan,
effective January 1, 2014.
suPPlemenTAl HeAlTH CARe
PResCRIPTIon DRugs
• Feminine contraceptives with the written prescription of a
physician subject to a maximum of $360 per family (Member
and Dependent in total).
• The Plan will cover the cost of an Epipen (an auto-injection device
used to treat anaphylactic shock by persons with severe allergies)
with a limit of two per eligible person every 12 months to a
maximum of four per family (Member and Dependent in total)
per year.
suPPlemenTARY meDICAl benefITs
• Effective January 1, 2014 the Plan will cover the cost of a blood
pressure monitor to a maximum of $100 every two years.
VIsIon
• Eye exams for members and dependents between ages 18 and
64 has increased from $75 to $95 once every 24 months, including
contact lens exam (In Alberta, eye exams for residents under age
19 and over age of 65 are covered by provincial health care).
DenTAl
• Basic/Major combined maximum increased from $2,750 to $3,000
per person per calendar year.
• Basic treatments include examinations, cleaning, extractions,
fillings, etc.
• Major treatments include crowns, periodontal scaling (up to 16
units per year), root canals, etc.
• Orthodontic Lifetime Maximum Amount increased from $3,000
to $3,500 per eligible child
o
Several changes efective January 1, 2014
Health and
Wellness Plan
• An eligible child must be at least age six and up to and including
age 17 at the time the treatment commences.
• The maximum dental fees covered by the Plan as described in the
ACAW Dental Fee Guide have been increased by 10 per cent.
• Actual fees charged by dentists can vary. Costs covered for
Frequently Used Dental Procedure Codes from the ACAW Dental
Fee Guide are listed on www.acawtrustfunds.ca for the most
common procedures. Your dentist can use this list to determine
the portion of your dental costs that will be covered by thePlan.
membeR lIfe InsuRAnCe
• A Member who is eligible for benefits is provided with life
insurance protection under the Group Life Policy. This coverage
has been increased from $100,000 to $150,000.
• A Spouse of a member who is eligible for benefits is provided with
life insurance protection under the Group Life Policy.
This coverage has been increased from $20,000 to $30,000.
PAYmenT of ClAIms
A comprehensive review of direct billing by service providers
is currently being undertaken. Until such time as this review is
completed, direct billing by service providers has been limited to
dental, drugs, ambulance and hospital room charges. All other direct
billing by service providers has been put on hold until further
notice. Members will be required to make payment to the service
provider and then submit their claims to the ACAW Trust Funds
office. There will be no exceptions to this notice. Thank you for your
patience in this matter.
By RobeRT PRoVenCHeR
HH_Winter14_p10-13.indd 10 1/27/14 2:55:51 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014 11
T
he administration building of the Alberta Regional
Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers (ARCCAW)
in northeast Edmonton sits atop an area of unstable clay.
This expandable clay takes a toll on the facility, particularly
the south side of the structure, causing the on-grade slab to heave and
deflect. The deflection has caused interior walls to crush within the
building, and, because of the facility’s high walls, repairs can be cost-
ly, disruptive and difficult. Fortunately, with the Alberta Carpenters
Training Centre (ACTC) also located at the facility and the Union’s
sturdy relationships with industry partners, many of these challenges
were alleviated during the repair.
P
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First Years
When the ARCCAW
administration building in
Edmonton needed repairs, a
group of first year scaffolder
apprentices stepped up
By DAviD DiCenzo LUCKY
on ToP oF iT ALL: Thank you Randy Dwernychuck, Darrell McGillis, Brenton Vanderleek, Rogelio
Lang Ramirez, Ryan Loe, Lyle Kormos, Marvin Eskew, Tracen Ronnie, Gavin Mullen, Carlos Restrepo,
Solomon Gebreselassie, Stephan Stecher, Dennis Westergaard, Saleban Mohamed, Khadar Abdi and
Hunter Shaw for your help with facility repairs. The class transported hundreds of scafolding pieces
into the building and assembled them in the meeting hall so the contractors could replace the drywall.
HH_Winter14_p10-13.indd 11 1/27/14 2:57:00 PM
12 HARDHAT WINTER 2014
Bob Provencher, project manager for the ARCCAW, needed a scaf-
fold system and a crew to take down and erect a 40-foot wall in the
facility’s meeting hall. No easy feat especially when the facility needed
to remain operation for the duration of the repair. Always resourceful,
Provencher approached Len Bryden, the director of training and appren-
ticeship at the ACTC, to see if anyone at the training centre could lend
a hand. Bryden spoke to several scaffold
instructors, who then came through and
recruited 24 first year apprentices for the
month-long repair project last October.
The apprentices were enthusiastic
about helping out, Provencher recalls, but
then came the task of acquiring the proper equipment for the job. Once
again, the Union’s strong connection with industry leaders proved to
be valuable. PERI Formwork Systems Inc., a well-respected equipment
supplier in the industry, stepped up and offered to supply all the scaf-
folding system required. “The PERI system was as good as I’ve ever seen
and proved perfectly suited for this project,” says Provencher, who notes
the job was a challenge, even for the skilled workers. “The tradespeople
rebuilding the wall system were able to perform their job with comfort
and ease due to the quality of the scaffold system.”
The apprentices were tasked with transporting hundreds of scaf-
folding pieces into the building and assembling them in the meet-
ing hall, a feat that took two days. After the contractors replaced the
drywall in the room over the course of three weeks, the apprentices
then took the scaffolding apart and hauled it out again, piece by piece.
“This project was extremely challenging because it needed to be done
in a working building,” says Provencher.
