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Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 Vol XIII, Edition 156
OBAMAS VALLEY VISIT
STATE PAGE 5
S&P HAS BEST
WEEK OF YEAR
BUSINESS PAGE 10
FARMERS SAY DROUGHT EFFORT LACKING
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Redwood City violated state envi-
ronmental requirements and its own
zoning ordinances and general plan
by approving a 16-house develop-
ment on steeply sloped lots at the
end of Laurel Way that may be prone
to landslides, according to a lawsuit
led Thursday by project oppo-
nents.
Save Laurel Way, the entity ght-
ing the Laurel Way Joint Venture
Project, also claims the city violat-
ed its own law by issuing a so-called
master planned development permit
because it is not dened or allowed
by the zoning code. Instead, the city
improperly used the planned
development permit process to
shoe horn a dense, cookie-cutter
subdivision into a small, semi-rural
area, defer [California
Environmental Quality Act] analy-
sis and shied from public review the
design and construction of 16 hous-
es, the suit stated.
The city cannot comment on
pending legal matters at this time,
said spokeswoman Sheri Costa-
Batis.
The suit names the city, the City
Council, Laurel Way Joint Venture
and Oded Haner. LWJVis 14 proper-
ty owners, included Haner, who
joined together to prepare the envi-
ronmental impact report and seek
city approval. The proposal calls
for 16 new houses, a 28-foot-wide
road and 50-foot-wide cul-de-sac.
The battle over the undeveloped,
4.75-acre site dates back several
years from the rst proposal to the
city in 2007 leading up to the
January 2014 approval of the mas-
ter planned development permit.
The Planning Commission
Redwood City sued over Laurel Way project
Opponents claim city violated the California Environmental Quality Act, its own zoning
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Drivers, heres
the bad news: Youll be paying
more for gasoline in the coming
weeks.
The good news: Youll likely
pay less than last year. Or the year
before, or the year before that.
The price of gasoline held steady
into early February, but an
increase is almost inevitable this
time of year. Pump prices have
gone up an average 31 cents per
gallon in February over the past
three years. And although this
years rise might not reach the
heights of years past, there are rea-
sons for drivers in some regions
like the Northeast to worry
about a painful spike.
Were going to get increases
and they are going to be notice-
able, says Tom Kloza, chief oil
analyst at Gasbuddy.com and the
Oil Price Information Service.
Were going to get that pop rela-
tively soon.
The price of crude oil has risen 8
percent over the past month, to
$100 per barrel. And analysts
expect fuel supplies to begin to
Higher gas
prices are
on the way
KERRY CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL
Students from Tim Weavers class at Roosevelt Elementary School share Valentine themed movies they produced
on iPads to residents at Atria Senior Center in Burlingame.
VALENTINES DAY VISIT
Still lower than last year at this time
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Lt. Gov.
Gavin Newsom, once a strong sup-
porter of Californias high-speed
rail project, told a conservative
radio show host Friday that he no
longer backs the bullet train and
would like to see the money divert-
ed to other projects.
I would take the dollars and
redirect it to other, more pressing
i nf r ast r uct ur e
needs, and I am
not the only
Democrat that
feels this way.
And Ive got to
tell you, I am
one of the few
that just said it
p u b l i c l y ,
Newsom said,
Newsom says to stop
high-speed rail plans
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Websites that post police mug
shots and demand hundreds or even
thousands of dollars for their
removal will be illegal under new
legislation introduced Friday by
state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San
Mateo, who compares the practice
to extortion.
Were all accountable for our
behavior but that doesnt mean
somebody should make money by
spreading your booking photo
around the world especially if
you were never convicted of a
crime, Hill said in an announce-
ment of his Senate bill.
The proposed legislation only
targets the for-
prot sites but
arrest records
and booking
photos would
still available
to media outlets
and interested
i n d i v i d u a l s
under the
C a l i f o r n i a
Public Records Act, according to
Hills ofce.
Specically, the bill will make
it illegal to solicit or accept pay-
ment to remove, correct or modify
online mug shot and each viola-
tion would carry up to a $1,000
ne.
Hill described the sites as y-
by-night enterprises that often
sully reputations and hinder
employment opportunities,
regardless of whether charges are
dropped.
One such case is that of former
New York police ofcer and lm
producer Bob DeBrino who was
arrested in January 2013 on suspi-
cion of driving while intoxicated
on methadone and Adderall by
Glendale police but charges were
dropped because the medication
was prescribed, according to Hill.
However, his mug shot remains
on websites demanding thousands
of dollars for removal and said his
Bill targets extortion mug shot websites
Jerry Hill
Gavin Newsom
See GAS, Page 23
See SUIT, Page 23
See HSR, Page 23 See MUG SHOT, Page 23
MEDAL COUNT
GOLD SILVER BRONZE TOTAL
4 Norway
U.S.A
Netherlands
3 6
4 3 6
4 5
13
13
12 3
Russia 2 5 12 5
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Christopher
McDonald is 59.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1764
the site of present-day St. Louis was
established by Pierre Laclede and
Auguste Chouteau.
We live by encouragement and die without
it slowly, sadly and angrily.
Celeste Holm, American actress (1917-2012)
Actress Jane
Seymour is 63.
Incubus Brandon
Boyd is 38.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A man gives a woman a "free hug" during Valentine's Day outside the Bellas Artes Palace in Mexico City Friday.
Saturday: Cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s.
Southeast winds around 5
mph...Becoming southwest 5 to 15 mph
in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Rain likely. Lows in
the upper 40s. South winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Aslight chance of rain in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Northwest winds around 5
mph. Chance of rain 20 percent.
Sunday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower to mid
40s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday:Sunny. Highs around 60.
Monday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s.
Tuesday through thursday...Mostly cloudy. Achance of rain.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
2 2 9
36 44 49 52 57 1
Powerball
Feb. 12 Powerball
10 19 28 32 39
Feb. 12 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
20 11 26 35
Fantasy Five
0 5 4
Daily three midday
I n 1564, Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei was born in
Pisa.
I n 1898, the U.S. battleship Maine mysteriously blew up
in Havana Harbor, killing more than 260 crew members and
bringing the United States closer to war with Spain.
I n 1933, President-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt escaped an
assassination attempt in Miami that mortally wounded
Chicago Mayor Anton J. Cermak; gunman Giuseppe
Zangara was executed more than four weeks later.
I n 1944, Allied bombers destroyed the monastery atop
Monte Cassino (MAWN-tay kah-SEE-noh) in Italy.
In 1952, a funeral was held at Windsor Castle for Britains
King George VI, who had died nine days earlier.
I n 1961, 73 people, including an 18-member U.S. gure
skating team en route to the World Championships in
Czechoslovakia, were killed in the crash of a Sabena
Airlines Boeing 707 in Belgium.
I n 1965, Canadas new maple-leaf ag was unfurled in cer-
emonies in Ottawa.
I n 1971, Britain and Ireland decimalised their currencies,
making one pound equal to 100 new pence instead of 240
pence.
I n 1982, 84 men were killed when a huge oil-drilling rig,
the Ocean Ranger, sank off the coast of Newfoundland dur-
ing a erce storm.
I n 1989, the Soviet Union announced that the last of its
troops had left Afghanistan, after more than nine years of
military intervention.
I n 1994, just as his trial was about to start, drifter Danny
Harold Rolling pleaded guilty to the 1990 murders of ve
college students in Gainesville, Fla. (Rolling was executed
in Oct. 2006.)
Former Illinois Congressman John Anderson is 92. Former
Defense and Energy Secretary James Schlesinger is 85.
Actress Claire Bloom is 83. Author Susan Brownmiller is 79.
Songwriter Brian Holland is 73. Rock musician Mick Avory
(The Kinks) is 70. Jazz musician Henry Threadgill is 70.
Actress-model Marisa Berenson is 67. Singer Melissa
Manchester is 63. Actress Lynn Whiteld is 61. Simpsons
creator Matt Groening (GREE-ning) is 60. Model Janice
Dickinson is 59. Reggae singer Ali Campbell is 55. Actor
Joseph R. Gannascoli is 55. Musician Mikey Craig (Culture
Club) is 54.
The ve interlocking rings of the
Olympics symbolize the ve conti-
nents of the world (Africa, Asia,
Australia, Europe and the Americas)
"linked together in friendship.
***
The average major league career of a
baseball is ve to seven pitches.
***
Because steel expands when it gets
hot, the Eiffel Tower is six inches
taller in the summer than it is in the
winter.
***
In Roman numerals X equals 10. Do
you know the Roman numerals for 5,
50, 100, 1000? See answer at end.
***
Abald eagles nest can be as large as
10 feet wide and 12 feet deep.
***
The longest recorded flight of a
domestic chicken is 13 seconds.
***
The cost of a first class postage
stamp in 1980 was 15 cents.
***
The size of Scarlett OHaras waist in
"Gone With the Wind was 17 inches.
Her waist was "the smallest in three
counties.
***
The maximum length permitted for a
squash racket is 27 inches. Squash is
played in 148 countries.
***
37.0 degrees Celsius, equivalent to
98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, is the normal
human body temperature. Typically, a
persons body temperature rises during
the late afternoon and drops late at
night.
***
Liberace owned 39 pianos. Eighteen
of his pianos are on display in the
Piano Gallery at the Liberace Museum
in Las Vegas, Nev.
***
It takes 40 minutes to hard-boil an
ostrich egg.
***
The average age when people start
needing bifocals to see clearly is age
40. Benjamin Franklin invented the
bifocal lens in 1784.
***
Napoleon Bonaparte had such a pen-
chant for white horses that he owned
50 of them.
***
If a contestant said the secret word
on "You Bet Your Life (1950-61) they
won $100.
***
Lt. Columbos badge number was
416. Peter Falk played Columbo, a
detective for the Los Angeles Police
Department, Homicide Division.
Columbo had a pet basset hound
named Dog.
***
Mount Waialeale on Kauai receives
the most rain in the United States. It
gets 460 inches of rain each year.
***
There are more than 2,700 different
languages spoken in the world, with
more than 7,000 dialects.
***
Over 21,500 members of the media
from around the world are traveling to
Greece to cover the Olympic games
this month.
***
The average porcupine has over
30,000 quills.
***
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has scored the
most points in NBA (National
Basketball Association) history. He
scored 38,387 points in his career.
***
One million pennies equals
$10,000.
***
Ans wer : Roman Numerals I=1,
V=5, X=10, L=50, C=100, CI=101,
D=500, M=1000, MCM=1,900
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? E-
mail knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call
344-5200 x114.
20 28 35 71 72 7
Mega number
Feb. 14 Mega Millions
0 0 6
Daily three evening
4
2
18
Mega number
(Answers Monday)
VISOR TRULY HYMNAL ENOUGH
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The couples Valentines Day was LOVELY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RUNPS
PIMKS
BUPCIL
NEPHHY
2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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Print your answer here:
The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Wind,No.
6,in rst place;Solid Gold No.10,in second place;
and Big Ben, No. 4, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:41.48.
3
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BELMONT
Ci ti zen assi st. Awoman said she thought
her phone was being tracked and reported it to
police at the station on Old County Road
before 11:26 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 6.
Public works call out. Aperson reported a
cooler placed on the sidewalk for a long peri-
od of time at Lyall Way and Continentals Way
before 12:32 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 5.
FOSTER CITY
Ci t i zen assi st . A man reported that a
woman from India was making harassing
phone calls to him before 3:10 a.m.
Monday, Feb. 3.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ance. A person
checked in to the Crowne Plaza hotel with a
fraudulent credit card before 12:42 a.m.
Monday, Feb. 3
SAN CARLOS
St ol en vehi cl e. A vehicle was reported
stolen at Elm Street and Magnolia Avenue
before 5:15 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7.
SAN BRUNO
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstance. A man was
jumping up and down and yelling at trees at
the 400 block of El Camino Real before 9:34
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 1.
Suspicious person. Awoman reported her
neighbor dug a hole in their front yard to steal
her water on the 2100 block of Crestmoor
Drive before 3:47 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1.
Lost vehi cl e. Aman called police to report
that he drank ve beers and could not nd his
car on the 200 block of Carlton Avenue
before 5:26 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1.
HALF MOON BAY
Driving infraction. Adriver was cited for
driving with a suspended license on the 100
block of San Mateo Road, before 1:41 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 4.
Vandal i sm. A person reported that an
unknown suspect had knocked over a fence
causing approximately $500 in damage on the
400 block of Wave before 12:00 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 31.
Stolen vehicle and stolen propert y. A
man was arrested for stealing a vehicle, with
narcotics and metal rails inside on the 200
block of San Mateo Road before 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31.
Police reports
The apocalypse is here
A woman possibly suffering from
dementia said her living room was lled
with zombies on Lincoln Avenue in
Belmont before 3:02 p.m. Thursday,
Feb. 6.
By Sara Gaiser
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
A Pescadero-based producer of grass fed
beef has issued a recall of all beef processed
in 2013 following a federal investigation
and recall of meat processed by a Petaluma
meat processor and wholesaler.
Leftcoast GrassFed has issued a statement
saying that while there have been no report-
ed illnesses from their products, they are
issuing the recall out of concern for the safe-
ty and health of their customers.
The company said in its statement that
Rancho Feeding Corporation, the Petaluma
slaughterhouse currently under scrutiny by
the U.S. Department of Agriculture,
processes many of its cattle, which are
billed as sustainably raised, humane and
entirely grass fed.
Rancho, located at 1522 Petaluma Blvd.
N. in Petaluma, has recalled all beef prod-
ucts processed between Jan. 1, 2013 and
Jan. 7, 2014-nearly 9 million pounds of
meat-- after the USDA found that diseased
and unsound animals had been slaughtered
without a full federal inspection. The recall
initially targeted only products produced on
Jan. 8, but has since expanded.
The Class I Recall indicates a high health
risk, and the un-inspected meat products
make them unsafe for human food, the
USDAs Food Safety and Inspection Service
said.
Leftcoast said in its statement that it con-
tracted with Rancho to process cattle on a
handful of days in the summer and fall of
2013.
We are sorry for this inconvenience and
saddened by the waste of millions of pounds
of meat, some of which, like ours, was
raised with meticulous care and attention to
the health and well-being of the animals
that produced it, the statement said.
The USDA has posted a list of more than
50 retail outlets in California and Florida
thought to have received shipments of the
affected meat, including dozens in the Bay
Area. Beef carcasses and boxes bear the
establishment number EST. 527 inside the
USDA mark of inspection, and each box
bears the case code number ending in 3 or
4.
No reports of illness have been received
in connection with the recalled products,
according to the USDA.
Pescadero company recalls beef
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 28-year-old man who thought he was
arranging a tryst with a 13-year-old
Millbrae girl arrived at the designated
Kohls store parking lot with alcohol and an
expired bottle of hot and sexy lotion,
according to prosecutors.
Marlon Melad Monton, of San Mateo,
rst met the real-life girl the morning of
Dec. 16 when he drove a black SUV up to
two 14-year-old Taylor Middle School stu-
dents walking west on Richmond Drive. The
girls later told school authorities and police
that the driver looked
under the influence of
something and handed
them a prewritten note
with a phone number and
the words hook up with
me before leaving. They
threw the note in the
bushes but a sheriffs
detective later retrieved it
and began a text message exchange with the
number. The detective pretended to be a 13-
year-old girl who said she wanted alcohol.
The responder texted that he could buy Four
Locos and marijuana for her and they
arranged to meet at the parking lot after
school.
On Dec. 18, deputies arrested Monton
after he arrived at the lot with alcohol in his
car along with a bottle of hot and sexy
lotion that expired in 2007, said District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Montons phone also reportedly con-
tained the text messages.
On Friday, Monton pleaded not guilty to a
count of attempted child molestation and
was scheduled for jury trial May 27.
He remains in custody on $200,000 bail.
DA: Man brought alcohol,sexy lotion to meet girl
Marlon Monton
Man arrested in closet
during home burgarly
ASouth San Francisco man is in jail after
hiding in a closet during a home burglary
Thursday night, according to police.
At approximately 11:55 p.m., the man,
identied by police as Esvin Zabaleta, 39,
was reported to have entered an occupied
home on the 400 block of Third Lane. He
contacted the woman inside the home ans
she locked herself in the bedroom and con-
tacted police, according to police.
Responding ofcers searched the home
and found Zabaleta hiding in a closet. He was
arrested and transported to a hospital for
treatment due to being under the inuence,
according to police.
Local brief
4
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 26-year-old man on probation for making annoying
phone calls is now charged with attempted kidnapping after
allegedly grabbing a woman walking in downtown San
Mateo Thursday afternoon and dragging
her roughly three feet.
The woman, also 26 years old, told
police she was walking around noon
when a man she later identied as Noah
Wayne Bennett grabbed her arm and
demanded she come with him. She replied
no and he dragged her before she could
pull away and run to her house to call
police, District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe
said.
Bennett told San Mateo police he had
taken the train to the city and was out window shopping near
Third Avenue at the time of the alleged incident.
On Friday, Bennett pleaded not guilty to one count of
attempted kidnapping and asked for a court-appointed attor-
ney. Bail was set at $175,000 and he remains in custody.
At the time of his arrest, Bennett was on probation. He
also has a criminal strike on his record for a 2010 Redwood
City robbery conviction.
Noah Bennett
Man on probation facing
attempted kidnap charge
Burlingame parking structure discussion continues
The Burlingame Trafc Safety and Parking Commission is
continuing its discussion of potentially building a parking
garage in downtown.
It held the second meeting of three discussing the structure
Thursday night and some Burlingame residents spoke about
potential alternatives to a parking garage.
I think there are a couple considerations, said resident
Christopher Bush. Think of congestion impacts of adding
parking. It could be inviting people to drive to downtown.
We should focus on better utilizing the existing parking
infrastructure. We would want to ensure we have a very
aesthetically appealing downtown parking structure.
Business owner David Jackson suggested looking at a
shuttle service to Caltrain as a trial run.
That might alleviate some of the extra cars looking for
parking, he said. It might be a Band-Aid for testing the
system.
Next month, the commission will make recommendations
to the Burlingame City Council on a potential structure.
Commissioners Mark Noworolski and John Martos will
bring back a discussion document on the matter at the March
meeting.
Local brief
STATE GOVERNMENT
State Sen. Leland Yee, D-
San Franci sco/ San Mateo,
received the highest score on the
California Labor Federations
annual legislative report card. Yee is
one of only 13 senators receiving a
100 percent rating this session. The
CLF represents 2.1 million union members in manufactur-
ing, retail, construction, hospitality, public sector, health
care, entertainment and other industries.
CITY GOVERNMENT
Bel mont is hosting a community workshop to gather
input about the Ralston Avenue corridor study conceptual
improvement plans Thursday Feb 20.
