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I worked my way pretty close to the front and Glen Tipton and KK Downing were killing it. but tracked through a bunch of old Telefunken v76’s and RCA tube preamps.This new album is a return to my metal roots. and Randy Rhoads on the ‘Blizzard of Ozz’ tour sealed the deal. It really makes my previous efforts sound very demo-ish. and some Manley mics that sounded great.Just part and parcel of the day-to-day existence of Bruce Bouillet. Bruce lays out his influences. I’m very excited to release this one. as well as using classic mics. TS: You’ve got a new instrumental album in the works… Could you give us some details? BB: Well it’s got Glen Sobel on drums. All the final dubs were done at my writing room in north Hollywood. due out this summer. I’ve taken my time to really put together something a bit more thought-out. some guitar and strings. and myself on guitars. . We tracked the basics at my friend Willie Basse’s studio in Burbank. This would have been around the late 70’s. The Sound: Can you tell our readers about the new cd? Bruce Bouillet: Yes. such as AKG c 12’s . TS: So what was the moment that hooked you into becoming a serious musician? BB: I think I was around thirteen.Plus having a couple years to practice stepped up my chops considerably. and Dave Foreman on bass. In a sit-down with The Sound. Seeing Van Halen on the ‘Women and Children First’ tour.Bruce Bouillet A veteran of the G3 tour. and I saw Judas Priest open up for Kiss. and dishes on his latest release. It should be released around late July early August. I walked out of the arena that night knowing that I was going to be a guitarist. So to say the least. ‘Unleashed in the East’-era Priest.. Heaviest record I’ve probably ever made. and a Grammy winning producer who rubs shoulders with some of music’s biggest stars on a regular basis. gear. a former member of Racer-X.. We monitored through an old Neve desk.

in order to write and demo stuff for this album. And that has stayed with me as an additional influence and motivator to make something really special. So it’s usually more about finding performances that I’ve never seen or artists that I never got exposed to. This was when it was above the Hollywood Wax Museum on Hollywood Blvd.. we were on our way up to the bay area to record the Racer-X album Second Heat. I got asked to join the band. when he was your teacher. And after filling out the entrance questions stacked in favor of Paul being my private instructor of course. TS: You met Paul Gilbert at GIT. BB: Well the first day I got to Hollywood. and would be surrounded by some really heavy progressive metal. I walked into the main performance hall when the original Racer-X line up was performing the ‘Street Lethal’ album for graduation performance credits.TS: What are some records or songs that you go back to for inspiration? BB: Well there is so much new and old music on the internet that is easily accessed these days that I rarely touch my music collection. We would try stuff in harmony and it did sound good right out of the gate. and that feeling of real appreciation from the audience and all the great players in all the bands. Shortly after that. I would also have to add that Paul Gilbert asked me to join him for a Japan tour and also a full tour of the US and Canada on the 2007 G3 tour… Hard to describe! All I can say is that it was one of the best times I’ve ever had on tour. He was a VERY aggressive player. By chance. and that appealed to me. His approach was sort of an over-the-top- from-the-start-to-the-finish type of thing. So some time in between September or October I went and ran lights for the original line up of Racer-X at the Waters Club in Long Beach. I had about four of five months once a week for a half an hour to learn some of his ideas and sequences. I went by GIT to check out the school. Within a couple of months.. Inspiration for the new album also came from me moving into various rehearsal rooms around Los Angeles. correct? Tell us about it. It was great. It had to be some kind of luck of the draw but these were some really good bands and players. . I moved into a few of these 24hr rehearsal lockouts. and death metal bands. I couldn’t believe how good Paul was. It made me want to do something heavy and hard hitting. Just the whole vibe of that tour was great. and a couple of weeks later Scott Travis joined the band.

certainly one . But I felt too good about just having a great show and what we had accomplished in a very short period of time to be mad about it all. we were recording a new album. It was good times and it was great to be involved in something that had the ability to push the envelope a little. and the newly acquired Ibanez ad campaign. Big. The biggest reason is because at that point in time my left hand was still blown out from the RacerX days and I had rarely picked up a guitar. TS: When Racer X reformed in 1999.do full time. that I was able to start playing for real again. California. and that wasn’t going to big enough to really till 2005 after some technique reforming and years of research into carpal tunnel and tendonitis. It wouldn’t be TS: Amazing that you ended up as a member of the incredible Racer X . you chose not to return with them. I think we reached the peak of what it was going to be. we were selling out some of the bigger clubs on the west coast. money-wise. So there was no way I was going to try and play in at that time. we rehearsed a lot. much less really practiced for about 7 years prior to that. and within a month or so of its release. We all knew that we were breaking up as a band.got any stories you want to share about it? BB: It was very fast-paced. and there were quite a few shows. So really. Why? BB: Well there are a couple good reasons why. I still couldn’t believe I had got to experience that. Sadly we all knew the band’s time was limited. My last really good memory of RacerX was being backstage after playing to a sold-out show at the Omni theater in Oakland. Within months of joining the band.how was that? BB: It was great. the best thing happened and we were able to go out on top of our game as far as the band was concerned. nearing the end. I personally thought it to be one of the best Racer-X albums. and that Paul was forming Mr. TS: You did do the mixing on their Superheroes album .

and Zakk had just laid down the finished solo. Also... so I’m using a 57 into a TLA tube preamp. So I got to work with everyone from Paul Stanley to Roger Daltrey. to Steve Stevens. we had just finished the HHH theme song for the WWE months prior. Lee.. their picks were. the whole Grammy thing was not that important. it went from Joe Coolie to Anthrax. TS: You won a Grammy for your production and mixing on Motorhead’s cover of Whiplash. Working with Bruce Kulick we did 11 plus tribute albums each. given that they have more tracks to record. having the amp head in the control room will increase your ability to fine tune. or being at Sound City when R. to Ted Nugent. If it sounds good. odds are. Then into API 312’s or NEVE 1073’s then summed together on to a track. Well the track won the Grammy. I don’t have that luxury at my current studio.I’ve gotten to work with more big-name people than I could have ever imagined just from being in the studio and knowing other artists or producers...to say the least . although two 57’s work great as does 57 and the AKG 414.M. pretty much at that point in time there were no rookies in the room.etcetera.. Winning the Grammy. it’s rare if drummer Mickey Dee doesn’t get it on the first take. So I take it for what it is.. great players + great songs = great record. I’ll use two mics.. I can name plenty of artists that have influenced me in many ways that will never be mentioned on the Grammys. Did I go? No.. if I have the gear available.of Jeff Martin’s best vocal performances on record. and a lot of stuff in between. At my studio.. Ronnie Dio. Slayer.. TS: What are some of your favorite miking and mixing techniques for electric guitars? BB: Standard stuff. usually Shure 57 and a Royer 121. Recording up at London Bridge in Seattle..members of Helmet. The trick with recording guitars is moving the mic or mics till a good sound is achieved. by Metallica. mixing. It was a fairly simple record to mix. it is good... Tony Levin. As a general rule of thumb. all of Motorhead are very quick in the studio.not always great in my opinion.. And Lemmy and Phil are equally as fast. I mean come on. Who makes the decision who is best? I do know that in the prior years. etc. Vinney Caleuta. Edgar Winter.A.I think that was at Devonshire studios. TS: What other artists have you recorded or mixed? BB: I have been very fortunate as far as engineering. Ben Harper to Buckcherry. it was a little unexpected.. Jake E.. TS: What’s your current rig setup? BB: At the moment it would . you know? Thank you for noticing. with 50 different name players. I can remember standing next to Ozzy listening to the playback of the No More Tears.. I don’t know who these people are. and producing in the studio.. Got any good Lemmy stories? What was winning a Grammy like? BB: Well... was recording their first album. Your ear is your best weapon in the studio. for me. now I’m going back to work on some new music.. Suicidal Tendencies. Yup..T. Aynsley Dunbar. This was also the fifth or sixth time for me to work with them.

Leave your name and number and I will call you back with available times.be an early 80’s Mark 4 Mesa Boogie. Seymour Duncan. TC Electronics. I first saw this player named Jeff Kollman playing one at the Baked Potato. Boss. 2009) . For more information on Bruce and his upcoming and current projects. strung with d’ Adarrio XPs and a few stompboxes. I was impressed by the stuff I saw so I met with them at the recent NAMM show and played some models they brought over. goes directly to a voice mail. and a 1978 Ibanez pf300 both loaded with Seymour Duncan JB’s. And they played great! Interesting fact is. TS: You’re an active teacher in LA as well as via Skype . TS: You’ve got the last word. Fulltone.Autographed Charity Edition” (2006) Solo Unspoken (2007) Interventions (2008) Interventions (Japan Release.how can our readers find you for lessons? BB: This number. He turned me on to the company. I have a 1978 Les Paul standard. 818 209 8028. BB: Well I’m thinking this new album will sum it up best. I don’t own a guitar with a bar so this pedal allows me to have similar effects. that they were the company that made the early 80’s Squier Strats from Japan.myspace. please visit him at www. TS: Have you found any new guitar or recording equipment that has inspired you lately? BB: Well this company in Japan named Fujigen is building me a guitar.com/brucebouillet ~ X ~ Discography With Racer X Second Heat (1987) Extreme Volume Live (1988) Extreme Volume II Live (1992) With The Scream Let It Scream (1991) With DC-10 Co-Burn (1995) With Paul Gilbert solo King of Clubs (1998) Flying Dog (1998) With The Bottom Dwellerz “Cracks Of The Concrete” (2006) “Old New Orleans . Digitech. There is also the Boss Supershifter that I use a lot. and that’s it.

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Up Close. and I was happy to get some other people to come in like Jonny Lang. We cut about 23 pieces and 15 of them weren’t done. one of those kinds of things that came pretty quick. and his newest creation. The Sound gets down with the Texas axe-slinger extraordinairre on studios. I just had an idea.Up Close & personal. The Sound: Tell us about the new record Up Close? Eric Johnson: Yeah. Yeah.. Jimmie Vaughan. What is the story behind this song? EJ: That was like an instrumental. touring. Sonny Landreth. it was kind of like a new thing with 15 pieces. I just had some dudes come in and help. TS: The song “Gem” from the new record is one of my favorite tracks. and Steve Miller. there really wasn’t a lot of sweat of that one. Once I laid © Max Crace . It was kind of cool to have some other people put their own designs into it..

It has an actual vocal melody thing. Yeah. I said I liked that pinch kind of popjazz kind of thing it had to it and it’s kind of fun. but I just turned it into an instru- mental as well. I never do kind of get the lyrics. Was that by design or did it just happen that way? EJ: That was a thing © Max Crace .I just started working with Clint Black to write a country tune together that was kind of interesting. you have two fellow Texans appear on with you. TS: Let’s talk a little about some of the other tracks such as “Soul Surprise”. and I just made the moment with a bunch of first-take chordal stuff in the background. you can hear it in the background. then at the very last minute I put “Fatdaddy” together and recorded it and had it mixed. The song was just kind of hanging around for a few years. “Brilliant Room” was something I wrote with Bill Maddox and he wrote the lyrics to it. so I just leave it with the scratch part with no words and just double the guitar and turn it into an instrumental. EJ: “Soul Surprise” is the one I enjoyed. TS: What is the story behind “Fatdaddy”? EJ: Well. so I just tried to just turn the song into an instrumental. but I finished the record. you did the Electric Flag cover ‘Texas’. TS: Continuing with Up Close. and I hadn’t really had all the pieces to. just as an afterthought at the end of the record process just because I wanted to get more instrumental guitar stuff on the record. There is a scratch piece singing along with the track so I left the lyrics in there with the guitar which is kind of weird. It’s kind of like the vocal piece and the lyric thing didn’t work out. “On The Way” and “Brilliant Room”. it was a lick. And the country tune. The record seemed a little imbalanced and didn’t seem to be enough hard rock stuff on it. Steve Miller on vocals and Jimmie Vaughan on guitar.the 3-piece track down I just had fun with it overdubbin’ stuff. which interestingly enough.

