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Serving UNC students and the University community since 1893

Expectation is the mother of all frustration.
ANTONIO BANDERAS
Thursday, February 13, 2014 dailytarheel.com Volume 121, Issue 151
SNOW POSTPONES GAME
Students outraged after long wait
DTH/MELISSA KEY
Students leave the Smith Center after learning that the Duke game would be postponed.
By Nicole Comparato
Editor-in-Chief
As soon as the PA system
clicked on around 5:40 p.m.,
booing echoed throughout
Koury Natatorium.
“I knew it was over,” said
junior Andrew Wood.
And so did more than 500
other students that had been
moved inside at 1 p.m. by the
Athletic Department after
snow made waiting in line
outside unbearable. The same
students who were reassured
multiple times throughout the
day — even through an Alert
Carolina text message — that
the Duke game was still on.
The announcer paused to
let the shouting subside.
He told Phase 1 ticket hold-
ers who had been waiting for
up to seven hours — many of
them abandoning their cars
and walking miles to get to
the Smith Center — that the
Duke basketball team would
not be making the 10-mile
trek to Chapel Hill due to
dangerous road conditions.
“Everyone knew,” said
Wood, who turned 21
Wednesday and hoped to
include the Duke game in
his birthday celebrations. “It
could have been the best.”
According to an Athletic
Department press release, the
9 p.m. game was postponed
due to inclement weather
and will be rescheduled for
Thursday, Feb. 20.
“Duke’s bus is not able to
get to their campus to pick up
the team in time to be able to
make the trip to Chapel Hill
so we can’t play this evening,”
Storm snarls roads, strands motorists, closes campus
People urged to stay off roads across North Carolina; winter
weather likely to continue throughout the day
Students frozen out of Duke game
DTH/ARAMIDE GBADAMOSI
Laurel Keefer, a sophomore biology major, makes a snow angel in front of South
Building on Wednesday afternoon.
DTH/MELISSA KEY
Avery Barr, a sophomore biology major, walks up
Bowles Drive after taking a run down the hill on his skis.
DTH/CHRIS CONWAY
Chapel Hill Transit bus services were suspended
Wednesday afternoon during the snow.
By Aaron Cranford and Jenny Surane
Senior Writers
Juniors Avery Calhoun and Hannah
Davis left their Mill Creek apartment
Wednesday for a quick trip to Harris
Teeter for some groceries.
Little did they know, they would be
walking back.
“We were driving back and everyone
was sliding around right in front of us, so
we just ended up pulling over and walked
all the way back since then,” Calhoun said.
Davis said the storm started so sud-
denly, they weren’t prepared for the slip-
pery drive home.
“We got to Harris Teeter, and it was
barely snowing at all and then — 10
minutes later — this,” Davis said.
Classes will be canceled today until 8
a.m. Friday, according to a press release
from the Department of Public Safety on
Wednesday.
Anantha Aiyyer, an N.C. State
University professor who studies meteo-
rology, said he expects sleet to continue
on and off into today.
He said the region will likely get an
inch or two of sleet today and possibly
more snow.
This snow storm comes about
two weeks after Winter Storm Leon
slammed the South. Aiyyer said it’s hard
to predict, but there’s a chance that the
region could get another winter storm
before spring, as it has been unusually
cold this year.
Brandon Thomas, spokesman for
Carolina Dining Services, said all cam-
pus dining services will be closed except
Rams Head and Lenoir Dining Halls. He
said employees were provided shelter at
local hotels and transportation.
Officials were also responding to
stranded residents across the county.
Wednesday’s winter storms over-
loaded the Orange County Emergency
Services department’s call center with
residents’ calls for help.
Chapel Hill police asked all residents
involved in minor accidents Wednesday
to exchange information with one anoth-
er and report it today.
Chapel Hill police spokesman Lt.
Josh Mecimore said police didn’t have
information about the number of car
accidents Wednesday.
At one point, the Chapel Hill Police
Department tweeted that officers were
called to respond to nine crashes in a five-
minute span around 1 p.m. Wednesday.
The police department closed parts of
U.S. Highway 15-501 and Martin Luther
King Jr. Boulevard Wednesday after resi-
dents couldn’t make it up steep parts of
the roads.
Gov. Pat McCrory declared a state of
emergency Tuesday. He urged people to
stay off the roads, even telling report-
ers that he wouldn’t be able to make the
UNC-Duke game.
Between midnight and 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday, N.C. Highway Patrol troopers SEE GAME POSTPONED, PAGE 7
SEE SNOW, PAGE 7
SNOW AND ICE
SURVIVAL GUIDE:
CAMPUS LOCATIONS
Because the University is operating
under Condition 3, all ofces are closed.
For updates, check unc.edu as well as
dailytarheel.com:

All classes are canceled and offices are
closed until Friday at 8 a.m.

All campus libraries are closed.

UNC Campus Recreation facilities are
closed, and Student Stores is closed .
CHAPEL HILL SHELTERS
The Orange County Emergency Services
department will open two emergency
shelters today if residents lose power or
heat:

The first shelter will be at C.W. Stan-
ford Middle School in Hillsborough.

The second shelter will open at Smith
Middle School in Chapel Hill.
CHAPEL HILL TRANSIT
Chapel Hill Transit will operate as condi-
tions allow today:

The department will update its
inclement weather page with bus route
closures at bit.ly/1aWkySx.

Students should take extra care when
boarding the buses and while waiting at
bus stops.

The department ended service on
many of its local routes Wednesday.
CAMPUS DINING
Carolina Dining Services said students
will be able to eat at the following loca-
tions Thursday:

Rams Head and Lenoir Dining Halls
will open at 9 a.m. today.