The study will determine the adequacy of using the corri-
dor for multi-modal uses including pedestrians, bicyclists,
transit and vehicles under existing and future conditions.
The meeting is 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Twin Pines Senior
and Community Center, 20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
The San Mateo City Council is holding a study ses-
sion to discuss the Community Development Department
management audit Tuesday, Feb. 18.
The meeting is 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave.,
San Mateo.
Nancy Charlow, a para-educa-
tor at Audubon Elementary School
in Foster City, is hosting a service
learning project for students at the
school. Students to are learning
about children their age living in
Cambodia and experiencing the joy
of giving to others. Students make
different and brightly colored
bracelets for the kids at Grace
House, a nonprofit school in
Cambodia. At the moment, there are more than 300
bracelets.
***
Registration is open for the San Mateo County School
Boards Associations March 10 dinner meeting on building
21st century learning environments using design thinking.
Speakers include Cary Matsuoka, superintendent of the
Milpitas Unied School District, Marcia Grilli, board
president of the Milpitas Unied School District, and
Ken Montgomery, executive director of the new charter
Design Tech High School.
The event takes place 6:30 p.m. at College of San Mateo,
1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd. in the College Heights Conference
Room, #468. Register at smcsba.org/events.
***
On Friday, Feb. 14, 320 sixth-grade students from Bowditch
Middle School graduated from the Foster City Police
Departments Gang Resistance Education and
Training program.
5
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BAY AREA
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO More than a ton of
illegal shark ns were seized from a vendor
in San Francisco, state wildlife ofcials said
Friday.
Michael Kwong, 42, of Kwong Yip Inc.
was cited for having 2,138 pounds of the
ns, which violates Californias ban that
went into effect in July, said Lt. Patrick Foy
of the California Department of Fish and
Wildlife.
Possessing shark ns, selling or trading
them is a misdemeanor under Californias
law, so Foy said it will be up to a judge to
determine any penalty.
Investigators were led to Kwong during an
investigation of an Emeryville restaurant
cited for selling shark n soup on Jan. 27.
We consider this an extremely egregious
violation of the law, Foy said. We will
work with San Franciscos district attorney
and push the case forward.
Amessage left for Kwong at his business
was not returned.
Kwong has been an outspoken opponent
of the states ban, and he was a member of a
Chinese-American group that sued to chal-
lenge its constitutionality, Foy said.
Conservation groups have estimated that
73 million sharks are killed each year glob-
ally for their ns, which are often cut from
live animals.
Opponents of shark nning praised the
states bust.
Californias shark n ban is critical to
ending the cruel practice of shark nning,
and to protecting sharks and ocean ecosys-
tems for future generations, Jennifer
Fearing of the Humane Society of the U.S.
said in a statement. This important bust by
Californias thin green line sends a strong
message that breaking Californias animal
protection laws has consequences.
Kwong insisted that the fins be kept
refrigerated during the investigation, in the
hopes that he would get them back, Foy
said.
The ns are often used to make shark n
soup, a traditional Chinese dish.
Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland,
New York, Oregon and Washington also
have state bans on the possession or sale of
shark ns, according to the Humane Society.
Officials make big shark
fin bust in San Francisco
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO San Francisco Bay
Area health ofcials issued a public warning
that a college student with measles could
have exposed thousands of others when he
attended classes and rode public transit.
The ofcials said Thursday they had con-
rmed that the student diagnosed last week
was not vaccinated and was likely infected
with measles during a recent trip to Asia.
The student in his 20s lives in Contra
Costa County and attends classes at the
University of California, Berkeley.
The measles virus can stay suspended in
the air for up to two hours, said Janet
Berreman, a health ofcer for the city of
Berkeley said Friday.
That can lead it to being very conta-
gious, said Berreman, adding that no other
measles infections related to the case have
been identied so far.
Kim LaPean, a university health services
spokeswoman, said UC Berkeley health
ofcials have contacted about 100 students
who were in class with the infected student.
The school also has ordered about 300 doses
of measles vaccine from the state for any
students not vaccinated.
Well continue to monitor the demand for
the vaccination and may hold a clinic if nec-
essary, LaPean said.
In Southern California, at least 10 ele-
mentary school students without complete
immunization records in Temecula were sent
home Thursday after a student was diagnosed
with measles.
Nationally, about 189 people were report-
ed to have measles last year, according to
the federal Centers for Disease Control.
That gure represented the second-largest
number of cases in the U.S. since 2000.
About 28 percent of these people got
measles in other countries, the CDC said.
Symptoms can begin one to three weeks
after exposure and can include high fever,
runny nose, coughing and watery red eyes. A
rash could develop on the face and neck two
to three days after a fever begins and could
spread across the entire body, Berreman
said.
Bay Area officials warn
of measles exposure
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE Aveteran Northern California
reghter is in custody on suspicion of sell-
ing and possessing methamphetamine, pro-
viding narcotics to minors and child molesta-
tion, state justice ofcials said Friday.
Mario Enrique Cuestas, 53, was arrested
Thursday at the San Jose re department
administration headquarters, California
Department of Justice spokeswoman Michelle
Gregory said Friday. Agents from a state-run
regional task force later seized computers and
personal records from Cuestas ofce and his
home for evidence.
Authorities arrested Cuestas, a San Jose re-
ghter for 20 years, after receiving a tip that
sparked a two-month investigation revealing
he was soliciting children for sex through
websites, Gregory said.
Cuestas recently became the departments
public outreach liaison that puts him contact
with schools, churches and other community
organizations, re ofcials said.
News of his arrest left his colleagues sur-
prised and angry. Deputy Chief Robert
Sapien, president of the San Jose reghters
union, said the accusations against Cuestas
seem out of character.
The charges and the arrest are shocking to
me and to all reghters right now. Everyone
feels horrible about that, Sapien said. To
have that compounded by having a reghter
associated with those crimes is difcult.
Clearly, the behaviors are not in line with
what were here to do, which is to help peo-
ple.
Fire Capt. Cleo Doss, a re department
spokesman, said the accusations could break
trust with the community.
Its something that we dont tolerate. It
goes against everything that this badge
stands for, Doss said.
Cuestas is being held without bail at the
Santa Clara County Jail. Fire department of-
cials say he has been placed on unpaid admin-
istrative leave.
San Jose firefighter accused of child molestation
6
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Scott Smith
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRESNO Farmers in Californias
drought-stricken Central Valley said the
nancial assistance President Barack Obama
delivered on his visit Friday does not get to
the heart of Californias long-term water
problems.
Amid one of the driest years in the states
recorded history, Obama came to the Fresno
area to announce $100 million in livestock-
disaster aid, $60 million to support food
banks and another $13 million toward
things such as conservation and helping
rural communities that could soon run out of
drinking water.
Obama told reporters in the rural town of
Firebaugh, where he met with community
leaders, that he wasnt about to wade into
California water politics. Yet the president
gently warned Californias leaders to nd
common ground rather than thinking of
water as a zero-sum game.
Were going to have to gure out how to
play a different game, Obama said. If the
politics are structured in such a way where
everybody is ghting each other and trying
to get as much as they can, my suspicion is
that were not going to make much
progress.
In his three-hour visit to the Central
Valley, Obama also toured a farm in Los
Banos to see the droughts impact rsthand.
Another farmer, Sarah Woolf, a partner
with Clark Brothers Farming, said anything
will help, but the federal government needs
to better manage the states water supplies
so farmers have enough during future
droughts like the current one.
Throwing money at it is not going to
solve the problem long-term, she said.
The Central Valley produces nearly one-
third of the nations fruits and vegetables,
and Fresno County leads the nation in agri-
culture. Ryan Jacobsen, executive director of
the Fresno County Farm Bureau, estimated
that 25 percent of the countys irrigated land
will go unplanted this year.
The drought has caused Democrats and
Republicans in Congress to propose dueling
emergency bills. Led by Republican Rep.
Devin Nunes, the House passed one that
would free up water for farmers by rolling
back environmental protections and stop
the restoration of a dried-up stretch of the
San Joaquin River that once had salmon
runs.
Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and
Barbara Boxer proposed their own version
that pours $300 million into drought-relief
projects without changing environmental
laws. The bill would allow more exibility
to move water from the Sacramento-San
Joaquin Delta to farms in the south and speed
up environmental reviews of water projects.
Mark Borba said he wasnt invited to share
his story with the president. His familys
Borba Farms wont plant one-third of the
11,000 acres of almonds, tomatoes, garlic,
lettuce, onions and much more they typical-
ly grow. Borba said the president could ease
this years drought hardship on farmers by
relaxing federal environmental regulations
within the boundaries of the law intended to
protect endangered sh.
We dont want money, Borba said. We
dont want a handout.
Not everybody dismissed Obamas
announcement. Rick Palermo of the
Community Food Bank in Fresno said he
expects that the drought will lengthen lines
in three Central Valley counties he serves.
The Fresno food bank expects to receive
some of the presidents money, but his
worry is that the donations they get from
farmers may be lacking.
About half of the 30 million pounds of
food they distribute each year is grown in
the Central Valley, he said.
Farmers: Obamas drought relief efforts lacking
REUTERS
California governor Jerry Brown,left,and President Barack Obama walks with farmers Joe Del
Bosque and Maria Del Bosque as he tours a drought affected farm eld in Los Banos Friday.
President Obama will pledge on Friday to speed federal assistance to help California recover
from a crippling drought that is threatening the critical agriculture industry in the No. 1 farm
state.
Boy Scouts sex lawsuit can proceed to trial
SANTA BARBARA A sex-abuse lawsuit against the Boy
Scouts of America survived a legal challenge Friday and is set for
trial later this year in California.
Santa Barbara County Superior Court Judge Donna Geck reject-
ed allegations of negligence against the Scouts at a hearing
Friday, but she said a 13-year-old former Scout could nonetheless
pursue the organization in court for failure to properly educate
Scouters about the dangers of sexual abuse, the Santa Barbara
News-Press reported.
The judge will also allow the plaintiff to pursue punitive dam-
ages.
The lawsuit was led by a boy who alleges he was molested by
a Scout leader while working at a troop-sponsored Christmas tree
sale in Goleta in 2007. The abuse occurred when the boys moth-
er stepped away for a moment and he was left alone with a 400-
pound former Eagle Scout who was acting as a volunteer leader,
the claim alleges.
The boys attorney, Timothy Hale, had argued in court papers
that the Boy Scouts were liable for negligent supervision because
another Scout had previously reported inappropriate behavior by
the volunteer leader, Al Stein.
State brief
STATE 7
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
REDDING Authorities prepared Friday to
burn down a mobile home where they said
more than 60 pounds of highly volatile explo-
sive material was found, making it risky for
deputies to walk the California property and
forcing the evacuation of dozens of nearby res-
idents.
The chemicals, gunpowder, primers for
rearms cartridges and other materials were dis-
covered on Feb. 6 after authorities responded
to an explosion at the dwelling in a sparsely
populated area of Redding in Northern
California.
Aresident, identied as D. Ray East, 63, lost
his left hand, broke his right arm and almost
lost sight in one eye in the blast, Shasta
County sheriffs Lt. Dave Kent said.
East remained hospitalized, and Kent said a
warrant was expected for his arrest. East told
investigators he was making fuel for model
rockets, according to Kent.
The mandatory evacuations began on Feb. 7
and were expanded Friday by another 30 or so
homes, Kent said. Roughly 55 homes were
under evacuation orders.
Unfortunately, were going to have to
destroy the house, he said. Whether its cut-
ting electricity to the house or placing materi-
als to set the re, anybody in that area is at
risk.
Easts attorney, Jeffrey Stotter, told the
Record Searchlight of Redding
(http://bit.ly/1gGaPhn) that East regrets the
inconvenience he has caused his neighbors but
doesnt think the materials at his home pose a
threat.
The sheriffs ofce and local ofcials dis-
agreed. The Shasta County Board of
Supervisors on Tuesday approved an emer-
gency declaration, and the sheriffs ofce
expanded the evacuation area to a radius of
2,000 feet from the house.
Im not happy about this, but if (the house)
blows up, Id rather not be in it, resident Liam
OConnell told the newspaper as he evacuated.
OConnell and his wife planned to stay with
their daughter but rst needed to make arrange-
ments for their pet goat.
The Red Cross has set up an evacuation cen-
ter, though Kent said most of the displaced res-
idents were with friends or family.
Deputies planned to consult with water and
air quality ofcials before proceeding with the
incineration. Smoke plume models will be
used to determine where the chemicals could
disperse, Kent said.
Were looking for clear skies and no wind,
he said.
Sheriff will destroy
explosive-laden home
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
YOSEMITE NATIONALPARK Yosemite
National Park will cap visitors at current
levels in its most popular areas, but it will
add campsites and maintain bike and raft
rentals under a plan announced Friday to
protect the river that runs through its heart.
Tourists complained last year when the
National Park Service considered getting rid
of bicycle and river-raft rentals as part of a
court-ordered effort to protect the Merced
River, which received congressional wild
and scenic designation in 1987.
Park ofcials have long wrestled with pre-
serving the river while maintaining public
access to Yosemite Valley, which receives
the bulk of the parks 4 million visitors
each year.
The third-most visited national park,
Yosemite boasts 1,200 square miles of
wilderness. Most visitors end up in the 8-
square-mile Yosemite Valley, home to the
towering Half Dome and El Capitan granite
monoliths, stands of pines and stair-step
waterfalls.
The number of visitors to Yosemite Valley
will be limited to 18,710 a day and 21,000
visitors a day during peak times similar
to trafc seen in the last several years. The
park planned to ease congestion by adding
shuttle buses and improving trafc ow.
Once capacity is reached, cars will be
turned away and directed to other sections of
the park. There will also be advance warn-
ing signs posted once trafc gets too heavy.
Environmentalists said the plan does lit-
tle to ease overcrowding.
The National Park Service has chosen to
nibble around the edges instead of taking a
big bite out of the congestion and crowding
that degrades Yosemite Valley, said John
Buckley, executive director of the Central
Sierra Environmental Resource Center.
He added: The heart of the Yosemite
Valley will continue to be diminished by
too many people and too many cars.
Bruce Hamilton, deputy executive director
of the Sierra Club, said he supports the
expanded use of public transportation and
bike rentals.
Those measures, however, fall short of
what is needed to x the congestion that
detracts from the beautiful natural setting,
he said.
After receiving thousands of public com-
ments, park ofcials decided that people can
still bike and raft, but the rental facilities
will be moved farther away from the ood-
prone river.
Under the revised plan, the park will also
add 174 more campsites for a total of 640
sites, and increase parking for visitors who
dont stay overnight. Ofcials also tabled a
proposal to develop the west end of
Yosemite Valley. A 1920s-era ice-skating
rink will be moved back to its original loca-
tion outside the river corridor.
It strikes a balance between protecting
the river and improving access, said
Kathleen Morse, the parks chief of plan-
ning.
The National Parks Conservation
Association agreed.
The proposal ensures that Yosemite will
maintain its crown jewel status over the
long-term, said Neal Desai, a eld director.
Once the plan is nalized within a month,
park ofcials will begin work to restore
nearly 200 acres of meadows by removing
stones and cement in riverbeds. Native veg-
etation will be planted to stabilize river-
banks, and some roads and trails will be
removed.
Yosemite plans to
cap visitor levels
NATION 8
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NORFOLK, Va. The day after a federal
judge struck down Virginias gay-marriage
ban, state Attorney General Mark Herring
wasnt vowing to appeal or insisting his
states law was sound.
Instead, he held a jubilant news conference
and declared it a great day for equality in
Virginia, boasting that he was putting the
state on the right side of the law and the
right side of history.
Despite their duty to defend the laws on the
books, state attorneys general are increas-
ingly taking an unusually supportive role in
the movement to legalize gay marriage
across the U.S. Some, like Herring, are
refusing to defend their states prohibitions
against same-sex matrimony.
Conservatives have bitterly accused them
of shirking their sworn responsibility. But
the AGs say that the legal case against gay
marriage is crumbling and that it would be
improper for them to argue positions they
have concluded are clearly unconstitutional.
Attorneys general in five states
Virginia, Pennsylvania, California, Illinois
and, this week, Nevada have declined to
defend same-sex marriage bans against law-
suits led by gay couples, while a sixth, in
New Mexico, challenged longstanding legal
interpretations that said such unions were
impermissible there. The AGs are all
Democrats.
Also this week: The Democrat running for
Colorado attorney general called on the cur-
rent Republican ofceholder to stop defend-
ing the states prohibition. And in Texas,
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy
Davis demanded that her likely GOP oppo-
nent, Attorney General Greg Abbott, do the
same.
The developments illustrate the growing
public acceptance of gay marriage and the
rapidly shifting legal landscape since last
summer, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck
down a key part of the Defense of Marriage
Act that denied gay married couples the fed-
eral benets and privileges enjoyed by het-
erosexual couples.
Its unusual, but not unheard of, for attor-
neys general to decline to defend a state law.
Gay-marriage opponents argue that attor-
neys general, as the top lawyers for their
states, are supposed to represent their client
the state regardless of personal
beliefs.
It shows a complete collapse of the line
between law and politics, said Ed Whelan,
president of the Ethics and Public Policy in
Washington. The defense of these laws is
not being litigated the way it ought to be,
and defenders of marriage laws will have
ample reason to believe the process is
rigged against them.
But Brian Moulton of the Human Rights
Campaign said the moves demonstrate the
impossibility of defending gay-marriage
bans in court. He noted that in three deeply
conservative states where the gay-marriage
movement recently won legal victories, the
attorneys general were on the losing side.
When you have federal district judges in
places as diverse as Utah, Oklahoma and
now Kentucky coming to the same conclu-
sion, that points to an emerging legal con-
sensus, Moulton said. I dont think its
shocking that you have attorneys general
who are looking at how the law is emerging
and are coming to similar conclusions.
The rst attorney general to stop defend-
ing his states ban was Californias Jerry
Brown, now governor. The U.S. Supreme
Court soon ruled that gay-marriage foes did
not have the legal standing to argue the case
in the AGs absence. With no opposing argu-
ment, the ban fell last year.
Illinois Lisa Madigan took a similar stand
in 2012, but before the case could go to trial,
the Legislature legalized same-sex marriage.
Pennsylvanias Kathleen Kane bowed out
last year, but the Republican governors
ofce assumed the duty.
In Virginia, the judge who struck down the
ban as unconstitutional put the ruling on
hold while it is appealed. If it is ultimately
allowed to take effect, Virginia could become
the rst state in the South to allow gay cou-
ples to wed.
The newly elected Herring was in ofce
less than two weeks when he announced last
month that he would ask the court to over-
turn the states 2003 voter-approved ban.
Herring had supported it a decade ago but
said he had since concluded it was unconsti-
tutional.