TS: A follow up to ‘Texas’; there are very few people under the age of 50 who are familiar with Electric Flag… What prompted you to record that song? EJ: Other than Steve wanting to sing ‘Texas’ it was one of my favorite blues songs as a kid. In my younger days I listened to Electric Flag frequently, I just loved that song. TS: There are similarities between your rendition of ‘Texas” and Jimi Hendrix’s ‘Red House’, was that by design, or was that how Electric Flag recorded it? EJ: No the original wasn’t like that, it was our interpretation of it; I guess that›s what happens when you get 3 Texans who love the blues together. TS: Performing live, is there anything that you thought really grabbed the audience in any certain songs? EJ: Well, the majority of the audience seemed to like “GEM”. We are doing a piece by John Coltrane which features Chris, and Wayne, the new drummer, and is one of the highlights of the show. The drum solo everybody seems to love, and we play a song off of Venus Isle at the end of the night and that seems to be enjoyed as one of the higher moments of the show. We are just doing a variety of other peoples’ songs that are just reworked and rearranged.

The Sound Sound The
that just happened. I went to see Steve Miller play in Austin and Jimmie Vaughan was sitting in with him, and we got together after the show, and I asked them if they would like to go to my studio and cut something, to which they both agreed. In the studio, Steve said he wanted to sing ‘Texas’ so we recorded it with Steve doing the vocal and Jimmie doing a fine solo; it was one of those unplanned events that worked out very well!

that is good because I just didn’t do the same old thing. TS: You worked with Sonny Landreth on “Your Book”. How did you meet Sonny? EJ: Well, I met Sonny Landreth years ago, and there have been times where Sonny use to sit in with our band if we were in the same town together, and we hung out a little bit. He asked me if I would play on one of his records (if the opportunity came up) where he was actually having guest artists on it - Bill, and Eric Clapton, and maybe a few others and myself as well. It was fun to play with Sonny on that song called “Milky Way”. And he said, “Man, maybe you can come play on one of my own records at some point” and I said “yeah, that would be great.” “Your Book” is a song that I wrote for my dad when he passed away, and Sonny’s dad had been recently passed away as well, and we kind of blended with the lyrics of what the lyrics meant on that. TS: (to Sonny Landreth) Working on the song “Your Book” with Eric, Sonny, could you tell us a little bit about this song and how you met Eric? Sonny Landreth: Well, I first met Eric when he was playing in a small town outside of Lafayette and it was really brief. It was a long time ago. Eric and myself didn’t actually get to know each other until

TS: Since we just talked about some of the musicians on the record, can you tell us who produced it, and anybody else on the record?

that has worked with a multitude of people- he came in and helped mix stuff. And what he did was he kind of took it in a different place. He EJ: Malford Milligan sang on also did something different “Brilliant Room”, and Jason Es- to the guitar that I wouldn’t kridge played and did some vocals typically do, and in some ways on part of the record. Andy Johns,

many years later. We played here in Lafayette, and also at Eric Clapton’s Crossroads and the first one he did outside of Fort Worth. And we became friends over the years. I sat in with him and he would come and sit in with me. I have of course been an admirer of Eric’s for many years. When he called about the song and sent me a copy of it, I was deeply moved because I had lost my father recently, in fact, not too long before he sent it to me. It resonated with me, and that’s a profound thing to have the opportunity to be a part of; that was really touching for me. I found it an honor to work with Eric on a personal

level; we had a common thing introduced as “yeah, he’s a that we both shared, and it Texan in Arizona”, and everywas very meaningful for me. body was talking about vortexes. They were like “yeah, TS: Eric, the song “Vortexan” you’re kind of like a Vortexhas a real great feel. Tell us an!” and I was like “Great!” about this song, where the idea of the name came from, and the TS: Can you tell us about story about writing this song? how the tour is going, and any plans to go overseas? EJ: This song is kind of like a blues shuffle that I kind of EJ: We got off to a late kicked along like “Cat’s Squir- start in late December, but rel”, an old blues standard. In we just finished three weeks fact, it’s a lot like “Cat’s Squir- in the west part of the U.S. rel”, but it’s like a cross be- and then we are going out tween “Cat’s Squirrel” and me to the Midwest and the East ripping myself off the rights to Coast. And then we are going my song called “Righteous.” It’s to pick up some more dates kind of right between those two I think in early October. We blues songs. I was in Arizona are going to do some double visiting some friends and was bills with Sonny Landreth

To what do you attribute Jimi Hendrix’s music being so popular  40-plus years after his passing? Did you ever see him perform. I just wanted a real legit state-of-the-art recording studio. so it’s all rooms inside rooms where it’s done right and is isolated and everything.©2010 Max Crace in Texas.we are planning a definitive comprehensive tour of Europe for next summer. it’s going fine. EJ: Yeah. to go over there and do a whole full tour. I have the whole thing built!”. TS: On the topic of Jimi Hendrix. and after a while I was like “wow. there is an obvious influence and appreciation of Jimi Hendrix in your music. TS: Recently you have opened your own recording studio. and I did the whole re- cord there from start to finish. and also Louisiana. I would work on the studio. Tell us about the new studio. whatever the royalties would allow for me to do it. and if Jimi were around today and you had the op- . it’s a place that I started years ago and I built it from the ground up. And yeah. so I just spent years and years building it.

Wayne Salzmann.. what song would I with your family.. I didn›t get exposed to African music as you can now. I also brought back some drums.portunity to play with him make his music so timeless. I think it guitar god. and songs.. but we’re kind of back to that again. and doing gigs and stuff. We haven’t played together for a few years. unfortunately they didn›t survive the trip back. I think the reason if they get the opportunity. what song would you like to play with him? TS: Staying with influences. but I think more im.. which would rica did you travel through.I have only played with him for a few weeks. I’m trying to get back in the studio and work on a solo acoustic record as well as a new electric record. or any new instructional DVDs. TS: Any new plans for a tab book.can give kids a more tempered portantly he was a incredible perspective. I am doing some session work with other people on certain records. also what part of Afsomething new. I read that as a teenager you EJ: Oh man that’s a good travelled throughout Africa question. or doing live © Park Street . on stage. but there is so much of it now. He is a new addition and he is wonderful! We are having a great time.. TS: Are you doing any producing with other artists as well? EJ: Not right now. I brought back some kalimbas. I think there is a lot of great stuff that is beyond your perimeter that can make you more open minded. all of travel is one of the best forms his songs (laughter)! Actually I of education. well anybody’s eyes May 1970. Do you think like to play with Jimi. and never played with him before. I went through musician who wrote wonderful Zambia and South Africa. It’s why he is so popular is because like looking through the world he was such a great songwriter. with a telescope. and be fun to play on something did you acquire any musical new he was creating. I did see influences from your travels?  him perform twice and it was really wonderful. The drummer. writing.  various bass instruments made out of twine. TS: How long have you been with this particular band? EJ: I have played off and on with Chris (Maresh) the bass player. and realizing and his guitar playing is what the world is a lot bigger than our catapults him to that status of immediate problems. but mostly concentrating on this new band. and then in open kids. First time EJ: I think traveling can really was in late 1968. especially as a would like to jam with him on teenager. and that’s what visited a lot of the game parks there. I did get to hear some Zulu and other various tribal music.

and do much as it can be fun.don’t settle for just ing out pretty soon. TS: I understand that you had a great friendship and working relationship with Chet Atkins. going to try and do some But you cannot reinvent the more acoustic guitar stuff. whatever you do. new. and different that his music created a whole new way. Like when Jimi Hendrix came out I cannot even describe what it was like there wasn’t even anybody close to what he was doing. and TS: Is there anyone you’d some unique. playing what you think there will be some tab books you should. so that the world can practice art.performances or teaching? and to find some music and playing that EJ: Well. Jimi’s music was so whole. ect you are involved in other that some of us do the same then the new CD and tour? thing over and over and just EJ: No.” by John you on. P. it. could you share a favorite experience with Chet to our readers? .or have them go “Oh my God. I am en. so consequently with Stevie Wonder.C. TS: Is there a favorite song It can be laborious as of yours to play live.unique voice that turns joying doing “Mr. you perform any covers? You need to find that EJ: As far as covers. piring thoughts for the fu. wheel. And TS: Do you have any right now I am just enjoying thoughts on the muplaying pieces I don’t normally sic business today? (play). feed you. so you didn’t have as much history for this music to be over-saturated. you know? Coltrane at the moment. you TS: Could you describe how you want to get enough typically go about practicing? joy and passion reinvested out of it to EJ: I try to put in a few where you want it to hours a day practicing. not really. probably because I haven’t pop music as we know ran it into the ground yet. I’m just try to reinvent the wheel. and we run the especially like to play or col. there is so much music that it is hard to turn people’s head TS: Do you have any as. And yes.really inspires you structional thing coming out and gives you joy. I am enjoying playing “Fatdaddy” right EJ: I just think that now.what is this?” Just because ture guitarists of today? of the sheer volume.risk of not really having any laborate with someday? saying just revolutionizing the EJ: I’d love to work difference. Today. has been going on since the 50’s and 60’s. we have a new in. it is hard to create a whole new wave. When I was just (a kid) there was only EJ: Just try to find that niche a history of 15 years of guitarbased pop music. Because coming out from Up Close. So TS: Is there any other projmuch of pop has been done. Of my tunes. And on iPad and should be com. There is some beautiful stuff that comes out.

TS: You are known for being a remarkable guitar player. I thought that was kind of funny. and Trevor Rabin all have done soundtracks for motion pictures. He called me back on the phone and said: What is that you are doing. Anyways. you don’t sound like yourself. you already paid me. I just have to tell you one thing. and you need to redo that and sound like yourself. I like going waterskiing. just trying to get myself together as a person. And he sounded friend Steve Wariner.. it was wonderful.Don’t ever step in front of my car!” And I replied “Jerry. and different challenges for you? he put Jerry on the phone and EJ:  Oh yeah. TS: Do you especially have any hobbies outside of guitar and music? EJ: Just philosophy and spirituality. TS: Another fallen guitar TS: Have any moments hero of ours. when  I sent him the track I did. you’ve got to I was like “oh my God!” And make the song work with just Jerry said to me “Eric. It was one time. you did enough by letting me play on your record!” I didn’t want anything. there is somebody here have you ever done an acousthat you’d like to meet. He always encouraging and willing to give me advice or a tip..Jerry Reed… any with Johnny Hiland? special Jerry Reed moments? EJ: I only played with JohnEJ: I only have one and it’s ny on one show and I rekind of funny. on the song ‹Distant Star› and could we look forward to you and Steve working together again? EJ: I would love to work with Steve again. a guitar great. TS: Can you share one more of Chet Atkins moments with us? tars! And I still have that guitar. so a few weeks later I get a package in the mail.” And I was like “Are you kidding? I ain’t taking any money for music. I try and do more fingerpicking on those gigs. which helps bring out the melody and bass more. he is great! I love his acoustic playing as well.EJ: I recorded on one of Chet’s records and one of the songs went fine. and he had given me one his personal gui- . which was very nice. I just one guitar and you are out there have to tell you one thing. to enjoy the mysteries in life. I did the track. he was a perfect example of a great guitar player who was openminded to all styles of music. Would you ever like to “Eric. however it seems that your vocals are overlooked. Brian May. and hanging out with my girlfriend. he was good friends with Jerry. So he kinda of busted me on that. I want to send you your payment for playing on my record. I like hiking. and just try EJ: I remember one moment where I played on one of his records.. player in Nashville. and he called me on his record and he said “well. That in itself to me is more important than music.you are my hero.” And I tic tour and does it present was like “Really? Who?”. he TS: I know you play a couple of called me one day and he said acoustic songs on this tour.” by yourself. what’s that?” And he said “don’t ever step in front of my car!” So. My great. TS: Jimmy Page. and the other one I did I  was so enamoured with the fact that I was recording with Chet that it was me copying Chet Atkins. I only met Jerry ally enjoyed that. over the phone. and being at the lake. What was it like to do vocals on Steve Morse›s 2nd album STAND UP. but “Hey.