“The scaffolding system had to be moved
through the building, avoiding fixtures,
furniture and staff, while causing as little
disruption as possible to daily business. It
took a lot of cooperation and commitment,
not only with the apprentices but the entire staff in the building.”
The project went through seamlessly and everyone at the facil-
ity, particularly Provencher, was grateful for PERI’s generosity and
the scaffolding apprentices’ hard work. “My reputation is that I
don’t often compliment people,” Provencher adds. “But this group
of apprentices handled the project with aplomb. They worked well
together and went about it with smiles on their faces. They enjoyed it
and it showed. We were very happy to have this group involved with
the project.”
For some of the first years, it was
one of the first times they had
worked on a real project.
TIES THAT BIND: PERI Formwork Systems generously provided its PERI UP
scafolding system to the Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied
Workers. The system was perfect for this project. Thank you PERI.
HH_Winter14_p10-13.indd 12 1/28/14 7:27:17 AM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014 13
For first year apprentice Darrell McGillis, being part of the scaf-
fold-building team was not only a great learning experience, but
was also affirmation that he had made the right choice to go back
to school.
The 45-year-old from Carvel owned his own stucco business for
12 years before making a return to the classroom. Jumping into a new
career proved intimidating for McGillis, but the instruction, opportu-
nity and camaraderie, particularly during this repair project, has ener-
gized him. “When we were told that we were going to build scaffolding
in the hall, I could see the excitement level rise as everyone wanted to
show off their newly acquired skills,” recalls McGillis. “It was good to
see all of the guys get into the job and get the project done.”
Ryan Loe, a 33-year-old apprentice from St. Paul, already had some
experience using the PERI system so he was assigned as one of the pri-
mary builders for the job. He, too, was excited to apply the knowledge
he acquired in the classroom to an actual project. “Two skills that our
training stressed was reading drawings and material estimation,”
explains Loe. “We had to modify the original design to make it work
in the space, but having the drawings to start from really helped. And,
having an accurate material list meant that we were able to do the job
much more easily.”
Loe says he and his fellow apprentices had a great time getting to
work on a real-world project, because as great as classroom instruc-
tion is, there really is no substitute for hands-on training. “Everyone
naturally slipped into roles that played to their strengths, just like on a
real jobsite,” he adds. “For some guys, it was one of the first times they
were on a real project so it gave everyone a real sense of accomplish-
ment. I don’t think the other classes could have done it any faster so it
was pretty impressive for a group of first-years.”
The apprentices came in ready to work. But the presence of Jake
Waldner, Provencher’s 70-year-old site carpenter, provided addi-
tional inspiration. “Jake is a gruff old guy but he’s a good man
– and no one is keeping up with him,” says Provencher. “When
these young folks see a man 70 years of age willing to work hard, it
inspires them to do the same.”
Provencher knew the project would provide a challenge for the
apprentices, but he also knew that because of the training they receive
at the ACTC, they would be capable. So the end result, which he says
saved a great deal of time and money, didn’t come as much of a surprise.
“They made the workday shorter because they attacked it with humour
and commitment,” Provencher says. “On behalf of the organization, I
want to say thanks to everyone who contributed to this project.”
HH_Winter14_p10-13.indd 13 1/28/14 7:28:14 AM
14 HARDHAT WINTER 2014
Bigger and Better
he United Brotherhood of Carpenters’ (UBC)
International Training Center (ITC) in Las Vegas is now
bigger and better than ever. An expansion that wrapped up
in September gives the ITC nearly one million square feet
of space on 17 acres to offer Union members across North America
the highest quality training as well as new programs to meet
evolving needs.
“It allows us to expand all of our training programs for members
and to put on more than 100 different train-the-trainer classes for
instructors throughout North America, including Alberta. Trainers
then go back to their local areas and train members,” says William
Irwin, executive director, Carpenters International Training Fund.
The expansion includes a new shop that is almost 100,000 square
T
The International Training Center in Las Vegas expands
to offer more programs to more members
By TRiCiA RADison
feet, increasing the total number of shops at the ITC to three. Called
the south shop, it is equipped to teach new training programs in
underwater welding and pile driving and has allowed the ITC to
expand its megatronics training by increasing the number of robots
from one to 10.
The new south shop also frees up space in the north shop so the ITC
can expand training in areas such as interior systems, heavy and light
gauge steel, storefronts, doors, hardware and flooring.
An exciting new feature is the retractable roof on the south shop. It
creates a 32-by-64-foot opening to allow scaffold training to go much
higher than ever before in a controlled setting. Alberta instructors
helped develop the curriculum that ITC will teach in the full-time
scaffold training area.
HH_Winter14_p14-15.indd 14 1/28/14 9:39:19 AM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014 15
“With the oilsands, we have an incredibly large market for scaffold-
ing in Alberta. As a result, we’ve developed a very professional train-
ing program and the ITC recognizes that we are leaders in the trade,”
says Len Bryden, director of Training and Apprenticeship, Alberta
Carpenters Training Centre. “The opportunity to contribute to
the curriculum allows us to share our knowledge with the rest of
North America.”
Bryden visited the ITC in November for the first-ever conference for
training directors and coordinators and, besides the informative ses-
sions, he was also very impressed with the facility’s recent changes.
“It’s wonderful,” he says. “The huge shops combined with their high-
tech classrooms and conference rooms will allow for more trainers to
get trained in best practices so we can bring it home to our members.”
Union members from Alberta also have an opportunity to visit the
centre, which has its own 300-room hotel and a cafeteria, through the
ITC’s third-year apprenticeship and journeyman programs. Bryden
explains that such visits are an opportunity to learn more about the
UBC and the training centre, see what’s going on outside of Alberta,
and network with Brothers and Sisters from other districts.