Republicans were furious.
Im a lawyer, said state Delegate Todd
Gilbert. I take positions I may nd person-
ally distasteful when they may benet a
client because thats my role as an attorney.
North Carolina Attorney General Roy
Cooper, a Democrat, has taken a similar
stand. While he supports same-sex unions,
he said in a statement: When legal argu-
ments exist to defend a law, it is the duty of
the Ofce of the Attorney General under
North Carolina law to make those arguments
in court regardless of whether I agree with
the law.
Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez
Masto said in an interview this week that a
recent federal appeals court ruling that gays
could not be excluded from juries because of
their sexual orientation had gutted the
argument the state was using to ban gay mar-
riage.
You have to look at the law, look at the
legal merits and see if you have a good-faith
defense, she said, adding that her personal
views on gay marriage are irrelevant.
Observers say the next attorney general in
the hot spot may be Oregons Ellen
Rosenblum. Last year, the Democrat signed
on to Supreme Court briefs arguing it was
unconstitutional to deny gays the right to
marry. A federal lawsuit challenging
Oregons ban is moving ahead. A
Rosenblum spokesman had no comment
Friday.
Attorneys general switching sides on gay marriage
Despite their duty to defend the laws on the books, state
attorneys general are increasingly taking an unusually supportive
role in the movement to legalize gay marriage across the U.S.
Great Lakes become nearly covered with ice
CHEBOYGAN, Mich. From the bridge of the Coast Guard
cutter Mackinaw, northern Lake Huron looks like a vast, snow-
covered eld dotted with ice slabs as big as boulders a battle-
ground for the icebreakers 58-member crew during one of the
roughest winters in memory.
Its been so bitterly cold for so long in the Upper Midwest that
the Great Lakes are almost completely covered with ice. The last
time they came this close was in 1994, when 94 percent of the
lakes surface was frozen.
As of Friday, ice cover extended across 88 percent, according to
the federal governments Great Lakes Environmental Research
Laboratory in Ann Arbor.
Sections of the lakes, which hold nearly one-fth of the fresh-
water on the worlds surface, harden almost every winter. That
freezing keeps the Coast Guards eet of nine icebreakers busy
clearing paths for vessels hauling essential cargo such as heating
oil, salt and coal.
National briefs
OPINION 9
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Salary and PTO change
Editor,
At the Feb. 5, 2014 meeting of the Se-
quoia Healthcare District Board of
Directors, CEO Lee Michelson was
given a 5.35 percent raise to $192,800
per year. The increase was retroactive
to his anniversary date of April 27,
2013, which will cost the district an-
other $10,000. Lee has also opted to
take advantage of the CalPERS health
insurance benets offered to directors
and employees at an added cost of
$13,160 per year.
The CEO manages one full-time and
three part-time employees. He over-
sees distribution of property tax
derived assets and revenue of $17 mil-
lion and $10 million per year,
respectively. These funds are dis-
pensed in a manner more suitable to a
philanthropic organization. Michel-
son, a fundraising superstar, is also a
member of the Silicon Valley Chapter
of the Association of Fundraising Pro-
fessionals, which awarded the district
the outstanding corporate Grant-
Maker award in 2011. No surprise that
the district was nominated by no less
than seven of its grant beneficiaries
who received a total of more than
$700,000 of funding from the Sequoia
Healthcare District that fiscal year.
If the district survives efforts to dis-
solve it, look for a Tramutola-crafted
parcel tax election in your future as Lee
hones his fundraising skills.
Jack Hickey
Emerald Hills
Americas direction
Editor,
John McDowells column View
from the Lariat, (Feb. 8-9 edition of
the Daily Journal) was informative.
The opinions of the Lariats patrons
ranged from concern over our failing
schools, the high cost of Obamacare,
rising rents, the doubtful long-term
viability of Social Security and even
the overarching sense that our polili-
tians care little about the middle
class. As patron Mike asks, what
happened to the values of working for
a living? As Mr. McDowell correctly
states, these stories are not scientific
polls. However, the recent Jan. 26
NBC News and Wall Street Journal
poll discovered that 63 percent of re-
spondents thought that America was
headed in the wrong direction, and
that is scientific.
Ethan Jones
San Bruno
What are the chances?
Editor,
The conservative John McDowell in his
column in the Weekend edition of the
Daily Journal (Feb. 8-9) titled View
from the Lariat would lead his readers to
believe a purely random sample of inter-
viewees at a local sports bar gave a
reasonable perspective of our countrys
political status. One would note every re-
sponse was negative and (whoa, the
irony) the subjects were right wing tar-
gets such as Obamacare, Social Security,
entitlement programs and debt reduction.
What are the chances the responders
were asked purely objective unbiased
questions? What are the chances these
responders were a representative sam-
ple of all who were questioned or of the
population in the bar? What are the
chances even one positive response
would be included in the column?
Answers: slim and none, and slim left
town.
Rel Kempf
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Kansas City Star
I
t is extremely encouraging to
see people in all walks of life
send congratulatory messages
to University of Missouri football
player Michael Sam after he coura-
geously revealed Sunday night that
hes gay.
This outpouring of support from
teammates, coaches, fans, celebri-
ties and politicians shows that
much of America has progressed on
this social issue.
Sams announcement is a water-
shed moment in the march toward
equal rights for gay and lesbian
Americans. He is poised to become
the first openly gay player in one
of the nations great pastimes, the
National Football League.
However, the national blitz of
mostly positive attention for Sam
cant block out some ugly realities.
Open prejudice still exists against
gay athletes in football and other
major league sports. Intolerance
manifests itself in other arenas,
too; witness attempts in state legis-
latures to prevent same-sex couples
from having their marriages recog-
nized.
The most important next step for
Americans to watch regarding Sam
will arrive at the NFL draft in early
May. Thats when well find out
whether some evolution on gay ath-
letes has occurred in the workplaces
of the older, too-often-bigoted NFL
officials who will decide which
team will draft him.
In a chilling article Sunday,
Sports Illustrated gave anonymity
to NFL officials, all of whom pre-
dicted various troubles for Sam. He
would lose money by being picked
lower in the draft, meaning coming
out was not a smart move for him.
He would chemically imbalance an
NFL locker room and meeting
room, becoming a big distraction
for his team.
These NFL officials need to exam-
ine what happened at MU this year:
The entire team knew about Sams
orientation, yet the Tigers went on
to have an extremely successful sea-
son.
Maybe the young men and women
who play sports these days have a
different, more enlightened take on
this matter. So do some college
coaches. As University of Kansas
basketball coach Bill Self said
Monday, I dont think anybody
should ever have to live or hide
behind who they are or how they
feel.
Michael Sam finds himself in a
unique situation, given the mega-
attention that the NFL receives. And
that makes his story extra com-
pel l i ng.
Sam and the other gay men
who will follow him into the league
should have the opportunity to
open peoples eyes while playing
on the biggest stage for sports in
America.
Big step forward for Americas gay athletes
Political earthquake
A
n earthquake recently shook the political land-
scape. It overturned assumptions that go back at
least a decade or more. Stereotypes and the status
quo tumbled on their heads. Establishment types in
Washington and Sacramento were shaken. The epicenter
of that quake was right here in the Silicon Valley.
What happened? The Republican National Committee
opened a technological ofce in San Mateo County a
county with 19 percent Republican registration and in an
industry not known as friendly to conservative thought.
It goes back to the Romney loss in the 2012 presiden-
tial election. Arigorous RNC post-mortem, the Growth
and Opportunity Project, dissected what went wrong. The
report noted among other things that, the presidents
campaign signicantly changed the makeup of the nation-
al electorate and identied, per-
suaded and turned out low-
propensity voters by unleash-
ing a barrage of human and
technological resources previ-
ously unseen in a presidential
contest.
To counter that advantage, the
authors concluded that the RNC
must develop a culture where
learning and research are valued,
information is shared, every
form of contact is tested and
measured and our talent pool
particularly in the areas of data,
digital and technology is expanded. The result is Para
Bellum Labs, just opened in San Mateo.
Chuck DeFeo, the RNCs chief digital ofcer, said Para
Bellum Labs (Latin for prepare for war) is a unique start-
up, incubated in the RNC that will pull the party forward
into a data-centric approach to campaigning. Under his
direction, that of Chief Data Ofcer Azarias Reda (formerly
of LinkedIn), and of Chief Technology Ofcer Andy
Barkett (formerly of Facebook and a resident of Redwood
City), Para Bellum will utilize leading edge Big Data tech-
niques to build a unied data warehouse merging voter,
donor and digital marketing data with email les, social
media proles and other information.
To be clear, the Obama campaign, the DNC and their pri-
vate spin-offs are still ahead in this game. But the RNC is
catching up. They see Para Bellum and other efforts as
being able to leapfrog the now legacy systems of the
Democrats and their progressive-liberal allies. In a recent
meetup in San Franciscos SOMA, Barkett likened his
efforts to that of developing countries going straight
from no telecommunication infrastructure to ubiquitous
cellphone penetration, doable since they had no legacy
landline systems holding them back.
The key to the initiative is nding world-class data ana-
lysts and others willing to work in pursuit of changing the
direction of the country rather than for stock options. In
Silicon Valley, that isnt so easy for the RNC. At that same
meetup, Barkett recalled how when he took the CTO job he
began having whispered conversations and furtive email
exchanges with engineers who confessed that they too
were Republicans. He said that in his group at Facebook it
was easier to know about a co-workers personal life that it
was to learn that she might be a Republican.
Thats why the efforts of people like Aaron Ginn, a
young San Mateo techie who works at StumbleUpon, are
vital to the success of the RNC effort. Ginn, along with
partners Chris Abrams and Garrett Johnson (a Rhodes
scholar), formed Lincoln Labs to bring center/right, con-
servative, and libertarian tech talent together in meetups
and hackathons.
Lincoln Labs not only networks such talent, but it sur-
faces those coders, engineers and others who might be
interested in joining Para Bellum, the RNC and their sister
organizations. This role is critical, because as Barketts
experience points out, its not easy being conservative in
the Valley. Sometimes the hostility is palpable, so its
hard to stand up and be counted.
However, as Ginn said, I have done missionary work
all-around the world, in friendly and hostile regions. To
me, the Bay Area is a continuation of this service of my
neighbors and my community. In the end, only people can
change their hearts and minds on issues. I think of myself
as removing barriers and trying to be a good representa-
tive of the issues.
The technological edge the Democrats built allowed
them to win key states for President Obama in 2012, and
to win the 2013 gubernatorial race in a divided Virginia.
Nevertheless, after a decade or more of technological lag-
ging, the RNCs commitment to change in both funding
and personnel is startling. The Democratic edge will soon
be gone. Thats a real political earthquake, and its hap-
pening right here in San Mateo County.
John McDowell is a longtime county resident having rst
moved to San Carlos in 1963. In the intervening years, he
has worked as a political volunteer and staff member in
local, state and federal government, including time spent as
a press secretary on Capitol Hill and in the George W. Bush
administration.
Other voices
John McDowell
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,154.39 +126.80 10-Yr Bond 2.75 +0.01
Nasdaq 4,244.03 +3.35 Oil (per barrel) 92.96
S&P 500 1,838.63 +8.80 Gold 1,318.40
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Hyatt Hotels Corp., up $3.46 to $52.85
The hotel operator said that its fourth-quarter net income doubled on
higher room rates and improved occupancy.
Weight Watchers International Inc., down $8.48 to $22.10
Free diet apps and activity monitors are hurting the weight-loss program
operator. CEO Jim Chambers expects a challenging 2014.
Trulia Inc., down $6.46 to $29.97
The online real estate listings company said that its fourth-quarter loss
widened from the year before as marketing costs rose.
Campbell Soup Co., up $2.04 to $43.01
The soup maker said that its second-quarter prot and revenue came in
above Wall Street expectations thanks to a later Thanksgiving.
Occidental Petroleum Corp., up $3.49 to $95.76
The oil and gas company said that it plans to spin off its California assets
into a separate publicly traded company.
The J.M. Smucker Co., down $3.33 to $91.81
The food maker said it is facing more peanut butter competitors and
consumers are shying away from articially sweetened jams.
The Mens Wearhouse Inc., down $2.46 to $44.07
The mens retailers stock fell after rival Jos.A Bank,which it is trying to buy,
said it is acquiring clothing brand Eddie Bauer.
Nasdaq
CafePress Inc., down $1.38 to $5.26
The online seller of personalized T-shirts,coffee mugs and other products
reported fourth-quarter results that missed Wall Street expectations.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The stock market
closed out its best week of the year on
Friday as investors focused on compa-
ny earnings and brushed off another
weak economic report.
Campbell Soup climbed after report-
ing earnings that beat the estimates of
Wall Street analysts. Cliffs Natural
Resources, a mining company, also
jumped after its earnings beat analysts
expectations and the company named a
new Chief Executive Ofcer.
The Standard & Poors 500 has wiped
out almost all of its loss for the year
after a big slump in January, and is now
just 10 points below its record close of
1,848 reached Jan. 15. Stocks slumped
last month because of concerns about
the outlook for growth in China and
other emerging markets and worries
about the health of the U.S. economy.
For all practical purposes, were
back, said Jonathan Golub, Chief
U.S. Market Strategist at RBC Capital
Markets. Weve effectively recovered
this pullback.
The S&P 500 rose 8.80 points, or
0.5 percent, to 1,838.63. For the
week, the index rose 2.3 percent.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 126.80 points, or 0.8 percent, to
16,154.39. The Nasdaq composite rose
3.35 points, or 0.1 percent, to
4,244.03, its highest close since July
2000.
The stock market got a lift on
Tuesday when Janet Yellen, the new
head of the Federal Reserve, said she
would continue the central banks low-
interest rate policies and as Congress
moved toward raising the U.S. borrow-
ing limit without the political drama of
last year.
The stock market started lower
Friday following news that U.S. facto-
ry output fell sharply in January.
Manufacturers made fewer cars and
trucks, appliances, furniture and car-
peting, as the recent cold spell ended
ve straight months of increased pro-
duction.
The Federal Reserve said factory pro-
duction plunged 0.8 percent in January,
following gains of 0.3 percent in both
December and November.
Investors are hopeful that much of
the weakness seen in recent economic
reports is due in large part to the unusu-
ally cold winter weather this year, said
Kristina Hooper, US investment strate-
gist at Allianz Global Investors.
Investors are choosing to look at
very mixed data through a positive
lens, Hooper said.
By late morning, stocks had edged
higher. They kept on rising throughout
the day.
Among the big gainers, Campbell
Soup rose $2.04, or 5 percent, to
$43.01 after the company reported that
its second-quarter prot and revenue
came in above Wall Streets expecta-
tions. Campbell Soup also stood by its
2014 forecasts for sales and earnings
growth. Cliffs Natural Resources
climbed $1.26, or 5.8 percent, to
$23.16 after its own earnings beat ana-
lysts forecasts.
About 80 percent of the companies
in the S&P 500 have now reported
earnings for the fourth quarter, accord-
ing to S&P Capital IQ. Earnings are
forecast to rise 7.8 percent compared
with the same period a year ago and 5.6
percent in the third quarter of 2013.
Among the days losers were cloth-
ing retailer Mens Wearhouse and
Weight Watchers International.
Mens Wearhouse dropped $2.46, or
5.3 percent, to $44.07, after Jos. A.
Bank Clothiers, which Mens
Wearhouse had been pursuing,
announced a deal of its own.
S&P 500 logs best week of year
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
After months of irting with the idea
of combining with a rival, Jos. A.
Bank has decided it is better suited for
another mens clothing brand.
Or has it?
The chain thats known for its mens
suits and 2-for-1 sales said Friday that
it struck a deal to buy the parent com-
pany of Eddie Bauer, which sells rugged
outerwear. The deal was reached with
Everest Topco LLC to buy Everest
Holdings LLC in a cash-and-stock deal
valued at $825 million.
But the acquisition, which comes as
Jos. A. Bank is being pursued by Mens
Wearhouse Inc., isnt written in stone:
Jos. A. Bank said Friday that it may end
the Eddie Bauer deal if it receives an
acquisition offer that is superior. It
would have to pay a termination fee if
it accepted another offer.
We are looking for a chance to be
more important for a specic customer
demographic, Jos. A. Banks CEO and
president Neal Black told The
Associated Press.
The deal comes in the middle of an
extended courtship between Jos. A.
Bank and Mens Wearhouse Inc. It
began in October when Jos. A. Bank
offered to buy its larger rival for $2.3
billion.
Mens Wearhouse scoffed at that
offer, and turned the tables, offering to
buy its rival for $1.54 billion. But
after Jos. A Bank turned down that
overture, Mens Wearhouse boosted its
offer last month to $1.6 billion.
Mens Wearhouse said on Friday that
it will consult with its legal and nan-
cial advisers to evaluate its options
with regards to Jos. A. Bank. Its shares
fell more than 5 percent in afternoon
trading Friday as investors apparently
worried that a deal between it and Jos.
A. Bank now is less likely.
Some analysts on Friday questioned
why Jos. A. Banks would choose to
buy Eddie Bauer, which some believe is
past its prime. They say that Mens
Wearhouse could be a better t for the
chain.
Eddie Bauer and Jos. A. Bank both
cater to similar customers the 35-to-
55-year old customer that has an annu-
al income of $100,000 to about
$125,000 and is budget conscious
but the companies sell different mer-
chandise.
By comparison, Mens Wearhouse
and Jos. A. Banks cater to different cus-
tomers, but they offer similar types of
clothing: suits and sport coats.
Richard Jaffe, an analyst at Stifel
Nicholaus who covers clothing retail-
ers, said the t of a Jos. A. Banks-Eddie
Bauer combination is much easier, but
the benets are less clear cut.
Jos. A. Bank said it has been identi-
fying possible acquisition candidates
over the past two years. The company
said Eddie Bauer was one of the rst
buyout targets it considered.
Jos. A. Bank buying Eddie Bauer in $825M deal
By Randall Chase
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ahard-fought auction for the remain-
ing assets of failed electric-vehicle
maker Fisker Automotive ended Friday
with a winning bid by Chinese auto-
parts conglomerate Wanxiang Group.
Wanxiang beat out Hybrid
Technology, led by Hong Kong bil-
lionaire Richard Li, with a nal bid of
$149.2 million in cash and other con-
siderations, including Fiskers plant in
Wilmington, Del.
Going into the auction, which began
Wednesday and ended Friday afternoon,
Hybrid had offered $30 million in cash
and cancellation of $25 million in debt
that it says it is owed as Fiskers senior
secured lender.
Wanxiang had offered $35.7 million
in cash and an equity stake for creditors
in a reorganized Fisker, with the possi-
bility of additional recoveries for cred-
itors through lawsuits against Fisker,
Hybrid and other parties. Its winning
bid surged to include more than $126
million in cash, $8 million in assumed
debt and an equity stake for creditors in
a reorganized Fisker.