reason I think that is good is that you can break down all the TS: What can your fans qualities and techniques they look forward  to from you have that make them sound in the next 2-3 years? like they do and play like they EJ: I want to do a solo acoustic do. and you won’t get bored. Mississippi Fire Club Aug-20 Sat New Orleans. It’s a process TS: What personal fa. I enmelodic. me keep my focus on music. he is a folk singer. you will have studio to record them as well. and listen back. All of the above helps work on a  Spielberg movie. and it could bussy. NC ArtsCenter Aug-17 Wed Charlotte.you admire and try to emulate nal guitarist from Austin by the what they do. John  ColEJ: Oh yeah..score a motion picture. I think but that would be a step. or to one who just there that most of us haven’t wants to improve their craft? heard of. Aaron Copeland. I would  love  to ment. TS: Any finalizing interview comments or words? EJ: Thank you so much for the opportunity.  The he is going to turn a lot of heads. a lot of fun doing it.  and oriented artists you listen to? is there a particular director you would like to work with? EJ: I really enjoy Keith Jarrett. and then EJ: I like The Tallest Man On it has to be real musical and Earth. you give to an aspiring guitarist who wants to make a career TS: Is there a rising star out in music. LA HOB . but you think is special? EJ: I think the first steps you can do is pick out the people EJ: Yeah there is a phenome. Claude Dedo a soundtrack.. I would love to trane.  Bill Evans. but I guess I would have to wait till TS:   What advice you could John Williams retires (laughs). NC McGlohon Theatre Aug-18 Thu Atlanta. And if you do that you will record and I  also have some automatically learn all their new electric songs I am work. As far as a particular ally enjoy listening to because director. ‘The Rights as  I could add to it and make of Spring’  is something  I reit better. as long Igor Stravinsky... and you have to be joy listening to Stevie Wonvery  discriminating with yourder..  When I’m driving I lisself. it helps to record yourself ten to Wes Montgomery. Miles Davis. and be any kind of movie....in  keeping discipline and getvorites do you like to lis. name of Carson Brock.ting those sounds together ten to at home or when to where it›s proficient and you are driving in your car? you are playing clean and you have a good sound. and is off the radar.styles and techniques  that ing on and I want to get in the you like anyhow. I wouldn’t turn that down. GA Variety Playhouse Aug-19 Fri Jackson. not to stop there. TOURING ITINERARY Aug-16 Tue Carrboro. You would TS: Who are the non guitar want to emulate 4 or 5 peo- ple of who you really like then you start picking and choosing those pieces you want to keep and then do you own thing. gees that’s a good it is so much out of my elequestion.

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©2010 XP Audio Inc. 5th 1 octave or 2 full octaves • Features a 3 octave foot controlled Dive Bomb! • Bright backlit indicators • IN. Extreme Processors • morpheusEFX. • ph. Specifications are subject to change.Bomber pedal • Proprietary polyphonic pitch Shifter • Pitch up a 2nd. 5th 1 octave or 2 full octaves • Pitch down a 2nd.0917 . USA • A division of XP Audio Inc.com Salt Lake City. OUT and power supply jacks llows for USB plug a pdates software u The (power supply included) • Rugged cast-metal chassis • Two-year limited warranty Dynamic foot controlled tremolo allows for smooth pitch shifting striking a perfect balance between control and ease of use Foot controlled bypass allows instant effect toggle on/off Foot controlled select button controls the increment and decrement of the pitch.265. All Rights Reserved Morpheus CAPO DropTune and BomberPedal are trademarks of XP Audio Inc. 4th. 801.

Mega-Chops! Mega-Bass! Megadeth A founding member of the seminal thrash metal icons. How’s the new record coming along. Shawn has a great back beat feel and that creates a really tight and punchy rhythm section. and what can we expect from it? Dave Ellefson: The record is almost done now and will be mixed in July while we are on tour. Chris is such a guitar freak that he can literally play anything. namely Shawn Drover and Chris Broderick? DE: It’s been really good. © 2011. Bungee Brent Photography . TS: What is it like playing with some newer blood. Dave Ellefson is back and bigger than ever! The Sound sits down with the man who puts the `Mega` in Megadeth! The Sound: After some time away. you’re back with the legendary MEGADETH.

that show was announced only a few days after the Indio. which was intended to frills is a throwback to our style of yesteryear. Yankee Stadium is just cool to play there. band and fans alike. There is a real synergy between us and those audiences that can’t be duplicated anywhere else on the planet. TS: Can you tell us if there are any talks to get any more Big 4 show dates in the US? DE: There is nothing planned after Yankee Stadium but then again. Obviously. TS: In that touring schedule. Likewise. California show. In some ways to go up there lean and mean and just knock a 60 minute set out of the park without a bunch of our career down there because we went there so early on. We compile the riffs to create a song and then we work on vocal melodies and lyrics after that. for sure. period! MAYHEM will be cool because we are the veteran band on that bill.. with The Big 4 in Europe and also Yankee Stadium. It has some various mixes and a show that was recorded live from back in 1986 in Cleveland. MAYHEM will be cool because of the variety of bands on the bill. South America is one of those continents who do their own special thing with the music and the live shows. OH with that recording’s lineup.. as well as the Rockstar Mayhem Festival and some South America dates. As for South America.But Who’s Buying?” box set coming out. that has been one of the most special audiences of . It’s pretty cool to hear what the band sounded like back then. TS: Do you have a special favorite place to play? Every place has its own unique vibe. who are you looking forward to most in terms of the hang? DE: The Big 4 is a great hang. TS: There’s also a deluxe 25th anniversary “Peace Sells. What will you have up your sleeve for these shows? DE: The Big 4 shows are really special and we go up and give it our all for the hour we have to play. What can you tell us about that? DE: It’s a celebration release for all of us. very raw and live! TS: You’ve got some huge tours happening this year. That’s what’s cool about playing metal music is that it is popular everywhere but each culture responds to it in their own unique way that is really spectacular.TS: How does the creative process happen in Megadeth? DE: It always starts with a riff.

We are now working on releasing a less expensive version so everyone can afford a David Ellefson signature bass from Jackson. We have the rest of our lives to 16 I had a powerful DE: I tried their instinct that hit strings a couple ‘have something to fall back on’ or go get a me at rehearsal years ago and they that I NEEDED really knocked me ‘real job’. your making a signature inspired me to get string set for you. My was going to quit school and three signal inputs gave us a strings are a custom guage of move immediately they had tight. not an amp rig telling me how to play. a BTO album “Not Fragile” and One created a low frequency KISS “Destroyer” TS: Also.128 for other plans! But. I started hearing rock n roll on the radio DE: I do a DI and on this record as a kid so I asked my mom to buy me a bass. They have a Angeles ASAP. five days after record? DI for FOH and splits into I graduated high school I moved DE: I do play songs in both four my onstage amp rack. as well as being able to properly capture that low bass guitar punch in those registers. . Modern music with lower tunings really creates intonation problems. I definitely TS: What about your live bass that instinct and planned the recommend them! rig? remaining two years of my high school days accordingly by DE: Live I rut the Jackson practicing. I followed the five string sets. That to LA with three friends. which are the exact same professional level basses I play on tour. which I got the used two microphones on a summer of 1976. we just roll with it because there is no deadline or end in sight with that lineup. punchy but thrash tone. That is one good thing about tuning to standard A-440 tunings is that the instruments really respond the way they were intended to when they were invented. It’s pretty simple and straight forward because I want the tone to come from my hands. TS: How have you been getting your tones in the studio? powers two Hartke HyDrive 810 cabs. The only effect is a Digitech stereo chorus.65. . TS: What was the one moment in your life where you knew that your direction would be music? DE: It was at age 11. jacksonguitars.80. So. Less and five string tunings but most consists of a Peterson rack than a week after I arrived there mount Strobo-Rack tuner into of it is five string. My tone settings are pretty much straight up at 12 o clock flat with the ‘bright’ switch in.45.105 and . fantastic Obviously when I went in the warm-ness while the other more tone and they really do stay house and told my parents I growl and punch. I’ve become I met Dave Mustaine and we a Hartke LH-1000 head that accustomed now to the five started Megadeth that month. great feel. which I’m sure will make my fans quite happy.be the only USA date. . all in tune as they promise. Another young those are the times to really pursue about it? pinnacle age was at those things. recording TS: Are you playing both 4 Concert basses through a and doing every musical activity and 5 string basses on the new Shure wireless into a Radial I could find. lows that really create a heaviness to the overall sound of the band. Then. Together. . heart and your dreams because when we are going on the bass Could you tell us guitar. . TS: What’s the scoop on the Dave Ellefson signature bass from Jackson? DE: We rolled out the first version through the Custom Shop. string because of the low. Those heads are so powerful we run the volume on ‘2’. Stay tuned to www. SIT is and those albums “I think it is vital to follow your gut.” to get out to Los out. That year I got Hartke Hy Drive 810 cabinet.com for more info on that in the coming weeks. gigging.

what do you feel about iTunes downloads of one song at a time? single with a b-side. We have the rest of our lives to ‘have something to fall back on’ or go get a ‘real job’. and Sony. which was a brand new tool at that time in the mid 1990’s when the book was published. in the 1950s marketing budgets are smaller. so they are used to it. its opportunities and really our lives in general. I’m really active those themed 50’s type diners with it so I enjoy it. or AOR (album oriented rock) format. The Internet now puts that power in every musician’s hands like never before. Tom Couture DE: With record sales down for record companies their DE: Historically. What additional advice would you give up-and-comers in the current climate? DE: Interestingly enough. TS: What about the recording industry? DE: Labels get absorbed every week in our industry and now there are alcohol/energy drink companies who are offering up record deals for bands. I think the idea of a ‘label’ is changing and those names are becoming Red Bull. social media has once more based on singles. Some of us long time legacy bands still get to make full length albums but even still we may only play a few of them live and then we revert back to the classics so many of our fans want to hear. I remember bands I liked only got FM radio play but sold half a million albums and would sell out 10. I think now musicians have to be entrepreneurial more than ever. like again put the power/obligation in iTunes so we’ve actually kind of the hands of artists to promote returned back to that. Fortunately. be played all over FM radio and barely sell 500 tickets to their shows. The whole thing may even change for us at some point. I think have juke boxes that feature a younger. So many start up bands make a lot of their money by selling ©2010. newer bands today . That was the generation I was introduced to music in and it changed how the industry sold music. TS: As an artist who plays in a band that focuses on albums as a whole. I think a volume two to follow up my book could be based almost entirely on the Internet and how it has changed the music business. Then. “Making Music Your Business: A Guide For Young Musicians” was first published. So. Jagermeister. in the later 1960s and 70s it turned into an LP. which for the artist may mean less songs per release but it also cuts down dramatically on album production costs. etc. That’s why their activities. the Internet has let the public have a much bigger say in how they want their music rather than the industry dictating that to us anymore. Again. if we only want to buy one song we can and most newer bands have to join that mind set in order to survive.June 1983. your heart and your dreams because when we are young those are the times to really pursue those things. and 60s the culture was much too. programmed radio and even promoted the concert tour business as we know it today. too. you really have to get out and perform live. TS: Will album-oriented rock music ever make a strong comeback in the mainstream versus the pop stars? DE: Some genres endear their fans to album-oriented releases but more and more it is about singles or at least EPs now. TS: The music industry has changed quite a bit since your book. bands can sell a million albums. too. the final chapter of that book was about the Internet. So. there are other outlets like energy drink companies and sponsorships that aid bands with this and I think that is definitely part of the touring model now. For that reason. rather than just Warner Bros. TS: What is the new business model for up-and-coming touring bands? DE: I think the days of a record company handing you a huge check and tour support are definitely over. TS: How do you view social media in the role of a band’s marketing? embrace it because computers and the Internet have been in their hands practically since birth. I think it is vital to follow your gut.000 seat arenas! Today. Once you make an album.