Built in 2001, the ITC was founded in an effort to standardize
training so that Union members are all taught the same way.
“Before we opened the centre, the International Training Fund
would go into an area once a year, and the regional training
centre would host the train-the-trainer sessions for two to
four weeks,” recalls Irwin. “But everyone did construction and
training differently.”
Standardizing curricula ensures that members are able to work in
other regions when contractors get out-of-area projects and allows
them to relocate without having to get new training credentials. The
ITC also updates the curricula annually so that members are always
receiving the most up-to-date information. Currently, the centre
publishes more than 600 technical training materials for the almost
250 training centres, like the Alberta Carpenters Training Centre,
across North America.
This expansion is the fourth since the ITC opened its doors and it
is now triple the size of the original facility. The UBC invested about
$44 million in the latest addition with the International Training
Fund also investing in the equipment needed for training.
HH_Winter14_p14-15.indd 15 1/28/14 7:29:51 AM
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000HH-StanleyHandTools-DPS.indd 1 1/13/14 2:04:15 PM HH_Winter14_p16-17.indd 17 1/24/14 2:35:47 PM
18 HARDHAT WINTER 2014
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HH_Winter14_p18-19.indd 18 1/27/14 3:01:48 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014 19
The Show
Must Go On
n June of 2013, a combination of environmental factors led to
the worst flooding in Alberta in over 100 years – and a challenge that
the Calgary Stampede would not soon forget.
On the morning of June 20, just a week before the scheduled start
of the 101st Calgary Stampede, the organization was bracing for disas-
ter. After the City of Calgary had declared a state of emergency around 10
a.m., the Stampede activated its own Emergency Command Centre.
But when the water arrived, no one could have been prepared for the
sight. By the early morning hours of June 21, eight inches of water covered
Stampede Trail. The Scotiabank Saddledome was filled up to row 10, the
historic ‘Blue Bridge’ had been washed away, and the fate of Stampede 101
appeared to be in jeopardy.
But that’s when workers came to the rescue, including many Brothers
and Sisters from Local 2103.
In fact, if it hadn’t been for a courageous team who stayed through
the night to push water away from the electrical substation, the Greatest
Outdoor Show on Earth may indeed have been in trouble.
I
Local 2103 members were among the many workers who
made last summer’s Calgary Stampede possible
By MARTIn DOveR
The magnitude of the damage was overwhelming, but thanks
to pre-planning and quick-thinking, cleanup had already begun.
On June 24, contractors from all over North America arrived to
help. Tandem trailers, dump trucks and other heavy-machinery
labored in constant, 12-hour shifts. And while the furious cleanup
effort raged behind the scenes, a press conference announced that
Stampede 101 would proceed.
One of the most daunting recovery tasks involved dirt from the
infield and track. It all had to be removed - then rebuilt with more
than 25,000 cubic meters of clay, sand and gravel. In addition, every
building had to be power washed, sanitized and inspected.
Thanks to the tremendous effort and support of volunteers,
employees and the community, Stampede 101 went ahead with
almost no visible signs of the disaster that occurred just days
beforehand. It was proof that we are greatest together and a testa-
ment to the strength of the community that came together in the
face of tragedy.
HH_Winter14_p18-19.indd 19 1/27/14 3:02:22 PM
20 HARDHAT WINTER 2014
rade Winds to Success really is a life-changing program.
“If it wasn’t for Trade Winds to Success, I’d probably still be look-
ing for a job,” Nick Zetterberg says.
Zetterberg moved to Alberta from Vancouver Island in 2011.
At first he bounced around the province looking for work, like many who
have made the move, but found only dead ends. “There’s tons of work out
here, but getting a job in the trades without experience, especially some-
thing like being a millwright, is tough,” Zetterberg says. “They’ll hire you
as a labourer, give you the three-month probation period, and then think
about offering you an apprenticeship, but it could be years before it hap-
pens. I was working at a sawmill, and if I hadn’t found Trade Winds, I’d
still be there doing the same thing every day for the next 30 years. Trade
Winds took me out of that.”
T
Program provides students with training today, security for tomorrow
By CoRy SCHACHTel
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Zetterberg began the classroom portion of the Trade Winds to Success
program, where students upgrade their education in order to pass the
pre-apprenticeship exam, in April 2013. Two months later he started the
eight-week hands-on portion, gaining real-world millwright experience.
He graduated August 16; his first day on the job was August 25. “Other
places offer pre-apprenticeship programs, but to come out of the program
as a union member, and get a job straight away, I haven’t heard of that any-
where else – and I looked,” he says.
Martyn Piper, president of the Trade Winds program’s board of direc-
tors, says finding avenues for Métis and Aboriginal people to become
union trade members was at the core of the program’s inception. “We saw
a potential connection with the federal government wherein there was a
mandate to encourage and find an opportunity for Aboriginal and First
Trade Winds to
SUCCESS
HH_Winter14_p20-21.indd 20 1/27/14 3:04:26 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014 21
By CoRy SCHACHTel
Nations people to enter the trades,” he says.
“But they needed specific entry points.”
Enter the local trade unions, each of which
contracts out their training centre to Trade
Winds to provide the facility and shop train-
ing. Initially backstopped by both the provin-
cial and federal government, the program now
receives further funding from oil companies,
who are keenly aware of the trade industry’s
coming turnover, and eager to find well-trained
replacements.