Wanxiang increases bid to win Fisker asset sale
U.S. rig count down 7 to 1,764
HOUSTON Oileld services company Baker Hughes
Inc. says the number of rigs exploring for oil and natural
gas in the U.S. declined by seven this week to 1,764.
The Houston rm said in its weekly report Friday that
1,423 rigs were exploring for oil and 337 for gas. Four
were listed as miscellaneous. Ayear ago there were 1,762
active rigs.
Of the major oil- and gas-producing states, California
gained ve rigs, New Mexico gained three and Kansas,
Ohio and West Virginia each gained one.
Texas lost five rigs, Louisiana declined by four,
Oklahoma lost three, Colorado lost two and Pennsylvania
and Wyoming each dipped by one. Alaska, Arkansas,
North Dakota and Utah were unchanged.
The U.S. rig count peaked at 4,530 in 1981 and bot-
tomed at 488 in 1999.
Business brief
1390 El Camino Real, Millbrae 94030
Reservations (650) 742-1003
(located in La Quinta Hotel. Free Parking)
Serving Lunch & Dinner
Featuring Wagyu Beef imported from Japan
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
<<< Page 13, Hillsdale closes out the
PAL season with a rout over Aragon
MAKE IT 3: FORMER SCOT LEADS SKYLINE TO THIRD STRAIGHT WIN >> PAGE 13
Weekend, Feb. 15-16, 2014
J
im Fre g o s i s bi g l eague
career got off to a real quiet
start. Hi s rst three at-bats,
as a teenager for the expansi on Los
Angel es Angel s, he hi t grounders
back to perenni al Gol d Gl ove
pi tcher Jim Kaat.
Over the next hal f-century,
Fregosi made a lot more noi se i n
majors.
Fregos i , a s i x- t i me Al l -Star
shortstop who went to manage the
Angel s t o t hei r f i rst pl ayoff
appearance and guide the rowdy
1993 Phi l adel phi a Phi l l i es i nto the
World Series, died Friday after an
apparent stroke. He was 71.
Popular on and off the el d, ful l
of opinions and an outsized per-
s onal i t y, Fregosi could argue with
the best of em. He could also laugh
at himself, and would poke fun at
hi s part i n one of basebal l s most -
lopsided trades the deal that sent
him to the New York Mets for a
young, wi l d pi tcher named Nolan
Ryan.
The Atlanta Braves said they were
not i ed by a family member that
Fregosi died early Friday in Miami,
where he was hospitalized after t he
apparent stroke while on a cruise
wi th basebal l al umni .
Fregosi ended more than 50 years
i n basebal l as a speci al assi stant to
Braves general manager Frank
Wre n.
Jim played a vital rol e i n our
cl ub over the l ast 13 years, Wre n
said Friday. As a seni or adviser he
was someone you could always pick
up the phone and get a feel for t he
players in the game. He covered all
30 teams for us and was such a pos-
i ti ve, knowl edgeabl e resource. He
lit up a room and had just great
Hudson says
hell be ready
By Jose Romero
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX Scott Kazmir is walking into
a different situation with the Oakland
Athletics and a most different role.
At 30, he nds himself as a veteran pres-
ence on a team full of young talent.
Kazmir signed a two-year, $22 million
contract with the As as a free agent.
Its the rst time that Ive ever been
probably four or ve years older than every-
one on the starting staff, he said. Thats
new to me, but its something were going
to have fun with. I got to meet all the guys
so far and its going to be a fun year.
Less than two years removed from pitch-
ing in an independent league, the left-hander
is the newest member of Oaklands starting
rotation.
The two-time ALWest champions reported
to spring training Friday for physicals, and
team workouts will begin Saturday.
Kazmir went 10-9 for Cleveland last sea-
son on a one-year, $1 million contract. He
struck out 162 in 158 innings and had a 4.04
Kazmir a
presence
on the As
By Don Ketchum
The Associated Press
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Tucked in the cor-
ner of the San Francisco Giants spring
training clubhouse are side-by-side lockers
belonging to the four stars of the starting
rotation Tim Lincecum, Tim Hudson,
Matt Cain and Madison Bumgarner.
At 38, Hudson is the newcomer to the
group, having signed a two-year, $23 mil-
lion free-agent contract in November.
He has pitched in the major leagues for 15
seasons his rst six with the Oakland
Athletics and then nine with the Atlanta
Braves. He is nine years older than
Lincecum and Cain and 14 years older than
Bumgarner.
Yet the right-hander already seems to t in
nicely with his new teammates. With 205
career victories, he is a welcome addition.
The only lingering question is the status
See KAZMIR, Page 16
See HUDSON, Page 14
See FREGOSI, Page 14
12
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingame 5, San Mateo 1
The Burlingame boys soccer team exocised a bit of
a demon on Friday.
And they did it at the expense of their its biggest
rival.
The Panthers, who admittedly have had trouble
scoring goals this season, put up two in the rst and
three more in the second, to rout San Mateo 5-1.
We havent scored ve goals in a game this sea-
son, said Burlingame head coach David Siracusa.
Thats like a three-game output for us. So, it was
nice. We opened things up in the second half and real-
ly took it to them in the end.
It was a big day for Jonah Synder. The senior scored
twice and assisted on another goal. Chuck Taylor,
Brian Gonzalez and Baxtor Kindler-b also found the
back of the San Mateo net.
SHP 5, Eastside 2
Sacred Heart Preps run through West Bay Athletic
League is still perfect.
With a couple of goals by Isaac Polkinhome lead-
ing the way, the Gators took down Eastside College
Prep 5-2. Andrew Segres goal, after Eastside had
equalized, wound up being the difference.
SHP is now 12-0.
Crystal Springs 3, Woodside Priory 1
The Gryphons of Crystals Springs Uplands School
have a .500 league mark in their sights after a 3-1
over Woodside Priory.
CSUS found itself down a goal in the second half
before scoring three unanswered. Brandon Chu equal-
ized in the 50th minute. Two minutes later, David
Madding scored the eventual game-winner with the
assist going toTheo Perisi
Madding added the icing on the cake with a goal in
the 70th minute.
Girls Basketball
Hillsdale 48, Aragon 30
The Knights saved one of their best offensive per-
formances of the season for the last game.
Hillsdale closed out Peninsula Athletic League play
at 10-2 good for second place in the PAL South
Division with a 48-30 win over Aragon.
The Knights put up 16 points in the third quarter to
pull away from the Dons.
Hillsdale was led by the Emilys Nepumoceno
scored 10 points while Lyons led the way with 13.
SPORTS 13
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Skyline today won its third
straight with a 5-0 win over
Shasta.
Trojans sophomore Daniel
Madigan persevered in a classic
pitching duel to earn the win, his
record improves to 1-1. The left-
hander was as economical as he
was dominant, working 7+
innings while allowing no runs on
five hits. He struck out nine
against no walks on just 83 pitch-
es.
As a transfer sophomore, the
win is Madigans rst at Skyline.
Shasta sophomore Casey
Duenas took the loss, his record
falls to 0-2. After surrendering
an unearned run in the third
inning, Duenas kept Skylines
1-0 lead in check until the
Trojans broke through in the
seventh. The left-hander worked
6 2/3 innings, allowing four
runs (three earned) on six hits,
striking out one against two
walks and a hit batsman.
In the third, Skyline jumped out
to a 1-0 lead. Nick McHugh
sparked a rally with an ineld hit,
legging out a chopper over the
pitcher, then advancing to second
on a errant throw by Shasta second
baseman Daulton Hanks. Phil
Cauleld followed with a soft line
out to short, but Shasta shortstop
Austin Lobue attempting a double
play and threw errantly behind
McHugh at second to allow an
advance to third. With two outs,
Michael Franco lined an RBI sin-
gle to center to plate McHugh.
In the seventh, Skyline broke it
open with a four-run rally. Dean
Aliamus drew a one-out walk. With
two outs, Cauleld walked to put
runners at rst and second. Franco
followed with another RBI single
to plate Aliamus. Lance Montano
then singled to score Caulfield,
advancing Franco to third. After
Montano stole second, cleanup
hitter Nobu Suzuki shot a two-run
single to center to score Franco
and Montano to cap the days scor-
i ng.
Skylines bullpen did the rest, as
Cage Cascone and Jonathan
Murphy came on to combine for
two shutout innings in support of
Madigan. Cascone currently paces
the Trojans with four appearances.
Murphy closed out the game with
his rst collegiate strikeout in his
Skyline debut.
With the win, Skyline improves
its record to 3-2, marking the rst
time the Trojans have been above
the .500 mark since April 16,
2011.
The Trojans wrap up their three-
game series with Shasta tomorrow
in a doubleheader at Skyline
Diamond. First pitch for Game 1 is
scheduled for 11 a.m. Game 2 will
start approximately 30 minutes
after the completion of Game 1.
Skyline nishes its home stand
Sunday at noon against Santa
Rosa.
Skyline rides Madigan to third straight win
Local Sports Briefs
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Top: Emily Lyons celebrates 3 of her 13 points during Hillsdale win over
Aragon. Bottom: Jonah Snyder, middle, receives congratulations for his
penalty kick goal.
Kevin Hart cedes celeb
MVP to education secretary
NEWORLEANS Film star Kevin Harts
reign as the best celebrity basketball player
of NBAAll-Star weekend has come to a hum-
bling end, even if the fans in attendance
thought otherwise.
The 5-foot-2 Hart had seven points and
four assists for the West team in a 60-56
loss to the East squad Friday night, but fans
voted him the game MVP for a third straight
year.
Rather than accept the trophy, Hart insist-
ed it go to U.S. Education Secretary Arne
Duncan, who had 20 points, 11 rebounds
and six assists for the East. The 6-5 Duncan
played at Harvard.
Hart says he had to be a humble loser,
but the comedian adds that on the bright
side, his new movie, About Last Night, is
in theaters this weekend.
SPORTS 14
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
relationships throughout the game.
When I rst became GM, one of the
things that made the transition so easy was
having Jim as close as a phone call for
advice and help or encouragement.
Braves president John Schuerholz said the
team would nd a way to honor Fregosi this
season.
He gave a lot to the game no matter what
uniform he was in, no matter whether he was
a player, a coach or a scout, Schuerholz
said. Some people say he could have man-
aged again right now. He was so smart and
knew the game so well. I agree with that.
Schuerholz said Fregosi didnt grow into
this personality. I think he was born with it.
I think he had that personality when he was
born.
Along with the Phillies and Angels
where he was reunited with Ryan and made
the playoffs in 1979 Fregosi managed
the Chicago White Sox and Toronto. He
took over the White Sox in the middle of the
1986 season after Tony La Russa was red,
and was hired by the Blue Jays after manag-
er Tim Johnson was dismissed during spring
training in 1999 for lying about his mili-
tary service record.
Phillies president David Montgomery
said the team and others in baseball lost a
dear friend.
Hell be remembered for his vibrant per-
sonality, wisdom and love of the game,
Montgomery said in a statement. Our deep-
est sympathy is extended to his widow,
Joni, daughters Nikki, Lexy and Jennifer
and sons Robert and Jim.
Giants general manager Brian Sabean said
Fregosis death leaves a hole in the unique
fabric of our great game. He was a great
friend and mentor to so many, no matter
what hat he wore.
He was a one-of-a-kind baseball lifer, he
said.
Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig spoke
of Fregosis widespread relationships in the
game.
The outpouring of support in recent days
illustrates the vast respect that Jim earned in
a great baseball life, Selig said in a state-
ment.
Fregosi was an inelder in the majors
from 1961 to 1978, hitting .265 with 151
homers and 706 RBIs. His best seasons
came with the Angels.
From 1964-69, he teamed with second
baseman Bobby Knoop to form a strong
double-play combination. They played
together in the 1966 All-Star game.
Knoop, now an Angels coach, said
Fregosi was the kind of guy who would not
have a tattoo, but would cover your back. He
was a tremendous person who had tremen-
dous passion for the game and loved the
Angels.
The Angels retired Fregosis No. 11 in
1988 and said he was a personal favorite of
former owner Gene Autry.
His personality was infectious, his love
of the game legendary, and his knowledge
endless, the team said in a statement.
Fregosi was traded from the Angels to the
Mets after the 1971 season for a package of
players that included Ryan. Fregosi played
just 146 games over two seasons for the
Mets and hit .233 with ve home runs; Ryan
turned into a Hall of Fame pitcher.
Fregosi later played for the Texas Rangers
and Pittsburgh Pirates. He began his manag-
ing career at 36 with the Angels in April
1978 two days after his nal game as a
player with the Pirates.
In 15 seasons as a manager, he posted a
1,028-1,094 record.
With the Phillies, Fregosi handled a team
that included a lot of rough-and-tumble
players and helped them reach the 1993
World Series. Philadelphia was beaten by
Toronto on Joe Carters winning home run
in Game 6.
Former Phillies catcher Darren Daulton
called Fregosi the best manager Ive ever
played for.
Our relationship was so special ... and he
was the one that taught me how to be a
leader, Daulton said. Fregos and I could
relate to each other whether we were in the
clubhouse or on the eld. In 1993 The City
of Brotherly Love changed the world ...
Fregos was the driving force!
Lenny Dykstra, a Phillies star in those
days, said Fregosi was a players manager.
Jim Fregosi was the reason that 1993
was one of the most exciting years in
Philadelphia sports history, he said.
James Louis Fregosi was born in 1942 in
San Francisco and excelled in baseball,
football basketball and track and eld at
Serra High School. He signed with the
Boston Red Sox out of high school and went
to the Angels in the 1960 expansion draft.
Continued from page 11
FREGOSI
of his right ankle, badly fractured on July 24
while he was covering rst base against the
New York Mets and stepped on by runner
Eric Young Jr. The injury ended Hudsons
season with an 8-7 record.
After reporting with other pitchers and
catchers to the Giants camp at Scottsdale
Stadium on Friday and taking his physical,
Hudson said he will be ready to make his
first regular-season start on time, either
against the Arizona Diamondbacks or the
Los Angeles Dodgers.
Health-wise, Im right on schedule,
Hudson said. I will be ready for the start of
the season ... the ankle feels really good,
close to 100 percent, but were not quite
there yet.
Hudson threw three bullpen sessions
before coming to camp and is due to throw
his rst ofcial session for the team on
Sunday.
Giants manager Bruce Bochy is looking
forward to seeing Hudson throw.
I talked to him yesterday, and right now,
we are planning to pitch him in that rst
game (regular season), Bochy said. We are
going to monitor his time on the eld (dur-
ing the spring) and not have him stand
around on that ankle too much.
Hudson said he doesnt think about the
ankle at all.
The next few weeks will give us a good
gauge of where its at, he said.
When teams come to San Francisco,
Hudson said, They know they will be fac-
ing tough starting pitching. Its as good as
it gets. I just want to come in and con-
tribute.
Having his fellow starting pitchers close
by this spring will be benecial, he added.
Its important, because we can work on
our craft together, he said.
Hudson wore a sweat shirt with his college
alma mater, Auburn, on the front. It was
pointed out that his catcher this season will
be Buster Posey, a Florida State alum.
Florida State edged Auburn earlier this
year for the college football championship.
Everybody has their faults, Hudson
said, smiling.
NOTES: OF Hunter Pence reported early as
he recovers from a case of pink eye, similar
to what sportscaster Bob Costas is experi-
encing at the Winter Olympics. Pink eye is
a bacterial or viral infection. ... Hitting
coach Hensley Meulens became a U.S. citi-
zen during a ceremony in Oakland earlier
this week. He is a native of the Dutch island
of Curacao. ... 3B coach Tim Flannery
moved through the clubhouse with ice
strapped to his right knee after recent sur-
gery. ... The arrivals of Ps Santiago Casilla
and Jose DePaula have been delayed by visa
issues in the Dominican Republic. ...
Bochy met with his coaching staff for two
hours, going over a few changes that will be
implemented in camp workouts.
Continued from page 11
HUDSON
Sports Brief
SPORTS 15
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Rebarts Interiors
247 California Dr., Burlingame
990 Industrial Rd #106, San Carlos
Mon-Fri 10:00-5:00
Sat 11:00-4:00
Evening Appointments Available
www.rebarts.com
6 5 0 - 3 4 8 - 1 2 6 8
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Prosecutors
charged former NFL safety Darren
Sharper on Friday with raping and
drugging two women in California and
disclosed he is under investigation in
connection with ve more drug-related
rapes in three other states.
Sharper briefly appeared in Los
Angeles Superior Court, where his
arraignment was postponed until Feb.
20 at the request of his lawyers. They
issued a statement saying he would be
exonerated.
Prosecutors then led a motion to
increase Sharpers bail to $10 million
and outlined details of investigations
involving him in Las Vegas, Tempe,
Ariz., and New Orleans.
Sharper has not been charged in the
other jurisdictions.
In the bail motion, Los Angeles
County Investigator John
Maccharella described a pattern in
which the former football star met
women at clubs or parties and lured
them to a hotel room, where they were
allegedly drugged and raped.
The motion says the incidents hap-
pened in the past ve months, with
two occurring within a day in Los
Angeles and Las Vegas.
After conferring with police in other
jurisdictions, Maccharella said in the
bail motion that the rst assault fol-
lowed an event for New Orleans Saints
football players on Sept. 22, 2013.
Maccharella said he was told a
woman went to a New Orleans bar with
Sharper, consumed an alcoholic bever-
age provided by him and blacked out.
She awoke the next morning while
being sexually assaulted, the bail
motion stated, noting that an exam
later showed Sharpers DNA was pres-
ent.
The Los Angeles charges were based
on incidents on Oct. 30, 2013, and
Jan. 14, 2014, beginning at a West
Hollywood nightclub. Sharper
allegedly met two women each time,
invited them to a party then said he
had to stop at his hotel.
In the October incident, each woman
was given a shot of an alcoholic bev-
erage before blacking out, and one
later awoke to nd the other being sex-
ually assaulted, the charging docu-
ments state.
In January, a woman awoke and sus-
pected she had been assaulted, the doc-
uments state.
Similar scenarios played out on Jan.
15 in Las Vegas and on Nov. 20, 2013,
in Arizona, the bail motion states.
In Los Angeles, Sharper is facing
two counts of rape by use of drugs, four
counts of furnishing a controlled sub-
stance, and one count of possession of
a controlled substance.
The complaint alleges the drugs
involved were morphine and zolpi-
dem, which is sold under the brand
name Ambien.
Sharper was represented by promi-
nent Los Angeles attorneys Blair Berk
and Leonard Levine.