All other Carolina Dining Services
locations will remain closed unless
otherwise noted.
Friday’s weather
Today’s weather
Do you think Duke
can make it now?
H 42, L 31
Sleep it of.
H 33, L 26
TODAY
Orgasm? Yes, Please!: Want
to learn how to have better,
healthy, fun and communicative
sex? This program focuses on
healthy sexuality and cultivat-
ing healthy relationships while
combining humor. Learn about
orgasms and enter a rafe to
win a free vibrator in a rafe. Pre-
sented in part by Project Dinah,
Interactive Theater Carolina and
Student Wellness.
Time: 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Location: Student Union, Great
Hall
Make Your Own Valentine:
Get crafty while making a card
for your special Valentine. Bull’s
Head Bookshop will supply all
the construction paper hearts
and googly eyes you need. It will
also be held Friday. Free.
Time: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Location: Bull’s Head Bookshop
“Smart Leaders, Smarter
Teams”(Lecture): Roger
Schwarz, an international leader-
ship consultant and former
School of Government professor
will give a lecture on the topic of
“Smart Leaders, Smarter Teams,”
the title of his recent book. Free.
Time: 3:30 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Location: Medical Biomolecular
Research Building, Room 2204
“We Love Valentines”Night:
Take part in a “Love in the Gal-
leries” scavenger hunt and make
your own Valentines.
Time: 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Location: Ackland Art Museum
FRIDAY
Valentine’s Carolina Skies: Ex-
NOTED. Who needs a date for Valentine’s
Day when you have your alarm clock? OK,
maybe that sounds awful, but one com-
pany wants to change that with its hybrid
vibrator/alarm clock, Wake-Up Vibe.
Set the timer, put in your underwear
and prepared to be jolted awake. Well, you
get it. Alright, then.
QUOTED. “ ... Your nature perforated the
abrasive organ pumps/ Spray painted
everything known to man ... ”
— Actress Kristen Stewart astounds the
world with a bit of her poem, entitled “My
Heart Is A Wiffle Ball/Freedom Pole.” No
one really knows what all of it means, but
it’s certainly provocative.
A
hh, is there any better way to introduce your newborn into a
world filled with commercialism than through a sponsored
Tweet? Former boy band member Kevin Jonas and his wife
Danielle know what’s up. Shortly after their daughter Alena
Rose was born Feb. 2, the couple quickly took to Istagram posting a
bizarre series of advertisements for Dreft laundry detergent featuring
photos of their bundle of joy.
“Love using @Dreft as we prepare for Baby Girl! Follow @Dreft for
exclusive content from our growing family! #BabyJonas #DreftAmazing
Baby Days,” Kevin Jonas wrote on Twitter. Glad you could share your
baby’s first moments on your phone and not at your wife’s bedside.
Jonas baby subject of ad
From staf and wire reports
DAILY
DOSE
• Someone committed sim-
ple assault at 500 Umstead
Drive betwen 3:03 a.m. and
3:10 a.m. Tuesday, according
to Chapel Hill police reports.
The person was fighting
with another person in an
apartment, reports state.
• Someone was acting
suspiciously at 201 Gardner
Circle at 12:25 a.m. Tuesday,
according to Chapel Hill
police reports.
The person rattled a front
door, reports state.
• Someone broke into and
entered a residence at 707
N. Columbia St. between
2:35 a.m. and 2:38 a.m.
Wednesday, according to
Chapel Hill police reports.
The person broke and
entered without force by
walking into an unknown
residence, reports state.
• Someone reported dam-
aged property at 125 West
Main St. between 9:30 a.m.
Friday and 8 a.m. Monday,
according to Carrboro police
report.
The person said a vehicle
was struck in a parking lot
and was dented in the back
right quarter panel, reports
state.
• Someone stole property
at 222 Old Fayetteville Road
between 5 p.m. Sunday and
8 a.m. Monday, according to
Carrboro police reports.
The person stole a Garmin
global positioning satellite
from an unsecured vehicle,
reports state.
• Someone was assaulted at
406 S. Greensboro St. at 10:50
p.m. Monday, according to
Carrboro police reports.
• Someone exposed them-
selves incedently at 1849
Fordham Blvd. at 9 a.m.
Tuesday, according to Chapel
Hill police reports.
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com. Please include the date of
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attach a photo if you wish. Events
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on either the day or the day before
they take place.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
plore the legends of love told by
ancient cultures about constella-
tions and other things in the sky.
$7.25 for adults, $6 for seniors
and students.
Time: 7 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Location: Morehead Plan-
etarium
“The Vagina Monologues”:
Enjoy an English or Spanish
presentation of this comedy put
on by V-Day Carolina. Tickets
available at Union Box Ofce.
Time: 6:15 p.m., 8:30 p.m.
Location: Hanes Art Center
POLICE LOG
News Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Daily Tar Heel 2
IN SHORT(S), THANKS
C
oach Roy Williams shakes hands with stu-
dents in the riser line for the UNC-Duke
basketball game before it was randomized
Wednesday afternoon. He thanked students for brav-
ing the cold and their support of the team.
DTH/NICOLE COMPARATO
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CORRECTIONS
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News Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Daily Tar Heel 3
MAKING CONNECTIONS
Congress
repeals
bill for
research
funding
By Mia Madduri
Staff Writer
For Congressional members,
politics is their lifestyle — but until
recently, many were in support of
limiting collegiate research of the
subject.
In January, the U.S. Congress
repealed past restrictions on National
Science Foundation funding for politi-
cal science research for the 2014 fiscal
year.
In 2013, Congress restricted
National Science Foundation
research funding to only projects
that promoted national security or
economic interests — a contentious
restriction that compelled some rep-
resentatives from UNC to lobby in
Capitol Hill.
Political science professor Frank
Baumgartner said many politicians
are skeptical of their role as research
subjects.
“A lot of politicians don’t like to be a
part of studies. There’s a lot of hostil-
ity toward the economics and political
science,” Baumgartner said.
“Political leaders think that
political scientists have some kind of
angle.”
He said some politicians don’t see
the value of research that is more lib-
eral arts-based.
Baumgartner said it’s not uncom-
mon for Congress to be hostile to the
study of political science, and there is
more of a focus on scientific, techno-
logical, engineering and mathematical
research.
Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla.,
proposed a bill four years ago try-
ing to eliminate political science
funding from the National Science
Foundation, which was $10 mil-
lion, and redistribute $7 million
to the National Cancer Institute,
Baumgartner said.
Congress did not pass this bill,
but accepted his modified version
of restricting funding to only politi-
cal science research that dealt with
national security or U.S. economic
interest.
“It was ironic because Coburn
used some data in a previous report
political scientists had written,”
Baumgartner said. “He was using
political science research for his fiscal
conservatism.”
Professor Jason Roberts said even
after the restriction was lifted, the
federal government might continue to
impinge upon the scope of social sci-
ence research.
“I do think federal social science
research remains under scrutiny,”
Roberts said. “The discretionary part
of the federal budget has been cut sig-
nificantly and this increases the com-
petition for scarce dollars.”
Roberts said some members of
Congress hold a limited view of politi-
cal science research and don’t advocate
funding.
“There are also some elected offi-
cials who do not think that social sci-
ence research should be funded by the
federal government.”
Most political scientists are
relieved the bill was not signed, he
said.
“I was pleased to see the restric-
tions on what NSF could fund or
review, and most of us in the profes-
sion believe that a rigorous peer review
process produces better research,”
Roberts said.
The foundation will return to its
own criteria for political science pro-
posals.
“In accordance with the provisions
of ... legislation, current proposals to
the political science program will be
evaluated in terms of NSF’s two merit
review criteria, intellectual merit and
broader impacts, in the same man-
ner as all other proposals submitted
to NSF,” said Debbie Wing, a spokes-
woman for the National Science
Foundation..
Even though the restrictions have
been repealed and the National
Science Foundation can continue
funding political science projects
based on their criteria, some political
scientists worry Congress will continue
to try to restrict funding.
“In the years to come we can
expect more of this kind of thing,”
Baumgartner said. “America leads
the world in this type of research and
when Congress steps in it’s counter-
productive.”
university@dailytarheel.com
There is a push to give
social sciences more
research funds.
DTH/ANI GARRIGO
Seniors Etiti Akhame-Ayeni, Wilma Mallya and Khadija Niang (left to right) cofounded Campus Africa Network, which aims to unite African groups at UNC.
Campus Africa Network connects organizations with Africa
By Mia Madduri
Staff Writer
Started last semester, Campus Africa
Network is a student-led initiative that hopes
to help UNC broaden its horizon.
Although Campus Africa Network isn’t a
part of the Campus Y, the group received grant
money from the Campus Y to start a new ini-
tiative that will help bring the other groups
realted to Africa together.
“We felt that there was disconnection
between student organizations that are
Africa related,” said Etiti Ayeni, co-director
and outreach coordinator of Campus Africa
Network. “A lot of these are smaller initia-
tives so they are much more isolated and
detached.”
“We felt we needed to address that issue to
try to bring them all together to talk about the
work that people do on the continent, current
affairs.”
Ayeni noticed that events which hosted
speakers from Africa had high attendance from
graduate students and professors rather than
undergraduate students.
Wilma Mallya, co-director of the group,
said increasing awareness was one of her
goals.
“We want to create something that can
inclusively come together, exchange ideas and
highlight work that’s being done so people
can have a clear understanding of Africa,” she
said.
Many of the members of Campus Africa
Network are also international students and
are making connections with people in Africa
— for example, their co-founder is currently
interning in Senegal.
“This truly is about making connections,”
Ayeni said.
Not only will this initiative help the general
campus, it will also provide a support group for
international students.
“It was hard for me to adjust during my
first year because I had to adjust to the rigor-
ous academic environment, the people and
the weather,” said junior Moradesola Bola-
Oyeledun.
“The key to adjusting is finding a great sup-
port system and a good solid group of friends,
especially international students you can relate
to,” he said.
Bola-Oyeledun said this initiative will help
because there are not many African students
who are actually international students here.
The Campus Africa Network is planning
on hosting events this upcoming March and
April, as well as partner with groups such
as Project Heel, World Micro-Market and
GlobeMed.
The organizers of the group also plan to
bring a faculty member to talk about their
work in Africa and make it interactive for
students. Ayeni wants students to think criti-
cally about the work that is happening in
Afirca.
“We teach people through educating,” said
Ayeni. “We want to make this a lasting pres-
ence on campus.”
university@dailytarheel.com
Alumna named ambassador
By Sharon Nunn
Staff Writer
UNC alumna Cassandra Butts is headed to
the Bahamas, but not for a vacation — she was
nominated by President Barack Obama Friday
as the new U.S. ambassador to the nation.
In her new position, Butts will handle a
variety of diplomatic topics, including political,
economic, military and cultural issues. She cur-
rently serves as the president-appointed senior
adviser to the CEO of Millennium Challenge
Corporation, an independent U.S. foreign aid
agency that aims to end international poverty.
In 1987, Butts received a bachelor’s degree in
political science from UNC. She went on to get a
law degree from Harvard Law School.
She now serves as a member of the UNC
Board of Visitors, which is a group of alumni
who volunteer and assist the Board of Trustees
and the chancellor in areas like government
relations, funding and public relations.
Butts serves on the student recruitment
and state relations committee. Her term ends
in 2017, but she doesn’t have to be present in
Chapel Hill to fulfill her duties.
“If she shows the same commitment that
she shows in serving the
students, I couldn’t see her
continuing to do anything
but excellent things in the
Bahamas,” said Michael
Zollicoffer, Board of
Visitors chairman.
UNC junior Jordan
Archer, who grew up in the
Bahamas, said the politics
and economics of the coun-
try are similar to those in
the United States, though
the Caribbean island chain
is a prime location for
international drug traffick-
ing due to its close proxim-
ity to the U.S.
“As far as issues went, drug smuggling is the
biggest issue. Because of its location in rela-
tion to Miami, it makes for a good ‘harbor’ for
smuggling drugs from one country to the next,”
Archer said.
“Our American embassy is doing a great job
there, and I don’t think there are any big issues
pressing them at this time.”
Butts previously worked as the deputy White
House counsel to Obama and general counsel
to the Obama-Biden Transition Project. Prior
to that, she served as senior vice president for
domestic policy at the Center for American
Progress.
When Obama appointed Butts to her cur-
rent position at the Millennium Challenge
Corporation in 2009, he referred to her as a
dear friend and trusted colleague.
“She goes above and beyond in what she does.
She has this desire to give back, and that’s hard
to put a price on,” Zollicoffer said. “It’s second
to none.”
Zollicoffer said Butts’ hard work shows in
what she has accomplished, and Archer said he
knows she will do an excellent job for his country.
“We’re everywhere,” Archer said. “It’s great to
know that a Tar Heel will be there.”
state@dailytarheel.com
Cassandra Butts will serve as the
U.S. ambassador to the Bahamas.
Food trucks park on South Campus
By Aaron Cranford
Staff Writer
South Campus students now
have another late-night food option
on the weekends.
Food trucks are parked in
Bowles Drive Parking Lot every
Thursday through Saturday night.
Justin Maness, a Baguettaboutit
food truck employee, said their
truck goes to a lot of campuses, but
he said Chapel Hill is their first
late-night opportunity.
“We are doing this on Duke’s
campus and N.C. State’s cam-
pus and even at breweries like
Fullsteam and Double Barley – we
are all over,” he said.
Randy Young, spokesman for the
UNC Department of Public Safety,
said Carolina Dining Services
worked this out in order to serve
the students’ late night appetites.
“They contacted us to identify an
area that had parking, a spot that
did not have enforced parking, one
that had a large population and
had good visibility.”
Ryan Moore, food service direc-
tor for Carolina Dining Services,
said in an email if the food trucks
have more customers, students will
likely see more.
“For now no more than three
food trucks are able to schedule
a particular night to start. This is
to mostly protect the trucks from
losing interest due to cold weather
and low turnout,” he said.
Renard Edwards, a
Baguettaboutit employee, said they
did not leave on the first night until
about 1:30 a.m., but the foot traffic
could have been better.
“For people to not know that
we were coming – for us to just
show up – the word got out pretty
decent,” he said. “It wasn’t an over-
whelmingly great night, but it was
pretty decent night out here for
people to not know about it before.”
Maness said the turnout was
underwhelming, but he said he
is expecting more people to come
when it is warmer.
“People don’t want to come out
here in this weather when it is this
cold, but I think once it starts to be
warm, around March or April time,
we will get a lot more people com-
ing out here,” he said.
Giselle Montgomery and Devon
Williams, juniors at UNC, said
having the food trucks will be great
as long as they are cheap.
Cassandra Butts
was named U.S.
ambassador to
the Bahamas by
President Obama.
She graduated from
UNC in 1987.
DTH FILE/BRIAN FANNEY
Baguettaboutit will serve food from the Bowles Drive Parking Lot.
“I think it is good because we
need as many food options as we
can support,” Montgomery said.
“Especially with lower cost,”
Williams said. “A lot of the options,
especially on Franklin Street, aren’t
as cost-effective.”
The trucks will not be in the
Bowles lot during basketball games,
but Edwards said they will hopefully
be there for a few football games.
Maness said he expects more
people to come out when it warms
up and people spread the word
about the food trucks being there.
“When word comes through and
people start spreading the word
that there are food trucks there
from (10 p.m.) to (2 a.m.), then
people will get stoked about it.”
city@dailytarheel.com
Bowles Drive Parking Lot
houses food trucks on
weekend nights.
diversions
Visit the Dive blog: dailytarheel.com/dive
Thursday, February 13, 2014
dailytarheel.com
The Daily Tar Heel 4
Triangle-based band Lost in the Trees ditches its string section in favor of a more regular rock sound on its latest LP Past Life. Page 5
Like the iconic toy itself, it’s not just for kids: The Lego Movie is a delightfully entertaining and funny film for kids of all ages. Page 6
House of Cards returns to the Internet this week and with it comes what might just be the greatest couple on air. Page 5
Dive staff writer Kristina Kokkonos talks to Daniel Bachman about his hopes to come to UNC and his musical aspirations. Page 6
MUSIC.
MOVIES.
COLUMN.
Q&A.
TODAY IN DIVE
key love
Weezy Rider is at it again! The band made
its debut on Halloween playing Weezer’s 1994
self-titled record that’s better known as The Blue
Album.
This time, Weezy Rider takes on Pinkerton.
Comprised of members of local hardcore punk
veterans, Catharsis, and Des Ark, will be playing
Weezer’s sophomore album in its entirety.
Joining the band will be Durham’s own punk
rock old timers, Chest Pains.
Hear your Weezer favorites as the band said
they were meant to be: loud and sloppy. Ask your
date to the Green Day concert and sing along to as
many “El Scorcho” lyrics you know.
— Marcela Guimaraes
Weezy Rider at
Nightlight
The Pinhook in Durham is the
place to be this Valentine’s Day,
where Durham’s own jazz hip-
hop fusion, The Beast, is teaming
up with Boom or Bust Burlesque
to bring an unforgettably sultry
Valentine’s special. The Beast com-
bines classic hip-hop beats and ele-
gant jazz melodies to create incred-
ibly original compositions and has
received some serious critical buzz
the past few years. Frontman emcee
Pierce Freelon, who doubles as a
UNC music professor, spoke of the
Triangle’s growing burlesque scene,
and assures that the Pinhook audi-
ence will be in for a treat. Indulge
your inner swank and join Freelon
and the lovely ladies of Boom or
Bust for a hip-hoppin’ night of pas-
sion. — Cozy Brents
The Beast Burlesque
to
N
eed a cool date for Valentine's D
ay? D
ive staf picks the b
est bets for almost e
v
e
r
y
k
in
d