Yes. Right now my Jackson Concert basses are really doing it well for me live. Again. who would it be? DE: I’ve jammed with quite a few people but I think Al Dimeola TS: What interests do you would be pretty rippin’. and what song DE: We do a lot of sports TS: On to some lighter topics together. Who would be in your dreamteam rock supergroup? I don’t like super groups because its all based on marketing rather than creating great music. something special with other unknown musicians. We do everything would it be? .All The World’s A Stage shortly.Not Fragile off right now? TS: Do you have anything else you’d like to share? You’ve got Iron Maiden.90125 DE: New Megadeth album out Rush. At the end of the day. TS: If you could jam with anyone that you haven’t already played with. which completely rules! DE: Kiss-Alive TS: Are there any newer bands that are just blowing your doors BTO.Killers the last word. have away from music and your TS: What current band would family? you most like to hear cover a Megadeth song.merchandise and even CD’s at their shows that the traditional channels of record stores is becoming the smaller piece of the pie now. not THE product.. Everything from 3 Inches of Blood and Arch Enemy and I’m looking forward to hearing new Godsmack and other release from bands on the MAYHEM tour this summer.. round! What are your top 5 DE: How about if Adele did “A soccer. see you on tour! TS: Do you have a “Number One” instrument? DE: I have many instruments for many uses. etc. Fame is a byproduct. Until then.the bonus lightning question from basketball to baseball. I’d much rather work with people who are creative together first and foremost rather than trying to fit a bunch of famous people in a room based on their names so someone can go out and ‘sell it’. it comes down to artists being creative in carving out their unique business models and taking control of their destinies instead of leaving everything in the hands of the old record business model that is going the way of the dinosaur anyway. . The latest personal most influential albums? Tout Le Monde”?! sport is now ping pong. we were all unknown at some point and then got famous because we created DE: There are some great metal releases coming out this year. football.

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Return of The Sound: Growing up in Australia. chums. My brother in law showed me how to read chord diagrams and then I just experimented from there. Brett Garsed was on the vanguard of shred fusion playing. Dark Matter. and songwriting would be a really big part of your life? Brett Garsed: My brother was the original owner of a cheap Maton semi-acoustic but as he was 10 years older than me and entrusted to running the family farm after my father passed away he had no more time to play it. AC/DC did a gig in the nearest city of . After enjoying life and music in his native Australia. I used to get it out from under the bed when I was about 10 and look at it while listening to his Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin albums. and ready to talk chops. Mind you. guitar. He`s worked with everyone from pop sensations to guitar`s most acclaimed players. do you have a particular moment you knew music.The King As half of Quid Pro Quo. and his latest offering. Garsed is back.

Frank Gambale had a huge effect on me as well and is one of the most original musicians to emerge in a long time. Victoria in 1974 which I attended (I was 11) and that was the thing that sealed my fate so I blame Angus and Malcolm!                                                        TS: Who are your earliest influences on guitar. Scott Henderson was the next profound influence and he’s my favourite musician to this day. I was offered a gig with him after sending out many demo tapes in late 1985 and then in 1986 I was the only guitarist on his “Whispering Jack” album which went on to become the highest selling album in Australian history. and how long it took to write? BG: The writing happened surprisingly quickly to be honest. I had 2 songs that had been kicking around for a while and “Avoid The Void” was already written . Santana.  TS: For those that aren’t as familiar with your work. most definitely in terms of concert sales anyway.Castlemaine.can you tell us the story behind it. He’s as heartfelt and emotional as any blues musician in my opinion. Eric Clapton etc. It was one of the most exciting times of my life. TS: The new record is “Dark Matter” . I was fascinated by how Larry could weave through the chords with the most beautiful melodies but was playing with a rock sound. I still don’t have a hope of understanding any of it at any kind of technical level which to me proves that music far beyond the analytical mind of the listener can still reach them at an emotional level which is absolutely where Allan’s music reaches me. Jimmy Page. Then I heard Allan Holdsworth and considering it was already natural for me to be a legato style player I really loved his sound but I also loved his compositions. Jeff Beck’s “Blow By Blow” and “Wired” albums pretty much introduced  to fusion and it was Larry Carlton that really sealed it. prior to Nelson. Jimi Hendrix. can you tell us about your background and what projects you’ve been involved with. I pretty much worked with John exclusively all that time as he was such a huge phenomenon that we were always busy. I toured and recorded with him until 1990 when I moved to America to join Nelson. and then with Nelson and beyond?   BG: My first professional gig was with John Farnham who is still Australia’s most popular artist. It was all classic rock that my older brother listened to. and what got you into jazz and fusion?   BG: Ritchie Blackmore was my earliest influence followed by David Gilmour.

but everything else was from a blank canvas and I was really glad to find out that it was very different from the material on “Big Sky”.what’s the story switched to the ESP Horizon behind it?    for the rock solo. and “Poison Dwarf”. I wanted to explore some heavier textures as I’d had a 7 string for a while and after recording “Quantum” with Planet X I wanted to  use that sound more. “If Only”. Perhaps Dave Chappelle could play him? :) TS: Can you tell us a background with “Be Here Now”. I Bong (License to Chill)” has used my Gibson 336 for the to be my favourite title of main melodies and solos. that’s the danger a while in a general state of of working titles that stick! disrepair so I decided to finish . All the melodies and solos files back and forth to each on “Be Here Now” are first other from LA to Australia. I just added some very honest. “If Only” was production tweaks here and there but it certainly wouldn’t the first new song I wrote sound the way it does without and just happened to be a ballad although I like the twist him! it takes in the mid-section where I attempt a David TS: I think the song “James Gilmour impersonation. take improvisations which Ric is the genius behind the why I love that song as it’s sound. I definitely don’t listen to other people or guitarists when I’m writing as my main focus in music is originality so I just dig into my own creativity and keep going until I’m happy with the results regardless of style or whatever I think other people’s reaction to it may be. then the album . I love playing melody and to be honest. I recorded. “Poison Dwarf” had been around for BG: Well. I think I screwed myself over by TS: Where was the “Dark getting caught up in Matter” disc produced. the whole “chops” thing. I just thought it’d be funny to see James Bond as a stoner as he’s pretty much a hard drinker. my personal favourite cuts from the record?  BG: “Be Here Now” is actually my favourite song as it’s my purely melodic side and is also predominantly a slide guitar song. and mastered at?   believe my main strength as a musician is in writing BG: Everyone recorded at and improvising strong home in their own studios melodies but I’ve already type or rehearsal spaces and Ric cast myself as a “shredder” Fierabracci and I mixed and and I’ll probably never shake mastered it by sending Logic it.

I’d prefer to use a room sound but I guess I’ll need a room before I can do that! TS: Are there any upcoming shows in the next couple of months with you and your band? BG: We’ll be doing some gigs during July here in Melbourne but other than that. The Bogner ran into a Hughes & Kettner 4x12 cab which was close miced with a Shure SM 57. It’s just a good fun blow but it seems to be one of the more popular tracks. I built a large box to put the cab in so it would cut down noise. I just happen to know 2 of the best bassists in the world and I wanted to have them both on the album. The blue ESP Horizon was the main guitar for solos but I also used my Steinberger GS which has the Fernandez Sustainer pickup built into it. 2008 it for this album. He’s such a unique and original artist so it was an honour to have him play on my song.   BG: My Bogner Ecstasy was the main amp although I used my THD BiValve for some of the clean. TS: How did you get into playing such a unique legato style with hybrid picking.. Gerry Pantazis and Phil Turcio have been working with me in our fusion group “Damage” for about 3 years so it was an obvious choice to have them on the album. I can barely raise the money to make the albums let alone take a band on the road so it’s just not going to happen unless a promoter puts their hand up. I tried standard tuning at first which was dreadful and a friend suggested I tune my © Fabio Pitisci.  TS: Tell us about the gear you used in the studio when recording this album. The Gibson ES 336 was used extensively and as I said. I really wanted to write a song specifically for Virgil. ambient sounds. world class musicians who should be more well-known than they are. especially after working with him on so many of his own . it’s impossible financially to tour independently as it’s just too cost prohibitive so there won’t be any more shows. an LTD 7 string was used for heavier textures.  TS: Can you tell our readers who you played with on this album?  BG: Virgil Donati guests on the title track “Dark Matter”. my focus my entire life has been originality instead of copying people. They’re just incredible. and also what got you into playing slide guitar? BG: As I said. Ric has always been the man for my solo stuff but I also wanted to have Craig Newman on a track so he played the main bass track on “Enigma” and Ric took the solo.. David Lindley is my favourite slide player but it was Rick Formosa of The Little River Band and Joe Walsh that got me started. Native Instruments “Guitar Rig” was heavily used for ambient and effect sounds as well and it’s an amazing program. I did that out of respect for the musicians that moved me and it’s the main thing I recognized that I loved about their playing.tunes.

I really must mention Sonny Landreth as a big influence as well. It wasn’t until a few months ago that I found an old YouTube clip of Jeff Beck doing it back in the early 70’s so he really is every bit the innovator we’ve come to know and love. Because of Joe Walsh. There’s always a way to make even the most angular changes work and I’m definitely saying this from the perspective of a listener and in no way as a master improviser! Listen to Scott Henderson. He is a true master of his instrument. Allan Holdsworth. TS: Could you share a story from the making of the Quid Pro Quo or Exempt albums?   BG: Making those albums was probably the most positive experience of my musical life. One of them was TJ and I.guitar to open E so I bought a cheap Les Paul copy and that  allowed me to develop control over the muting to the point that I could go back to standard after a while. a true innovator. Virgil and Ric. at BG: Back in 1995 TJ least no money considering Helmerich was running a live sound class at Musicians we’d had a national #1 single Institute and he had to keep bringing in different configurations of bands for the students to mix. especially Quid . a consummate professional and it’s a crime that he’s not a household name amongst all musicians. I wear the slide on my second finger so when I had the idea to angle it to achieve major third intervals it worked.  TS: What advice would you give an advanced player to playing over fusion changes? BG: Just take it slowly and even approach 2 or 3 changes at a time to develop a flow and see how they link together. I’d just finished a year of touring with Nelson together?   and of course ended up making no money from it. Michael Brecker or any of the true geniuses and let them lead the way.  We’ve been like family ever since and I’m still trying to talk him out of working with me because he deserves much better! TS: Do you have any plans to make another record with TJ Helmerich in the future?   BG: No plans unfortunately but I’d love to do it. TS: How did you and Ric Fierabracci first meet and jam Pro Quo. Once again. To say I was blown away by Ric’s playing is still an understatement. least of all bassists. Never say never. I’ve adopted his approach of using my fingers in front of and behind the slide and it’s a great technique. though. It’d be tough as TJ and I like to write together but seeing as I live in Australia and he’s in LA one of us would have to pay for a plane ticket and there’s no budget for that I’m afraid.

