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9th Grade English Unit Plan The Diary of Anne Frank English Common Core Standards: Reading: 1.

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (9-10.RL.1) 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. (9-10.RL.2) 3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. (9-10.RL.3) Writing: 1. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). (9-10.W.2) 2. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole. d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. (910.W.3) Speaking and Listening: 1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. a. Come to discussions prepared having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, and presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented. (9-10.SL.1) 2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally), evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source. (9-10.SL.2) 3. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. (9-10.SL.5)

Monday (50 min)  Journal Entry: If the government was out to get you because of your race, gender, religion, etc., what would you do? (10 min) Share thoughts with class. (5 min)  

Tuesday (85 min block) Journal Entry: If you had to go into hiding, where would you hide? (10 min) Share answers with class. (5 min)

Wednesday 

Thursday (50 min) Journal Entry: If you were under  the conditions of Anne Frank, would you confide your thoughts and emotions to a diary? Why or why not? (10 min) Share thoughts with class (5 min) 

Friday (50 min) Journal Entry: Do you think that teens are often alone and misunderstood? Why or why not? (10 min) Share thoughts with class. (5 min)

1. Video Clip: (3 min)  Concentration Camp Liberation 2. Video Clip Discussion: (25 min)  Place students into groups of 3-4 students.  Each group will discuss their thoughts about the video and what impacted them the most.

1. PowerPoint: Introduction to the Holocaust (20 min) -Hand out note taker 2. Timeline Activity: Create

1. Lecture: Who is Anne Frank? (15 min) 1. Book Discussion (30 min)  PowerPoint presentation  Progression of characters 2. Book Discussion: (15)  Important themes  Students will discuss their  Activity: Get in perceptions on Anne Frank and groups of 3-4 people

a timeline of the Holocaust and fill in the major events with the notes from your note taker. (10 min) 3. Exit Ticket: Write on a paper a piece of information about the Holocaust that impacted you. (5 min) 4. Homework: Read the foreword to The Diary of Anne Frank.

After they are finished with their discussion, one student from each group will go up to the board to write one thing they discussed. Class discussions.

who she is so far. 3. Closure: Based on class discussion, write 2-3 sentences on whether Anne Frank is similar to modern teenagers today. (5 min) 4. Homework: Read 25 pages of the diary and keep adding to dialectical journal.

3. Writing Activity: (42 min)  Students will be given pictures of Auschwitz-Birkenau camp.  Students will carefully look at the pictures.  Students will write a journal entry in the perspective of a prisoner being taken into the AuschwitzBirkenau camp. o Students must use a great deal of imagery and details to describe their experience. 4. Homework:  Finish writing assignment (due Thursday)  Read 40 pages of The Diary of Anne Frank. o Students will start a dialectical journal to fill in while reading. Tuesday (85 min block)

the information they have included in their dialectical journals. -Each group will share with class two entries and/or events in the diary that they believed to be important. 2. Closure: In one sentence, explain which journal entry and/or event that has happened thus far in The Diary of Anne Frank is the most important. Then, in two or three sentences, explain why. (5 min) 3. Homework:  Read 50 pages of The Diary of Anne Frank by Monday and keep filling in the dialectical journal.

Monday (50 min)

Wednesday

Thursday (50 min)

Friday (50 min)

Journal Entry: How does stereotyping and discrimination affect the way you view those that are different from you? (10 min) Share thoughts with class. (5)

Journal Entry: Discuss how you think you would change as a person if you were under the same circumstances as Anne Frank. (15 min) Share thoughts with class. (5 min)

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Journal Entry: Would you go out of your way to hide a loved one? Why or why not? (10 min) Share thoughts with class (5 min)

No journal entry for today.

1. Book Discussion: (15 min)  How did Anne and those living with her feel about the discrimination they felt from the Nazis? How did they cope with it?  Share any new information they have written in timelines. 2. Activity: (15 min)  Place students in groups of 3 to 4 people.  Each group will be given a long sheet of paper.  Each group will discuss and write down ideas/comments

1. Book Discussion: (15 min)  Do you see any maturity and/or progression with the characters?  Theme(s) 2. Closure: In two or three sentences, discuss with a partner which character has matured the most in The Diary of Anne Frank. (5 min) 3. Anticipatory Set (10 min)  Authority: Can it influence one’s actions, whether they be good or bad? 4. Video: Watch Milgram’s Obedience to Authority Experiment (15 min) 5. Discussion: (15 min)  “I was just following orders.”  How does this relate to the Holocaust?  Is this still seen in the world today?  Discuss the previously stated

1. Book Discussion: (15 min)  Characters  Theme(s)  Conflict

1. Quiz: Holocaust and The Diary of Anne Frank (20 min)

2. Project: (30 min)  Students will start on their project which is due next Friday. 2. Review for Quiz on Friday: (20 min)  Who are the characters? - Jeopardy Style Game What are their  Holocaust Terms (Antipersonality traits? What Semitism, Final Solution, Nazi, are their relationships to Hitler, Jews, etc.) one another?  The Diary of Anne Frank (up till  Brainstorm and look at now) specific entries from the o Characters, theme(s), diary. and conflicts  Hand Out Character Web and fill it in with 3. Homework: Study for quiz and read characters from The 25 pages of The Diary of Anne Diary of Anne Frank. Frank. 3. Homework: Read 50 pages of The Diary of Anne Frank and keep filling in dialectical journal.

