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Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation Program (CUPRI)

A Message from the Ontario Minister of the Environment

Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation


OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS

I am pleased to note the work that has been undertaken and accomplished by the Agricultural Adaptation Council (AAC) to promote research into greener alternatives for Ontarios landscape and lawn care industry. The Ministry of the Environment has provided funding to the AAC to establish the Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation (CUPRI) program. This program is integral to fostering new tools and approaches to managing lawns and gardens. My ministry is encouraged by the program results we have seen, particularly the progress in the development of new grasses for sport elds and promising approaches for the control of insect lawn pests. My ministry will continue to work closely with our

I commend the members of the AAC for their good work in support of protecting our environment and human health.

A Message from the Ontario Minister of the Environment An Introduction to CUPRI Fighting common turf grass bugs the natural way Project Listing

partners in the landscape and lawn care industry to investigate new tools for landscaping and lawn care. Building on the success of the CUPRI program will help ensure enhanced environmental performance for the sector. Yours sincerely, Jim Bradley Minister

These projects were funded in part through The Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation Program, which is funded by the Government Adaptation Council.

of Ontario, and administered by the Agricultural

An Introduction to CUPRI

Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation


OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS

The introduction of the cosmetic pesticides ban in 2009 brought with it the need to develop alternatives to the use of pesticides for cosmetic purposes in the lawn care, landscaping, park maintenance and turf management sectors. These alternatives were researched and tested through the Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation (CUPRI) Program administered by the Agricultural Adaptation Council (AAC). The Ministry of the Environment made available over $450,000 to 9 projects that created and evaluated greener options to pesticides for landscaping purposes including lawns, gardens, parks and turf grass.

Projects supported through CUPRI: Encouraged the development of biopesticides and lower risk pesticides for managing lawn and garden pests; Assessed the feasibility of commercialization of biopesticides and lower risk pesticides for maintaining lawns and gardens; Promoted innovation of alternatives to the use of pesticides for lawn and garden care; and Supported the growth of green industries and greener approaches to maintaining landscapes. The CUPRI program was extremely successful and provided crucial funding to research alternative products and processes to help the lawn care, landscaping, park maintenance and turf management sectors.

A Message from the Ontario Minister of the Environment An Introduction to CUPRI Fighting common turf grass bugs the natural way Project Listing

Project proposals were rst reviewed by a dedicated program committee of individuals representing the horticulture and lawn care sector as well as government representatives. Successful proposals were then recommended to the AAC board of directors for funding. The AAC board is comprised of individuals elected by their peers to serve the organization. Their in-depth knowledge of Ontarios agricultural, agri-food and agri-products sector and its needs helps ensure that projects and funds are allocated where they are needed, without duplicating other efforts.

These projects were funded in part through The Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation Program, which is funded by the Government Adaptation Council.

of Ontario, and administered by the Agricultural

Fighting common turf grass bugs the natural way

Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation


OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS

When Ontarios cosmetic pesticides ban came into effect in 2009, the lawn care industry needed to nd new pest management tools. Through a three year project initiated by Landscape Ontario, researchers at the Vineland Research and Innovation Centre (VRIC) and turf specialists at the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food (OMAF) set out to identify and evaluate biological control products for two of the most common

With bio-based products, you have to use them under conditions where theyll be most effective. For example, if the outside temperature is too high, it kills them and if its too low, it makes them in active, he explains. Application also has to tie in to the biology of the pest. With the Chafer, the older the larvae are, the less susceptible they will be to the control product. So timing is absolutely critical. The most effective nematodes against European Chafer

A Message from the Ontario Minister of the Environment An Introduction to CUPRI Fighting common turf grass bugs the natural way Project Listing

turf grass pests, European Chafer and Hairy Chinch Bug. There is a real need in the lawn care industry for pest management tools that are sustainable as well as being efcacious, says Dr. Michael Brownbridge from VRIC. European Chafer more commonly known as grubs and Hairy Chinch Bug are two of the most widely distributed turf pests in the urban and residential environment. Brownbridge and OMAFs Pam Charbonneau selected various nematodes tiny parasitic worms that kill pests and fungi used in other jurisdictions. They looked at different methods of application and formulation to determine whether these biopesticides would be effective in Ontarios climate and conditions. They also evaluated the inuence time of application has on product effectiveness. Researchers also found that treatments applied in the spring and fall when conventional lawn products had traditionally been used provided different levels of grub control. Those applied in the spring, when soil temperatures were less than ideal for the nematodes and the larvae were too old, were largely ineffective. The fall treatments, which targeted younger larvae were Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Steinernema glaseri, which are registered under a variety of trade names. Even so, the best control using optimal timing and targeting the most susceptible stage of the grub resulted in a kill of only about half of the population. Brownbridge says this shows the need for additional work to determine treatment thresholds and highlights the importance of taking an integrated management approach to maintain healthy lawn turf.