with us later that night. Ripped off by record and management companies again! TJ and I had been trying to figure out how to make individual solo albums for Mark Varney but his budgets were so small it was almost impossible until we came up with the idea of combining our efforts and budgets to make one album so Mark agreed to that. just before we could afford to eat every day. I’m hoping this is correct so forgive me if I’m a bit foggy on the details. let alone for music and probably everything else. a appear on an album with him.  a few years later. Every time I hear the songs from “Quid Pro Quo” I feel great as they hold very special memories for me and represent everything that I consider to be wonderful about music and being a musician.what was it individual keys on the piano like working on Centrifugal in real time.  I was touring with Bobby Rock and Carl Carter in early ‘92 I think and we were playing in Memphis so we met Shawn and I think Barry Bays at Shawn’s mother’s house. Speaking of Shawn. We weren’t sure if it’d work and we’d be able to fly the tracks back to the original 24 track tape but we decided to go for it and it did indeed work which only proves what a visionary TJ really is. He then jammed Funk with Frank Gambale.and the album had sold 3 million copies. leaving us 5 tracks to do solos and melodies at his apartment. He is one of the greatest true genius in an age when that word gets thrown around musicians of our time that’s for sure. not only as a musician but as a recording engineer. Gary Willis on bass and Paul Mirkovich on keys. I’ve never had so many first take solos as on that album. would have run away in fear! The drum clinic was at least 2 hours long and this was the I had just finished doing my tracks at Fast Forward studios last song and to my absolute in Orange County when Frank amazement. mainly because you could punch in but if you tried to punch out in the middle of a take it would leave a huge gap so it was better to just go for full takes. Subway sandwiches. He played us some of “Powers Of Ten” and I listened in total disbelief as he explained to me that he tracked the drums live and unTS: One last question about quantized by playing them on the old days . We Jimmy Earl. he got up on arrived and I got to meet him stage and remembered every note of what I’d showed for the first time. We did the basic tracks there with Bobby Rock on drums. He’s been him so he really did have such a huge influence on a photographic memory me and it was an incredible honour to meet him. and the late. TJ then had the idea to put smpte code (time code) on one track of his Fostex 8 track reel to reel (this was LONG before ADATs) and put a stereo mix of the basic tracks on 2 more tracks. Definitely ahead of his time! We wrote everything in a week and it was the most free-flowing and enjoyable time I’ve ever had as a musician. We were both broke off our asses and ended up calling the first song “Subway” because that’s all he released “Powers Of Ten” and it was an experience I’ll never forget. I got to meet Shawn like confetti. He was a true genius and one of the most humble people so it was in itself a humbling experience to meet him. TJ was working at Cherokee studios in LA at the time to so the Robbs who were the owners were very supportive and gave us a lot of down time. Such a powerful gift and so tragic that he’s not still with us. Like I said. great were playing one of Bobby’s Shawn Lane? tunes which had a very involved melody and I showed BG: I did my solos first which was just as well as if I’d it to Shawn and of course it heard what Frank and Shawn represented absolutely no were going to play I probably problem to him whatsoever. None of those solos have any edits and we used the same process for “Exempt” as well.  .

  It’s an amazing school so I’ll probably wait till next and anyone that has the than me.com or iTunes. I’m not TS: Ok.  TS: Do you have any plans for any more books or instructional DVDs in the future?  . You can only practise I consider myself very.brettgarsed.  very fortunate. I don’t recall anyone using the pick and remaining TS: Do you have any advice TS: Do you have a favourite for up-and-coming players career highlight with you and 3 fingers until I did it and about practice routines or your guitar? no one had ever discussed angling the slide the way I do what to study?   it.   prepared to pay for a fuzzy BG: I’ll quote Jimi. our readers to pick up “Dark straight. very one had ever talked much your favourite things for so fortunate for everything I’ve about hybrid picking. let alone long before they become been able to experience and incorporating the 4th finger boring so rotate the subject am still experiencing so I’m an of the right hand so I feel that and keep the sessions short extremely grateful person. if I have other work I have to prioritize that.  approach to hybrid picking and slide.  order it directly from me at BG:  I’ve done a couple www.. My first video on is to keep it varied as it will alive and making somewhat of REH was released back in ensure you’re a well-rounded a living as a musician. This is 1994 and as I said. great!  You’ve got sure how much people are the last word. releases relevant in that the Instead of practising picking things I’m discussing seem to of whatever for 3 hours TS: What’s the best place for be unique to myself. I’d seen musician and will also prevent a really tough industry and most of the videos and no burnout. break the 3 hours Matter”? up into shorter sessions that are interspersed with other TS: Have you still been BG: If they’d like a personally techniques and also a bit of teaching Skype lessons? autographed copy they can reading etc.  computer screen so I have no idea what to charge.  makes those instructional so that it keeps motivation up. at least in an instructional BG: My best piece of advice BG: The highlight to be perfectly honest is that I’m still setting.com or but it’s a question of time they can get it from www. no. Australia so the time zones It’s easy to find.TS: Are you still doing master TS: Are you involved in any other projects you want us classes and teaching at to know about at this current Musicians Institute? time? BG: Seeing as I’m living in BG: Nothing at the BG: No. Also.  can be a bit confusing. I can’t really think of Australia. “Make image of a guy on their love. but if I’m ever moment. I have some anything to offer that hasn’t back in LA I’d be honoured touring coming up at the end if they’d let me back in the already been covered by of the year with John Farnham people much more qualified door. as I’m all the way over in abstractlogix. I like my latest opportunity to study there is year before I figure out what DVD as it covers my unique I’m going to do next.. not war”.

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I believe players like Eric Johnson and Joe Satriani have had tremendous success in bridging the gap from virtuoso playing to listener-friendly songs. and they happen to have great guitar players. . you won’t get heard or if you do you’ll have a hard time maintaining the listener’s interest.Ole! f o y r u f e h t d n a n o i s s a p e t Th t i w e H s s u R tro s e a m o c n e flam ! The contemporary wizard of the flamenco and smooth jazz genres talks song writing. and how to achieve success in music. The Sound: When writing your instrumentals.” “Always With You Always With Me.” “Far Beyond the Sun.” I could go on. do you approach it as a guitar player or as a songwriter? Russ Hewitt: Always as a songwriter—you have to think of it that way.” “Mr. Those are great songs that can be listened to over and over. making music in the digital age. Otherwise. Carlos Santana isn’t going to scare anybody on guitar but he can write something that still gets played on the radio 30 years later. Scary. but you see the point. I really like the early Shrapnel Records recordings because of the focus on songs that gave the players a platform to showcase their talents.” “Frankenstein. Think of some of the great instrumentals like “Cliffs of Dover.

I worked on this song for four years and wrote five completely different versions before the final version. which gives me two dominant 7 chords (A7 and G7) a step apart. even things that aren’t supposed to.” “We recorded this in a hurry at a friend’s house…. and then you took just over two years on your new one. When I play live I . You’re also going to be judged on the last thing you do.. If it’s not the very best you can do. Why mess with what works? Since what I play isn’t true flamenco. why bother going through the effort? TS: I noticed your songs and solos are longer with your new recording. RH: Yeah. if you’re hard to get along with it brings everybody down. which doesn’t appear in any other scale. so you better be 100 percent happy with the final product.” I could go on for days. Ha! Your legacy as a player is what you leave behind and there are no do-overs.. I couldn’t be happier with the finished product.TS: With the exception of a couple of guest artists I noticed you used the same band and producer from your first CD “Bajo el Sol. It’s based on the A Hindu scale. once an artist finds success they’ll bring in a brand new team of people and players. Cuban or South American.” “Only listen to tracks 1 and 3..” What takes you so long? RH: In this digital age everything lasts forever. “Alma Vieja. With the addition of Grammy-winning violinist Charlie Bishart. The key is to surround yourself with incredible players who understand your musical vision and who can add something to the song that you couldn’t have thought of yourself. I’ve done projects in the past where I’ve made excuses as I’m handing someone a CD: “Our new stuff is better….. But I thought it could be better so I waited to record it. I worked on those two chords in different grooves and feels and finally ended up in a modified cha-cha style.” “Our singer was sick while recording.” “We got rid of half the band but this is all I have now…. TS: Your song “Dhanyavad” is one of my favorites. it’s essential to find players who are wellversed in many styles and feels.. It doesn’t matter how good of a player you are.” RH: That was a very conscious effort on my part.. whose incredible playing takes the song to a different level. TS: You took three years and completely re-recorded your first CD. A B C# D E F G. This was the only song that was supposed to go on my first CD. I got tired of doing that and I wanted to put out something that I was proud of from start to finish and that I felt was the best representation of my playing. but are able to apply what they do to a commercial pop instrumental. Latin jazz. Often times. They are also great guys and cool hangs. Can you tell me about it? RH: Sure. which is on the CD. The harmony lines are in thirds and the solos and remaining melodies modulate down a step (G7 and F7).

that becomes my primary focus and I don’t have time to do technique all day. TS: When you play live do you improvise or do you play the recorded solo? RH: There are spots during certain songs when we play live that I’ll do whatever I want. more than likely you’re just faking it and that can get old real quick. I also added violin and saxophone just so every song isn’t a rhumba flamenco. I also wanted to avoid having the CD sound just like the first one. But when it was his time all he did was make faces.tend to add another solo and chorus to the older songs. TS: What are some of the challenges of being an independent artist? RH: Right now it’s finding the time to do everything. TS: What were some of the challenges you faced when you sat down to write “Alma Vieja”? RH: One of the pleasant surprises on “Bajo el Sol” was the feedback that people leave it playing in the car or during dinner parties or while they’re relaxing around the house. I would love to get to the point where my improvs are the same as something that I sat down and worked out. samba and cha-cha to the new CD. And. feedback the guitar and do high kicks.” and I was very excited to see Richie Blackmore play the solo. so I went ahead and did it on the new songs. these are two completely different mind frames and I have . milonga. For me. The trick then becomes “How can you make a fiveminute song interesting?” The devil is in the details and some of these songs have up to 70 tracks going on. Unless you’re a master improviser. or at least it should. but until then I’ll play the recorded version. I wanted to be able to play both CDs back to back to make it seem like one long continuous CD. I remember seeing Deep Purple play “Highway Star. I was in shock. so I added a tango. but for the most part I’ll play the recorded solo. A well-written solo adds to the song and can become as memorable as the melody itself. In between CDs is when I have time to work on my chops because when I start writing music. When I sat down to write “Alma Vieja” I had to think in terms of “Is this song good enough for repeat listens?” not just if it’s good or bad. The reason is that if you crank it on a nice stereo you can hear and pick out something different each time. pick scrape. On the longer solos in “Tango for Ahn” and “Gabriela mi Corazon” I added an additional solo melody theme.

verse and solo in a 4+4+3 arpeggio pattern and I group the chorus in a 3+3+3+2 rhumba pattern to give it a feel of 6/8 but without changing meter. I’ve listened to some songs in this time signature and they all seemed very chaotic and hard to listen to. I have a good chance of developing a recognizable sound and style. 11/8 or 11/4.yet to be able to do both at the same time. country. Hello. which is down a half step. Or that Rivers Cuomo from Weezer carries around a binder of 300 of the best songs ever written. depending on how you want to count it. I remember reading an interview with Chad Kroeger from Nickelback on how he broke down their hit “How You Remind Me” and he realized the song had three separate hooks in it. redid my website and press kits. In “Soldade. Sometimes it’s one chord that makes the song. There are many hooks within a song other than the chorus.” Where did you learn your samba rhythms? RH: Ha . Latino or any of the Top 40 to try and figure out what it is that makes the song catchy or a hit.” rehearsed and recorded a live DVD with my full eight-piece band. Ivan Torres. I can usually break it down and figure it out but sometimes I come across something that defies all logic. Ke$ha. A hook can be a chord progression.” I group the intro. is a self- . While all that is going on. Outside of the normal arpeggios.” Ultimately that would be the goal with my playing and song writing. In the last couple of months I put out “Alma Vieja.” RH: I really love odd time signatures and this one is in 11/16. My challenge when working in odd time signatures is how I can make this work in my style and whether I can make it flow and not choppy. and released my first single from the new CD (which is now my third song to make the Smooth Jazz Top 40) and now I’m in “getting-publicityfor-the-new-recording” mode. What is your song writing process? RH: There is definitely an art and a science to song writing and I’m doing my best to immerse myself in that world. I’ll listen to all kinds of music from pop. but to be consistent you have to study and work on it. who’s been playing with me for the last four years. The rhythm guitar is in standard tuning except for the high E. I’ve definitely noticed that I have a different way of approaching and playing the guitar now than I did with all the rock stuff in the past. I wanted the verse melody open and airy and I wanted the chorus in a major key to feel uplifting. TS: Your song “Samba Samba” sounds like a modern version of “Girl from Ipanema. This new CD marks my sixth year of doing nuevo flamenco full time and only playing electric guitar on session work.through osmosis! My live drummer. a time signature. technique. The longer solos are also a by-product of my knowing more of what I want to do and play. TS: Do you think you have your own style? RH: That’s a good question and my best answer is. I’m still gigging four to five nights a week as well as working on bigger festivals and shows. and phrasing that play such a huge part in what defines you. You can happen upon a great song. etc. TS: Tell us about the song “Soldade. The drums really make the song because they give it a groove and the verseto-chorus transition is smooth. a re- peating lick or melody. lyrics. I believe if I continue on the path I’m on. TS: You’ve mentioned song writing several times. a beat or groove. three notes per string and pentatonic scale. “I don’t know. there’s also note choice.