o
f

m
u
s
i
c

f
a
n
.
You won’t actually be spending a night in
the capital of Mali to take part in One Night in
Bamako — in fact, for this show, you don’t even
have to go off campus. Carolina Performing Arts
does you the favor of bringing world-class enter-
tainment right to UNC’s very own Memorial Hall.
From One Night in Bamako, you can expect two
of Mali’s greatest living songwriters performing
songs not just about love, but about empowerment
and politics, too, according to the CPA website.
Take advantage of those $10 student tickets and
take in a performance you’re not likely to encoun-
ter again. After the show, there’s a special reception
for students that includes free desserts, so there’s
plenty to take advantage of. — Allison Hussey
One Night in
Bamako
The second night of WKNC’s Double Barrel
Benefit is a doozy with some of the Triangle’s best
talent. The $12 ticket price would be worth it for
any two of the acts, but a stacked bill of four bands
makes this show a special steal: guitarist Daniel
Bachman, Loamlands, Bombadil and Mount
Moriah.
The songs alone could make for an odd date
— arguably, Bombadil and Mount Moriah are at
their best when they’re singing about how much of
a bummer love can be, with songs like “One More
Ring,” “Honeymoon” and “Three Saddest Words”
by the former and “Lament,” “I Built a Town” and
“Only Way Out” by the latter. What’s not to love?
— Allison Hussey
Double Barrel
Benefit
Those looking for something more transcendent
should check out Julianna Barwick’s show at the
Carrack, sponsored by the Pinhook.
Barwick, a Brooklyn-based musician, uses lay-
ered loops of her own vocals to create expansive,
otherworldly landscapes. From time to time, she
pulls in some instrumentation, but non-vocal pres-
ence remains minimal.
By the end of any track, listeners have been
swept far away on her ethereal voice, unable to
remember how the song even began.
Bring a date if you like, but you’ ll become lost
in your own thoughts as soon as Barwick starts
her looping and envelops you in hers.
— Drew Goins
Julianna
Barwick
Who needs dinner at an expensive restau-
rant when you can take your sweetheart to see
two pop rock acts for way less than half the
price? Nothing says romance like guitar-heavy
Diarrhea Planet and fun-loving powerhouse,
Those Darlins.
Both bands have proven to be stellar performers
and will mend the hearts of even the most jaded
victims of the college dating scene. Fellas will love
Diarrhea Planet’s grungy garage band feel and
ladies will go crazy for Those Darlins’ girl power
dynamic.
If you’re looking for an evening of high energy
and cool tunes, look no further than Raleigh’s
Kings Barcade. — Natalie Carney
Diarrhea
Planet at Kings
Diversions Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Daily Tar Heel 5
Lost in the Trees
Past Life
Alt Rock
Ari Picker, leader of Lost
in the Trees, is a virtuoso at
beautifully weaving his sad
and tragic past into his band’s
varying shades of majestic
music. On the band’s third
LP, Past Life, Picker and crew
interject vulnerable sentiment
similar to previous albums,
but this time with a different,
progressive lens.
The band’s previous record,
the enthralling A Church That
Fits Our Needs, served as a
bittersweet tribute to Picker’s
deceased mother who took
who her own life shortly after
Picker’s wedding years ago.
Past Life carries the same
weight, but instead of pure
and heartfelt reflection, the
classically trained Picker sub-
stitutes orchestra strings for
more upbeat drums and elec-
tric guitars to mold Picker’s
transition of moving on with
the memory of the past still
vibrantly presence.
Lost in the Trees’ emotion
is still there with haunting
harmonies in “Excos” and
“Rites,” opening up a misty
transitional space for the
album to meditate on a previ-
ous life while contemplating
a potential afterlife. But the
band’s mood is different this
time. While Picker’s elegance
is always warming, Past Life
does not carry this warmth as
seamlessly as previous works.
Nevertheless, songs like
the title track, the lilting and
ambient “Glass Harp,” and
the optimistic “Sun” bring
a revered symmetry to the
album’s journey.
Past Life is a step to the
side from Lost in the Trees
history rooted in grieving cel-
ebration. It welcomes all that
comes with such a sentimen-
tal background, but is willing
to explore new territory, and
new emotions.
— Charlie Shelton
Xiu Xiu
Angel Guts: Red Classroom
Avant-garde
It’s beginning to seem like
Xiu Xiu has a new piece of
music out every month, yet
somehow the group manages
to create fresh noise rock that
very few others can imitate.
The band’s latest, the murky
Angel Guts: Red Classroom, is
more of the same, but some-
thing fans will immediately
enjoy.
The eerie, industrial open-
er “Angel Guts:” sets the tone
for the rest of the record. The
instrumental track begins
with a repetitive siren-like
noise before fading into static
and then nothing for the last
minute and a half. It’s not
until “Archie’s Fades,” a bare
dance number that distorted
vocals and creepy lyrics come
into play.
“New Life Immigration”
is a standout, almost dead
center in the album. Taking
inspiration from contempo-
raries like Twin Shadow, the
song is more emotional and
heart-wrenching than any
others.
Some of the later tracks
blur together, becoming a
hazy, dark mass of distorted
vocals and strange beats.
Maybe if the album was
shorter than fourteen songs,
the effect would be less
noticeable, but as is, Angel
Guts begins to wear the lis-
tener down.
While not a good introduc-
tion for the average listener,
fans of Xiu Xiu will find a lot
to like.
— Mac Gushanas
MUSICSHORTS
POOR
FAIR
GOOD
EXCELLENT
CLASSIC
STARS
Allison Hussey, Editor
Chris Powers, Assistant Editor
diversions@dailytarheel.com
Charlie Shelton, Mac
Gushanas, Amanda Hayes,
Schyler Martin, staff writers
Mary Burke, Design & Graphics
Editor
Cover Design: Hailey Johns
DIVESTAFF
A ‘House of Cards’ built
upon a captivating marriage
T
omorrow marks the
much-anticipated
return of the Netflix
original series “House of
Cards.” Save the saccharine
kisses in the rain or “I got off
the plane”s — such gestures
are tiresome compared to
what the characters of “House
of Cards” has to offer.
Without a doubt, the show
boasts the most compelling
partnership on air: Claire and
Frank Underwood.
Instances of infidelity and
manipulation bar them from
becoming the idyllic picture-
perfect couple, but that’s
boring. You want to be Frank
and/or Claire as much as you
want to stay far, far out of
their way.
In their professional lives,
both Claire and Frank are
ruthless. Frank cuts and wea-
sels his way all the way to the
vice presidency in season one
of “House of Cards,” while
Claire runs her charity with
an iron grip.
They’re sharp and calculat-
ing, but are often more tender
with each other in peculiar
ways — like when Claire buys
a rowing machine for a petu-
lant Frank because she’s wor-
ried about his heart.
When viewers see the pair,
there are few if any typical
affectionate exchanges. They
pause from her husband.
Netflix has stayed tight-
lipped about what’s to come
in the new season. Two
trailers do little in the way
of offering any substantial
answers as to what this sea-
son will bring.
As Frank rises to power
(and presumably continues
his treacherous ways), Claire
will be right at his side doing
some climbing on her own.
It’s a stretch to say that the
Underwoods’ relationship is
refreshing because it seems
realistic — a relationship like
theirs in reality would more
likely be horrifying. It seems
almost as far-fetched as the
lovey-dovey trope, but is infi-
nitely more intoxicating.
As season one came to
a close, the couple faced a
myriad of issues that season
two needs to address.
Will children be in the
picture for the Underwoods?
How will Claire handle the
looming lawsuit from a for-
mer employee? Will Zoe try
to wreck the Underwoods’
marriage? How will Frank
and Claire handle life in the
vice president’s seat?
There’s a lot on the line for
Claire and Frank as this next
season kicks off. Will their
relationship splinter under
the many levels of deception,
or will they find that they
need each other more than
either?
The “House of Cards”
writers will almost certainly
handle these situations with a
fantastic grace and deftness.
It’ ll be quite a ride to see if
the Underwoods come tum-
bling down.
diversions@dailytarheel.com
“I don’t know
whether to be
proud or terrified.”
Frank Underwood,
on his wife Claire in the trailer for the
second season of House of Cards
interact much like business
partners, and yet there’s a
consistent undercurrent of
intimacy.
Kevin Spacey’s Frank
Underwood is as slick and
cold as an ice luge. He has an
affair with the young tena-
cious journalist Zoe Barnes
(Kate Mara), but it’s not a
secret. Claire knows what’s
up, and isn’t afraid to let Zoe
know who’s boss.
One episode late in season
one also hinted that Frank
had a male lover in the past,
though it’s not clear where
or how Claire may come into
play there.
Though Spacey is the star
of the show, Robin Wright
as Claire steals the spotlight
whenever she’s near it. She’s
not just your standard Strong
Woman type: she’s indepen-
dent and interesting, but dif-
ficult. She’s not exactly a nice
person.
And yet, it’s difficult not to
feel bad for her as she tries to
hide her impending meno-
Allison Hussey
Diversions Editor
COLUMN
WE ARE ALSO PRESENTING...
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19
JOHN BROWN’S BODY
FRIDAY, FEB. 28
LOST IN THE TREES
919-967-9053
300 E. Main Street • Carrboro
Serving CAROLINA BREWERY Beers on Tap!
**Advance ticket sales at SchoolKids Records (Raleigh), CD Alley (CH).
Buy tickets on-line www.etix.com | For phone orders CALL 919-967-9053
www.catscradle.com
The BEST live music ~ 18 & over admitted
FEBRUARY
APRIL
MAY
APRIL (CONT.)
MONDAY, FEB. 17
RUSSIAN CIRCLES
FRIDAY, MARCH 14
DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS
JUNE
14 FR: LAKE STREET DIVE ( Sold out)
15 SA: NC FRESH CATCH OYSTER TOUR : Big
Fat Gap, The Dye Wells, Regatta 69, NC
Songsmiths, Shannon O’Connor
17 MO: RUSSIAN CIRCLES , Ken Mode, Inter
Arma**($13/$15)ds
18 TU: JONATHAN WILSON w/ The Blank Tapes*
*($12/$15)
Feb 19: JOHN BROWN’S BODY w/ Lionize**
($12/$15)
FEB 21: WHITE LIES w/ Frankie Rose**($20/$23)
FEB 22: WHO’S BAD **($17/$20) w/ Chit Nasty Band
FEB. 28: LOST IN THE TREES
w/ All Tiny Creatures**($15)
MARCH 2014:
1 SA: STEPHEN KELLOGG w/Heather Morgan**
($18/$20)
MARCH 3: STEPHEN MALKMUS & THE JICKS
w/Purling Hiss**($19/$22)
March 4: MEWITHOUTYOU and Touche
Amore w/ Seahaven and Caravels**($15/$17)
MARCH 5: SHOVELS & ROPE **($14/$16)
MARCH 6: DELTA RAE **($20/$25) w/the Falls
and Brett Harris
FR 7: BROAD CITY LIVE **($25) Presented by
AEG Live
March 9: THE PAINS OF BEING PURE AT
HEART **($12/$14)
March 11: GREEN RIVER ORDINANCE w/
Elenowen, Emily Hearn**($12/$15)
14 FR: DIALI CISSOHKO & KAIRA
BA and Orquesta GarDel ($10)
15 SA: THE DIRTY GUV’NAHS w/ Cereus
Bright**($12/$15)
3/18: TYPHOON w/PHOX, Wild Ones**($12/$14)
3/19: RAC ** ($15/$17)
March 20: TINARIWEN w/ The Melodic**($23/$25)
21 FR: SAN FERMIN **($12/$14) w/ Avers
22 SA: WXYC 90s Dance ($5/$7)
March 26: OKKERVIL RIVER **($16/$18)
29 SA: HOLY GHOST TENT REVIVAL **($12/$14)
30 SU: AMERICAN AUTHORS **($15)
dMarch 31: G-EAZY **($15/$20)
APRIL 1: BAYSIDE , Four Years Strong, Daylight**
($16.50/$19)
4/8: TWENTY-ONE PILOTS **($20/$25) w/
NoNoNo, Hunter Hunted
4/12: DANNY BROWN **($17/$20; on sale 2/14)
4/13: THEE SILVER MOUNT ZION **($13/$15)
17 TH: CLOUD NOTHINGS **($12/$14; on sale 2/14)
18 FR: THE ZOMBIES **($32/$35)
April 22: SLAUGHTERHOUSE **($22/$25)
April 23: TYCHO **($15/$17)
MAY 2014
May 5: BEATS ANTIQUE **($20/$22)
MAY 6, ‘14: HAIM (Sold Out)
10 SA: METRONOMY **($15/$17)d
MAY 12: BOMBAY BICYCLE CLUB **($17/$20)
MAY 13: THE 1975 ( Sold Out)
16 FR: ANGEL OLSEN **( $12/$14)
May 18: OF MONTREAL W/DREAM TIGER **($15)
June 14: THE ENGLISH BEAT **($18/$20)
MARCH
CAT’S CRADLE -- BACK ROOM:
2/14: MAGNOLIA COLLECTIVE/ MICHAEL
RANK & STAG**($5)
2/16: Cibo Matto**($20) w/ Salt Cathedral
2/19 GARDENS & VILLA ** ($10/$12)
w/Waterstrider
2/21; Hiss Golden Messenger plays Bad
Debt**$12 w/Alex Sauser-Monnig
2/22: Hospitality**($10/$12) w/ Air Waves
2/25: Robert Ellis**($10) w/ T Hardy Morris
2/26: Caroline Smith ** ($8/$10) w/Lowland Hum
2/28: DYLAN LEBLANC & JOSH MOORE**($10)
3/1: JON SHAIN TRIO **($10) w/Anna Rose Beck
3/6: Moonface ($12)
3/14: The Loudermilks, Cousins, John Howie Jr. )
3/19: Rueben and the Dark, NO, The
Darcys**($8/$10)
3/20: Shearwater**($10/$12) w/ Death
Vessel and Jesca Hoop
3/21: Noah Gundersen**($10/$12) w/
Armon Jay
3/28: I WAS TOTALLY DESTROYING IT w/
Blanco Basnet, & more
3/29: BIRDS & ARROWS w/ Kelley McRae**($8/$10)
4/2: EISLEY w/ Merriment **($15; on sale 2/14)
4/3: DEAN WAREHAM**($15)
4/5: Rhett Miller**($15/$18)
4/9: SHAWN MULLINS w/Max Gomez**($20)
4/21: Charlie Hunter & Scott Amendola**($15)
5/1: WAKE OWL ($10)
5/3: WAKEY! WAKEY! **($10/$12)