We look forward to the true facts
being revealed in this case, Berk said
after the brief court appearance. And
we are hopeful Mr. Sharper will be
fully exonerated before this case is
concluded.
Details disclosed in investigations
of ex-NFL safety Darren Sharper
16
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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ERA over 29 starts. He walked only 47 in
his rst full season since 2010 with the Los
Angeles Angels.
A former No. 1 draft pick, Kazmir was a
two-time All-Star over five-plus seasons
with the Tampa Bay Rays. He never had a
season in which he lost more games than he
won until 2010 with the Angels.
Kazmir had started losing velocity on his
pitches before that season because of vari-
ous arm injuries that plagued him from
2008-11. But in 2013, Kazmir found his
groove again and got back the zip on his
fastball.
This was a guy who when he rst came up
with Tampa, was one of those crown jewels,
a left-handed guy with plus-plus velocity,
As manager Bob Melvin said. Started out
pretty well and then had some bumps in the
road, and I think hes probably better for
it.
Melvin said he hasnt slotted Kazmir in
the rotation yet and hasnt announced his
starter for the opener.
Whoever we start on opening day could
pitch one, two, three, four or ve, Melvin
said, referring to the rotations order. Its
just having quality guys.
The top rotation candidates along with
Kazmir are Sonny Gray, A.J. Grifn, Dan
Straily and Jarrod Parker. Kazmir is the only
lefty in the group.
Kazmir is eager to show that he can put in
another strong season at full strength. He
was particularly effective in the second half
of last season.
I always feel like Im kind of going to
have a chip on my shoulder just from every-
thing that kind of went on, Kazmir said. I
feel like theres going to be always some-
thing to prove.
Kazmir said hes excited about the As ros-
ter and looks forward to the challenge of
competing for supremacy of the AL West
with big-spending clubs like Texas, Los
Angeles and Seattle. Hes not looking to put
much pressure on himself to lead the pitch-
ing staff.
Just do my job, thats all I can do, he
said. Help the guys whenever they need
help, just be there for everyone. Once
everyone comes together its going to be a
great atmosphere.
NOTES: Relief pitcher Sean Doolittle is
dealing with a right calf strain and will be
held back from throwing on Saturday, but
Melvin expects him to recover quickly. . . .
Pitcher Ryan Cook has right shoulder
inammation that isnt believed to be too
serious and will be limited in the spring, but
is expected to be ready for the start of the
regular season. ... Melvin sees LHP Tommy
Milone as a contender for a spot in the start-
ing rotation. Hell also take a look at LHP
Drew Pomeranz and right-hander Josh
Lindblom.
Continued from page 11
KAZMIR
By Steve Reed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
An investigation into the racially charged
Miami Dolphins bullying scandal detailed
widespread harassment in the teams locker
room that extended beyond the two players
at the center of the probe.
The NFL-ordered report stated there was a
pattern of harassment committed by at
least three players and extended to two line-
man and an assistant trainer, all targets of
vicious taunts and racist insults.
Lawyer Ted Wells released the report
Friday, saying guard John Jerry and center
Mike Pouncey followed Richie Incognitos
lead in harassing Jonathan Martin, who left
the team in October. They threatened to rape
his sister, called him a long list of slurs and
bullied him for not being black enough.
In a statement emailed by a league
spokesman, the NFL did not make any men-
tion of possible punishment stemming
from the case. The league only conrmed it
had received the report and said it appreciat-
ed the Dolphins cooperation with the
investigation. Wells said he does not intend
to comment further.
Martin is biracial, Incognito is white, and
Jerry and Pouncey are black.
Martins agent Kenneth Zuckerman said
his client feels vindicated by the report.
He feels a great sense of relief,
Zuckerman told The Associated Press.
Jonathan Martin is a great man and hes
only shown me that he is very honest since
the day I met him. He loves football and is
eager to get back on the eld, regardless of
what team he plays for.
Incognitos attorney, Mark Schamel,
released a statement calling Wells report
replete with errors and said that Martin
was never bullied by Richie Incognito or
any member of the Dolphins offensive
line.
Incognito sent a tweet Friday night, say-
ing: You could not dene me in 144 years
let alone 144 pages Mr Wells. Thank you
for your hard work and dedication.
Martin, who has two years left on his con-
tract with the Dolphins, declined interview
requests.
Inquiry says Incognito, 2 others harassed Martin
College of
San Mateo Swimming
The College of San Mateos
Kawei Tan has made his initial
splash.
Tan nished rst in his races dur-
ing a meet at Chabot College as
the junior college swin season
gets underway. We did a great job
competing today, said CSM swim
coach Randy Wright. We won
races, had a number of second and
third place nishes, plus had some
good times.
Kawei is an exceptional swim-
mer, hes fast in a number of
events. Despite the season being
young, his times today are fast
enough to qualify for States.
Kawei is the product of hard work
and great coaching, I am excited to
be a part of his development as a
swimmer.
Sophomore Derek Koo was
impressive in placing rst in the
sprint free.
CSM will head to Livermore
next Friday for the Las Positas
Invitational. The meet features a
number of teams from outside the
Coast Conference. We are all
looking forward to checking out
the speed from across the State.
The meet also features diving
during the swim meet. CSM has
two divers this year, 2013 State
Finalist Erin Harris and Travis
Russo.
SPORTS 17
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
A community of caring Christians
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 28 24 .538
Brooklyn 24 27 .471 3 1/2
New York 20 32 .385 8
Boston 19 35 .352 10
Philadelphia 15 39 .278 14
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 37 14 .725
Atlanta 25 26 .490 12
Washington 25 27 .481 12 1/2
Charlotte 23 30 .434 15
Orlando 16 38 .296 22 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 40 12 .769
Chicago 27 25 .519 13
Detroit 22 30 .423 18
Cleveland 20 33 .377 20 1/2
Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 38 15 .717
Houston 36 17 .679 2
Dallas 32 22 .593 6 1/2
Memphis 29 23 .558 8 1/2
New Orleans 23 29 .442 14 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 43 12 .782
Portland 36 17 .679 6
Minnesota 25 28 .472 17
Denver 24 27 .471 17
Utah 19 33 .365 22 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 37 18 .673
Phoenix 30 21 .588 5
Golden State 31 22 .585 5
L.A. Lakers 18 35 .340 18
Sacramento 18 35 .340 18
ThursdaysGames
Chicago 92, Brooklyn 76
Oklahoma City 107, L.A. Lakers 103
SaturdaysGames
No games scheduled
NBA GLANCE
ALPINESKIING
MensSuper Combined
6. Bode Miller, Easton, N.H., (12, 1:54.67; 7, 51.93)
2:46.60.
11. Jared Goldberg, Salt Lake City, (15, 1:54.90; 10,
52.39) 2:47.29.
12.Ted Ligety, Park City, Utah, (18, 1:55.17; 8, 52.22)
2:47.39.
NR. Andrew Weibrecht, Lake Placid, N.Y., DNF.

BIATHLON
Womens 15kmIndividual
31. Noah Hoffman, Aspen, Colo., 41:02.7.
38. Erik Bjornsen,Winthrop,Wash., 41:44.7.
47. Brian Gregg,Winthrop,Wash., 42:42.0.
52. Kris Freeman,Thornton, N.H., 42:54.8.

CROSS-COUNTRYSKIING
Mens 15kmclassic
31. Noah Hoffman, Aspen, Colo., 41:02.7.
38. Erik Bjornsen,Winthrop,Wash., 41:44.7.
47. Brian Gregg,Winthrop,Wash., 42:42.0.
52. Kris Freeman,Thornton, N.H., 42:54.8.

FIGURESKATING
Men
9. Jason Brown, Highland Park, Ill. (6, 86.00; 11,
152.37), 238.37.
U.S. OLYMPIANS
Nation G S B Tot
Norway 4 3 6 13
UnitedStates 4 3 6 13
Netherlands 4 3 5 12
Russia 2 5 5 12
Canada 4 5 2 11
Germany 7 2 1 10
Switzerland 5 1 1 7
Sweden 0 5 2 7
Austria 1 4 0 5
Belarus 3 0 1 4
China 2 2 0 4
France 2 0 2 4
Japan 1 2 1 4
Slovenia 1 1 2 4
Italy 0 2 2 4
Czech Republic 0 2 1 3
Poland 2 0 0 2
Britain 1 0 1 2
South Korea 1 0 1 2
Australia 0 1 1 2
Latvia 0 0 2 2
Slovakia 1 0 0 1
Croatia 0 1 0 1
Finland 0 1 0 1
Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1
Ukraine 0 0 1 1
OLYMPICS TABLE
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONERS OFFICE Suspended Atlanta C
Orinn Sears 50 games for violating the Minor
League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Agreed to terms with OF
Corey Brown on a minor league contract.
TEXAS RANGERS Agreed to terms with RHP
Tommy Hanson and 1B/DH Mitch Moreland on
one-year contracts.Placed LHP Joseph Ortiz on the
60-day DL.
TAMPA RAYS Agreed to terms with LHP Erik Be-
dard on a minor league contract.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES Agreed to terms with RHP
Julio Teheran on a six-year contract.
WASHINGTONNATIONALSAgreedtotermswith
RHP Josh Roenicke on a minor league contract.
American Association
GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS Released RHP Derek
Blacksher.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES Signed RHP Kyle Devore.
Released C Trevor Coleman.
ST. PAUL SAINTS Signed RHP Paul Burnside and
OF Buddy Sosnoskie.
Frontier League
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS Signed OF Craig Hertler
to a contract extension. Signed Cs Patrick Reardon
and Conor Thompson. Released INF Max Casper.
NORMAL CORNBELTERS Released RHP Matt
Suschak.
SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS Signed Cs Ty Nelson
and Mike Valadez to contract extensions. Signed C
Cody Coffman.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Signed TE Richard Gordon
to a one-year contract.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Named Evan Marcus
strength and conditioning coach and Jeff Hurd as-
sistant strength and conditioning coach.
NEW YORK GIANTS Announced the retirement
of DE Dave Tollefson.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Signed OL Greg Van Roten
to a reserve/future contract.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Re-signed S Dan
West. Signed WR Antonio Robinson.
Arena Football League
SPOKANE SHOCK Named Drew Buchkoski
strength and conditioning coach and Raul Vijil as-
sistant strength and conditioning coach.
HOCKEY
American Hockey League
AHL Suspended Rochester D Matt MacKenzie
one game for his actions during a Feb. 8 game.
BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS Signed D Jake
Newton to a professional tryout contract.
MILWAUKEEADMIRALSReassignedGScott Dar-
ling to Cincinnati (ECHL).
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
CHIVAS USA Signed M Thomas McNamara.
COLUMBUS CREW Signed D Ben Sweat and M
Kingsley Baiden.
FC DALLAS Acquired F Andres Ramiro Escobar
on loan from Dynamo Kiev (Ukraine).
TRANSACTIONS
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 57 37 16 4 78 176 125
Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145
Montreal 59 32 21 6 70 148 142
Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182
Detroit 58 26 20 12 64 151 163
Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191
Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183
Buffalo 57 15 34 8 38 110 172
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138
N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146
Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167
Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161
Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175
Carolina 57 26 22 9 61 144 158
New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146
N.Y. Islanders 60 22 30 8 52 164 200
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 57 39 12 6 84 196 135
Chicago 60 35 11 14 84 207 163
Colorado 58 37 16 5 79 174 153
Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 145 147
Dallas 58 27 21 10 64 164 164
Winnipeg 60 28 26 6 62 168 175
Nashville 59 25 24 10 60 146 180
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 196 147
San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 175 142
Los Angeles 59 31 22 6 68 139 128
Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 163 169
Vancouver 60 27 24 9 63 146 160
Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 137 179
Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47 153 199
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Olympic break
No games scheduled
NHL GLANCE
MEN
Two
Martin Fourcade, France, biathlon, 2 gold.
Dario Cologna, Switzerland, cross-country, 2 gold.
Felix Loch, Germany, luge, 2 gold.
Tobias Arlt, Germany, luge, 2 gold.
Tobias Wendl, Germany, luge, 2 gold.
Maxim Trankov, Russia, gure skating, 2 gold.
Fedor Klimov, Russia, gure skating, 1 gold, 1 silver.
Michel Mulder, Netherlands, speedskating, 1 gold,
1 bronze.
Albert Demchenko, Russia, luge, 2 silver.
Patrick Chan, Canada, gure skating, 2 silver.
Christof Innerhofer, Italy, alpine skiing, 1 silver, 1
bronze.
Andris Sics, Latvia, luge, 2 bronze.
Juris Sics, Latvia, luge, 2 bronze.

WOMEN
Two
Darya Domracheva, Belarus, biathlon, 2 gold.
Tatiana Volosozhar, Russia, gure skating, 2 gold.
Natalie Geisenberger, Germany, luge, 2 gold.
Ksenia Stolbova, Russia, gure skating, 1 gold, 1 sil-
ver.
Ireen Wust,Netherlands,speedskating,1 gold,1 sil-
ver.
Charlotte Kalla, Sweden, cross-country, 2 silver.
Margot Boer, Netherlands, speedskating, 2 bronze.
MULTI MEDALISTS
TOP25BASKETBALL
Men
No. 1 Syracuse vs. N.C. State, 3 p.m.
No. 3 Florida at No. 14 Kentucky, 9 p.m.
No. 5 San Diego State vs. Air Force, 8:05 p.m.
No. 7 Kansas vs.TCU, 4 p.m.
No. 8 Duke vs. Maryland, 6 p.m.
No. 10 Cincinnati vs. Houston, 3 p.m.
No. 11 Iowa State vs.Texas Tech, 1:45 p.m.
No. 12 Saint Louis vs.VCU, 2 p.m.
No. 16 Iowa at Penn State, 1 p.m.
No. 17 Virginia at Clemson, Noon
No. 19 Texas vs.West Virginia, 8 p.m.
No. 20 Memphis vs. No. 24 UConn at the XL Center,
Hartford, Conn., Noon
No. 22 Ohio State at Illinois, 8 p.m.
No. 25 Pittsburgh at North Carolina, 1 p.m.
Women
No. 20 Gonzaga at BYU, 4 p.m.
No. 24 St. Johns vs.Villanova, Noon
No. 25 Michigan State vs. Ohio State, 5:30 p.m.
NBA
All-Star Saturday Night at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
WEEKEND SCHEDULE
Local Sports briefs
18
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
By Pete Yost
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The Obama administra-
tion on Friday gave banks a road map for
conducting transactions with legal marijua-
na sellers so these new businesses can stash
away savings, make payroll and pay taxes
like any other enterprise. Its not clear
banks will get on board.
Guidance issued by the Justice and
Treasury departments is the latest step by
the federal government toward enabling a
legalized marijuana industry to operate in
states that approve it. The intent is to make
banks feel more comfortable working with
marijuana businesses that are licensed and
regulated.
Others have a keen interest, too, in a regu-
lated nancial pipeline for an industry that
is just emerging from the underground.
Marijuana businesses that cant use banks
may have too much cash they cant safely
put away, leaving them vulnerable to crimi-
nals. And governments that allow marijuana
sales want a channel to receive taxes.
But a leading nancial services trade group
immediately expressed misgivings and oth-
ers, too, said the guidelines dont go far
enough in protecting banks.
After a series of red lights, we expected
this guidance to be a yellow one, said Don
Childears, president and CEO of the
Colorado Bankers Association. This isnt
close to that. At best, this amounts to serve
these customers at your own risk and it
emphasizes all of the risks. This light is
red.
Washington and Colorado in 2012 became
the rst states to approve recreational use of
marijuana. A group is hoping to make
Alaska the third state in the nation to do so.
Currently, processing money from mari-
juana sales puts federally insured banks at
risk of drug racketeering charges, so theyve
refused to open accounts for marijuana-relat-
ed businesses.
Fridays move was designed to let nan-
cial institutions serve such businesses while
ensuring that they know their customers
legitimacy and remain obligated to report
possible criminal activity, said the Treasury
Departments Financial Crimes Enforcement
Network, or FinCEN.
But in response, the American Bankers
Association said guidance or regulation
doesnt alter the underlying challenge for
banks. As it stands, possession or distribu-
tion of marijuana violates federal law, and
banks that provide support for those activi-
ties face the risk of prosecution and assorted
sanctions.
The group says banks will only be com-
fortable serving marijuana businesses if fed-
eral prohibitions on the drug are changed in
law.
Denny Eliason, a lobbyist for the
Washington Bankers Association, said it
will take some time before banks decide
whether to take advantage of the guidance.
He called it a good rst step, but said it sets
forth a complicated process for the banks to
follow for example, by ling suspicious
activity reports designated marijuana limit-
ed in the case of business that seem to be
complying with the rules, and marijuana
priority for those acting questionably.
Theyll have to have a real awareness of
the activities of their customers, he said.
State banking regulators in Colorado and
Washington appear to believe that mainly
small and medium-sized banks will be inter-
ested in handling nancial transactions with
legal marijuana stores, not the big ones, a
FinCEN ofcial said, speaking only on con-
dition of anonymity to talk about internal
deliberations.
This is a decision that each nancial
institution needs to make on its own, the
ofcial said. We feel quite comfortable that
we have acted within the scope of our author-
ity and therefore dont expect legal chal-
lenges to the new procedures.
FinCEN writes the rules that U.S. nancial
institutions must follow to help protect the
system from money laundering and the
nancing of terrorism. The ofce said it
expects nancial institutions to perform
thorough customer due diligence on marijua-
na businesses and le reports that will be
valuable to law enforcement.
Under the guidance, banks must review
state license applications for marijuana cus-
tomers, request information about the busi-
ness, develop an understanding of the types
of products to be sold and monitor publicly
available sources for any negative informa-
tion about the business.
Banks, marijuana sellers can do business
By Charles Babington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAMBRIDGE, Md. President Barack
Obama said Friday that top priorities for
Congress should be increasing the minimum
wage and overhauling the immigration sys-
tem, while acknowledging that election year
politics could complicate the effort.
Obama and Vice President Joe Biden deliv-
ered pep talks to a House Democratic retreat
on Marylands Eastern Shore, less than nine
months before the lawmakers face re-election
amid widespread voter disapproval of
Congress.
The president and vice president called for
sweeping changes to immigration laws, but
Republican leaders have all but ruled out pas-
sage before the midterm election. Obama
urged the Democratic crowd to keep working
on the issue and insisted some Republicans
want a deal.
But theyre worried, and theyre scared
about the political blowback. And look,
everybody here is an elected ofcial and we
can all appreciate the maneuverings that take
place, particularly in an election year,
Obama said.
While Democrats are largely united on
immigration, there are sharp divisions
between the White House
and some lawmakers over
trade. Obama made no
mention in his public
remarks of his request for
Congress to grant him
fast-track authority to
move trade agreements
with Asia and Europe.
Democratic leaders have
staunchly opposed that
step.