I end up playing the sax line on the guitar.” so I immediately went to work and “Samba Samba” was the next song I wrote. During gigs I would often ask Ivan to give me a groove or beat and one day I just locked in. This song is going to be my second radio release so my producer Bob Parr spent a lot of time on the overall sonic appeal. and how is the track doing on the charts? RH: I co-wrote this song with my producer. #13 on the Smooth Jazz indie charts.taught Brazilian drummer. Bob Parr. Bob also played the organ on the track.” features contemporary jazz saxophonist Michael Lington. “Pacific Sunrise. This week the song is #32 on the Smooth Jazz charts. which is trickier than you think. “Hey! I don’t know where that came from!” and Ivan responded. We wanted a top-down-cruising vibe and once it was completed we thought Michael would be a perfect addition. He was in the middle of a tour but flew out in between dates to keep our recording session. How did that come about. TS: Your first single.” My friend. I was like. and knocked it out in a day. this time with Ivan on drums.” It’s where you can mix parallel major and minor chords together and I extended the chords to 9th and 11th shapes. I thought it would be a good addition. When we perform live. TS: And the last word is…? RH: In hindsight now my words of advice to guitar players is to see the bigger picture and . How could you not!” The song writing technique I used was called “modal interchange. we’ve been playing together for four years. I was very happy with the song and although we were in the mix phase already. So we went back into the studio. #33 Radio Wave Internet airplay chart and on Billboard’s New and Active chart. I didn’t want to wait to get started on writing new songs after we finished recording “Alma Vieja.

to work towards a goal. If you want to be a studio session player you have to read music perfectly and be well versed in many styles. You’ll want to move to L.A., Nashville or N.Y. and start doing sessions for free or for little money until you can break into the scene. If you want to be a Classical or Flamenco guitarist 90% of it is technique. The physical command over the guitar shapes your phrasing and the ability to play the fast runs. Playing without a goal or purpose will lead to ruts quicker and a lack of focus.  The bigger picture goes beyond learning a song or lick but putting yourself out there whether it’s playing live, meeting people and making contacts, moving to a city or state that will provide more opportunity and immersing in the community you want to be a part of.  Find a musician that is successful at what you’re wanting to do and ask questions or become a understudy. I spend much more time on the business side of music than sitting down and playing but i find it just as beneficial if not more.

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all though not all are on the list. I tried my using my EH Memory Man delay. I literally threw it in the garbage! Being a persistent fool. They can be found on our web site artist list at www. I proceeded to make a distortion unit. my daughter was starting to play guitar and listening to some heavy bands. It was oh so close. but after spending many months tweaking. I love using that pedal!” The conversation got much easier from there. Five months later. Tyler Connolly from Theory of a Deadman.dlseffects. In 1998. success was at hand and the Echomaster Delay was born! Greg Howe actually ended up using that delay. ts DLS Effec Effects Me with Alex an d Geddy from Rush I would say the RotoSIM™ was the toughest to design and the most innovative. That enticed me to dust off my gear and play a bit more with my old effects. “Hey dad. Then I went on to design the EchoTAP and Chorus~Vib effects. I thought a while and said. and a host of others. From there I used a similar design philosophy and designed the stereo Ultra Chorus which exhibited some beautiful chorus sounds. and with some extra features”. but I would say the RotoSIM™ is at the top of the list. “hey Joe. So. Keith Richards.. I should be able to design something at least as good. hey. There Other DLS players are Ben Carey is a great blend of technologies The whole pedal line seems to get from Lifehouse. Alex Lifeson in his to achieve that chewy Doppler some really great user reviews.The Story Behind. but it was not working. I scrapped it in frustration because it did not meet my expectations. Joe Don turned a huge smile and said. with many prototype revisions flying back and forth to my 4 beta testers in the US. which she used and liked very much.. Brad Whitford from Aerosmith used both effects after they were released. She came to me and said. That pedal took over a year to get right. “Oh. So I did some research and proceeded to design my first Delay pedal. the one who designed the RotoSIM”. Billy Corgan from Smashing Pumpkins. . which were very well accepted. I could pull it off. studio. His tech Dave Graef said. I figured why not.com. I started all over again with a whole new hybrid electronic design approach. hear that heavy guitar sound? Can you make me something that does that kind of distortion?” Hum. I get emails quite often from musicians thanking me for designing that pedal! I remember being introduced to Joe Don Rooney from Rascal Flatts. I used to use overdrive and now that I had electrical engineering expertise. this is Dave from DLS. “Heck.

DLS is thankful to all the musicians using our effects. It can be used in stay true to that philosophy. The what unique sounds and features Versa Vibe is a Vibrato/Univibe® I can bring to the table. analog warmth and versatility. I usually type pedal. From there I think are much smaller in size. fe Li h s ou e’s Joe Do n Roon out m ey's ri y ped als! Sw g. make be top quality in sound and construction and something we The CV2 Chorus Waves™ is a would be happy to buy if we were beautiful sounding chorus and is the customer. We also designed a in mind and different expectations. This is because multiple to control how much Bass Throb musicians have different sounds is added. Beta testing is Versa Vibe we designed a first ever a huge part of the R&D process Bass Throb control that allows you too. type effect. the bass throb totally then build them to work together overloads the sound. Check our website for a dealer list. Waveform control so the musician I try to make our effects so they can dial from mild to harsh vibes. usually starts with a suggestion The Versa Vibe and CV2 Chorus from some of the pro musicians I Waves are our newest effects and am friends with. and more pristine as you go clockwise towards position 7.check eet! Tyler from Theory of a Deadman . Stay tuned to some wonderful new products to be release in late 2011 and in 2012! **Uni-Vibe® is a registered trademark of the Dunlop Manufacturing. plus has wide stereo image for stereo users. The Vibrato is very warm and has a There are a lot of pedals out there. We want every product we type vibrato sound. So. but not direct. and gets wider. The Versa good. About the Versa Vibe™ How we decide which pedal to make and CV2 Chorus Waves™ pedals. but have products that are Vibe can get that old Magnatone™ great. in our in a prototype. Dry/Wet pot to blend some chorus My goal is to never settle for just with vibrato to taste. The Blend pot mixes as much analog instrument in the chorusing as desired. we really love what we do at DLS Effects™! We want our products to satisfy every level of musician by offering the highest standard of sound and construction quality.ith w in’ rey g n Ha n Ca Be DLS All and all. plus can be tweaked to satisfy most. In many Univibe® will test modules of my designs and style pedals. we added an expression pedal input. but packed of how I might cop that sound and with warmth and versatility. plus a lot more. while maintaining We sell through dealers world-wide. and for driving DLS to deliver the sounds and features you desire and deserve. The 7 position Chorus Width control makes the chorus sound more tight and compressed starting with position 1. Inc. mono. brighter. We will always very versatile.

Every month we have more and more musicians trying and switching to our stone guitar picks. The eureka moment came when a friends daughter mentioned that a piece he was working on looked like a guitar pick. the agates/jaspers are 7.picksofstone. they are generally less dense than the agates so they cut fast but because they are less dense they are not a predictable stone. I lived in Wyoming. While collecting fossils I was in the company of rock hounds who had been working with stone and fossils for decades and before long I found myself working with stone as well. Our newest design is a traditional shaped pick with a jazz style tip. The tone of all stringed instruments is enhanced by our picks of stone and every genre of musician has been amazed at the sound. www. meaning we may make 10 picks but get only 6 that we deem playable. where it is ground to its final shape. in a private setting as well as seminars.Picks of Our company. The reason for the tone difference is the hardness of the stone. The most predictable and hardest stone I work with is the Brazilian Agate. New designs are generally created at the request of customers who want something a little different than we currently offer. The small saws cut the thin slabs that will have a pick template drawn on it so the trim saw can cut away the excess rock from the template. to date. The picks then go into a 2 week polishing cycle which takes them from a rough texture to a glass like finish. cleaning and selling fossils. The MOHs scale is from 1 (talc) to 10 (diamond). we get feedback that our picks are producing a sound they have never heard before from instruments. When we moved back to Canada I had a large amount of fossil fish so decided to open a business collecting. Once the rock has been trimmed away from the pick template it goes to the grinding station which consists of 4 diamond grinding wheels. During the summer I would head down to Wyoming for 2 months to collect fossils and head back to Canada to clean and sell them through the winter months. has been in operation since 2008. I have a big saw with a 14” diamond blade that cuts big rock into smaller bits that can fit onto my smaller saws which have 10” diamond blades. has over 80 of our stone guitar picks In his collection. Fragments of the Past. We can’t detect a tone difference between stone that is the same hardness. A long time endorser of our Picks of Stone has been Warren Robert of Halifax. We haven’t come up with a name for it yet.5-8 and the obsidians/glass are 5. Canada. the designer loves it and we believe it will become a favourite among many players. I encourage every reader today to mention us on any of their social networks. Our picks of stone have recently been getting into the hands of some big names in the music world and I am sure it won’t be long before Picks of Stone is a common name among musicians of all genres and playing abilities. The softer stone produces a lighter tone than the hard stone. The Jaspers are right in the middle. There is a definite tone difference between the obsidian/glass and the jasper/agates. we are currently running a “Name that Pick” contest. We just added a new design to our stone pick line-up.com . so stop by our website and check it out and submit a name. regardless of the density of the stone.5-6. Ston e Warren is an incredible guitarist playing with the band POGEY as well as doing solo recording and teaching in Halifax. The idea took root and after about 4 months of research and development the first pick was sold to a customer that. The stone that is easiest to work with are the obsidians. USA and spent 2 summers digging fossil fish. from country to gypsy jazz. they cut fast (about ½ the time it takes to cut thru Brazilian Agate) so I can produce more in a given time period and it is less stress on my saw blades and grinding wheels.

Natural.picksofstone. Stoned Yet ? www.picksofstone.com www.com .Picks of Ston e Handcrafted.

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q = 93 2:47 Oleo Strut string skipping sextuplets Gretchen Menn 6 6 6 $ &$ % % ! ### ! #% % % % % $ $ % # % & % # % & % # % " ! % &% #% % &% #% % &% #% % &% A E 6 6 6 9 6 6 "# 2 ! ! 10 7 8 9 7 8 9 7 8 9 7 8 9 7 8 9 11 7 8 9 9 7 8 ! ### % " #% % &% % % F©‹ 6 6 &$ % % % % 6 6 $ % % #% % $ % 6 % #% % 6 $ % &% #% % &% #% 6 6 D "# 3 10 9 11 12 9 11 12 11 12 14 12 12 13 14 14 12 13 14 15 12 13 14 12 13 $ $ % G©‹ # % % % % % % % % % % % ! ### % % % % % % % #% % % #% % " E 6 6 6 6 6 6 14 12 14 16 14 14 14 13 14 16 6 16 13 14 6 "# 4 14 16 13 14 16 13 14 16 13 16 13 % % % % % $ & % ! ### % #% % % &% #% % % &% % % % &% % % '% % #% " F©‹ B‹ A 6 6 6 6 6 6 12 12 14 13 12 11 14 13 12 11 17 17 17 17 "# 11 13 14 11 12 13 14 13 12 11 .