“In the next two or three years, the industry
will be faced with losing about 23 per cent of the
workforce to retirement, and that includes me,”
says millwright instructor Dave Knight, who
took in the first class of Trade Winds students
five years ago and says the program’s reputa-
tion is already well established. “All the unions
recognize what’s coming, and they’re bringing
in new apprentices, just like we are, to fill the
void when people start punching out. And all
the contractors have completely bought in to
the Trade Winds program, too. The students we
send from Trade Winds have preference over
a first year apprentice walking in off the street
because they know our students have the train-
ing and safety qualifications.” Knight says that
over the program’s first five years, students have
a more than 75-per-cent success rate in finding
and maintaining meaningful work.
And it’s that meaningful work, not just
a paycheque, that current students like Ed
Dunning find so rewarding. The 30-year-old
spent 16 years as a labourer, digging ditches,
washing bays, chipping ice, until he heard about
the program from a friend who had completed
it and now is a journeyman. “I was absolutely
nervous when I started Trade Winds, consid-
ering I hadn’t had any proper schooling since I
was 16,” Dunning says. “But since I started, I’ve
had the best help. The instructors are great, but
you don’t always ask them for help,
because they get the students work-
ing together. So you work with your
classmates, even on the educational
portion, just like you will with cow-
orkers when you get a job.”
Set to graduate in January, Trade Winds
has both stimulated and put Dunning’s mind
at ease, providing him a future he may other-
wise not have had. “The program offered me
the chance to stop breaking my back and learn
something new every day. I’m actually able to
use my brain again,” he says. “It means so much
to me, so much to my fiancée, our daughter, and
my parents. Stability is a beautiful thing.”
Dunning’s classmate and friend Jennelle
Richards agrees. As a single mom, she’s aware of
the beauty of stability, and knows first hand how
Trade Winds can help achieve it. “I had been out
of work for a year when I moved to Edmonton
from Fort Mac. I came here with just my two
kids and it was scary,” she recalls. “But the first
thing they said when I got here was that they
are here to help us pass this course and get a job,
however they can. Even then I didn’t realize
how helpful they’d be – they also found me a two
bedroom apartment and got me bus tickets.”
Trade Winds has always focused on finding
females within the Aboriginal community to
enrol – a trend that’s growing across the entire
trades industry – and even though she’s the only
one in this particular class, Richards felt right
at home from the start. “Ever since I got into
the program I have seen more women getting
into the trades, which is awesome, but being
the only girl in class doesn’t even cross my
mind,” she says. “I love working in
the shop, I love our instructors. I’m
just so in love with this trade, and
eager to learn. I know I’m going
to be an awesome millwright;
this program has given me my
independence back.”
Word is spreading among the Aboriginal
community about Trade Winds, which began
running two sessions in 2012 and has had stu-
dents come from the Northwest Territories.
“I was out with a friend from class and had
another buddy saying he wants to be like us,
that he wants to be an electrician, not just do
drywall his whole life,” Richards says. “I just
said he already knows how to do it: just call
Trade Winds right now.”
Trade Winds to
SUCCESS
“I’m going to be an awesome millwright,”
says Janelle Richards. “This program
has given me my independence.”
HH_Winter14_p20-21.indd 21 1/27/14 3:05:44 PM
By MATT SMITH
hat cardio should I do? What
exercises build strength? How
many days a week should I go
to the gym? How much weight should I
use? How many rest days do I need? Which
program is best for me? How do I know it’s
even working?
Like anything in life, when you start
something new you’re going to have
questions. That’s OK, but be careful not
to overwhelm yourself. I’ll explain some
basic guidelines to incorporate into your
current program or what to consider when
starting out from scratch, but the most
important thing I can tell you is to focus
on actually training; don’t worry about
W
Successful exercise isn’t complicated, but it
does take effort and incremental steps
STop overTHInkIng
ft @ work
the minor details. If you’re new to regular
exercise, following some simple guidelines
will help you realize just how attainable your
goals really are.
First, the keys to a successful workout rou-
tine: Do no harm, keep it simple, start light,
progress slowly and, finally, do no harm.
The first (and last) might seem obvious,
especially when moving weighted objects, but
never underestimate your ego. When lifting
weights in front of friends, the opposite sex,
or even that strange guy lurking in the corner
of the gym, we tend to push ourselves harder
than we should. But, how can you progress
if you’re injured? How will hurting yourself
affect your overall attitude toward working
out? Remember; injury is the result you least
want to achieve when exercising.
As often as “keep it simple” is hammered
into someone’s mind, it can be challenging
to resist all the sexy, new exercises and
programs spouting to be the best. Always
remember that training is simple; pick a few
basic compound movements, warm-up and
then move. Afterward go for a brisk 30-min-
ute walk or do some sprints and call it a day.
Don’t overthink it. The truth is, too many
people try to major in the minors, which is
usually all that these trendy programs offer.
Instead, focus on the important key factors
and everything else will fall into place.
Most big-time fitness trainers and com-
22 HArDHAT WINTER 2014
HH_Winter14_p22-23.indd 22 1/27/14 3:07:32 PM
Matt Smith, CSEP-CPT, NASM-CES
By Randy Stefanizyn, Manager, Labour Relations,
Syncrude Canada Ltd.
FoundationS’ EdgE
Start light and progressively increase
weight or reps with each workout. I know
that probably sounds way too simple, but it
will work. Here’s how it hits the foundational
points to building a successful routine:
A) You’ll continually hit personal records
(increased motivation)
B) Your tendons and ligaments will adapt to
a new workload (injury prevention)
C) You’ll perfect your form with each
repetition (long-term progress)
D) You’ll be clear on what you need to do
each session (focus)
panies won’t ever tell you this, but it’s very
simple to get strong, lean and conditioned.