5/9: TYRONE WELLS **($15/$17) w/Nick Howard
5/10: UNDERACHIEVERS w/ Denzel Curry
and Dillon Curry** ($17; on sale 2/14)
THE RITZ (RALEIGH):
March 14 FR DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS w/
Blitzen Trapper**($25/$28):
April 28: CHVRCHES**($22/$25)
LOCAL 506 ( CHAPEL HILL):
Feb 15: Into It. Over It. **($10/$12) w/ The
World Is A Beautiful Place…, A Great
Big Pile Of Leaves, Bats & Mice
MAY 11: Spirit Family Reunion**($12)
THE HAW RIVER BALLROOM:
March 4: ST VINCENT**($22/$25)
March 5: FUTURE ISLANDS, WYE OAK**
($16/$18) w/ Ed Shrader’s Music Beat
March 22: THE DUHKS**($20/$23)
April 10: SUPERCHUNK**($12/$14)
April 11: DANIEL ROSSEN (of Grizzly Bear)
w/ William Tyler
May 8: CONOR OBERST w/DAWES**($35;
on sale Friday)
MONDAY, MARCH 3
STEPHEN MALKMUS & THE JICKS
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19
GARDENS & VILLA
SATURDAY, FEB. 15
INTO IT. OVER IT.
University of Chicago professor
Michael Geyer
The 20th Annual Mary Stevens Reckford
Memorial Lecture in European Studies will be
delivered on Thursday, February 20 by
Free & Open to the Public
Gerrard Hall at 7:30pm
Visit iah.unc.edu/reckford2014
for more details
Age of Destruction:
World War I -
One Hundred Years Later
Diversions Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Daily Tar Heel 6
MOVIESHORTS
The Lego Movie
Everything is awesome!
From the plethora of beloved
characters to the long line of
jokes, “The Lego Movie" sets
the bar high for animated
movies in 2014. The film is
cinematically dazzling with
stop-motion animation that
shows off several Lego worlds
and some impressive action
sequences.
The story begins with the
wizard Vitruvius (Morgan
Freeman) delivering a
prophecy that states the
“Special” will find the Piece
of Resistance and stop Lord
Business (Will Ferrell) from
destroying the world with
his evil weapon, the “Kragle.”
Some time later, an extremely
ordinary, non-special con-
struction worker named
Emmet (Chris Pratt) finds
the Piece of Resistance and is
deemed the “Special.”
Each character, from
Green Lantern to Batman
(Will Arnett) to Unikitty,
has its own special quirk.
These spark dozens of
funny moments, like Green
Lantern’s fanboy obsession
with Superman and Batman’s
need to be dark and brooding.
The level of comedic
writing is tremendous and
there is an endless supply
of great ideas woven bril-
liantly throughout the plot.
The movie makes no effort to
cover up Lego people’s limited
movement, often poking fun
at the lack of physical expres-
sion. The film lets it be and
it only makes it even more
comical.
“The Lego Movie” takes a
clear jab at conformity and
formulaic sitcoms. The writ-
ers deliver their message well
and thankfully only spend a
minute reconciling good (cre-
ativity) and evil (order) in a
few touching moments. Then
it’s right back to being funny.
The movie doubles perfect-
ly as a commercial to show
kids what kind of impressive
world they can create with
just some Legos and unsup-
pressed creativity, a message
both kids and adults can
understand and appreciate.
— Amanda Hayes
The Monuments Men
Despite flaunting a stel-
lar cast and being based on
an inspiring true story, “The
Monuments Men” is a disap-
pointing, unsatisfying film
with a serious case of identity
crisis.
The movie follows an
unlikely World War II pla-
toon that’s made up of artists
and scholars who are tasked
with going into Germany and
rescuing precious art stolen
by the Nazis . The message
of this movie is noble. Art is
important and sometimes, art
is worth dying for.
Despite having this fas-
cinating story to work with,
“The Monuments Men”
doesn’t have much genuine
plot. As the men travel from
one location to another, the
film becomes expositional.
With George Clooney,
Matt Damon, Bill Murray,
John Goodman, Bob Balaban
and Cate Blanchett playing
major roles, there’s clearly an
abundance of talent. But for
incomprehensible reasons,
most of that talent isn’t used.
After the men set out on
the mission to retrieve the art,
they immediately split up and
travel to different locations.
These drastically different
subplots make the film feel
incredibly disjointed.
“The Monuments Men”
never decides what genre it
wants to be. Though everyone
involved seems to appreci-
ate what this film has to
say, they can’t overcome the
issues. Clooney in particular,
who also directed the movie,
seems passionate about the
message.
Despite the film’s down-
falls, there are brief moments
of promise. Murray and
Balaban make a perfect pair
and stand out above other
characters. Murray’s portrayal
of his character is comical
and light. Balaban’s is uptight
and stressed. They bicker
constantly, but they also go
to extra lengths to make each
other happy.
With a weaker cast, this
wouldn’t have been nearly
as disappointing. But with
actors of this caliber, who
work so well together, “The
Monuments Men” is little
more than a whole lot of
wasted potential.
— Schyler Martin
COURTESY OF DANIEL BACHMAN
Daniel Bachman is a guitarist hailing from Virginia whose distinct
fingerpicking style blends the sounds of the old and the new.
Instrumentalist Daniel
Bachman went on his first
European tour in 2011.
Since then, he’s been on the
road almost nonstop — and
he’s only 24. Originally from
Fredericksburg, Va., Bachman
moved to Chapel Hill recently
in hopes to eventually attend
UNC. He talked to staff writer
Kristina Kokkonos about his
plans for the future.
DIVERSIONS: Tell me a little
bit more about wanting to go
to UNC at this point.
DANIEL BACHMAN: Well I
dropped out of the program
SEE BACHMAN LIVE
Time: 8 p.m. Sunday with
Chris Forsyth
Location: The Pinhook, 117
W. Main St., Durham
Info: www.thepinhook.com
Q&A with Daniel Bachman
I was in at the University of
Mary Washington for his-
toric preservation when I was
probably 20. I had always
wanted to go to UNC, but I
could never afford it. Now
that I’m old enough to get
residency and (pay in-state
tuition,) I’m planning on
trying to apply for fall 2015.
We’ ll see if they take me.
DIVE: So where does music
fit into that for you, as far as
your goals and ambitions?
DB: They’re completely
separate. If I do the music
thing, it’s like full time. If I do
the school thing, it’s full time.
That’s what boiled down to
dropping out the first time.
You’re either on the computer
all day working on stuff or
you’re on the road all the time.
That’s the only way it works
financially, too. They’re two
completely separate worlds.
DIVE: I noticed that you
went on a summer 2013 U.K.
tour. Tell me a little bit about
that.
DB: That was, I think three
weeks. I did all around the
U.K. and Ireland, probably 16
or 17 shows, with a couple of
days off. It was nice. The U.K.
is more like touring the U.S.
than touring Europe, it’s like
a similar vibe.
DIVE: What have you done
so far this year?
DB: Just one tour in January.
I’ve got one record coming out
in March that’s like a reissue
record, and then I’ve got anoth-
er full-length record that’s
coming out in April through
this label out in Asheville. Then
the U.K. in March, U.S. in April
and nothing from there, which
is cool. Then in June, I’m back
in Europe and the U.K. Then
I will be taking it easy for a
while. I’ve been going and
going for about two and half
years now, pretty nonstop.
DIVE: What’s your biggest
goal with music?
DB: Forever, I always told
myself, “Get two years of sup-
porting yourself off of music.”
Which I kind of did. So now,
if everything just stopped,
I’ve got gnarly stories and it
would be fine. But I’m not
going to stop.
DIVE: That’s really cool, to
have accomplished that at
a young because not many
people can say that, but also
to feel fulfilled enough.
DB: I’m definitely satis-
fied, yeah. I’m happy with
everything.
myhousing.unc.edu
DEADLINE ALERT
Today is the
last day to
apply for
housing.
live the life. blue
carolinaperformingarts.org
BOX OFFICE 919.843.3333
STUDENT
TICKETS JUST
What do you get when you mix hip-hop moves,
circus and martial arts? Compagnie Käfig.
This all-male Brazilian troupe, featuring 11 street dancers
from Rio de Janeiro’s famous shanty towns, performs pieces
inspired by their individual stories in an exhilarating tour de
force of acrobatic skills and stamina. Clapping, cheering and the longest headspin
you’ll ever see are all part of this dazzling, physical performance.
COMPAGNIE KÄFIG
LIVE AT MEMORIAL HALL
FEBRUARY 25 & 26 // 7:30 PM
News Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Daily Tar Heel 7
By Adam Golden
Staff Writer
For UNC students look-
ing to find love in a hopeless,
songless place this Valentine’s
Day, Brentton Harrison is
here to help.
The Marian Cheek Jackson
Center is hosting a Song-a-
Gram fundraiser this week. For
a donation of $25 for residents
in the Northside and Pine
Knolls neighborhoods and $45
for Chapel Hill and Durham
residents, the center will send
someone to sing a song to the
person of the donor’s choice.
That singing someone will
likely be Harrison, the center’s
community action coordina-
tor, whose promotional video
on the organization’s website
offers a taste of the voice
that could be ringing around
town today and Friday. Song
options include “My Girl” by
The Temptations and “Lean
on Me” by Bill Withers.
The Jackson Center is a
nonprofit working to preserve
the history of the historically
black, low income Northside
community of Chapel Hill.
Freshman Brooke Hess
said sheliked the idea.
“I think it’s really corny and
kind of cliche and cute,” she
said. “If I were to get one, I
would want it to be ‘The First
Day of My Life’ by Bright Eyes
because for me, that song is
really nostalgic and sweet and
that would show me they really
knew me and my music taste.”
Harrison said the event is a
way to raise funds but also to
get out in the community.
“I am just hoping it brings
a smile to their face and gives
them joy,” he said.
Harrison is not a profes-
sional singer but said he
enjoys singing.
“I sing at work all the time
while I am working, and my
coworkers said I sound pretty
good,” he said.
Freshman Rachel Simpson
had another idea of how to
use the Song-a-Grams.
“I would send ‘Bye, Bye,
Bye’ by the Backstreet Boys as
a funny way to break up with
someone,” she said.
Senior Jordan Paschal said
he was not a fan of the idea.
“I would rather just give a
donation as opposed to doing
something like that,” he said.
Freshman Madison
Kearneyliked the Song-a-
Gram event but saw room for
improvement.
“I like the idea of it, but
I think if they did a larger
group of singers it would be
more interesting.”
Those interested in send-
ing a Song-a-Gram can
contact the center or visit its
website to register.
city@dailytarheel.com
The Jackson Center is
offering song-a-grams
for Valentine’s Day.
Fundraiser spreads love through song
Online MBA program experiences success
By Sarah Headley
Senior Writer
As she hopped in a cab
to go to a business dinner,
Meredith Culler made time
for a phone interview — just
like she makes time to obtain
her master’s degree.
Culler is enrolled in the
MBA@UNC program, an
online program offered by
Kenan-Flagler Business
School.
Out of the first two MBA@
UNC graduating classes, 71
percent of students received
a promotion or positive job
change. Culler, a current stu-
dent living in San Francisco,
was recently promoted to
Inventory Manager of Pottery
Barn.
Culler said she joined the
program because she wanted
to earn a valuable degree but
did not want to stop working.
“I was doing my research
and knew that I liked my job,
and I wasn’t willing to give
up my current career path,”
she said.
“I never would have been
able to be promoted and be
where I am now if I had taken
myself out of the workforce.”
Since its creation two and
a half years ago, the program
has enrolled more than 600
students, many of whom are
working professionals like
Culler.
The executive director of
MBA@UNC, Susan Cates,
said the program takes in stu-
dents four times a year and
said UNC athletic director
Bubba Cunningham in a
statement.
“The safety of the teams
and officials is the number
one priority and this was the
best decision to make at this
time.”
Senior Chase Edwards
walked two miles from Chapel
Ridge apartments, spent
hours waiting, dished out $40
on paint and took about an
hour and a half to turn his
entire body blue for the game.
He said the change in plans
made him miserable.
“You see a week in advance
it’s going to be snowy, it’s
going to be bad conditions,
why can’t they come to the
Carolina Inn, sleep here?”
Edwards said.
“Why can’t they get here
3 o’clock or 2 o’clock … you
want to raise the question,
‘Did they want to play us
tonight with a Dean Dome
packed full of students?’”
Many season ticket holders
were unable to travel to the
game, and students would
have been able to fill the
empty seats in the lower level
of the Smith Center, prompt-
ing many who previously
planned to watch on TV to
rush out in the icy conditions
to make it to the stand-by
line.
Sophomore point guard
Marcus Paige, as well as some