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Yes. & œ œ# œ œ œ œ 1012 9 1012 œœ œ œ # œ œ œœ 9 1112 10 12 œ œœœœ œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# œ œœ 12 10 12 11 9 1210 9 1210 9 1210 8 10 10 8 9 1012 Ex. Here's a D7 pentatonic I like to use sometimes. Not all the inversions. here's the D mixolydian scale. Just this one for now. 2) D7 arpeggio with 4th degree (G) added. It's commonly used as a companion scale for soloing over D7. 1: So here's a D7 chord. No. Now we got a little flow going. 4: D Mixolydian Pentatonic #1: Cool. T A B Ex. & œ #œ œ œ œ œ 10 14 10 12 10 12 œ #œ œ œ œ 11 12 10 13 #œ œ œœœ 10 13 10 œ #œ œ œ 12 11 12 10 10 14 10 œ œ #œ œ œ œ 12 10 14 10 8 10 © 2011 jonfinn. You can think of it in at least two ways: 1) Dminor pentatonic with major 3rd.com "Good Music People Like" . 2011) D7 1 243 Ex. 3: D Mixolydian Scale: Now. There Certainly way more options. But this works pretty well.All About D7 By Jon Finn (Aug. #w w 4 &4 w w 10 11 10 10 10fr. œ œ œ œ œ # œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ & œ #œ œ 10 9 12 10 12 11 10 8 10 8 10 11 12 10 12 9 Ex. 2: D7 Arpeggio: Here's an arpeggio fingering that goes with it.

but it has a way of conveying "I'm home now. Play it and see: Ex." I find that when I do that. I just need to keep looking." It's based on F# minor pentatonic with b5. but to me the 9th implies an octave displacement. I have to be willing to wade through a bunch of bad ideas. I can come up with way more things than if I "just wait to be inspired. Ex. There's no place left to go. You may want to call this a D9 arpeggio. every note sounds like it "could" go someplace else. F# is the 3rd of D7. but sounds really cool. Let's keep going and see where it takes us.) The basic idea is this: "Take what you already know." Of course. but the good ones are always buried in there somewhwere.2 All About D7 (cont. The root always works.com "Good Music People Like" . 5b: D mixolydian Pentatonic #2 œ œ œ # œ œ & œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ 5 8 5 7 4 7 5 7 5 7 5 8 5 œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ 8 5 7 5 7 5 7 4 7 5 8 5 5 This next one is tricky to think about. That's fine too. 5a: D Mixolydian Pentatonic #2: œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ & œ œ #œ 10 12 9 12 10 12 9 11 10 13 10 14 10 10 œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ 13 10 11 9 12 10 12 9 12 10 8 10 Here's another way to play the exact same thing. which is the b7 of the D7 chord. Because you never play the root of the chord. The b5 of F# is C. Here's a D7 arpeggio with the 2nd degree (E) added. Verbally. this sounds much more confusing than it really is. 6a: D Mixolydian Pentatonic #3: œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ & œ œ #œ 8 12 9 12 9 10 9 11 10 12 8 12 8 12 œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ 8 12 10 11 9 10 9 12 9 12 8 10 © 2011 jonfinn. and find a different angle on it. This one will "feel" kinda like an A minor pentatonic but with F# replacing G: Ex.

7a: D9 arpeggio œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ & œ #œ œ œ œ 10 9 12 10 9 12 11 10 8 12 10 14 10 12 œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ 8 10 11 12 9 10 12 9 10 12 8 10 This is a variation where the 13th (B) is added: Ex." Ex.All About D7 (cont. Because of this the phrase "doubles back. Here's a D9 arpeggio.) This version of D Mixolydian Pentatonic #3 probably "looks" more like F# minor pentatonic b5. Notice that the 9th of the chord is played before you begin the next octave.com "Good Music People Like" . 6b: D Mixolydian Pentatonic #3: 3 #œ œ œ œ œ & #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ 2 5 2 3 2 4 2 4 1 5 2 5 2 œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ 5 2 5 1 4 2 4 2 3 2 5 2 5 Let's mess with it a bit more. 7b: D13 arpeggio œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ & œ #œ œ œ œ œ 10 9 12 10 9 9 12 11 10 8 12 12 10 œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ 12 12 8 10 11 12 9 9 10 12 9 10 7 12 10 © 2011 jonfinn. It might illustrate the idea a little better: Ex.

It's not really "All about D7" or "Everything I know about D7." Most of these start and/or end on the 6th string. But here. This example is all the chromatic pitches I could find (using my ear to decide what I like/don't like). the b3 (F) is played before the 3rd (F#).) So what else? How about Chromatics? Ok. different starting pitches etc. This is what I came up with. the 4th degree (G) is played before the 3rd (F#). Always try new stuff! © 2011 jonfinn. That was done so that you can see the range of possiblilities. Get the idea? Ex. When practicing." Rather.com "Good Music People Like" . 8b: Chromatics. but messing with the order of the pitches & œ œ œ #œ bœ nœ œ 10 13 10 9 11 12 œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ b œ n œ bœ nœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ 10 12 11 13 10 13 10 13 13 14 10 13 13 10 12 10 11 œ bœ nœ œ œ #œ 11 12 10 13 14 w 10 10 12 12 10 No. For the acsending part. do these in all keys. 8a: Using Chromatics œ œ #œ ˙ œ œ b œ n œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ & œ œ bœ nœ #œ œ #œ œ 8 10 11 12 9 10 11 12 9 10 11 12 9 10 11 12 10 11 12 13 10 12 13 14 10 œ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ bœ œ œ & 13 14 12 10 8 12 11 10 8 10 11 9 12 11 10 9 œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ ˙ œ 12 11 10 8 9 12 10 8 10 Here's another one using roughly the same concept. there are some twists and turns. I like talking to myself.4 All About D7 (cont. Ex. different rhythms. and the b5 (Ab) is played before the 5 (A). These were created by ordering the pitches a little differently. Descending. sounds good. all positions. these are more like "seeds.

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1 4 :4 c Sequencing in 4's (A Major) B B DB B & 1 B DB B B ( 2 DB * 4 B B DB & 1 B B DB DB & 1 B DB DB B ( 2 DB DB * 4 B B ( 2 ( 2 * & 1 4 * & 1 ( 2 ( 2 * 4 ( 2 * 4 ' 1 * 4 ' 1 ( 2 ' 1 * 4 4 7 DB B B DB ' 1 B B DB B ( 2 B DB B B * 4 DB ' 1 B B DB ( 2 B B DB DB ( 2 B DB DB B * 3 ( 2 * 4 ' 1 * 4 ' 1 ( 2 ' 1 ( 2 * 4 * 4 ( * 4 ( * ( * "! 13 DB DB ( * B B "! ( 4 1 DB * B B DB "! ( * 4 1 3 B B DB B "! ( * "! 4 1 3 4 2 2 4 1 3 4 1 3 3 Page 1/1 .

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4 "' B B B B B B B "$ "$ "% "' B B B B B B B B "$ "$ "% "% "" "" ! 7 8 B B B B B B "# * "# * "# * B ! 7 B B B B B B "" * "# * "# * "% "" "" B ! B B B B B FB "! * "# * "# * B ! 4 4 B * B B B B B B B "" "% "( "' "' "' ") Copyright 2011 All Rights Reserved .International Copyright Secured Page 1/1 . "' B B B B B B B B "' "$ "$ "% "% "" * "" B B B B B B B B ! ( ( * * "# "# "' 1.Floating Jason Spell Music by Jason Spell Moderate 1 DDDD 4 : 4 c B B B B B B B B h = 120 ! ( ( * * "# "# 2.

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Poison Dwarf Brett Garsed Dark Matter Music by Dark Matter .Transcription by Jason Spell 1 DDDD 4 : D4 c Driving Rock Fusion Ethereal Guitar Effect Fade In h = 160 Drums Enter Q B * 3 B B ) ( Head D#5 4 B B L "# B "" BBBBQ B B B B B L E5 3 ( ) * ) * ) ( "" "# B "" BBBBQ B B B B B B B B B B B B5 3 ( ) * ) * ) ( "" ! ( ! "" "# ! "" "" 7 B B B B B ! ( "" ! ( B B B BB Q B B B B B BB Q B B B B B B BB B BB B L L G#5 E5 3 3 3 ! * ) ( "" "# "" ( ) * ) * ) ( "" "# "" ( ) * ) * ) ( B5 10 B B B B ! ( ! B B "" "# B ! B "" B B B B B ! ( "" ! ( B B B B B B L D#5 3 ! * ) ( "" "# B "" BBBBQ B B B 3 ( ) * ) * ) ( "" Copyright 2011 Brett Garsed All Rights Reserved .International Copyright Secured Page 1/9 .

E5 13 B B L "# B "" BBBBQ B B B B B B B B B B B B5 3 ( ) * ) * ) ( "" ! ( ! "" "# ! "" B B B B B ! ( "" ! ( B BBB 3 ! * ) ( "" G#5 16 B B B BB Q B B B B B B B B B > B Q BB BBBQ BB B L L B L E5 Verse 1 B 3 "# "" ( ) * ) * ) ( "" "# "" * "" * ) "" ) * "" * "" ) > B B B B P B B L L * "" ) * ) "" "" 20 Q B B B B B B L ) * "" * "" ) Q B B B B B B B L ) * ) ) * ) "" B B Q B Q B Q H Q BH B B B B B B L "" * ) L * 3 "" ) * "" ) * "" 24 GB B B Q B B E5 L * 1/2 * "" * ) "" ? @ > > A QBBB QBBBBBBQ BBBP BBB QBBBBBB L L L L L L Verse 2 B * ) "" ) * "" * "" ) * "" ) * ) "" ) * "" * "" ) 29 Q B B B B B B B L ) * ) ) * ) "" B BQ B Q B B B L "" * ) L * Q B BBBBB B B L 3 "" ) * ) "" ) * "" GB B B Q B GB F#5 * "" "" * "" "" L * "" "$ Page 2/9 .

33 . B A QB L L "# "" ZZZ ZZZZ F B B B B B B B B F B B B B B B B B Q B B B Q F B B B Q FB F B B Q L L 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 * ) * "" * "" "# "" "# "% "# "% "# "% "& "# "% "& "% "# "% ZZZ "% "% ZZZZ full "# "% ? 37 ZZZZZ A ZZZZZ B. "" ZZZZZZZZZ B B B B FB B B B B B FB B B FB FB > B QBB BBBQ BBBP BB> B B L L L L Verse 3 B "( "' "( "% "& "% "( "% ZZZZZZZZZ "# "& "% "# "% "# "" ) * "" * "" ) * "" ) * ) "" 42 Q B B B B B B L ) * "" * "" ) Q B B B B B B B L ) * ) ) * ) "" B B Q B Q B Q H Q BH B B B B B B L "" * ) L * 3 "" ) * "" ) * "" 46 GB B B Q B B E5 L * 1/2 * "" * ) "" ? @ ZZZZ > > B B Q BBBBBBQ BBB P BB Q BB BBBB A QBB L L L L L L Verse 4 B * ) "" ) * "" * "" ) * "" ) * ) "" ) ZZZZ ) * "" * "" 51 Q B B B B B B B L ) * ) ) * ) "" B BQ B Q B B B L "" * ) L * Q B BBBBB B B L 3 "" ) * ) "" ) * "" GB B B Q B GB F#5 * "" "" * "" "" L * "" "$ Page 3/9 .