Biden did address the Democratic opposi-
tion during a private question-and-answer ses-
sion with lawmakers. The vice presidents
ofce said Biden made the case for why trade
negotiations serve U.S. economic and strate-
gic interests. But a Democratic aide said Biden
also acknowledged that lawmakers dont plan
to act now to give Obama the leeway hes
seeking.
The Democrats hard line comes just days
before trade issues dominate a North American
Leaders Summit in Mexico, where Obama will
meet with Canadian Prime Minister Stephen
Harper and Mexican President Enrique Pena
Nieto. A key topic will be progress on the
Trans-Pacic Partnership trade talks, which
are designed to expand trade among 12 coun-
tries in the Americas, the Pacic and Asia. The
agreement has been seen as a vehicle to
update the 20-year-old North American Free
Trade Agreement among the U.S., Canada and
Mexico.
Biden was more partisan than the president
in his public remarks, suggesting the
Republican Party is too fractured to be effec-
tive.
He urged the Democrats not to focus on the
few things we do have problems with and
argued that Americans back them on issues
including raising the minimum wage,
expanding early childhood education, immi-
gration reform, gay marriage and even health
care.
Lets go out and make every single effort
not just to defend but to aggressively push our
agenda, Biden said. They are with us.
And for any lawmaker who might not be
feeling so condent, Biden said, I can imag-
ine our prospects being viewed by the press
and everyone else as being a whole hell of a
lot brighter by the time we turn to September
than now.
The president also thanked lawmakers for
banding together to increase the govern-
ments debt with no strings attached in legis-
lation that Congress approved this week and
for standing behind his health care law
through its troubled rollout.
Obama: Immigration, minimum wage top agenda
Barack Obama
Thousands in dark days after ice
storm hit Georgia, South Carolina
WILLISTON, S.C. Ben Ziegler frowned
grimly as he used borrowed equipment to cut
rewood for his home on the third day with-
out power to keep his wife and 14-month-
old daughter along with a neighbor family
of ve warm.
I got tired of this about ve minutes after
the lights went out, the 33-year-old U.S.
Army veteran said at a rewood stand near
his Evans, Ga., neighborhood.
Despite their weariness, Ziegler and thou-
sands of others in east Georgia and western
and southern South Carolina may be without
power for several more days. The nasty win-
ter storm that blew through the South and
eventually barreled up the East Coast
dumped a tree-splitting, utility-pole-snap-
ping inch of ice on the area and many,
including South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley,
compared the damage to the aftermath of a
hurricane.
The same system dumped more than a foot
or two of snow on parts of several states and
was blamed for more than two dozen deaths,
closed schools, snarled air trafc, caused
countless crashed and delayed thousands of
ower deliveries on Valentines Day.
National brief
City Scene
BrianCopeland starts
a run of his newest
one-man show
SEE PAGE 20
By Jacqueline Tang
A
s I enter the second semester of my
senior year, and nal semester of
high school, Ive come to realize
that too much time is spent dwelling on the
future. The four years of my high school life
will soon culminate when I graduate in May.
It seems that this whole year and in fact, all
of high school, is spent focused on the next
chapter of life college. In this past holi-
day season, almost every
conversation Ive had
with family members and
friends would inevitably
end up grazing the topic
of college. They would
ask questions like,
Where did you apply?
and Whats your top
choice?
Similarly at school,
Ive noticed that many of my fellow seniors
dedicate a significant portion of time
lamenting to one another about the difcul-
ties of the college application process.
While I completely recognize that applying
to college is a trying task that tests even the
most patient individuals, I think our time as
high schoolers can be spent better.
We have been primed by our culture, teach-
ers, school, parents and peers to value col-
lege. Each year at Aragon High School, the
counselors come into our classrooms at
least once a semester to remind us of the
number of courses we must take to be a com-
petitive applicant at four-year universities.
Similarly, College Board sends an incessant
amount of emails reminding me that There
is still time to take the SAT, and that Your
scores can still be improved! Not to be out-
shone by College Board, countless univer-
sities bombard high schoolers with emails
starting in their sophomore year about how
You are the student our college needs! We
are constantly reminded of the value of a
college education. While investing time and
thought to our future is a positive thing, too
much focus on whats to come denitely has
its drawbacks.
This focus on college has almost become
an unhealthy obsession of sorts. People
will pay thousands of dollars to hire college
High school in
perspective
REUTERS
Jimmy Fallon went from being a member of the Saturday Night Livecast to following in the footsteps of Johnny Carson,New Tonight Show.
By Frazier Moore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK On the walls of Jimmy
Fallons ofce are photos. Lots of photos.
Of his 2007 marriage to lm producer Nancy
Juvonen. Of their 6-month-old daughter,
Winnie. Of his mom and dad as newlyweds.
Fallon points them all out to a visitor
proudly.
But the dominant photo is a portrait of
Johnny Carson, aglow in front of his
Tonight Show drapes.
I look at that every day, says Fallon,
and just go, Yeah its SO fun!
Already Fallon is immersed in this kind of
fun. For ve years he hosted NBCs Late
Night, a job he relinquished only days ago.
And now hes looking ahead to the Big
Show, The Tonight Show, where Monday,
at the special time of 12 midnight EST, he
retrieves Carsons mantle back in New
York after 42 years in Los Angeles.
Its giant! Its a big TV moment! says
Fallon. Even if it wasnt me, I would tune
in to watch.
AManhattan home base perfectly suits its
new host, a consummate New Yorker, while
bringing it under the same hallowed roof
(NBCs Rockefeller Center headquarters) as
Late Night and Saturday Night Live,
other jewels in the crown of Lorne
Michaels, its new executive producer.
It also allows Tonight to make a clean
break from its turbulent post-Carson era
under Jay Leno (and, fleetingly, Conan
OBrien), when the Carson-bequeathed for-
mula of jokes, celebs and chitchat was, too
often, upstaged by behind-the-scenes soap
opera.
Leno was consistently the late-night rat-
ings winner, but never won much respect
from the public, critics, or even his own
network, which twice sent him packing
from Tonight.
Back in New York, where both The
Tonight Show and Carson as its host made
their start, this 60-year-old TVinstitution is
poised to pick up the legend from where it
languished after Carsons 1992 retirement.
The show will even recommission that
sacred space Studio 6B where Carson
reigned before his 1972 move west.
I wish Johnny Carson was still around,
so he could see what we did with his studio,
says Fallon. I cant WAIT to show every-
body!
But even as the 39-year-old waxes eager-
ness about the new Tonight Show, he
wants everyone to know it wont really be
so different, after all: essentially an hour-
earlier Late Night With Jimmy Fallon,
including its house band, the Roots (though
this eight-piece ensemble will expand by
two horns), its announcer-sidekick, Steve
Higgins, and comic bits like Slow Jam the
News and Thank-you Notes.
When we started Late Night, we were
A new Tonight dawns
See STUDENT, Page 22
By Matt Moore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA Theres more to the story
about how Peter Parker became the amazing
Spider-Man than previously was known.
Starting in May, Marvel Comics will shed
more light on how the transformation took
place and how those early days of ghting
crime, juggling school and coming to terms
with the emotional blow of losing Uncle Ben
helped turn Parker from a gawky teenager with
a knack for cracking-wise into the hero and
human hes become.
Dan Slott, who has been writing Spider-Man
for Marvel since 2008, said the new story not
only pays homage to the rst 1962 appearance
of the Stan Lee and Steve Ditko-created charac-
ter, but peels back more layers of what was
going on in the rst volume of the 700-issue
The Amazing Spider-Man, which began in
March 1963.
When youre looking at things in those
issues, youre going: Wait a minute! How did
this happen? How did he get this? Where did
this come from? Why didnt Aunt May ever
wonder about that? he said.
The ve-part story titled Learning To
Crawl starts May 7 with Amazing Spider-
Man 1.1 and concludes in September with
issue 1.5. Slott is writing the interlude with art
by Ramsn Pirez. Artist Alex Ross has painted
each of the storys ve covers.
Slott calls the story a chance to learn more
about Parker the teenager and high school stu-
dent, not just the recipient of a bite from a
radioactive spider.
You start looking at it closer and closer and
you go, Theres a story here that were not see-
ing,he said. Avery pivotal and crucial story
that lovingly respects everything that went on
but tells you more, so much more about Spider-
Man and so much more about Peter Parker.
What is it that readers will learn? Slott is
notorious about keeping a lid on his plans,
preferring to let readers nd out the day a book
is out and not before.
But there are clues, hints even, such as a new
Marvel to spin new webs in Spider-Mans history
Marvel Comics,the creator of Spider-Man,will
shed more light on how Peter Parker became
the web-slinging crime ghter. See SPIDER-MAN, Page 22
See FALLON, Page 22
I wish Johnny Carson was
still around, so he could see what
we did with his studio. I cant
WAIT to show everybody!
Jimmy Fallon
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Findus on
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EXPIRES: February 28, 2014
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1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
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Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
THE SCION: BRIAN
COPELANDS TALE OF PRIV-
ILEGE AND MURDER EXAM-
INES THE MINDSET OF THE
PROVOKED KILLER. The
storyline has become so familiar
it seems, as they say, dj vu all
over again: a man shoots someone
in a movie theatre because he
wont turn off a cellphone, or
shoots someone in a car because
he wont turn down the radio, or,
in Brian Copelands new solo
show The Scion, shoots three peo-
ple who, well, just wont get off
his back. How does this happen?
Using the events surrounding the
infamous Santos Linguisa Factory
triple homicide as a case study,
Actor and KGO Talk Show Host
Brian Copeland examines the
uneasy relationship between the
law and those who grow up believ-
ing they are above it. For his
source material, Copeland draws
on one of the most grisly events
in East Bay history. In 2000,
Stuart Alexander, scion of the
Santos Linguisa Factory dynasty
in San Leandro, gunned down three
meat inspectors as they attempted
to enter the facility for an inspec-
tion. Alexander blamed his crimes
on the inspectors, stating that he
was provoked. Copelands fasci-
nating and observant narrative
follows this dark story from its
innocuous start to its twist end-
ing. 70 minutes without intermis-
sions. Directed by David Ford.
Through March 1.
TIMES AND TICKETS: On
the Marsh San Francisco Main
Stage. 1062 Valencia St. (near
22nd Street). Thursday and Friday
at 8 p.m.; Saturday at 5 p.m. $15-
$35 sliding scale, $60 reserved.
For information or to order tickets
call (415) 282-3055 or visit
www.themarsh.org.
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW?
It was at the Marsh in 2004 that
Copeland premiered his rst one-
man show, Not a Genuine Black
Man, about his experiences grow-
ing up in San Leandro in the
1970s, when that city had a 99.4
percent white population and poli-
cies of housing discrimination and
segregation. The play, originally
scheduled for a six-week run, went
on to run 25 months, becoming
the longest-running one-man
show in San Francisco history.
Copelands other theatrical work
includes The Waiting Period, a
solo play about his lifelong strug-
gle with depression, and the
Christmas play The Jewelry Box.
***
TWEET. TWEET. ITS
MARGA GOMEZS LOVE-
BIRDS, IN ITS WORLD PRE-
MIERE AT THE MARSH. In the
Marsh Studio Theater, GLAAD
award-winning solo theater artist
and comedian Marga Gomez
morphs into a crew of wacky
lovers and incurable romantics as
they chase their hearts desires
into the night, through decades,
and to absurd lengths.
Documenting the action is
Polaroid Phillie, an ageless night-
club photographer and xture at
gay bars, Spanish restaurants and
anywhere passion happens. This
show is 70 minutes with no inter-
mission and is intended for audi-
ences aged 18 and over. Directed
by David Schweizer. Through
March 15.
TIMES AND TICKETS:
Thursday and Friday at 8 p.m. and
Sat. at 8:30 p.m. 1062 Valencia
St., San Francisco. For tickets
($15- $35, $50 reserved), visit
www.themarsh.org or call 415-
282-3055 between 1 p.m. and 4
p.m. Monday through Friday.
***
THE MARSH, THEN AND
NOW. In 1989, Stephanie
Weisman, the theaters founder and
artistic director, started The Marsh
because she wanted a place for
writers and performers like herself
to develop their performances. It
began as a Monday night perform-
ance series, just at the time when
solo performance was taking off
in San Francisco, and it was an
immediate success. Every week,
four different performers per-
formed for fteen minutes each at
the legendary Hotel Utah, a his-
toric drinking hole formerly fre-
quented by gold miners and Beat
poets. Competition with Monday
Night Football drove The Marsh
to Mortys in North Beach, the
famous 60s hang-out where
Lenny Bruce and Sarah Vaughn
used to perform. In 1990, The
Marsh moved into the back room
JOAN MARCUS
THE SCION AT THE MARSH SAN FRANCISCO. Brian Copeland appears in
his solo show The Scion, in its World Premiere at The Marsh San Francisco
through March 1.
See SCENE Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
After a fth-grade boy is suspended for
unspecied reasons, his mother reports to his
school, as requested, for a parent-teacher con-
ference.
Thus the stage is set for a confrontation of
roller-coaster emotions in Johnna Adams
Gidions Knot at Aurora Theatre Company in
Berkeley.
As the audience enters for this two-woman,
one-act play, the teacher, Heather Clark (Stacy
Ross), looking somewhat harried, is alone,
grading papers at her desk. Shes interrupted by
the arrival of the mother, Corryn Fell (Jamie J.
Jones).
It soon becomes apparent that Corryn, whos
a single mom, is quite angry and that Heather is
reluctant to engage her or to tell her why the
boy, Gidion, was suspended.
Heather wants to wait for the principal to
arrive, but Corryn soon discerns that the prin-
cipal has no intention of showing up.
Not only is she angry, Corryn is sarcastic
and demeaning toward Heather, who began
teaching only two years ago after working in
advertising. For her part, Corryn teaches litera-
ture at the graduate level at Northwestern
University.
But there are deeper reasons, including mater-
nal love and bewilderment, behind Corryns
anger this afternoon. Others become clearer as
more information is revealed by the characters.
This wrenching play explores issues like
cyber bullying, young sexuality, parenting,
educational practices and even taste in litera-
ture.
As directed by Jon Tracy, the two actors mine
the script for all of its nuances and surprises
while investing its many pauses with meaning.
Nina Balls classroom set comes complete
with desks, chairs, wall charts and uorescent
lights (lighting by Michael Palumbo).
Running 90 minutes the clock on the wall
moves from 2:45 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. this
play is packed with emotional power and food
for thought combined with the pleasure of see-
ing two skilled actors at work.
Gidions Knot will continue at Aurora
Theatre Company, 2081 Addison St., Berkeley,
through March 2. For tickets and information,
call (510) 843-4822 or visit www.aurorathe-
atre.org.
Aurora stages gripping Gidions Knot
DAVID ALLEN
Corryn (Jamie Jones),right,confronts Heather (Stacy Ross) about the contents of a note passed
to her son, Gidion, in class in Gidions Knot.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK With 1.23 billion users in all
the avors and up-and-down stages of romantic
relationships, Facebook knows a thing or two
about love.
For example, two people who are about to
enter a relationship interact more and more on
Facebook in the weeks leading up to making
their coupled status ofcial up until 12 days
before the start of the relationship, when they
share an average of 1.67 posts per day.
Then, their Facebook interactions start to
decline presumably because they are spend-
ing more time together ofine. But while they
interact less, couples are more likely to express
positive emotions toward their each other once
they are in a relationship, researchers on
Facebooks data science team found.
Touching on everything from religion to age
differences, Facebook has been disclosing such
light-hearted ndings in a series of blog posts
this week, with one coming up later Friday and
another, on breakups, Saturday. Friday, of
course, is Valentines Day.
Facebook data scientist Mike Develin, whose
background is in mathematics, notes that the
relationship stuff is sort a side project for his
team, the ndings geared more toward academic
papers than Facebooks day-to-day business.
His day job is Facebooks search function
how people use it, what they are searching for
that isnt available and how to make it more use-
ful.
But the patterns Facebooks researchers can
detect help illustrate just how useful the sites
vast trove of data can be in mapping human
interactions and proving or disproving assump-
tions about relationships. Can horoscopes pre-
dict lasting love? Forget about it.
We have such a wide-ranging set of data,
including on places there may not be data on
otherwise, Develin said, adding that because
Facebook knows a lot about peoples authentic
identity, there are almost no boundaries to the
kinds of questions the researchers can explore
about the structure of society, culture and how
people interact.
What Facebook knows about love, in numbers
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FLESH AND METAL: BODY AND MACHINE IN EARLY 20TH-CENTURY ART IS JOINTLY
ORGANIZED BY THE CANTOR ARTS CENTER AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY AND
THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART.
FERNAND LGER, DEUX FEMMES SUR FOND BLEU (TWO WOMEN ON A BLUE
BACKGROUND), 1927; SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, FRACTIONAL
GIFT OF HELEN AND CHARLES SCHWAB; ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS),
NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS; PHOTO: BEN BLACKWELL.
NOV 13

MAR 16
museum.stanford.edu
F L E S H
AND
M E T A L
Body and Machine in Early 20th-Century Art
DOING Late Night, Fallon explains, but
over ve years its kind of grown, and blos-
somed into what it became, which is The
Tonight Show. We grew into it!
Fallon rst became popular during his six
years on Saturday Night Live, where he
displayed a chameleonic range of characters
and impersonations, plus a musicality that
grants him uncanny skill at mimicking
numerous recording stars.
His 2004 departure from SNL to pursue a
lm career didnt pan out, particularly with
the comedy op Taxi, in which he co-
starred with Queen Latifah (who now has her
own talk show, in daytime).
I learned a lesson from that movie, he
says. I denitely appreciate everything I
get now, where I probably wouldnt have if
that movie was a giant hit. Im kind of
happy that my lm career didnt take off.
Now a TV staple, Fallon declares that hes
developed a voice that people expect from
us.
What is that voice?
Fun. Nice. Absurd, he says reectively.
Athoughtful pause, then a laugh. Im still
working on the list.
His key strength as host boils down to his
unflagging engagement, says Toni ght
Show producer Josh Lieb.
Hes got genuine empathy for his guests
and for the audience, he said. Hes trying
to give them the best of himself.
He is the most inclusive comic Ive ever
known, adds Lieb, whose credits include
The Daily Show With Jon Stewart and the
sitcom NewsRadio. Some comics want to
shut the audience out. Jimmy really wants to
bring the whole world in on the joke.
Fallon is also up for anything, and his
guests seem chill about following his lead.
Like when he and tough-guy action-lm star
Jason Statham doused each other with pitch-
ers of water during a card game called Water
War.
Im not afraid to get wet, says Fallon,
chortling at the memory. Im not afraid to
get messy.