Just consistently lift weights, eat properly
and get enough sleep. Do this for six months
and you’ll be shocked. This is the only
guaranteed way to trim fat, put on muscle or
become as strong as an ox. Unfortunately,
words like “consistency” and “long-term”
don’t sound nearly as appealing as what these
get-fit-quick programs claim to offer.
Instead, start at a weight you can easily
handle and add a little each session. This
technique will build all the important
foundations required for an effective routine:
increased motivation, injury prevention,
long-term progress, and focus.
Starting light and building steadily with-
out changing anything else in your life and
you will still see desired results. If you follow
a program long enough, you will eventually
reach maximum weight and intensity. This
goes for any type of cardio and conditioning,
too. But, it’s important to keep that ego in
check and avoid injury by only taking on
what you can handle. Always strive to stay
injury free.
SoME Kind oF training PrograM
Here is an efective, straightforward approach to training: Exercise three times a
week, alternate between workout A and B, and take one rest day between workouts. Follow
up each session with two miles of brisk walking or a few sprint periods. Like all exercises,
consider your doctor’s approval before starting any serious training program.
This is just a basic template, but let’s call it the “Some Kind Of Training Program.” The
frst number indicates the number of sets recommended while the second indicates how
many repetitions in each set. For example: 5x5 = fve sets of fve reps where 3x10 = three
sets of 10 reps.
WORKOUT A**
Some kind of SQUAT 5x5
Some kind of HORIZONTAL PRESS 5x5
Some kind of PULL/ROWING 5x5
Some kind of ABDOMINALS 3x10*
*optional
WORKOUT B**
Some kind of SQUAT 5x5
Some kind of VERTICAL PRESS 5x5
Some kind of DEADLIFT 1x5
Some kind of ABDOMINALS 3x10*
**Take two minutes rest between all sets
As a general guideline, progressively add fve pounds to upper body movements and 10
pounds for lower body movements every session. You’ll eventually hit a point where you
cannot complete all fve sets of fve reps and instead your workout will look something like
this: 5x5x4x3x2. That’s OK; just continue at that weight until successfully completing fve sets
of fve reps. Barbell exercises are ideal, but any type will work if you follow this guideline.
I hope this demonstrates how simple an efective workout program can be. But please
understand that simple does not mean easy. Continual education and consistency are
overriding factors to any program and in the end success is always up to the individual. Will
you be successful in 2014?
If you have any questions about this program, or adjusting your own, don’t hesitate to
shoot me an email at matt@smithtrained.com.
HardHat WINTER 2014 23
HH_Winter14_p22-23.indd 23 1/27/14 3:07:52 PM
24 HARDHAT WINTER 2014
Geared Up
UnplUGGeD
It’s 2014; have you gone cordless? Cordless tools aren’t new,
but users have always encountered challenges with battery-
powered tools in cold temperatures, especially here in
Alberta. But, Dewalt’s latest gas-free cordless framing nailer
is up to the task. The new XR Lithium Ion Brushless Framing
Nailer has the power to drive a 90 mm ring shank nail flush
in even the coldest temperatures, making it ideal for heavy
duty woodworking professionals.
The Dewalt XR Framing Nailer doesn’t rely on combustible
fuels to drive a nail and as a result, the nailer maintains
consistent performance throughout its
entire lifespan. Users save money
because there is no need for
costly gas canisters and they are
not tied to any one nail brand. A
combination of the Dewalt 20V MAX
4.0AH li-ion battery pack, along with
the efficient transfer of energy from the
motor allows the Dewalt XR Framing
Nailer to drive a large quantity of nails
per charge – meaning that even
heavy users should only have
to recharge their battery
once to complete a full
day’s work.
The Dewalt XR Framing Nailer is
available at home centres, mass retailers,
and hardware stores for a retail price of $549 for the
DCN690M1 and $429 for the DCN690B bare tool. For more
information visit dewalt.com.
BUilT foR ComfoRT
Bostitch’s new low profile paper tape framing nailer might be
one of the most comfortable on the market. Its over-molded
grip and new features, such as a selectable trigger, and an
adjustable rafter hook, make it perfect for just about any job.
The framer weighs just over seven pounds but delivers
840 inch-pounds of impact energy. Other performance
features include a tool-free selectable trigger that easily
allows users to choose the firing mode that best suits each
job – single-drive or multi-drive – with just the flip of a
switch.
The framer’s short profile and slim body allows it to adapt
between rafters and small spaces. An adjustable rafter hook
gives users a free hand when needed plus, with a magazine
capacity of 92 nails and last nail retention magnet to prevent
the last nail from dropping out of the nose of the tool, work
always goes smoothly.
Tools to help you work faster and smarter
The Bostitch LPF33PT Low Profile Paper Tape Framer
is available at home improvement and independent dealer
stores across Canada at a retail price of $299.99. For more
information visit bostitch.com.
fiGHT THe ColD
Here in Alberta, there is no getting away from cold weather.
But, Dewalt’s new line of heated jackets can help make
freezing temperatures more barable through the work day.
Powered by Dewalt 20V Max or 12V Max lithium ion batteries,
the jackets are capable of providing hours of core body
warmth and continuous heat. The new line includes three
different styles: a soft shell work jacket, a hooded work jacket,
and a True Timber camouflage jacket.
Each offers a water- and wind-resistant outer shell, an LED
controller with three temperature settings plus pre-heat
mode, and three core body heating zones: left and right chest,
and back. The soft shell work jacket and
camouflage jackets offer a fourth
heating zone in the collar.
The heating power is
transferred from the
batteries to the jacket by
a USB power source
that is also capable of
charging up to two
USB-compatible
electronic devices.