L L B5 ") "$ ZZZZ B B B "' "% ") "' "' "' ") C# Page 4/9 . full ") E5 "* ? ") "' ZZZZ B B B ZZZZ B B. 3 A.H.55 A ZZZZ ZZZZ B . Q L B L "# "" B B B Q B B B Q FB B B 3 3 3 * ) * "" * "" "# "" "# Q FB FB 3 "% "# FB B B B FB B B B B 3 3 3 "% "# "% "& "# "% "& "% "# 58 B B B "% "% "% B B Q L "# "% ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ full A ? Q L B B ! B "% FB B B B F B B B B F B GB B B B B FB B "% "( "% "& "% "' "% "* "' "% "' "* "& "% "' "% "# "% 61 FB F B B B B B B F B B B B B BIR "% "" "# "% "# "" "% "$ Head D#5 E5 B5 BB = "% "# "" ZZZZZZZZ B B B B BBBB BBBB BA A G#5 ( * * * * * * * ( ( "# "% "" "# "" ZZZZZZZZ ( ( * E5 67 ZZZZZZZ = = ZZZZZZZ B5 P ZZZZZ A B ZZZZZ full "* B "( D#5 ? ?@ full "* B U B ZZZZ B B.

"%* "! * H H B BBB BBB B BB ( * ( & ( & % & "& "' "% "' "& "% "' F#m7 84 B B."'- BBBBBB "% "( "' "% "% "% B B. DB B B B B G B BB B B B B Q B D B B B B B B B B B D B BB 3 3 ( * "" "# "# "" * "" "# "" "% "" "# "$ "' "' "% "' "' "% "% "$ "% "# "% Page 5/9 .73 P B B B B ") "' ") G#5 Q BBBB B B 3 3 "" "$ "% "$ "% "' FB "( G5 3 B B FB "' "( FB 3 "% B B FB B B B B B B 6 3 "' "% "& "% "' "% "' "( "% "% Solo F#m7 76 DDDF F A full "* ? @ Q L B B B full "* "( ?@ B B B ZZZZZZ A 3 "* "( "* ") "( ZZZZZZ B BBBB B 3 "( "' "( "' "* "' B B B B ZZZZ B B. "( "% "' "% "( ZZZZ "% Em7 80 B BBBBB GB 1/2 "% ?@ B . % # P . B B B B B "% "% "% .

87 B DB B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B FB B B B B B B Em7 "( "' "% "' "% "' "$ "% "' "% "$ "' "% "$ "' "% "' "( "' "% "( "' ."#- "& "# "& "( ? A P BBBBBBBBBBBBB B Q "' ") "* "' "( "' "( "' "* "( "* "( ") "* "( "& "% 94 DB F B B F B DB F B ZZZZZ B B B B."*- ZZZZZZZZZZZZZ ZZZZZZZZZZZZZ full "* "& "' "& "* ? Q B B F B ZZZZZZ A full "( "( "& ? P "* ZZZZZZ Page 6/9 ."%- BBBB B B B F B D B B B B B B FB B FB "% "( "' "% "( * "! "" "# "" "! "" "# "! B FA full "# "& ? "( "% "& "( F#m7 90 B B B B B BB Q L ."&- @ B B B ZZZZ B BB ZZZZ full "( "( "( ZZZZZ ZZZZZ "# . B B B B B B F B B DB F B B F B B B B B B B B DB B B B B B B B B Em7 "* "' "* "' #! "* ") "( ") "( ZZZZZ L 3 3 ") "* ") "' ") "% "& "% "$ "( "' "& "% "( "% "' "( "' "* "' "( "' "( "' "* F#m7 "' "( "* 97 B FB B B B B B B 3 "' "( "' "* "' "& ! B B B "& "* ZZZZZZZZZZZZZ B ZZZZZZZZZZZZZ . A BB BB B B 3 "( 3 .

B B B B B F B B B B B B F B DB B FB B B B 1/2 ") "* ") ? H "& 106 R B B B B B B B B B B B FB BB B "% "" "# "' "# "' "% "' "# "% "# "% "% "& "% @ "% "& "% "( "% "& "' "% "% "( "% "% ") "% "' "' "% "' "% "# B."#- * "! ? @ ? . B B ."!- ZZZZZZZ GB ZZZZZZZ L DB * DB "" full "" "# "# "# ?@ ZZZZZZ ."#"# .101 P DB #$ B B B B B B B F B DB B B #" #% #" ## #" #$ #" ## #$ #" #% B B B B B B F B B DB F B DB F B F B B DB F B B 3 #" ## #" #$ #" #" ## #" #! "* #! "* ## #" #! "* #" 103 B B B B B BF B B B B B B F B B B B 3 #" "* "' "& "' "& "% "' "% "' "& "% "( Em7 B B B.""- ZZZZZZ B * 3 B B "# B B B B full ."# F#m7 ? B ZZZZ B Q BBB B 1/2 @ "" ? ZZZZ .""- @ * "" "! "# 109 B FB "$ B B . FB B B B B "& "* "& "% "( "' B "# Q B FB B B B full "% "# "% ."#- full Em7 112 P B B B B B B B B B B "% "' "% "& "( "% "( "% "( "& "% B B B B B B B B B B FB B B B B B 3 3 "# "& "# "& "% "# "% "# "% "# "% "# "% "# "" Page 7/9 ."%.

B B B A B B B B B B B B B B B F B DB B B DB F B B B DB B B B B B R M R B B P B "' "$ "& "' "$ "' "& "% "$ "' "$ "% "' "% "' "( "' "% "' "% "' "( "% "( "( "* "' "% "' "$ "% "$ ZZZZZZ 119 B DB F B F B DB F B F B DB F B "( #! ") "( ") "( #! "* ") .114 FB B B B B B B B "# "" "% "# "% "' "# "' F B DB "$ "% B FB B B B B "( "& "( "* "( "& "% B FB B B B B B B B B B B B B F B M R "& "% "& "% "# "# "% "& "( "& "% "& "% "$ F#m7 116 ZZZZZZ . B GB B B G B D B B B B F B DB L B B R B B FB B B B B B B B L B BBBB begin fade out Em7 "* "' "( "& "' "% "( "( "* "("* ## "* "' "% "% "' "( "% "( "' "% "' "% "' "( "' "% "' "# 122 B B B B B B F B GB B B B B R BBBBBBB B B BF B B B B B B B B R B B F B DB B B B B B B B M F#m7 "# "# "" * "# "" * "" "! "# * "! * "# "! "" "# * "" ( "% "# "! * "! * "" * ( ' ( ' * 125 B B B B B DB B B B B B B B B BB 3 ( ( ' * ' ( ' ( * "! * ( * ) ' * / B B B B B B B B B DB B B B B B B T * ( ) * ( * ( * ' ' ) * * "# * "! * "" "# "% "# "% "* "% "' Page 8/9 .

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R a f a e l P a d i l l aP e r c u s s i o n ( Mi a mi S o u n dMa c h i n e , S h a k i r a ) B o bP a r r B a s s ( C h e r , B r i a nS e t z e r O r c h e s t r a ) l f r e d oR e y e sJ r D r u ms Wa ( S a n t a n a , S t r u n z a n dF a r a h , R i c k y Ma r t i n ) A l f r e d oC a c e r e sG u i t a r ( H a me dN i k p a y , F e r n a n d oS o l a r e s ) C h a r l i eB i s h a r a t ( Y a n n i , A e r o s mi t h , R o l l i n gS t o n e s ) Mi c h a e l L i n g t o n ( C o n t e mp o r a r y J a z z S a x o p h o n i s t ) I v a nT o r r e s ( I n t e r n a t i o n a l R e c o r d i n gA r t i s t )

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Pacific Sunrise
Russ Hewitt
Music by Russ Hewitt - Transcription by Russ Hewitt & Jason Spell
Freely
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Copyright Russ Hewitt 2011 All Rights Reserved - International Copyright Secured

Page 1/5

C GB B B B B GB B B B B F/G ( ) % & Sax Break C D7/C Dm7b5 C F/G ) ( ) ( & ( % & # ( % & # ( C 28 D7/C Q B Dm7b5 B L & # B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B ' $ ) & ' $ ) & "! ( B B B B B DB B B GB B B DB B B G B B B B C E * ' "! ( "# "# "$ * * "! "# * "! ( "# * "! ( Page 2/5 . B B Q B B C C B B B B B L ) & + + + + ( % ( % ) & & # Fadd9 B B B B B B Q B B B B B B B B ' $ Esus4 L ) & B B B DB B B GB B B DB B B G B B E * ' "! ( "# "# "$ * * "! ' $ ) & "! ( "# * "! ( Prechorus Am 15 B B B B B B B DB B B B F B B B B B B B B Q B B B B Am/G Dadd9/F# Fadd9 Gsus4/D * ) "! * ) ) * ( ) ( ' ) ' & $ & $ % & $ & F/G B BB DB F B B B B B BB B G B ' $ ' & $ ' & ( ) ( & ( & ( 19 B & Chorus C B B B B B GB B & ( & & ( $ & D7/C B B Q B B B B B GB B & & ( & & ( $ & Dm7b5 B B Q B B B B B B.Dm7 12 B B B. C 22 B B P G B B DB F B B B E 3 $ & 2. GB & & ( & & ( & $ & ( ( 1.

Prechorus Am 32 B B B B B B B DB B B B F B B B B B B B B Am/G Dadd9/F# Fadd9 Gsus4/D * ) "! * ) ) * ( ) ( ' ) ' & $ & $ BBB B % & $ & F/G B BB DB F B B B B B BB B QG B L ' $ ' & $ ' & ( ) ( & ( & ( 36 B & Chorus C B B B B B GB B & ( & & ( $ & D7/C B B Q B B B B B GB B & & ( & & ( $ & Dm7b5 B B Q B B B B B B. C GB B B B B GB B B B B F/G ( ) % & 4.3. C 39 B P GB E $ & B ) B DB F B B B 3 ( ) ( & ( 2. GB & & ( & & ( & $ & ( ( 1. C F/G ( % & # ( % & # 42 Sax Break Am Dm7 Fadd9 Esus4 E Am Dm7 Fadd9 Esus4 E Guitar Break Am 50 GB B B B B B B B BB Q B GB B Am/G Dadd9/F# L * ) ) * * ) ) "! "! """# ) * "! ( B B DB B B B GB B B B B F B BB F 3 3 * ( "! ( ) * Am GB B B B B B B B BB Q B GB B Am/G L * ( "! ( ) ) "! ) * * ) ) "! "! "" "# ) * "! ( "! ) Page 3/5 .

)1. GB & & ( . 61 & ( ( & & ( $ & ( & & ( & $ & C B P GB $ & F/G B ) B DB F B B B 3 ( ) ( & ( 2. C Q GB B B B B B B B B B B B B L F/G ( * ( & ( & & ( & ( & & ( & Chorus C 63 B ) B GB B B B G B & ( H D7/C B B Q GBH B B B GB B & & ( Dm7b5 B B Q GBH B B B B. GB & & ( & & ( $ & ( & & ( $ & ( & & ( & $ & Page 4/5 .Dadd9/F# 53 Q G G DB BD FB B B B B B R B B B B B B F 3 ( ) ( ) Am GB B B B B B B B BB Q B GB B Am/G Dadd9/F# L * ( & ( ( & ( & & ( & & ( ( & & ( & & ( & ) ) * * ) ) "! "! "" "# ) * "! ( B B B B DB F B B B B B DB F B B F & ( ) ( & ( & ( ' & $ 56 BBB BBBBBB B B B B B B BB B BB BBBB Gsus4/D 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 $ & & & $ & & ) ) ) & ( ) "! "! "! ) * "! "$ "$ "$ "! "# F/G "& "$ "% B B B B B B G DB F B B B BB "& "$ "% "& "$ "% ( ) ( & ( & ( 58 B B & Breakdown/Chorus C B GB B B B G B & & ( $ & H D7/C B B Q GB B B B GB B & & ( H Dm7b5 B B Q GBH B B B B.

66 B C P GB $ & F/G B ) B DB F B B 3 ( ) ( & 2. B ( C F/G 68 Outro/Sax Solo C D7/C Dm7b5 Fade out 3rd time C 3x Page 5/5 .1.