It seems to be paying off. Note that char-
ter Late Night host David Letterman held
that post for more than a decade before
launching Late Show (now Fallons CBS
rival at 11:35 p.m.). OBrien labored 15
long years before his short-lived promotion
to Tonight.
Now, after only a ve-year internship,
Fallon has graduated to whats repeatedly,
momentously, hopefully described as his
last job.
Thats what it SHOULD be, he nods.
Its a great job, and it should be the last
job, if you do it right. Im looking forward
to being here a long time!
Continued from page 19
FALLON
consultants to help them navigate the
college admissions process even when
they are just starting off high school as
freshmen. Ive been asked by an under-
classman if I joined newspaper at school
because I thought it would look good on
my college application. It should go
without saying that my three years of
involvement in journalism is not because
I was hoping to bolster my college appli-
cation or resume. Rather, I chose to join,
and continue writing for, newspaper
because of the genuine interest I have in
the evolving field of journalism. Several
years ago, no one would have ever ques-
tioned an individual about their motiva-
tion to participate in an extracurricular
activity. However, the changing land-
scape of college admissions has prompt-
ed some to engage in activities and pursue
leadership positions in which they would
otherwise be uninterested. This is the
result of our college-centric society.
It is a shame people begin preparing for
college admissions earlier and earlier.
Mind you, Im not undermining the value
of a quality college education; I just think
we need to reconsider how much focus we
are giving to four years of our lives. The
average American is expected to live for
79 years. College only constitutes four of
them (which amounts to 5 percent of
ones life). Instead of worrying about
tomorrow or concerning ourselves with
admission to the best university, we
should treasure the time that we have as
high schoolers. Rather than having con-
versations that only fixate on the four
years to come, we should be having con-
versations that we will remember four
years from now.
Jacqueline Tang is a senior at Aragon High School
in San Mateo. Student News appears in the week-
end edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
villain never before revealed who may or may
not be Parkers peer, inspired by newspaper
and TVreports of Spider-Mans actions.
Someones running around trying to be just
like Spider-Man and theres no way in Peters
mind that hes not responsible for everything
that guys going to do, said Slott of the
Ditko-esque bad guy he would not name.
Continued from page 19
SPIDER-MAN
of the now defunct Caf Beano on Valencia
Street (now Caf Ethiopia). Within a month,
it was putting on seven performances a
week. After a short stint at the old Modern
Times Bookstore location, in 1992, The
Marsh moved to a 112-seat theater formerly
occupied by the jazz club Bajones (where,
according to local lore, you could get a mar-
garita on the rocks at six in the morning).
In 1996, The Marsh purchased the whole
building, gradually developing the 12,000-
square-foot space into a community arts
center, which now includes two theaters, a
comedy club, a cafe and a youth theater. The
area around The Marsh is now jammed with
small restaurants, cafes and eclectic shops.
Attended, reasonably priced and covered
parking is steps away from the Marsh at the
New Mission Bartlett Garage, entered from
21st Street between Mission and Valencia
streets.
Susan Cohn is a member of the San Francisco Bay
Area Theatre Critics Circle and the American
Theatre Critics Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 20
SCENE
Jury sides with
Garth Brooks in loan lawsuit
NASHVILLE, Tenn. A Nashville jury
has sided with country music singer Garth
Brooks in a dispute he had with a former
employee over $226,000.
The Tennessean is reporting that a federal
jury in Nashville reached a verdict Thursday.
Brooks California movie and TV produc-
tion company, Red Stokes Entertainment,
sued Lisa Sanderson claiming she failed to
repay a $226,000 loan.
Sanderson, the former CEO of the produc-
tion company, says the money was a gift.
She testied that she and Brooks were once
so close that they were like family. She also
claimed that Brooks owed her a pension
after the rm closed in 2010.
The jury foreman says Sanderson should
have had documentation about the pension.
Afterward, Sanderson told the judge that she
did not have the money to repay Brooks.
Entertainment brief
LOCAL/CALENDAR 23
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, FEB. 15
NFL 88 Plan Brunch. 10 a.m. to Noon. Silverado Belmont
Hills, 1301 Ralston Ave., Belmont. RSVP to kstromgren@sil-
veradocare.com by Sat., Feb. 15. For more information call
226-4150.
Rose Garden Work Party. 10 a.m. to noon. San Mateo
Central Park Rose Garden, Ninth and Palm avenues. Coffee
and snacks will be provided. Bring gloves. For more infor-
mation call 574-1677.
Golden Nursery Fourth Annual Citrus Tasting Event. 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Golden Nursery, 1122 Second Ave., San Mateo.
Bring an empty belly and lots of questions to discover the
fruit you, your friends and family will love to eat and grow.
Expert help from Deanna at Generation Growers. Free. For
more information call 348-5525.
Branches, Buds and Blossoms: Romance of the Winter
Garden. 10:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Filoli, 86 Caada Road,
Woodside. Admission to all activities is free for Filoli mem-
bers or with paid admission for non-members.
Dad and Me at the Library. 11 a.m. Portola Valley Library,
765 Portola Road, Portola Valley. Free. For more information
go to www.fatherhoodcollaborative.org.
E2 Fitness and Breakfast: Serious Sculpt with Jonathan
Kulter. 11 a.m. Whole Foods Market, 1010 Park Place, San
Mateo. For more information contact hsu-
lien.rivera@wholefoods.com.
Nom Nom Paloe Book Signing. 11 a.m. Whole Foods
Market, 1010 Park Place, San Mateo. Free. For more informa-
tion email hsu-lien.rivera@wholefoods.com.
LoveFest 2014. Noon. Whole Foods Market, 1010 Park
Place, San Mateo. Taste chocolate, champagne, wine and
artisan food. For more information contact hsu-
lien.rivera@wholefoods.com.
Chocolate and Cabernets Tasting at La Honda Winery.
Noon to 4 p.m. La Honda Winery, 2645 Fair Oaks Ave.,
Redwood City. $10. For more information email
info@lahondawinery.com.
53rd Annual Camellia Show and Plant Sale. Noon to 4
p.m. 1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. Free admission. For
more information email sfpcscamellias@gmail.com.
Continues Sunday.
Steve Okamoto Presentation. 1 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Steve
Okamoto will speak of the forced removal of Japanese from
the Pacic Coast during World War II in his presentation
entitled, Relocation: A Constitutional Mistake of Historic
Proportions. The program is free with the price of admis-
sion to the museum, which is $5 for adults, $3 for students
and seniors. For more information call 299-0104.
SWADemonstration. 1 p.m. SWA Gallery, 2625 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more information call 737-6184.
The Mikado by Gilbert & Sullivan. 2 p.m. Dinkelspiel
Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Drive, Stanford. This is a Stanford
Savoyards production. Shows run two and a half hours in
length.Tickets range from $10 to $20. For more information
and to purchase tickets go to
http://savoyards.stanford.edu.
Terry Lyngso of Lyngso Materials presentation: What
Camellias Need to Thrive in Your Garden. 2 p.m. 1400
Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. Free. For more information
email sfpcscamellias@gmail.com.
Toddler Dance Party. 2 p.m. San Mateo Public Library
Oak Room, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more infor-
mation call 522-7838.
Reception: Blooming. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Main Gallery, 1018
Main St, Redwood City. Free. For more information email
tmgginger@gmail.com.
Protein Based Breakfast Class. 5 p.m. 907 Newbridge St.,
Suite A, East Palo Alto. Free. For more information call (408)
903-6049.
Live at Mission Blue: Cypress String Quartet. 7:30 p.m.
475 Mission Blue Drive, Brisbane. $40. For more information
email jenniferbousquet@yahoo.com.
SymphonyConcert III. 8 p.m. First Congregational Church,
1985 Louis Road, Palo Alto. Performance will feature the
churchs Letourneau pipe organ. $20 general admission,
$17 seniors, $10 students. For more information go to
www.paphil.org.
Groovy Judy Raises the Roof. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Pioneer
Saloon, 2925 Woodside Road, Woodside. For 21 plus audi-
ence. Tickets are $5. For more information call 851-8487.
SUNDAY, FEB. 16
Third Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance with the Bob
Gutierrez Band. 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road. $5. For more information
call 616-7150.
53rd Annual Camellia Show and Plant Sale. Noon to 4
p.m. 1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. Free admission. For
more information email sfpcscamellias@gmail.com.
Third Sunday Book Sale. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Friends of San Carlos Library
invite you to search their collection of gently used books,
CDs and DVDs.
Drought: Camellias in the Ground and Containers. 2
p.m. 1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. Free. For more
information email sfpcscamellias@gmail.com.
Dr. Lonnie Smith Trio. 4:30 p.m. Douglas Beach House, 307
Mirada Road, Half Moon Bay. Two one-hour sets begin at
4:30 with intermission. Entry is $45 (does not include buf-
fet). $5 discount for youth under 21. To buy tickets go to
http://lonniesmith.brownpapertickets.com. For more infor-
mation email info@bachddsoc.org or call 726-2020.
MONDAY, FEB. 17
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Samaritan House,
4031 Pacic Blvd., San Mateo. To make an appointment or
for more information call 523-0804.
Dance Connection with Live Music by Nob Hill Sounds.
Free dance lessons 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. with open dance 7 p.m.-
9:30 p.m. Burlingame Womans Club. 241 Park Road,
Burlingame. Male dance hosts free admission. Bring a new
rst-time friend and earn free entry for yourself. For more
information call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, FEB. 18
San Mateo Newcomers Club Luncheon. Noon. Iron Gate
Restaurant, 1360 El Camino Real, Belmont. Be ready to take
part in games and trivia. Checks for registration must have
been received by Wednesday, Feb. 12 in order to partici-
pate. For more information call 286-0688.
Afterschool Special at CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo. Receive
50 percent your admission. Let your child explore interac-
tive science exhibits and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
Wellness Lecture: Graceful Aging. 6 p.m. Half Moon Bay
Library, 620 Correas St., Half Moon Bay. Preregistration is
required. Register at:
www.newleafhalfmoonbay.eventbrite.com For more infor-
mation email patti@bondmarcom.com.
Calendar
approval was predicated on limiting the house
sizes from 2,400 to 3,432 square feet which
led both Save Laurel Way and the developer to
appeal. The City Council denied both and fur-
ther scaled the size range from 2,000 square
feet to 3,432 square feet.
Opponents argue the revised nal EIR used
to approve the permit is inadequate because it
understated or failed to look adequately at the
ramication. The sites slopes, for instance,
are unusually steep with geologically
unstable soils but the revised nal EIR
deferred studies of possible landslides until
after the projects approval, according to the
suit.
The suit also contends the city violated its
own stormwater treatment ordinance by
allowing a project that constructs roads and
homes within 30 feet of a protected creek.
Project opponents also cite concern about
the destruction of heritage trees, construction
noise and trafc impacts, increasing soil
movement and damage to neighboring prop-
erties.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
Continued from page 1
SUIT
decline as reneries dial back production to
perform maintenance and make the switch
to summer fuels.
Gasoline prices are already creeping high-
er. The nationwide average price has risen
for seven days in a row to $3.34 per gallon,
the highest level since October, according
to AAA, OPIS and Wright Express.
California, Connecticut and New York driv-
ers are paying an average of $3.65 or more,
the most in the lower 48 states. Montana
and South Carolina drivers are paying $3.10
or less.
But the nationwide average is not expect-
ed to quite reach its high point of last year
of $3.79 per gallon, set February 27, never
mind the highs of $3.94 in 2012 and $3.98
in 2011. AAA predicts a peak of between
$3.55 and $3.75 per gallon.
Gasoline prices are 8 percent lower than
last year at this time, even though crude oil
prices are about the same, in part because
gasoline supplies are plentiful. Refiners
have kept operations humming to meet
increased demand for heating oil during the
frigid winter, and have produced more gaso-
line as a result. But the stormy weather has
left cars buried under snow, where they dont
use much gasoline.
Now, however, with the end of the winter
in sight, renery output is expected to slow
down as reners conduct typical seasonal
maintenance. Even reners that are up and
running sometimes reduce production at this
time of year. Theyll soon switch to making
more expensive summer gasoline that is
formulated to meet clean air rules, and they
dont want to be stuck with unsold winter
gas.
That reduced production depletes supplies
and causes gas prices to rise as the U.S. driv-
ing season approaches.
There are a few twists this year that could
send prices higher than forecasters expect,
though, especially in certain markets.
Three crucial refineries that serve the
Northeast have maintenance already under-
way or scheduled soon, according to Kloza.
Delta Air Lines facility in Trainer, Pa., is
nishing up maintenance and is expected to
be back on line in a couple of weeks, accord-
ing to analysts. The Philadelphia Energy
Solutions renery in Philadelphia is also
undergoing maintenance, and the giant
Irving renery in New Brunswick, Canada,
is expected to go offline at the end of
February, analysts say.
If maintenance goes as planned and the
weather in the Northeast stays nasty sup-
pressing demand for gasoline prices
shouldnt spike too dramatically. But if
something goes wrong at a renery and peo-
ple start hopping in the car again, prices
could soar in New York and New England.
Kloza says California and the Pacific
Northwest are also at risk for higher prices
because both regions rely so heavily on a
relatively small number of reneries.
Low supplies will be more difcult to
replace than in the past because the U.S. is
receiving fewer imports of gasoline and
other fuels from abroad, while exporting
more. Reners often nd it cheaper to send
any excess fuel they produce abroad than to
send it to other U.S. locations because of
shipping rules that require domestic ship-
ments to use a small eet of U.S. boats,
which charge higher rates.
The market may not take off, but theres
plenty of dry tinder, and I think it will,
Kloza says. Its going to get pretty inter-
esting here over the next 45 days.
Continued from page 1
GAS
according to a recording of the program pro-
vided by the station, KTTH in Seattle.
Most are now saying it privately.
Newsoms comments make him the most
prominent Democrat in California to pub-
licly split with Gov. Jerry Brown on the
project, which is one of the governors top
priorities.
Newsom was asked about the $68 billion
plan during an appearance on the Ben
Shapiro Show. The host said many
Californians have turned against the bullet
train after approving a 2008 ballot measure
that allowed the sale of nearly $10 billion
in bonds for it.
Newsom said he was the rst California
mayor to support the bond measure and even
campaigned for it with then-Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger, a Republican. Now, he
said, I think Im where the public was and
is.
We dont have the federal dollars that we
were hoping for only about $3 billion
has come forward. The private sector hasnt
stepped up, he said. That said, the gover-
nor is hell bent on doing the rst phase of
this in that area you just referenced, the cen-
tral part of the state.
Brown has continued to back the bullet
train even as questions grow about how the
state will pay for it. Browns ofce referred
questions about Newsoms comments to the
California High-Speed Rail Authority.
High-speed rail is forging ahead because
voters backed a statewide rail modernization
program that is creating jobs and will pro-
vide clean transportation for generations to
come, Dan Richard, chairman of the rail
authoritys board, said in a written state-
ment.
A Sacramento County Superior Court
judge last year threw out the states funding
plan, ordering it to write a new one, and pre-
vented the sale of high-speed rail bonds.
Late Friday, the 3rd District Court of
Appeal agreed to hear an expedited appeal
from Browns administration, which said
the decisions could cause serious delays and
set a bad precedent for other public works
projects in the state.
Continued from page 1
HSR
business deals have collapsed as a result.
This has been a damn nightmare,
DeBrino said in a prepared statement. Its
about time to stand up to these con men who
are ruining lives.
Five states Georgia, Illinois, Oregon,
Texas and Utah have passed laws restrict-
ing the practice of charging payment for
mug shot removal and 14 others are intro-
duced similar legislation this year.
Continued from page 1
MUG SHOT
COMICS/GAMES
2-15-14
FRIDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Ponytail site
5 Like some goals
10 Free from tension
12 Cry of warning
13 Zodiac sign
14 Door topper
15 Consumer gds.
16 Durocher or Tolstoy
18 Moray
19 Gathered
23 Bad-mouth
26 Donnes done
27 Singer Seeger
30 Moral codes
32 Enlarge, as a pupil
34 Cauliower bud
35 Storm warnings
36 Bend forward
37 Comic Philips
38 Lobbying group
39 Fabric edge
42 Drill attachment
45 Secure a tent
46 Drains, as energy
50 Closed
53 Main course
55 Plays the guitar
56 Addisons partner
57 Ear danglers
58 Solar radiation
DOWN
1 All You Is Love
2 Charity
3 Operated a ferry
4 Many millennia
5 Luau welcome
6 Possess
7 A twist of
8 Shade provider
9 Bellow
10 The Wizard of Oz studio
11 Most rugged
12 Coalition
17 Afr. neighbor
20 Geologic epoch
21 Play wrap-up
22 Edit out
23 Rocks Leppard
24 never y!
25 Wing tip
28 Field protector
29 Jazzy James
31 Subj. of rollovers
32 Harms
33 PC button
37 Festive night
40 RN assistants
41 Helena rival
42 Shrub
43 Crazy about
44 Pamplona runner
47 Square footage
48 Rain hard
49 Meet, in poker
51 Kennel youngster
52 911 responder
54 degree
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
GET FUZZY
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2014
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Gambling will lead
to misfortune. Financial limitations are apparent if
you arent careful with your cash. Hard work will be
required to maintain your position; dont trust any
risky schemes.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Focus on children,
creative projects or getting out and socializing. An
older relative may be a burden. Offer help, but dont
let anyone take you for granted.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Dont become too
chummy with a colleague. You will be disappointed
if this person doesnt respond in the way you hoped.
Expect delays with travel and communications.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Take on creative
projects that you may have been afraid to attempt
in the past. Its time to move forward with your
dreams, hopes and wishes.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If you limit yourself,
you will have regrets later on. Dont take what others
say too seriously, and keep a steady watch on events
transpiring in your work and home lives things
could get away from you if you arent careful.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Dont be shy; take part
in activities that are happening in your community.
Dont address matters that require legal, nancial or
medical input until you have more information.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Work by yourself and at
your own speed. Someone influential may try to
hold you back. Do whatever it takes to complete
your planned endeavors.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You will want to
express yourself today, so dont hold back. It would
be best to say whats on your mind and let others
respond in whatever way they see fit.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Problems while traveling
or dealing with authority gures can be expected.
Make sure your documents are up to date before you
venture out. Someone may have a hidden agenda.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You can make a
difference if you get involved in an organization
that helps the underprivileged. You are likely to
meet someone special who shares your concerns.
Together, you will make a contribution.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Watch what
you say. Someone may use your words against you.
Emotional matters will surface if you try to skirt issues.