of his teammates, tweeted
their thoughts about that
potential atmosphere.
“I’m just still thinking
about the whole lower half
being filled with students,”
Paige tweeted Wednesday
night.
“Woulda been the coolest
thing ever.”
One person who was
particularly invested in
attendees’ efforts was coach
Roy Williams, who visited
the Smith Center line in his
Carolina blue basketball
shorts to thank the students
braving the conditions.
Hours after that and just
a few minutes after post-
ponement was announced,
Williams once again came to
thank them and apologize for
the cancellation.
“We will play Duke in the
Smith Center before this
season is over,” Williams told
students. “But it won’t be
tonight and it won’t be tomor-
row night.”
The Athletic Department
collected tickets and wrist-
bands so that the line would
be in the same order Feb. 20
that it was Wednesday.
“I am glad they are hon-
oring what students did,”
said senior Jamal Benjamin.
“Because it was snowing,
GAME POSTPONED
FROM PAGE 1
it was freezing cold, my
toes had frost bite. I’m glad
they’re honoring our position
in line.”
Students said Williams’
appearance helped calm
down many of those vocaliz-
ing their frustration.
Just 20 minutes after
hearing the game would be
postponed, the 500 students
outdid their own booing by
singing UNC’s alma mater
even louder.
Ending with a booming
“Go to hell, Duke.”
university@dailytarheel.com
“We will play Duke
in the Smith Center
before this season is
over.”
Roy Williams,
UNC men’s basketball coach
responded to 1,360 service calls
across the state — the average
number of service calls a day
is 800 .
Thousands of power out-
ages were reported across
the state, and more are
expected in the next couple
of days.
A Duke Energy spokes-
woman said Tuesday night
that there are about 3,400
field workers across North
Carolina and South Carolina
to help with reparations.
Calhoun and Avery could
attest to the treacherous con-
ditions on roadways as they
made the walk back to Mill
Creek with plenty of grocery
bags, beer and wine in hand.
“We took all of the essen-
tials,” they said in unison.
city@dailytarheel.com
SNOW
FROM PAGE 1
DTH/CHRIS CONWAY
Pedestrians walk down North Columbia Street in front of Ackland
Art Museum as snow begins to fall Wednesday afternoon.
“If I was going to put in the time … I needed
to go to a school I was proud of.”
Meredith Culler,
a student in UNC’s MBA@UNC program
has more than a 98 percent
retention rate.
Students are able to inter-
act with one another and
their professors as they would
through other social media
sites. Cates said the site has
a social media backbone
that resembles LinkedIn and
Facebook.
“I’m a grad of our full-time
program, and I’m very proud
of the education experience
that I received through that
program — I’m equally as
proud of the educational
experience the MBA@UNC
students are receiving,” she
said.
Culler said MBA@UNC
offers her the quality she
would expect from a full-time
program.
“I felt that if I was going to
put in the time, the effort, the
money and all those things, I
needed to go to a school I was
proud of,” she said.
Culler said she was proud
to be enrolled in a program
at one of the top business
schools in the nation.
“The professors that make
Carolina so amazing – we
have the same experience,”
Culler said.
Larry Chavis, a professor
of strategy and entrepreneur-
ship , said the online program
offers an interactive experi-
ence.
“I do a lot more on focus-
ing on specific students than
when I have 60,” he said.
Classes do not exceed 15
students and classes are held
via webcam, which Cates said
holds students to a higher
degree of accountability.
“You can’t hide,” she said.
“You can’t slip in on the back
row and hope you don’t get
called on.”
Students review mate-
rial online before each class,
which is available at all times
so that they can fit it in to
their schedule. They can also
comment on any questions
they might have for the pro-
fessor to address during the
next class.
Students are required to
attend at least two immer-
sions that occur over a three-
day period in cities across the
globe. MBA@UNC tries to
decorate the locations in as
much Carolina blue as pos-
sible, so that when students
meet face-to-face they feel
closer to their classmates.
“You’re a Tar Heel for the
rest of your life,” Chavis said
to his class in the orientation
video.
university@dailytarheel.com
d
Need a HOTTIE for
Valentine’s Day?
Party with UNC’s own
Sweet, Sexy, Male Exotic Dancer!
Call Jamie 202.425.6162
~ ask for student rates ~
919.968.7226
millhouseproperties.com
Mill House has the best selection of student homes,
close to town and campus. Contact us for Fall 2014
housing (limited availability) or to wait list for
Fall 2015. The best downtown houses go quickly!
NO ONE KNOWS
THE HILL LIKE
THE MILL
Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Daily Tar Heel 8
NOTICE TO ALL DTH CUSTOMERS
Deadlines are NOON one business day prior to
publication for classified ads. We publish Mon-
day thru Friday when classes are in session. A
university holiday is a DTH holiday too (i.e. this
affects deadlines). We reserve the right to re-
ject, edit, or reclassify any ad. Acceptance of ad
copy or prepayment does not imply agreement
to publish an ad. You may stop your ad at any
time, but NO REFUNDS or credits for stopped
ads will be provided. No advertising for hous-
ing or employment, in accordance with federal
law, can state a preference based on sex, race,
creed, color, religion, national origin, handicap,
marital status.
Child Care Wanted
AFTERSCHOOL CAREGIVER For 9 year-old
in Carrboro, need car. M/Tu/Th pick up
at school, 2:30- 5:15pm. $12/hr. March
thru early June. Option open for next
fall. 919-968-0272.
For Rent
FAIR HOUSING
ALL REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, limitation, or dis-
crimination based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status, or national origin,
or an intention to make any such preference,
limitation, or discrimination.” This newspa-
per will not knowingly accept any advertising
which is in violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis in accordance with
the law. To complain of discrimination, call
the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development housing discrimination hotline:
1-800-669-9777.
4BR HOUSE AND 2BR COTTAGE. 209 North
Columbia Street. Completely remodeled with
hardwoods throughout. $600/mo per bed-
room. Available August 2014. 704-277-1648
or uncrents@carolina.rr.com.
1.5 BLOCKS TO FRANKLIN STREET: 1BR
and 2BR apartments at 408 MLK. Spa-
cious rooms with lots of light. Parking
and water included. Avaiable. June and
August. Limited time special rates: 1BR
$600/mo. and 2BR $900/mo. 919-929-
1188 or www.hilltopproperties.net.
1BR/1BA COTTAGE. 116 North Street, right
off Franklin Street. Small covered front
porch, W/D, water included, $875/mo.
Available August 2014. 704-277-1648 or
uncrents@carolina.rr.com.
COUNTRY LIFE IN 3BR/2BA RANCH in Or-
ange County off Hwy 70 between Durham
and Hillsborough. Sunroom with fireplace,
Large yard, firepit. $1,300/mo. Fran Holland:
fhollandprop@gmail.com.
GRADUATE STUDENT WANTED to live in beau-
tiful home and assist lady in exchange for low
rent. Call 919-542-6780.
UNIVERSITY COMMONS 4BR/4BA.
$1,600/mo. Includes: UTILITIES walk
in closet, internet, furnished living
and dining. J, D lines. Available 8-1-
2014. 919-923-0630. For application:
NolAloha@nc.rr.com.
1BR/1BA FRIENDLY LANE. Best location in
town. Half duplex with spacious rooms, hard-
wood floors, AC, parking. Available June 1.
Year lease, no pets, no smoking. $820/mo.
Visit www.hilltopproperties.net for photos and
details. 919-929-1188.
AWESOME 6+ BR IN CARRBORO! Available
June 1. 3,000 square feet. Walk to downtown.
6BRs up plus 1 or 2 down, sunroom, pool room,
and bar room! Hardwoods, carpet, dishwasher,
W/D, carport. No dogs. $2,750/mo. Call 919-
636-2822 or email amandalieth@att.net.
For Sale
BOOKS: FIRST CAME the physical changes,
spread by viruses carrying recombinant DNA.
Then came the memories. WONDERS AND
TRAGEDIES, a science fiction novel, is by Alan
Kovski. Available via Amazon.com.
BOOKS: A WILDERNESS may be prowled by
creatures of the forest. Or it may be urban,
highly cultured and just as deadly. WILDER-
NESS, a science fiction novel, is by Alan Kovski.
Available via Amazon.com.
BOOKS: STOLEN MEMORIES, dangerous
dreams, collapsing societies, lost souls, engi-
neered life, our world transformed. REMEM-
BERING THE FUTURE: science fiction stories by
Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon.com.
Help Wanted
LIVE IN CAREGIVER. $4,200/mo. Companion
for 90 year old woman. Companionship, light
housekeeping, cooking, accompany on er-
rands. Ideal for retiree. Send resume, detailed
background. billkennedy1958@gmail.com.
VALET DRIVERS needed for upscale restau-
rants, hotels and events. Great for students.
Flexible hours, lunch shifts available. In-
cludes great tips nightly. For more infor-
mation call 919-601-0223. Apply online:
www.royalparkinginc.com.
CAROLINA STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES is
seeking candidates for its legal assistant
position to begin July 15, 2014. Duties
include typing, filing, reception, book-
keeping and legal research. Knowledge
of Microsoft Office is a must,. Knowl-
edge of Macintosh computers and web-
site development is helpful but not re-
quired. This is a full-time position, M-F,
8:30am-5pm, requiring a 11.5 month
commitment starting on July 15, 2014
and ending on June 30, 2015. Perfect
for May graduate who wants work ex-
perience before law school. Mail resume
with cover letter as soon as possible but
no later than March 16, 2014 to Dorothy
Bernholz, Director, Carolina Student Le-
gal Services, Inc., PO Box 1312, Chapel
Hill, NC 27514. CSLS Inc. is an Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity employer.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF WANTED: Raleigh
Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources De-
partment is seeking enthusiastic summer camp
counselors for our youth programs division
who are interested in working with campers
ages 5-11. Experience working with children is
preferred, but not required. For more informa-
tion or to apply, please contact Hillary Hunt by
email at Hillary.Hunt@raleighnc.gov.
GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTOR: Chapel Hill
Gymnastics has part-time positions available
for energetic, enthusiastic instructors. Ap-
plicants with knowledge of gymnastic termi-
nology and progression skills preferred, but
will train right candidate. Send a resume to
margie@chapelhillgymnastics.com.
CARRBORO RECREATION AND PARKS (ath-
letics division). Part-time temporary. YOUTH
BASEBALL UMPIRES: March thru June, ages
6-15 years-old, games M-F evenings and Sat-
urday. 4-10 games/wk, flexible scheduling.
Training provided, previous experience and/
or sound baseball knowledge preferred. Pay
range $16-$24/game. ADULT SOFTBALL UM-
PIRES: April thru June. Games Tuesday and
Thursday evenings, 3-6 games/wk, flexible
scheduling. Previous experience and/or sound
slow pitch softball knowledge preferred. Pay
range $21-$23/game. Application deadline:
February 28, 2014. For an application contact
Human Resources, 301 West Main Street, Carr-
boro, NC 27510, 919-918-7342 or visit website
at www.townofcarrboro.org.. EOE.
Internships
LIGHT MESSAGES
PUBLISHING
Seeking highly dedicated intern to oversee ba-
sic marketing, sales, public relations tasks. Can
work remotely, some office time required. 35
hrs/mo. $10/hr. Resumes to books@lightmes-
sages.com. 919-886-5498.
MINDFULNESS AND MEDITATION: Reduce
stress, increase concentration and resilience.
4 session course for young adults starts
February 24, Carrboro. Register by 2/18.
www.thewellnessalliance.com/BreeKalb.html.
919-932-6262.
PERFECTION PERSONAL SHOPPING. Grocery
shopping service for busy professionals, el-
derly and college students. Will shop local
and specialty grocery stores. Please contact
go _shop@aol.com for rates.
Summer Jobs
POOL PROFESSIONALS IS hiring pool atten-
dants, lifeguards and managers for the sum-
mer. Contact Ali today at agreiner@poolpro-
fessionals.com to secure your summer job. Pay
is $8-$15/hr 919-787-7878.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: The Duke Fac-
ulty Club is hiring tennis and summer camp
counselors, lifeguards and swim instructors
for Summer 2014. Visit facultyclub.duke.
edu/aboutus/employment.html for more
information.
Travel/Vacation
BAHAMAS SPRING BREAK
$189 for 5 DAYS. All prices include: Round trip
luxury party cruise, accommodations on the
island at your choice of 13 resorts. Appalachia
Travel. www.BahamaSun.com, 800-867-5018.
Announcements For Rent Help Wanted Help Wanted Help Wanted Announcements
BR = Bedroom • BA = Bath • mo = month • hr = hour • wk = week • W/D = washer/dryer • OBO = or best offer • AC = air conditioning • w/ = with • LR = living room