The kitted
jackets retail
between $199
and $249. For
more information visit
dewalt.com.
HH_Winter14_p24-25.indd 24 1/28/14 7:31:35 AM
HARDHAT

WINTER 2014 25
KidZone
Hammer Time
Word Search
You’ve probably seen a hammer before, but did you know
there are actually many different types of hammers? Each style
has a different use. The most popular is the claw hammer, named
after the curved part of the tool that can remove nails. This is the
type of hammer that most people have at home, but professional
carpenters use many different styles when they are working.
Claw
BallPEin
Cross
CluB
slEdgE
MallET
sofT
PowEr
Pin
Q: Why did the man hit his hand with a hammer? (Answer below)
Kinds of Hammers
sledge hammers are used for heavier jobs like breaking up rock and
stone, but there are also pin hammers that are much smaller and
used for cabinet work. There are even power hammers (but most
people call them “nailers”) that use electricity instead of muscle.
Hammers can be dangerous if they aren’t used properly, so make
sure there is an adult around if you ever want to use one.
Hidden in this puzzle are the names of some of
the hammers that carpenters use. Can you find
them all?
Q w i C l T B T n M n u n Z l
K Q f s Y u Q g Y o J H Z B l
M C P f B u f V J r Z a r w Q
d a r r n E K s J B Q f C o T
M Q C n i P o n K g C a Z E o
V s r T r f n i T f Y V l l P
C f o l T M w E K a X l l a B
s B s d E J C P f f a E o Q u
J P s l E d g E Q M C T f C d
P P Q g K i C u X l H n M Y r
H f K J T r C Q u r s l f E M
o f K C s s K B E w P o K C w
M Y Q a s o K w a l C w f M l
V r C i K n o r g l i w Q d X
H H H s P P J Y a C f J s u u
Matching Game
sledge
Hammer
Power Hammer
(nailer)
Pin Hammer
Claw Hammer
Mallet
Can you guess which hammer
is which? Match each hammer
photo to its name.
a n s w e r s : J o k e - H e w a n t e d t o s e e s o m e t h i n g s w e l l . ; M a t c h i n g g a m e - 2 , 1 , 5 , 3 , 4
1
2
3
4
5
HH_Winter14_p24-25.indd 25 1/27/14 3:08:55 PM
hen Neal Hugh graduated high school in 1996, many
of his classmates didn’t know what they wanted to do
with their lives. But for Hugh that period of direction-
less panic was short lived. His father gave him a piece of advice
that Hugh should have seen coming: “Get into a trade.” After all,
his father and grandfather were both members of the Local 1460,
and, for Hugh, a millwright’s work is in his blood. He applied
to the Union that summer and, before he knew it, was on the
out-of-work list, ready to be sent into the field. “My father told
me ‘I opened the door for you, but it’s up to you to keep the door
open.’ ” recalls Hugh. His first four-week call was in Wabamun and
he hasn’t looked back.
Now a third-generation millwright of Local 1460, a 17-year vet-
eran of the trade and current vice-president of the local’s executive
committee, Hugh has forged his own path in the industry. Helping
the president of the executive committee, Dave Knight, with new
member orientations, Hugh is often the first face apprentices see.
And, as an instructor for the Alberta Millwright’s Training Centre,
he has found his way of opening the doors for his future Brothers
and Sisters.
For Hugh, the key is to impart the skills and knowledge an
apprentice needs to his students without beating it in to them.
It’s a technique he learned on the job. “I have a lot of supervisory
background where I’ve been a foreman or a general foreman.”
says Hugh. “With that comes mentoring. I don’t treat them like
I am the boss and they’re my employees.” Instead, he treats them
like colleagues.
“I’m working with them, and we want the job done right.”
Hugh hopes that his students feel empowered and, more
importantly, will want to continue to learn – something he says is
most important in the diverse world of millwrighting. “I always
tell my students if you have the opportunity to get on different
jobs, do it. Expose yourself to the different opportunities that are
out there,” he says. “Don’t just do it for the money. Do it because
you want to see what it’s all about.”
W
Open Doors
By COry Haller
Meet the Instructor
P
H
O
T
O
:

J
O
R
D
A
N

W
I
L
K
I
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S



Neal HugH
Hugh says the most rewarding part of his role as an instructor is witness-
ing students’ passion for learning the trade. Back in 1996, he was one of 12
millwright apprentices at his local. Today more than 400 apprentices are
involved with Local 1460. It’s a door that Hugh proudly opens but, of course,
it’s up to the apprentices to keep their doors open, with Hugh guiding them
along the way.
As an instructor for the millwright
apprenticeship program, Hugh opens
doors for his future Brothers and Sisters.
26 HarDHaT WINTER 2014
HH_Winter14_p26-27.indd 26 1/27/14 3:09:44 PM
Meet the Apprentice
By Cory HAller



P
H
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T
O
:

J
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D
A
N

W
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K
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S
etHAn rAbby
ariety is the spice of life – and no one knows this better
than Ethan Rabby. His interests revolve around physical
activity, whether it’s going to the gym, playing hockey or
cross-country skiing, but he feels it’s just as important to exercise the
mind. This is something he does each day during his studies in NAIT’s
Millwright Apprenticeship Program, and he’s excited to have found a
career he believes stimulates his mind as much as his body. This is part
of the reason why the fourth year millwright apprentice left his previ-
ous studies as a personal trainer and switched to the trade. Though he
loves physical fitness, making it a career quickly leached the passion
for the gym out of his life. “It took something I enjoyed and turned it
into a job. At that point, I didn’t want to work out on my own time.”