Be honest and dont let anyone limit your freedom.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Get involved in
talks that challenge you mentally. You will learn from
a good debate. You have much to offer and much to
gain if you just speak up and share your ideas.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
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Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
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104 Training
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The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
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110 Employment
AUTOMOTIVE -
Experienced Smog &
Repair Tech Wanted
Must have diagnostic experience & own
tools. Compensation tbd based on expe-
rience. If interested please apply in per-
son at: SpeeDee Oil Change, 390 El Ca-
mino Real, Millbrae, CA.
BUS DRIVER
JOBS AVAILABLE
Requires willingness to obtain Class B
CDL Learners Permit with Passenger
Endorsement. Paid Training.
CALL TODAY, (415)206-7386
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
CHILD CARE -
Part time, two days per week, 8:30 to
5:30pm, plus occasional babysitting
for two kids, ages 4 and 6.5. Position
is in Belmont. Watch kids at home,
and also transport them to school if
necessary.
Requires experience with similarly
aged kids, reliability, drivers license,
car and clean driving record.
Please call (650)303-6735.
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have.Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
110 Employment
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
DRIVER -
DELIVERY DRIVER, own car, must
speak English. Good driving record.
Good pay and working enviirtoment,
Apply in person, Windy City Pizza, 35
Bovet Rd, San Mateo.
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNAS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 200
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
IN-HOME
CARE Staffng
GREETER /
SALES PERSON
Greet customers and up-sell car
wash and detail services. $8.00 +
commission. Potential for $15-$30
per hr. Jacks Car Wash. 3651 S. El
Camino Real, SM. 650-627-8447.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259316
The following person is doing business
as: Zaaz Studios, 3153 Campus Dr.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Whole
Body Beauty & Wellness, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Diane Demattei /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/22/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 526451
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Daniel Alger, Jessica Clements
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Daniel Alger, Jessica Clem-
ents filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Malcolm Jovan Alger
Propsed Name: Malcolm Patrick Alger
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 14,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/28/ 2014
/s/ George A. Miram /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/28/2014
(Published, 02/01/14, 02/08/2014,
02/15/2014, 02/22/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259301
The following person is doing business
as: Ambassador Apartments, 145 N. El
Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Richard Tod Spieker and Catherine
R. Spieker, 60 Mulberry Ln., Atherton,
CA 94027. The business is conducted by
a Married Couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 03/31/2011.
/s/ Richard Tod Spieker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/21/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14).
26 Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journals wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
B2B sales experience is preferred
hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
work well with others
Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259332
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Past Utopia Productions, 2) Past
Utopia, 315 Canoe Ct., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94065 is hereby registered by
the following owner: William Reed, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ William Reed /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259349
The following person is doing business
as: The Maker Spot, 86 17th Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Bernadine De-
sign, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Bernadine Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259346
The following person is doing business
as: Spensers Delicatessen, Meats, &
Seafood, 249 Visitation Ave, BRISBANE,
CA 94005 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Spenser Cates Udovch,
435 Mariposa St., BRISBANE, CA
94005. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Spenser Udovchi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/14, 02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259386
The following person is doing business
as: RMD Auto Body, LLC, 1229 Mont-
gomery Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
RMD Auto Body, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on 12-
19-13.
/s/ Dominic Borg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259340
The following person is doing business
as: Golden Key Locksmith, 740 Bounty
Dr., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jona-
than Dray, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Jonathan Dray /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259432
The following person is doing business
as: St. Francis Animal Hosiptal, 871 Sier-
ra St., MOSS BEACH, CA 94038 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Amy L de Lorimier, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Amy L de Lorimier /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259448
The following person is doing business
as: UNAlliance, 1349 El Camino Real,
#2, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: United
Alliance For Economic Development,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Gimbler Escobedo Aliaga /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/31/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259176
The following person is doing business
as: In Stride Bookkeeping, 515 Madison
Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Nicole Redman, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Nicole Redman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259180
The following person is doing business
as: Scissors X T-Shirt Hand Paint & Cut-
ting Design, 1329 El Camino Real #3,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Sandra
Sanchez, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Sandra Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259538
The following person is doing business
as: MSF Decorations, 374 Alberta Way,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Melinda
Gayle Slatt-Friedeberg. same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on 01/01/02.
/s/ Melinda Gayle Slatt-Friedeberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259611
The following person is doing business
as: G.E.S, 180 A Utah Ave., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Ground Express Services, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/1998.
/s /Kapo Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259610
The following person is doing business
as: Air & Ground World Transport, 180 A
Utah Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: AG World Transport, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/1998.
/s /Kapo Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259468
The following person is doing business
as: Abcam Burlingame, 863 Mitten Rd.,
Ste. 103, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Epitomics, Inc, DE. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s / Michael Hadjisavas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259275
The following person is doing business
as: Lindserella, 1646 Virginia Ave., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Lindsay
Joan Brugioni Peterson, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Lindsay Joan Brugioni Peterson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259588
The following person is doing business
as: Bullseye Translation, LLC, 274 Red-
wood Shores Pkwy., #528, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94065 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Bullseye Transla-
tion, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/26/2010.
/s/ Nadezhada Mcleod /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
210 Lost & Found
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANICA Free to
Senior Center, educ./service facility. No
response free to anyone. (650)342-7933
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3 each (650)341-1861
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
295 Art
5 prints, nude figures, 14 x 18, signed
Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all. 650-345-
3277
6 CLASSIC landscape art pictures,
28x38 glass frame. $15 each OBO.
Must see to appreciate. (650)345-5502
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC OMELET Maker quesadillas
& sandwich too $9 650-595-3933
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
G.E. ELECTRIC DRYER - New, pur-
chased Sept 2013. Paid $475. Will sell
for $300. Excellent condition. Call SOLD!
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
296 Appliances
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24x24x24, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24 wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
STOVE AND HOOD, G.E. XL44, gas,
Good condition, clean, white.. $150.
(650)348-5169
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18 Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24 5 speed in
very good condition $75 SOLD!
SCHWINN 20 Boys Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
19 TOTAL (15 different) UN postage-
stamp souvenir cards, $70 catalog value,
$5, (650)-366-1013.
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
255 US used postage-stamp blocks &
strips (1300 stamps) and more, mounted,
$20, (650)-366-1013.
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
HO TRAIN parts including engines, box-
cars, tankers, tracks, transformers, etc.
$75 Call 650-571-6295
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE DOLLS- 2002 Collection- Never
removed from box. Holiday Celebration &
Society Girl. $40.650-654-9252
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15 boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
VINTAGE 50'S JC Higgins toboggan, 74"
long & 18" wide. $35. 650-326-2235.
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
27 Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains
Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27 SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
32 FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
ATT 2WIRE Router, working condition,
for Ethernet, wireless, DSL, Internet.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. SOLD!
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72x 21 x39 1/2
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
304 Furniture
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
SOLD!
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65.
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, SOLD
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
SOLD!
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINER - La-Z-Boy wing back reclin-
er fabric burgundy color. Solid condition
$60.00 Call 650-878-4911
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
304 Furniture
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, (650)345-5502
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each (650)574-3229
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/ cover, washable $25.
(650)578-9208
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (3) stainless steel
21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. - $10 all
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty & case $25 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
308 Tools
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
WINCHESTER POCKETKNIFE scis-
sors, bade, sdriver file $10 650-595-3933
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 SOLD!
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
GREEN CERAMIC flower pot w/ 15
Different succulents, $20.(650)952-4354
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $7, SOLD!
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO SOLD!
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
310 Misc. For Sale
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 (650)574-3229
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40 high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM, MARINA Cool 10, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. (650)591-
1500
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WANTED SLIVER Dollars
(650)492-1298
WANTED: HORSE DRAWN
EQUIPMENT
For restoration.
Condition is not critical.
Email location, photo, &
Telephone number. to:
rosekrans@pacbell.net or
call (650)851-7201
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56 square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, $10 (650)375-8044
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
RAY BAN Aviator glasses - brand new in
case. Green lens-gold frames. 63mm.
$99. 650-654-9252
STETSON COWBOY Hat -never worn.
Size 6 7/8-4X Beaver. Horse hair head-
band. $99. 650-654-9252
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BASEBALLS & softballs 6 in all for only
$5 650-595-3933
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50. (650)637-
0930
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. SOLD!
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
28 Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 A Different
World actress
10 More than ready
to do
15 Halleys field
16 Veronese white
17 Norwegian
offerings
19 Most like a
beachcomber
20 __ Mutual
Friend: Dickens
last completed
novel
21 Royal letters
22 Texting gasp
23 Profile listing
25 Yes!
26 St. Peters
Basilica attraction
29 Many roomies
30 Match
31 The first one open
on Majorca in
1950
33 Lake Geneva river
35 Princess with a
Wookieepedia
entry
36 I Lost It at the
Movies author
37 Narrow vents
39 Teaching method
based on set
theory
42 Gent
43 Moselle tributary
45 The Love Boat
bartender
47 Hit the __
48 Precisely!
49 Lucy of
Elementary
50 Time to look
forward
51 Trot
52 Aids
56 Fails to intervene
59 Spud
60 Europes tallest
ferris wheel
61 Underhanded type
62 Mississippi has
four
DOWN
1 Telecommuters
tool
2 Faith of more than
1.5 billion people
3 His was the first
number retired by
the Mets
4 Irelands __
Islands
5 Audio giant
6 Cross to bear
7 View from The
Hague
8 Graph- ending
9 Cooperstown
charter member
10 Theres a lot of
interest in it
11 Food cooked in
an imu
12 Method
13 Accruing fines,
maybe
14 Did a double
take?
18 Chafes
24 Kin of -ish
27 Spring bloom
28 Distract the
security guard,
say
30 Pampas weapons
32 Assignment
34 Half: Pref.
36 Fuel that built the
Rockefeller
fortune
37 Adjective for
Pygmalion or
Major Barbara
38 Shower
paraphernalia
39 Hound
40 Like owls
41 Lock-changing
tool?
42 See 57-Down
44 Luandas land
46 Triggers a bleep,
maybe
48 Icelandic singer
53 Org. that rejects
bad eggs
54 Van.
alternative
55 Recent Yankee
star named for
Jackie
Robinson
57 With 42-Down,
spots for sailors
gear
58 Scand. kingdom
By Brad Wilber
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
02/15/14
02/15/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
SOLD!
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE
SALE
EVERYTHING
MUST GO
Feb. 14, 15, 16
9am - 5 pm
2545 Eaton Ave
San Carlos
(650) 366-6747
or
(530) 613-3320
3 Complete French
provincial, Bed room
set, side-by-side
refrigerator, Power
sofa New, Leather re-
cliner, Complete oak
dining room set
and Much More!
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
335 Garden Equipment
LAWN MOWER Solaris Electric Cord-
less 21 self propelled. Excellent work-
ing condition.$85. 650-593-1261
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
REX HOME BUYER SEMINAR
PRESENTED BY SHARPERBUYER
MIKE LYON TO DISCUSS
UNIQUE DOWN PAYMENT
METHODS
Saturday, FEB 8th, 1pm-2pm
850 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame, CA 94010
FREE
RSVP at http://bit.do/rexpresentation
RE Financing Wanted
WANTED: $200,000 second behind
$360K first. Home value $850,000 to
$900,000. Tom, (650)327-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
99 DODGE Van, 391 Posi, 200 Hp V-6,
22 Wheels, 2 24 Ladders, 2015 Tags,
$4500 OBO (650)481-5296
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
Well run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition SOLD!
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
620 Automobiles
OLDSMOBILE 99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. $1,500.
(650)740-6007.
VOLVO 85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO 85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUVs
FORD 98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2000 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
TOYOTA 05 TUNDRA, 4WD, Access
Cab, low mileage, $14,000. Call Joe
SOLD!
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires Service Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Claremont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a 96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUNNING BOARDS Dodge Ram fac-
tory chrome running boards. $99 (650)
995-4222
RUNNING BOARDS- Dodge Ram facto-
ry chrome running boards in great condi-
tion. $99 (650)995-4222
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICAS HOUSE
CLEANING & JANITORIAL
SERVICES
House Cleaning Move In/Out
Cleaning Janitorial Services
Handyman Services
Spring Cleaning Special! $65
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot Decks Fences
Handyman Painting
Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels Framing
Carpentry Stucco Siding
Dryrot Painting
Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS CLEANING
Roof and Gutter Repair
Screening & Seal
Replace & New Gutters
Free Est. Call Oscar
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
L.C PAINTING
(650)271-3955
Interior & Exterior
Sheetrock/Drywall Repair
Carpentry Repairs
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
Plumbing
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
30 Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
BANKRUPTCY
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
President's Day Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
$29
ONE HOUR MASSAGE
(650)354-8010
1030 Curtis St #203,
Menlo Park
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
www.unionspaand salon.com
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP serving your mid-Peninsula
real estate needs since 1976.
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
BRE LIC# 1254368
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
WORLD 31
Weekend Feb. 15-16, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Koreas agree to hold family reunions as planned
SEOUL, South Korea North and South Korea agreed in a
rare high-level meeting Friday to stop insulting each other
and to go ahead with planned reunions of Korean War-divid-
ed families next week despite a dispute over upcoming U.S.-
South Korean military drills.
Highly emotional reunions of long-separated families
havent been held in three years.
The agreements reect recent attempts by the rival Koreas
to ease animosity. Analysts, however, say ties could quick-
ly sour again because the countries may disagree over how
to implement the arrangement. Authoritarian North Korea,
for instance, is demanding that the South Korean govern-
ment control media reports critical of the Norths leader-
ship, something democratic Seoul has said it cannot do.
Ayear after repeatedly threatening nuclear war and vowing
to bolster its atomic capability, North Korea has recently
pushed for better ties with Seoul, agreeing to arrange
reunions of families separated by the 1950-53 Korean War.
Analysts say the impoverished North needs good relations
with Seoul to win outside investment and aid.
Officials: Ugandas leader to sign anti-gay bill
KAMPALA, Uganda Ugandan President Yoweri
Museveni plans to sign a bill into law that prescribes life
imprisonment for some homosexual acts, ofcials said
Friday, alarming rights activists who have condemned the
bill as draconian in a country where homosexuality already
has been criminalized.
Museveni announced his decision to governing party law-
makers, said government spokesman Ofwono Opondo. In
Twitter posts on Friday, Opondo said the legislators, who
are holding a retreat chaired by Museveni, welcomed the
development as a measure to protect Ugandans from social
deviants.
Musevenis decision was based on a report by medical
experts presented at the retreat, saying that homosexuali-
ty is not genetic but a social behavior, said Opondo.
Evelyn Anite, a spokeswoman for the governing party,
said the report, which had been requested by the president,
was prepared by more than a dozen scientists from Ugandas
Health Ministry.
Berlusconi remains a force in Italy turmoil
MILAN He has been convicted of tax fraud, booted out
of the Senate and banned from political ofce.
In other countries, that would be three strikes. But in
Italy, Silvio Berlusconi has not lost his political legitima-
cy, and it will be on full display when the former premier
leads his Forza Italia party to meet with Italys president to
discuss prospects for a new government after Premier Enrico
Lettas resignation Friday.
Berlusconis reemergence on Italys political scene comes
just days after a court in Naples put him on trial yet again,
this time for allegedly paying a senator 3 million euros ($4
million) to switch parties to bring down a rival govern-
ment.
Berlusconi is just one of the political leaders that
President Giorgio Napolitano was meeting Friday and
Saturday to see if Matteo Renzi, the leader of the
Democratic Party who engineered Lettas demise, has
enough support in Parliament to head a new government.
If Napolitano is satised that Renzi does, he could tap him
as early as this weekend to form a new government, which
would then have to pass votes of condence in Parliament.
World briefs
By Robert Burns
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON If any of the
65 Afghan militants who were
released from a former U.S. prison
in Afghanistan return to the battle-
eld, they risk being hunted down
by U.S. forces, a Pentagon ofcial
suggested Friday.
Without getting into hypothet-
icals, every day we continue to go
after those enemies in
Afghanistan that are targeting our
forces, the forces of our allies and
the Afghan people, and nothings
going to change about that. And
should one of these detainees
rejoin the ght, they need to know
that they do it at their own peril,
said the Pentagons press secre-
tary, Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby.
The 65 were released Thursday
by the Afghan government over
strenuous objections by the U.S.
government, which says the men
are dangerous Taliban ghters and
bomb-makers likely to return to
killing foreign forces and
Afghans.
Kirby said the 65 are not consid-
ered targets at the moment.
Theres not going to be an
active targeting campaign, if
thats what youre asking for, to
go after them, Kirby said. That
said, if they choose to return to the
ght, they become legitimate ene-
mies and legitimate targets.
The U.S. has asserted that some
of them were directly linked to
attacks that have killed or wound-
ed 32 U.S. or coalition personnel
and 23 Afghan security personnel
or civilians.
All of these individuals are peo-
ple who should not be walking the
streets, Kirby said. And we had
strong evidence on all of them --
evidence that has been ignored.
And thats unsatisfactory to us.
Kirby said Washington is con-
cerned that the government of
President Hamid Karzai might
release additional prisoners
deemed by the U.S. to be danger-
ous.
The spokesman said Defense
Secretary Chuck Hagel is frustrated
by a number of recent moves by
Karzai, including his decision to
release the 65 prisoners.
The Obama administration also
has been aggravated by Karzais
refusal to sign a long-term securi-
ty agreement with the U.S. that he
agreed to last year. The pact would
provide the legal basis for any
U.S. forces to remain in
Afghanistan as trainers and advis-
ers after the international combat
mission ends in December.
This is a relationship that mat-
ters and a country that matters.
And as frustrating as it can be at
times, he (Hagel) also believes we
need to keep working at this,
Kirby said.
Former Afghan prisoners could be targeted
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOCHI, Russia In a powerful
symbol of international sports
detente, Russian President Vladimir
Putin dropped in on U.S. Olympic
headquarters Friday to chat about
the Winter Games and the upcoming
Russia-U.S. hockey showdown.
He even wore a red Happy
Valentines Day from Team USA
pin on his lapel.
Putin spent about half an hour at
USA House in Sochis Olympic
Park, sitting on a couch talking
with U.S. Olympic Committee
chairman Larry Probst and CEO
Scott Blackmun. From there, he
made a stop at Canada House next
door.
Putin was very gracious,
Blackmun told The Associated
Press. What I would remember is it
sends a strong message about the
importance of sport to Russia.
The Russian leader looked
relaxed, wearing a dark jacket with
an open-collar light blue shirt. He
had a glass of red wine as he asked
the Americans about their experi-
ence in Sochi so far.
We talked about mostly our
impression of the games,
Blackmun said. He was very inter-
ested in knowing what we thought
about the level of infrastructure, the
level of services. ... We compli-
mented him on the great operations
so far.
Putins visit offered a sharp con-
trast with the chilly state of politi-
cal relations between Washington
and Moscow over issues that
include Ukraine, Syria, Edward
Snowden, gay rights and human
rights.
USAHouse gets
visit from Putin
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