These projects were funded in part through The Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation Program, which is funded by the Government Adaptation Council.

of Ontario, and administered by the Agricultural

Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation


OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS

and soil temperatures were higher, provided about 50 per cent control. Interestingly, adds Brownbridge, when experiments included a chemical treatment as a comparison, not once did the chemical controls show better results than the biological ones. The nematode Steinernema carpocapsae, rosemary oil and a sprayable formulation of the fungus Metarhizium

Brownbridge, is to determine how these new varieties can work together with biopesticide products to control pests sustainably and effectively. For more information, visit www.landscapeontario.ca. This project was funded in part through the Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation (CUPRI) program. CUPRI is funded by the government of Ontario and administered by the Agricultural Adaptation Council.

A Message from the Ontario Minister of the Environment An Introduction to CUPRI Fighting common turf grass bugs the natural way Project Listing

anisopliae were found to be very effective against Chinch Bug in trials completed in 2010 and 2011. In 2012, researchers evaluated various non-biological products, including various soaps and oils, none of which were successful. These all work by contact with the pest and Brownbridge wonders how much the years hot, dry conditions contributed to the failure by altering the insects natural behaviour. Based on two years of data, we have several products that are great candidates. Now we need to look at what we should do in hot, dry years, he says. The essential foundation for any of these controls, though, is a healthy lawn that is well-managed and has great root development so it can tolerate damage. As a result of this project, researchers are now looking at some new, more resilient varieties of grasses that can be used in lawn seed mixes. The long-term goal, says

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These projects were funded in part through The Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation Program, which is funded by the Government Adaptation Council.

of Ontario, and administered by the Agricultural

Project Listing
Project Listing

Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation


OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS

Functional Biopesticides for the Lawn Care Industry


Landscape Ontario Horticultural Trades Association

Biological Control of Crabgrass


6310907 Canada Inc.

This project will identify and develop new biocontrol strategies to address the problem of white grubs in lawn turf. Determining the Efcacy of the Mustard Bio-Product CA-1 as a Bio-Herbicide
Ontario Turfgrass Research Foundation

The purpose of this project is to develop a fungus called Curvularia into an effective and selective bioherbicide for crabgrass. Field Evaluation of Biocontrols for Leatherjackets ( Tiphula paludosa )
Ontario Turfgrass Research Foundation

Determining the Efcacy of the Mustard Bio-product CA-1 as a Bio-herbicide.

This is a project to test the eld efcacy of various biocontrol agents on early stages of leatherjackets applied in the fall. Efcacy Evaluation of All-Natural Corn Gluten Blends in Turf for the Control of White Grubs
Ontario Turfgrass Research Foundation

A Message from the Ontario Minister of the Environment An Introduction to CUPRI Fighting common turf grass bugs the natural way Project Listing

Commercialization and Scale-up of Hydrolyzed Corn Gluten Meal


Environmental Factor Inc.

The ultimate aim of this project is to provide end users with a natural replacement product for chemicals. This product is to be hydrolyzed liquid corn gluten. Evaluation of Steam and Solarization as Alternatives to Herbicides in Ornamental and Turf Plantings
Landscape Ontario Horticultural Trades Association

This is a project to evaluate the efcacy of corn gluten-based formulation supplemented with neem of the control of white grub in turf.

Poa supina on pesticide free athletic elds and home lawns


Ontario Turfgrass Research Foundation

This project seeks to determine the effectiveness of steam and solarization treatments for weed control in ornamental gardens, and steam as an alternative to glyphosate for turf kill when overseeding or rejuvenating lawns. Efcacy of Bioherbicides and Lower-risk Herbicides for Weed Management in Lawns and Fruit and Vegetable Gardens
University of Guelph

This is a project to analyze the effectiveness of Poa Supina as a species for pesticide free home lawns and athletic elds.

This project will evaluate alternatives to cosmetic pesticides to manage weeds in lawns, and fruit and vegetable gardens.

These projects were funded in part through The Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation Program, which is funded by the Government Adaptation Council.

of Ontario, and administered by the Agricultural

Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation


OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS

A Message from the Ontario Minister of the Environment An Introduction to CUPRI Fighting common turf grass bugs the natural way Project Listing

Agricultural Adaptation Council Ontario AgriCentre Suite 103, 100 Stone Road West Guelph, ON N1G 5L3 519-822-7554
www.adaptcouncil.org

@adaptcouncil

youtube.com/adaptcouncil

These projects were funded in part through The Cosmetic Use Pesticides Research and Innovation Program, which is funded by the Government Adaptation Council.

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of Ontario, and administered by the Agricultural