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* All Immigration Matters *
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Interested
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Space?
Julia W. Burns, MD
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919-428-8461 • juliaburnsmd.com
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Law Office of Daniel A. Hatley
Best Wishes to the Tar Heels in 2013-2014!
dan@hatleylawoffice.com
151 E. Rosemary St., Ste. 205
www.hatleylawoffice.com
919-200-0822
Invision Resume Services
THE RESUME EXPERTS
888-813-2320 • info@invisionyourimage.com
Call Today & Save $25!
Get Interviews, Internships, & Job Offers...
UNC Community
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Individual & Group Rates from just $25/night
Beachfront Location with Bar & Restaurant
Drinking Age 18 • In-House Tours & Water Sports
Spend Spring Break in the Caribbean!
The Lazy Hostel • Vieques, Puerto Rico
lazyhostel.com•787-741-5555
Airport Shuttle Service
CLT • PTI • RDU
Triad Connection
Chapel Hill to RDU $30
Share Ride $25
9 19-6 19-8021
www.triad-connection.com
triadconnection 1@gmail.com
Announcements
For Rent
Help Wanted
Religious Directory
EPISCOPAL CAMPUS MINISTRY
Join us for dinner & fellowship!
Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m.
A Parish in the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina
Student Chaplain -The Rev.Tambria Lee
(tlee@thechapelofthecross.org)
304 E. Franklin St. Chapel Hill, NC
(919)929-2193 | www.thechapelofthecross.org
United Church of Chapel Hill:
Welcoming & Affirming
Open to EVERYONE
Social Justice • EQUALITY
Multi-cultural • Mutli-racial
Uniting - Just Peace Church .
-College Students Welcome-
Coffee Hour & Classes at 10:00 a.m.
Worship at 8:45am & 11:00am
Our Faith is over 2,000 years old
Our thinking is not
God is still speaking