Rabby spent a short period bouncing around the construction
industry, but nothing snagged his interest. It wasn’t until a friend’s
father toured Rabby through Local 1460 that he found a clear direc-
tion. “He showed me around and showed me the variety of stuff you
get to work on at any given time,” says Rabby. “You might be work-
ing a month or two at a time on different kinds of jobs. I decided to
go to school for it and give it my best shot. And I love it.”
Rabby takes his newfound work seriously, transferring the disci-
pline he learned at the gym and applying it to his studies. “I look at it
V
Active learner
the same way; as long as you are doing your best – and giving it your all –
you’re going to find success.”
Now in his fourth year in the apprenticeship program, Rabby’s
hunger for variety in his work is showing no signs of abating. He has set
goals for years – decades, even – down the road.
“I’m always looking to expand my knowledge,” Rabby says. “I’m
working toward getting my Red Seal ticket and then my Blue.” He
adds that another possibility for his future would be to take advantage
of NAIT’s business degree program, which he will have two-years
credit for once he earns his Red Seal ticket. It’s his way of always being
prepared for the next step, which might include a move to the planning
sector or supervisory role later in his career. “I would say a lesson I have
learned is not to get to comfortable.” Rabby says. “I’m constantly look-
ing at different ways to do things and learning about my trade, because
I know that in the next 20 or 30 years, I still won’t know everything.”
“I’m always looking to expand my
knowledge,” Rabby says. “I’m working toward
getting my Red Seal ticket and then my Blue.”
HArDHAt WINTER 2014 27
HH_Winter14_p26-27.indd 27 1/28/14 7:32:50 AM
28 HARDHAT WINTER 2014
REPORT Training and Apprenticeship
iversity. As a member of the Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters
and Allied Workers (ARCCAW), you’re already familiar with this term.
We see it every day in all the different jobs we do and we live it in our
personal lives as well. Our type of work involves people of all races, genders, ages
and languages and I believe that is one of our greatest strengths. We become
stronger as we learn to overcome some challenges that diversity may bring,
whether it’s through training apprentices or jobsite performance. We are always
adapting to overcome any challenges we face as workers in a highly competitive
and sometimes dangerous workplace.
This brings me to diversity in regards to your training and your goals as
a member of the ARCCAW. Whether you are a journeyperson carpenter or
scaffolder, millwright, drywall/ISM lather, industrial shop worker, roofer, or
any other trade we represent internationally, keeping your abilities current and
having a diverse skillset is guaranteed to keep you more employable.
Be sure our dispatch department has your current email address so you
receive notices we send regarding openings in classes, and any other important
updates as they happen. Call your local hall to pass on your information to our
provincial dispatch department. Visit abcarptc.ab.ca for a listing of scheduled
courses at the Alberta Carpenters Training Centres (ACTC), because we have
a lot to offer. For example, did you know we ran four five-day UBC Commercial
Door Hardware training classes in 2013, in both Calgary and Edmonton? We also
ran Period 1 and Period
2 Carpenter eight-week
programs for carpentry
apprentices, over a dozen
Forklift/Telescoping
Rough Terrain (PITO)
two-day classes, two-day
Aerial Work Platform (AWP) classes, five-day UBC International Rigging
Certification classes, as well as five-day Print Reading classes. We also held
five-day Level and Transit Training classes, in addition to 14-day Industrial
Technical Training classes, eight-week pre-employment Trade Winds to
Success classes in Edmonton and Calgary, and 42 separate scaffold classes
(three-, four- and five-week programs) between April 2013 and December 2013.
It was a busy nine-month period, but that list doesn’t even include the
hundreds of members here for in-house safety training courses. I want to
congratulate the students and apprentices who kept all ACTC locations
buzzing for the past nine months. Thanks, also, to our excellent ACTC staff
members, because without them, none of this would be possible.
Take a look at all of these courses and ask yourself what diversifying
your personal training portfolio could mean to you. There are so many
opportunities that exist right now for our members who are willing to go the
extra mile and upgrade their skills. And, the Alberta Carpenters Training Trust
Fund covers more than I have even listed here. When I talk about diversity,
I mean it. Consider courses like the Better SuperVision program for future
management positions. The trust fund reimburses $1,000 to members once
Continue To Learn
D
the course is completed. How about taking
the Industrial Construction Crew Supervisor
(ICCS) certificate from the Alberta
Government after that? Again, the trust fund
reimburses here, too. How about a basic
welding program to help get a carpenter
job where some welding is required? The
trust fund will cover these types of skills
training and many more options, just be sure
to get prior approval from our office first.
More diversity in skills and abilities will
undoubtedly lead to more opportunities for
employment.
Please consider what I am saying. Don’t
settle for just one type of training or skill
when more opportunities are available to
you, whether it’s through the new Federal
Apprenticeship Grant Fund or the Alberta
Carpenters Training Trust Fund as an
ARCCAW member. The future looks bright in
our industry, and if we all stay together, train
together and diversify our skills, we will be
hard to beat.
Len J. Bryden,
Director of Training and Apprenticeship
Alberta Carpenters Training Centre
We adapt to overcome challenges
we face as workers in a highly
competitive and sometimes
dangerous workplace.
HH_Winter14_p28-29.indd 28 1/27/14 3:11:45 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014 29
REPORT Local 1460 Millwrights
ur benefit funds remain key components in recruiting and
sustaining millwright members and their families.