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about the following questions: How can one as an individual fight against discrimination? What is the most that one can do?

questions with a partner 6. Closure: In two or three sentences, discuss how you’re influenced to obey what authority says. (5 min) 7. Homework: Read 40 pages by Thursday and keep filling in the dialectical journal.

3. Closure: In two to three sentences, address the following question: In your opinion, does discrimination still exist today in comparison to the discrimination the Jews underwent under the power of Nazi Germany? (5 min) 4. Homework: Read 25 pages of The Diary of Anne Frank by Tuesday and keep filling in the dialectical journey. Monday (50 min)  Journal Entry: Why do you think Anne Frank, a teenager girl, has become such a prominent symbol for the Holocaust? (10 min) Share thoughts with  Tuesday (85 min block) Journal Entry: If you had the chance to meet Anne Frank, what would you say to her? Why? (10 min) Share thoughts with class. (5 min) Wednesday  Thursday (50 min) Journal Entry: Would your understanding of the Holocaust be quite the same if Anne Frank had not taken a small plaid diary into hiding with her? (10 min) Share thoughts with class. (5  Friday (50 min) End of Unit Journal Entry: What do you think Anne Frank's life would have been like had she not perished in the concentration

class. (5 min) 1. Book Discussion: (15 min)  So far, what are Anne’s thoughts about the war?  So far, what are Anne’s thoughts about the Nazis? 2. Project: (20 min)  Students will choose a favorite movie or TV show (no cartoons or reality shows).  Hand out Character Web.  Students will analyze the character in the show and how they interact with one another. 3. Homework:  Read 25 pages of The Diary of Anne Frank and keep filling in Dialectical journal.

1. Book Discussion/ Activity: (30 min)  Characters/Theme/Conflict  Video Clips from the movie.  Students will get with a partner, and they will compare and contrast the diary to the film on a Venn diagram. o Class work- must be turned in at the end of activity 2. Project: (40 min)  Make a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting the characters of The Diary of Anne Frank and the characters of their favorite movie or TV show. (Turn in Venn Diagram)  Then, students will place the characters they chose from their favorite TV show or movie within the setting of The Diary of Anne Frank.  Students will write a two page scenarios (10) or a short play of how the characters would act if they were placed in the same context as read in The Diary of Anne Frank. 3. Homework:  Read the rest (20 pages) of The Diary of Anne Frank and keep filling in Dialectical journal.

min)  1. Book Discussion: (30 min)  How has Anne Frank impacted your life?  Did Anne Frank and the other characters mature by the end? 2. Closure: (5 min)  In two or three sentences, discuss how Anne Frank matured throughout the book. 3. Homework:  Finish the project to turn in on Friday.

camps? (10 min) Share thoughts with class. (5 min)

1. Discussion: (15)  What do you think is the legacy Anne Frank has left the world?  Discuss thoughts with a partner and then as a class. 2. Wall of Remembrance: (15 min)  Write a message as a memorial for the victims of the Holocaust. 3. Closure: (5 min)  In two or three sentences, discuss one thing that impacted you the most about the Holocaust.  Turn in project, character webs, journals, and dialectical journals.

Work on the scenarios/short play.

Resources: Borrowed Hardcopy Resources  The Diary of Anne Frank by Anne Frank Borrowed Online Resources  Character Web: http://www.create.cett.msstate.edu/create/classroom/handouts/Byrd_Michelle_CD3_Clash_Clan_Handout5.pdf  Project: http://www.create.cett.msstate.edu/create/classroom/lplan_view.asp?articleID=224  Milgram Experiment: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3f6LLV3fkXg  Wall of Remembrance: http://library.thinkquest.org/12663/wall.htm  Discussions/Journal Entries: http://www.litlovers.com/reading-guides/14-non-fiction/75-anne-frank-diary-of-a-young-girl?start=3  Concentration Camp Liberation: http://www.history.com/topics/the-holocaust/videos#concentration-camp-liberation  Auschwitz-Birkenau Camp: http://remember.org/jacobs/index.html  The Diary of Anne Frank (2009 film from YouTube) Teacher-Created Resources  Holocaust PowerPoint and Handout Note-taker  Who is Anne Frank? PowerPoint presentation  “I Was Just Following Orders” materials  Timeline Activity for the Holocaust  Holocaust Quiz