MASS SCHEDULE
Saturday: 5:15pm
Sunday: 9am, 11am & Student Mass at 7pm
919-929-3730 • 218 Pittsboro St., CH
jrogers@upcch.org • 919-967-2311
110 Henderson St., Chapel Hill
• Thursdays Fellowship dinner
& program 5:45-8 PM
• Weekly small groups
• Sunday Worship at our six local Partner Churches.
• Trips to the NC mountains & coast as well
as annual spring break mission opportunities.
www.uncpcm.com
Presbyterian
Campus
Ministry
First Pentecostal Church
Days Inn, 1312 N. Fordham Blvd.
Worship
with Us :
WEDNESDAYS
at 7:30pm
Special Music & Singing in Each Service
For more details: 919 - 47 7- 6555
Johnny Godair, Pastor
Visit us in Durham at 2008 W. Carver St.
Sunday 10am & 6:30pm, Tuesday 7:30pm
Fun work environment & a great way to gain experience for future jobs.
Must be dependable and have a positive attitude. $10/hour + commissions.
Send resume to: 919-489-8788 or email: natalie@evergreensnc.com
Sales and Marketing SUPERSTAR!
2 full time positions available for Spring & Summer
(c) 2013 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is an 8 -- Group projects go well
now and for the next three weeks with
Mercury in Aquarius. Don’t sweat the
small stuff right now. Cuddle up with a
loved one and make some magic. What
could you create together?
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7 -- Resume your leadership
role. Schedule more carefully for the next
three weeks, as tests and challenges
can arise with Mercury in Aquarius. It’s
easier to get distracted. Maintain an
active social schedule, and stay in com-
munication.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is an 8 -- Increase the level of or-
ganization. Discuss philosophical ideas
and make long-range plans. The com-
munication style could change abruptly.
For about three weeks with Mercury in
Aquarius, you’ll be good at finding ways
around problems.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 9 -- Financial planning pro-
vides power. Figure out prices, and send
invoices. Track your earnings and revise
your budget. Review statements for er-
rors. For about three weeks with Mer-
cury in Aquarius, discover new sources
of revenue.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 9 -- Ask for counsel from a
master. Team communication reaches
a new level. For about three weeks
with Mercury in Aquarius, let your part-
ner take the lead. Negotiate creatively.
Many views give a broader picture.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7 -- Put technology to work in
new ways over the next few weeks. Dis-
cussions take on a more logical form. For
three weeks with Mercury in Aquarius,
your work gets more interesting, and
your cleverness shines.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is an 8 -- Work on creative writing,
art or music over the next three weeks
with Mercury in Aquarius. You’ll learn
new games and computer programs
quickly. Study with talented friends. Play
together, and gain new chops.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is an 8 -- Make up a list of intended
improvements. Make choices around
style, color and size or scale. For three
weeks with Mercury in Aquarius, you’ll do
your best thinking at home. Communicate
virtually, rather than traveling.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 9 -- Things seem easier to un-
derstand for the next few weeks, with
Mercury in Aquarius. Writing flows. You
get fascinated by complexities, and en-
tranced in analysis. Review the stats. Con-
sider how they affect business.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is an 8 -- Thoughts become more
logical, and there’s lots of money to be
made over the next three weeks, with
Mercury in Aquarius. Devise an earn-
ing strategy, and plot your course. Move
ahead confidently, with bold action.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 9 -- You’re more objective over
the next three weeks with Mercury in
Aquarius, and learn quickly. Begin a logi-
cal, rational cycle. Tell your personal story.
Get your partner involved. Discuss the di-
rection to move forward.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 9 -- Take more time for quiet
contemplation over the next three weeks,
with Mercury in Aquarius. Completion is
top priority. Your dreams are trying to tell
you something. Take notes on realizations
and insights. Meditate.
HOROSCOPES
To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.
If February 13th is Your Birthday...
Mercury backs retrograde into Aquarius today,
launching your next year with a month of reinven-
tion. Dive into research and practices to grow your
health and performance. A spring-cleaning provides
the backdrop for a new romantic stage around the
June 10 eclipse. Adventure will come - play safe.
MALE
VOLUNTEERS
WANTED!
Healthy Men 18-35 Years
of Age needed for:
Bacterial Disease
Research Study
PAYMENT
OFFERED
For information call:
919-843-9564
Services
How about a fresh start?
at Farrington Road Baptist Church
A Night of Forgiveness
Special Guest Speaker • Door Prizes
Refreshments • Music
5936 Farrington Road, Chapel Hill
919-489-5889 • farobap.com
Saturday, Feb. 15th, 6pm-8pm
MERCIA RESIDENTIAL
PROPERTIES
is now showing 1BR-6BR
properties for 2014-15 school
year. Check out our properties
at www.merciarentals.com
or call at (919) 933-8143.
Get a Jump Start on Housing for Next Year!
RECYCLE ME PLEASE!
NEED A PLACE TO LIVE?
www.heelshousing.com
Your search
for a place to live
just got easier.
www.heelshousing.com
Search for apartments by bus route, number of rooms,
price and even distance from the Pit!
2x3 Heelshousing - your search.crtr - Page 1 - Composite
www.heelshousing.com
NEED A PLACE TO LIVE? A GROCERY STORE? A LICENSE PLATE? A MECHANIC?
ALL THE LINKS & INFO YOU NEED TO SURVIVE IN CHAPEL HILL.
News Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Daily Tar Heel 9
Student to ambassador
President Obama nomi-
nates a UNC grad to be
ambassador of the Bahamas.
See pg. 3 for story.
Food truck mania
UNC created a food truck
program, and students are
eating it up. See pg. 3 for
story.
Social science research
Congress repealed past
restrictions on collegiate
research funding last month.
See pg. 3 for story.
Four for you, Glen Coco
Your loved one can be
serenaded with a donation
to the Jackson Center. See
pg. 7 for story.
games
Solution to
Wednesday’s puzzle
Complete the grid
so each row, column
and 3-by-3 box (in
bold borders) contains
every digit 1 to 9.
© 2014 The Mepham Group. All rights reserved.
Level: 1 2 3 4
(C)2014 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All rights reserved. Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Asian noodles
6 Quick looks
11 “The __”
14 Poke __ in
15 Game console button
16 __ polloi
17 “Sommersby” actress
19 1992 figure skating silver
medalist
20 What “will be” will be?
21 Actress Dolores __ Rio
22 Post-blizzard creation
24 “The Federalist Papers”
co-writer
27 Part of UNLV
28 Shortcut, perhaps
33 Kobe’s home
36 Energy
37 Environmental sci.
38 Hosp. areas
39 Freaked out
43 Org. for analysts
44 Dickens clerk
46 __ Aviv
47 Plant
circulatory
tissue
49 Measure
used by
navigators
53 Some govt.
lawyers
54 Kind of
memory
58 Golfer and
his buddy,
say
62 Barbecue
item
63 Never, in
Nuremberg
64 Trash holder
65 Packaged produce buy,
and a literal description
of the ends of 17-, 28-,
39- and 49-Across
68 Word before or after blue
69 Paris pupil
70 Picture
71 “Mr. __ Passes By”:
Milne play
72 A.J. Foyt, e.g.
73 Flies alone
DOWN
1 Hindi for “king”
2 Now, in Nicaragua
3 Surfing equipment
4 Ransom __ Olds
5 Locker room exchange
6 Opening words
7 Some RPI grads
8 Body shop figs.
9 Sharp
10 Easy pace
11 Playfully kooky
12 Minute amount
13 Utah national park
18 Crumbly cheese
23 Corduroy ridge
25 Biographer Tarbell
26 Extended short story
29 Singer/actress Peeples
30 Energize, with “up”
31 “Not a chance”
32 Character actor Jack
33 Doe in many films
34 Specialty
35 Lewis Carroll, for one
40 Non-Rx
41 Museum funding org.
42 Bookplate words
45 Educ. collaborators
48 As of now
50 Glucose, to fructose
51 Geese : gaggle : crows :
__
52 Beatnik’s “Gotcha”
55 “Barry Lyndon” actor
56 Musical nickname
related to jewelry
57 Survey answers
58 Cook’s meas.
59 Collaborative Web
project
60 Kunis of “Black Swan”
61 Corporate VIP
66 Holiday starter
67 Rock genre
MFA students showcase
art in exhibition series
DTH/KATIE WILLIAMS
Lile Stephens’ MFA thesis exhibition “Operating Systems”is on display in Hanes Art Center until Friday.
By Rupali Srivastava
Staff Writer
The Master of Fine Arts
program at UNC has attract-
ed artists from all around the
world, ranging from South
Korea to Arkansas to New
York City.
Now, in preparation for
graduation in May, nine of
these second-year student
artists will showcase their
work in their own weeklong
exhibit in the John and June
Allcott Gallery in Hanes Art
Center. The series of nine
exhibits, titled Aesthetic
Conditions, began Monday
and will end in mid-April.
Second-year MFA student
Minjin Kang, who special-
izes in photography, said she
was looking forward to the
opportunity to exhibit her art,
which she’s spent more than a
year creating.
“I’ve traveled to probably
at least 20 places in Chapel
Hill and all over the state to
take these pictures,” the South
Korea native said. “So I’m
excited for people to see them
in the gallery.”
Kang said that while pre-
paring her work and creating
art at UNC, she has received
a lot of helpful support from
faculty.
What she likes most about
the program here, she said, is
her relationship with faculty
and how encouraging and
supportive they have been of
her work.
Fellow MFA student and
professional artist Michael
Bramwell also said he found
the faculty very helpful.
“Many of them have galler-
ies, and many of them show
in the art world, so when
they teach, they’re not just
teaching from a theoretical
perspective,” the New York
native said. “They have prac-
tical experience that I can
relate to, and that’s been very
helpful.”
For some students, success
in the program depends most
upon self-discipline.
MFA student Lile Stephens
of Arkansas said he appreci-
ated how far faculty go to
communicate with students.
“All of our faculty are very
accessible, and a lot of the
really good feedback comes
from one-on-one interactions
with them,” he said.
“But it’s really centered
around being a self-disci-
plined artist.”
Stephens’s exhibit is the
first of the series to be on
display at the Allcott Gallery,
and will remain there until
Friday.
Stephens’s work utilizes
older pieces of technology
— which he said many call
obsolete — and finds alter-
nate functions that will allow
people to see them in new
ways.
He creates art installations
involving video and outdated
electronics, and uses many
resources provided by the
University, such as studios,
digital cameras, audio equip-
ment and even a new laser
cutter.
Bramwell, who teaches an
art course at the undergrad-
uate level like other second-
year MFA students, said
the University’s resources
helped him to create work
as well.
“I take full advantage of
the design lab, the media
resource center, things like
that, to produce videos and
photographs and all of other
stuff I do,” he said.
His exhibit will emphasize
the importance of language
through visual art. Even after
practicing as a professional
artist for 21 years, Bramwell
said he thought he might have
more to formally learn about
art and its history, which is
why he returned to school to
complete his MFA.
Tennessee
aims to offer
community
college for free
By Lindsey Brunson
Staff Writer
Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam
unveiled a plan to offer high
school graduates two years
of free community college
education in his State of the
State address last week — but
higher education analysts are
skeptical that a similar pro-
gram would work in North
Carolina.
Haslam, a Republican,
dubbed the initiative the
Tennessee Promise, which
he said could be paid for via
state lottery money.
“We are fighting the rising
cost of higher education, and
we are raising our expecta-
tions as a state,” Haslam said.
“We are committed to making
a clear statement to families
that education beyond high
school is a priority in the state
of Tennessee.”
But N.C. education ana-
lysts said the promise might
not be all that it seems.
George Leef, the direc-
tor of research for the John
William Pope Center for
Higher Education Policy, a
right-leaning nonprofit in
Raleigh, said a plan for free
community college would
not be a good idea in North
Carolina, Tennessee or any-
where else.
“The problem with making
education free is that people
are apt to value it less, take
it less seriously, if they don’t
have something of their own
at stake in it,” Leef said. “We
shouldn’t artificially encour-
age people.”
Warren Nichols, the vice
chancellor of community
colleges for the Tennessee
Board of Regents, said he was
excited about the governor’s
proposal. He said the plan is
an opportunity for more stu-
dents to attend community or
technical colleges, which he
said most high schoolers in
the state deem unaffordable
at $4,000 a year.
“They just don’t have that
kind of resources or money,”
he said.
Still, Nichols said the plan
is not just “free money.” While
any graduating high school
senior can apply for the pro-
gram, he said each student
must work with a mentor to
maintain successful academic
standing in community col-
leges and complete a mini-
mum of eight community
service hours each semester.
Terry Stoops, direc-
tor of education studies
at the right-leaning John
Locke Foundation in North
Carolina, said while he
thinks Haslam had correctly
identified the problem, his
Tennessee Promise is not
necessarily the best solution.
He said it is unlikely that any
similar policies will be pro-
posed in North Carolina.
“I think the idea of utiliz-
ing community college to
enhance the skills and knowl-
edge of the workforce is a
good plan, and I think North
Carolina should think along
those lines,” Stoops said. “But
this specific plan is not for
North Carolina.”
Stoops said even if North
Carolina implemented a
similar program, the state
would not currently be able
to fund it because of the ris-
ing cost of Medicaid and Gov.
Pat McCrory’s plan to raise
teacher salaries.
While Haslam proposed
that the state’s lottery reserve
fund pay for the Tennessee
Promise through an endow-
ment, Stoops expressed con-
cern at the sustainability of
this funding.
“The problem with lottery
revenue is that it fluctuates so
much,” Stoops said. “Because
it’s such an unstable revenue
source, it really isn’t a very
good one to rely upon for a
program, especially one that
requires multiple years of
implementation.”
state@dailytarheel.com
Some experts doubt
such a plan would be
feasible in N.C.
Stephens said he wants
to be an art educator after
graduating, and agreed that
the program has allowed him
to learn beyond just artistic
skill.
“I think the combination
of having artistic ability and
having learned and practiced
a direct conceptual approach
to teaching will really prepare
me for a competitive job mar-
ket,” he said.
For now, however,
Stephens said he was excited
about the exhibit, and hoped
people would be interested in
seeing old technology work in