The millwrights’ pension fund provides post-retirement income
security to millwrights and their spouses. Many newly-recruited members
express relief in the knowledge that while they labour, they and their spouses
are accumulating a hassle-free retirement nest-egg. I’m thankful to prior
business representatives who had the foresight to arrange for a retirement
plan on our behalf, even when we, then, didn’t understand its importance.
The millwrights’ health and welfare fund attends to our more immediate
needs: prescription drugs to keep us healthy, dental care to repair our teeth
and maintain our children’s smiles, and many other benefits designed to
assist in troubled times. Those benefits are attractive to potential recruits,
and sustain and provide comfort to working and retired millwrights and their
families.
The millwrights’ training fund plays a critical role in broadening our
capacity for workplace excellence. The training centre provides hands-on
training to new recruits and seasoned veterans alike, and highly-skilled
members make it easier for the union to capture more market share, thus
protecting wages and benefits for all.
All three funds are overseen by a board of trustees, whose responsibility
it is to utilize the available assets to deliver the best possible services. When
prudent to do so, based on the available assets, the trustees improve the
design and delivery of those services. Some recent health plan improvements
include:
• Introducing a drug card to make the purchase of
prescription drugs easier;
• Hiring a new insurance company to pay long-term
disability and other benefits;
• Adding a local service office to expedite handling
of complex benefit claims;
• Extending dental coverage to retired members,
effective January 1, 2014.
Our benefit funds, and the above improvements, would not exist without
the commitment of prior millwright members and leaders, who agreed to
collectively sustain and support each other through the introduction of
group benefit, training and pension funds.
While acknowledging our past history, the design and delivery of the
services will not remain static. Both design and delivery must evolve to
satisfy the changing needs of our membership. Your positive and active
participation in that process is invaluable. We will continue to listen closely
to your feedback, and adjust the services to ensure your health, training
and retirement needs. We will continue to ensure that the recruitment
requirements of the funds are properly addressed, now and into the future.
O
Health and Wellness Improvements
Bob Hugh, Senior Business Representative -
Local 1460 Millwrights
HH_Winter14_p28-29.indd 29 2/12/14 1:18:08 PM
30 HARDHAT WINTER 2014
Work for millwrights at sawmill operations in the mid-20th century wasn’t
very different than it is today. The majority of sawmills in Canada were
still located in British Columbia, processing logs into lumber. The
biggest difference in today’s sawmills is the emphasis on worker safety
and waste minimization. Today, sawdust and other mill waste is
processed into particleboard and related products, or used to
heat wood-drying kilns.

At the Sawmill
Parting Shot
HH_Winter14_p30-32.indd 30 1/27/14 3:12:56 PM
HARDHAT WINTER 2014 31
In Memoriam
Training + Events
UPCOMING
ARCCAW notes with sorrow the
passing of the following members.
Meetings

First Wednesday of each month:
Local 1325 meeting
Third Thursday of each month:
Local 2103 meeting
Fourth Tuesday of each month:
Local 1460 meeting
training
alberta Carpenters training Centre
The following is a sample of training courses
that are open for registration at the time of
publication of this edition of Hard Hat.
For full listing or more information on
training courses, visit abcarptc.ab.ca or phone
the Edmonton ofce at 780-455-6532 or toll-free
at 1-877-455-6532.
All courses are at the Edmonton location
unless otherwise indicated.
Commercial Door Hardware
Installation Course:
March 10 to March 14, 2014 (Calgary)
April 7 to April 11, 2014
May 26 to May 30, 2014 (Calgary)
Industrial Technical Training:
January 27 to February 9, 2014
March 24 to April 6, 2014
May 5 to May 18, 2014
May 12 to May 25, 2014
June 23 to July 6, 2014
Period 1 Carpentry:
May 20 to July 11, 2014
Pre- Employment Carpentry Program:
March 10 to May 2, 2014
LOCaL 1325
Said Ali
November 2013,
Age 56
Patrick Doyle
October 2013,
Age 70
Helmut Eggert
October 2013,
Age 83
Ruslan Korolew
October 2013,
Age 51
Line Savoie
October 2013,
Age 51
Adrien Thebeau
October 2013,
Age 64
LOCaL 1460
Mato (Matt) Bozic
October, 2013
Age 64
LOCaL 2103
Dale Boyce
December, 2013
Age 53
Hubert Kleine
October, 2013
Age 87
Scafolding Journeyman Upgrade:
February 3 to March 7, 2014
April 14 to May 16, 2014 (Calgary)
Scafolding Level One:
February 10 to February 28, 2014
February 18 to March 7, 2014 (Ft. McMurray)
March 3 to March 21, 2014
March 17 to April 4, 2014 (Calgary)
April 7 to April 25, 2014 (Ft. McMurray)
April 14 to May 2, 2014
April 28 to May 16, 2014
May 26 to June 13, 2014
May 26 to June 13, 2014 (Ft. McMurray)
Scafolding Level Two:
January 27 to February 14, 2014 (Ft. McMurray)
February 10 to February 28, 2014
March 10 to March 28, 2014
March 17 to April 4, 2014 (Ft. McMurray)
April 7 to April 25, 2014
April 28 to May 16, 2014
April 28 to May 16, 2014 (Ft. McMurray)
May 20 to June 6, 2014
June 16 to July 4, 2014
June 16 to July 4, 2014 (Ft. McMurray)
Scafolding Level Three:
March 3 to March 28, 2014
March 31 to April 25, 2014
May 20 to June 13, 2014
June 2 to June 27, 2014 (Calgary)
June 9 to July 4, 2014
MiLLwrights training Centre
Visit www.albertamillwrights.com
for a current listing of training courses available.
HH_Winter14_p30-32.indd 31 1/28/14 7:35:37 AM
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