unique ways.
“Hopefully, people will be
interested and come out,” he
said. “It’s a weird, crazy, tech-
no universe in that space.”
arts@dailytarheel.com
SEE THE SERIES
Time: Now through April
18
Location: Allcott Gallery,
Hanes Art Center
Info: art.unc.edu
Going Out?
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Opinion Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Daily Tar Heel 10
Established 1893, 120 years of editorial freedom
QUOTE OF THE DAY
FEATURED ONLINE READER COMMENT
Class cancellation
was poorly handled
TO THE EDITOR:
I am writing to voice
my displeasure about the
nature of the Alert Carolina
message sent Wednesday
morning.
Firstly, the original mes-
sage on http://unc.edu was
unclear, leaving many stu-
dents unsure as to whether
Thursday classes were can-
celled all day or only until
11 a.m.
When Alert Carolina
sent out the email clarify-
ing that Thursday classes
had cancelled until 11 a.m.
unless stated otherwise, I
wasn’t alone in my bewil-
derment.
Students all over cam-
pus were left wondering
why a forecast of 3-5
inches of snow and almost
an inch of ice throughout
the area that was sup-
posed to continue falling
through Thursday wasn’t
enough to cancel classes
for the day.
It is very clear that the
town of Chapel Hill is
inadequately equipped to
handle such a snowstorm,
particularly in time for
classes past 11 a.m. on
Thursday.
We don’t live in New
York City, where a fleet of
countless snowplows is
ready at any moment to
deal with a winter storm.
This is sunny Chapel
Hill.
Let’s be realistic here.
Cars are littered all over
the roads here, with many
of them being abandoned.
This isn’t just a classic
case of a student calling
for classes to be cancelled
at the first sight of a snow-
flake — this is a serious
snowstorm, at least for
Chapel Hill, and appropri-
ate measures need to be
taken.
Leaving the status of
class in limbo until offi-
cials have time to get a
better feel for the condi-
tions of the road is unnec-
essary.
Spoiler alert — the
roads are still going to be
in bad, if not undrivable,
shape.
Failing to cancel all
Thursday classes imme-
diately was a shortsighted
move that just serves to
inconvenience students and
faculty who are stuck at
home on Wednesday won-
dering whether they have
to complete their work for
Thursday.
Mary Yount ‘15
Communications
Journalism
A rivalry perspective
from down under
TO THE EDITOR:
Coming from Perth,
Western Australia, we have
our fair share of heated
sporting rivalries.
The Ashes, Cricket’s old-
est test match series, was
recently won by Australia
5-0.
After being humiliated
by the English the last
two times and being the
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
“Are you going to serve finger sandwiches,
too? I don’t remember this kind of treatment
when I was at UNC.”
NClaw441, on students being allowed to wait inside the Smith Center
“... You want to raise the question, ‘Did they
want to play us tonight with a Dean Dome
packed full of students?”
Chase Edwards, on Duke not being able to make it to the game
EDITORIAL CARTOON By Mark Viser, mviser@email.unc.edu
Love is
like the
stock
market
L
ove is like the stock
market: fickle in the
short term and gainful
in the long term.
If love really is like the
stock market, who better to
ask about success in love than
somebody who’s succeeded in
the stock market? Enter David
Gardner, a 1988 Morehead-
Cain UNC alumnus and co-
founder of The Motley Fool, an
investment advisory company.
David, who spoke to a
packed lecture hall at UNC
last March, knows a thing or
two about winning in the stock
market: Since 2002, he has
achieved an unbelievable 233
percent return on his stock
investments (as compared with
the market’s average return of
47.1 percent).
Imagine if you found a
partner whom you loved 233
percent more today than 12
years ago?
If we apply Gardner’s wis-
dom on stock investing to love,
you could find such a partner.
I interviewed Gardner on how
to succeed in love by applying
proven stock investment tactics.
First off, here’s how Gardner
feels that love is like the stock
market: “Once you’ve bought in,
it’s all about holding from there.
People who sell (love) a lot won’t
get much satisfaction.”
Just like stocks don’t make
us money after days, but rather
after years, love does not form
overnight. Day traders who
buy and sell stocks willy-nilly
are sure to lose their socks,
while patient investors like
Gardner trust each stock’s
ability to generate long-term
wealth. If you want a love part-
ner, don’t keep trading around:
Pick somebody and get to
know him or her.
I asked Gardner why he
decided to marry early out of
college and how he spotted
winning stocks like Netflix and
Amazon in their early days —
how do you find love so early?
“Usually, among the first-
movers you find some big-time
winners. Members of the oppo-
site sex prized as potentially
very valuable lifetime mates
will be in high demand early on
and like any kind of draft, will
often be early picks. Similarly, in
business, the first-movers — the
companies that get going fast
and strong early — often wind
up the long-term winners.”
According to Gardner, it
sounds like Beyonce was right
after all: “If you liked him then
you should’ve put a ring on
it.” Don’t wait too long, or Mr.
Right will be Mr. Taken!
Despite all this, love is not
exactly like the stock market:
An important part of stock
investment is diversification,
aka buying stocks from several
companies to minimize risk.
The marriage market, au con-
traire, hinges on non-diverse
monogamy (hence the divorces).
Gardner’s take: “The better
you truly know your stock — or
potential spouse — the more
likely you’ve got a winning
long-term investment, the less
likely you’re going to be sur-
prised by bad news.” Gardner
also said in stocks “you’re
buying the people who run
the business. The corollary in
romance is that you’re not just
marrying your spouse-to-be —
you’re marrying his/her family.
They count; it all counts.” Time
to meet the parents, y’all.
Whether you’re smitten on
Feb. 14 or Sept. 21, invest in
long-term love.
2/14: EL CAMINOCAROLINE
Caroline Leland on being a
vegetarian while abroad.
N
E
X
T
Glenn Lippig
Common Economics
Junior economics and food studies
major from Raleigh.
Email: lippig@live.unc.edu
SPEAK OUT
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• Edit: The DTH edits for space, clarity, accuracy and vulgarity. Limit
letters to 250 words.
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Hill, N.C. 27514
• E-mail: opinion@dailytarheel.com
product of a penal colony
under British rule, we have
learned to channel that
loathing of England into
our intensely contested
sporting encounters with
them.
However, as a young
UNC student coming all
the way from the landdown
under, no hype video, Dick
Vitale Game Day mono-
logue or ESPN special
could detail what I walked
into when arriving in God’s
country, otherwise known
as Chapel Hill.
The hatred, loathing
and disdain for that school
up the road from us can
only be experienced in
last second heartbreaks,
full game blow-out wins,
National Championship
victories and rushes of
Franklin Street.
The collective passion
of alumni, boosters, cur-
rent students and faculty
culminates in a 40 minute
game just twice a year —
sometimes more if we are
lucky — two 20 minute
halves, 12 men rotations,
five timeouts and two
coaches that boils down to
the greatest rivalry in all
of college sports.
Coming to school in
Chapel Hill was the great-
est decision of my life, and
whenever I return home to
this small slice of paradise
below the Mason-Dixon
Line, I thank the Lord that
I chose the greatest shade
of blue that ever existed!
It’s forever a great day
to be a Tar Heel and, as
always, GO TO HELL
DOOK!
Craig Knight ‘11
King Perth, Western
Australia
A look back at fresh-
man housing
TO THE EDITOR:
A recent article entitled
“South Campus Dorms lim-
ited to Freshmen” brought
me back to my time in
Chapel Hill.
As I remember, back in
the bronze age when Craige
and Ehringhaus Residence
Halls opened in the early
1960’s, they were exclu-
sively for freshmen.
They were reserved for
freshmen because, at the
time, these dormitories
were the farthest from
campus, out in the boonies
all by themselves the
woods.
In addition, Ehringhaus
had a cafeteria, and was a
primary location for ath-
lete housing.
Craige and Ehringhaus
quickly developed a reputa-
tion as the most hell-raising
dorms on campus and
maybe even the entire
southeast.
The damage was amaz-
ing.
As a result, both dorms
were opened to upper-
classmen the next year
as the Department of
Housing and Residential
Education admitted a
huge mistake.
Maybe this time the
presence of women may
alter things. that should be
interesting — or not.
F. Marion Redd ‘67
Hillsborough, NC
VIEWPOINTS
I
t doesn’t make sense to invest money in
passenger trains beyond basic renova-
tions. As the NCDOT looks to cut costs,
it should do its best to remove funds from
the seldom used passenger trains so that they
may be used for more practical freight trains.
Many people are unaware that the state is
home to two passenger trains because very
few people use the railways as their principal
means of travel. Putting money into market-
ing strategies and new features to increase
ridership is wasting the state’s delicate
resources that could easily be used in much
more effective ways.
I’d love to see North
Carolina have an expan-
sive high-speed rail sys-
tem. The environmental
benefits would be tre-
mendous, not to mention
the significant abatement
in highway traffic. But
our country is simply not
suited for this model of
travel that works so well
in Europe.
Many people will always prefer to drive,
despite the cost. Those that don’t have access
to a car will continue to use other forms of
public transportation, even for long dis-
tances. People often consider taking a bus to
New York rather than paying for a flight, but
when was the last time you heard of someone
taking the train? Despite that, the Carolinian
train makes that long trip every single day.
And investing more in passenger trains
may be detrimental to the enormously suc-
cessful freight train industry in America,
which removes the need for hundreds of
cargo trucks on the highways. Congestion on
train tracks would result in slower and fewer
freight trains. It’s essentially creating a new
service and expecting demand to appear,
while taking away a service that has seen suc-
cess for decades.
If anyone insists on traveling by rail,
they’re always welcome to hop a freight train.
A
s NCDOT begins a study on alter-
natives to reduce costs in rail oper-
ations, officials should also con-
sider methods to improve revenue through
increased ridership. A well supported and
widely used railway system has environ-
mental and safety benefits that should not
be denied to North Carolina.
The traffic on our roads is increasing
every day — this is a growing hassle, a grow-
ing danger and a growing detriment to both
our health and the environment. While
there is no denying that the railway system
has an environmental
impact, its impact is
substantially less than
the alternatives of road
and air travel. Trains pol-
lute up to 85 percent less
than aircrafts.
The construction of
parallel tracking will
allow freight and pas-
senger trains to run on
separate tracks and thus
substantially lessen the
delays that are at times a burden to riders.
While this is a step in the right direction,
the NCDOT rail division will have to further
improve the riding experiencing if it expects
to attract customers away from their cars.
Adding Wi-Fi services to trains has been
suggested and should be implemented, but
NCDOT should not stop there.
Merely increasing resources in terms of
the marketing of trains could be an invest-
ment that’s benefits far outweigh the costs
in the long run. The correlation between
effective marketing strategies and increased
ridership is legitimate and it’s time that
North Carolina takes notice in order to tap
into this greatly underutilized resource.
These improvements could cause ticket
prices to increase, but if the product is worth
the cost, customers will always be there and
increase ridership on trains, is nothing but
good for the state.
THE ISSUE: The North Carolina Department of Transportation has recently
received funding to improve the safety of the state’s railways. It will also begin
a study to look for alternative way to cut costs across all of its railway opera-
tions while also maintaining ridership.
Don’t support a
system that can
not succeed.
Don’t pass on
passenger
trains.
Alex Willcox
Editorial board
member
Trey Bright
Editorial board
member
As the Olympic games
continue, so does the slow
degeneration of
Bob Costas’ eyes.
Costas has been
removed from
broadcasting
after he contracted a nasty
case of conjunctivitis. He is
reportedly receiving the tra-
ditional Russian treatment
which involves local herbs,
something called “tooth
cheese”and lots of vodka.
QuickHits
The Olympics didn’t have a
competition monopoly this
week as canines
of all breeds
vied to be top
dog at the West-
minter Kennel
Club Dog Show. Sky, a fox
terrier, beat out multiple
mop-like dogs to win best
in show. Despite being a
total bitch, Sky was gracious
in victory allowing the los-
ers to still smell her butt.
In an anticlimax, elections
will move on to a runof
election be-
tween Andrew
Powell and
Emilio Vincente.
Once again
students did not listen the
DTH’s endorsement, forcing
us to not only question the
continued efectiveness of
print media but also our
purpose in life as well. These
are dark times.
Pink eye Here we go again Dog days are over
North Carolina is once
again staring Armageddon
in the face as
multiple inches
of snow de-
scend upon us.
Streets have be-
come parking lots as many
abandon their cars. Oddly,
milk and bread remain on
the shelves of local stores
while everywhere has al-
ready completely sold out
of any type of alcohol.
White Out
The chillest of Olympians,
Sage Kotsenburg, won the
men’s snow-
board slopestyle
competition,
netting the frst
gold for the U.S.
He did so by pulling of a
“Back 16 Japan.”Despite our
assumptions, we have been
assured that this is actually
a thing and Kotsenburg has
yet to sell his medal for a
totally rad dream catcher.
Gnarly, dude
After the tragedy that was
Phillip Seymour Hofman’s
death, the world
has lost another
great with the
death of Shirley
Temple. In
addition to acting, Temple
was known for her work as
an ambassador to Ghana.
People the world over will
be pouring out Fourties
and Sprite and Grenadine in
remembrance.
Heidi
EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS
NICOLE COMPARATO EDITOR, 962-4086 OR EDITOR@DAILYTARHEEL.COM
ZACH GAVER OPINION EDITOR, OPINION@DAILYTARHEEL.COM
DYLAN CUNNINGHAM ASSISTANT OPINION EDITOR
EDITOR’S NOTE: Columns, cartoons and letters do not necessarily
represent the opinions of The Daily Tar Heel or its staff. Editorials reflect
the opinions of The Daily Tar Heel editorial board, which is made up of
eight board members, the opinion editor and the editor.
ALEXANDRA WILLCOX
DYLAN CUNNINGHAM
GABRIELLA KOSTRZEWA
KERN WILLIAMS
DAVIN ELDRIDGE
MAHMOUD SAAD
SIERRAWINGATE-BEY
TREY BRIGHT