Religious  Instructions:    
A  Prose  Poem    
 
By  Jane  Gilgun  
 

 
 
 
A  nun:  “Your  body  is  the  temple  of  the  Holy  Spirit.”  She  was  huge  and  round,  dressed  
in  black,  with  a  white  thing  squeezing  her  face  into  a  fleshy  ball.  
 
Me:  “You  mean  my  body  isn’t  mine?  Someone  else  lives  there?”    I  didn’t  say  that  out  
loud.  I  was  too  afraid  of  the  nun.  I  was  ten  years  old  or  maybe  even  younger.  
 
A  nun:  “Your  body  is  the  temple  of  the  Holy  Spirit.”  
 
Me:  “You  mean  I  have  to  be  pure?    I’m  not.  I  bleed  every  month.  The  smell  can  be  
unpleasant.  I  lust  after  boys.”  This  is  what  I  thought  four  years  later.    You  can  count  
on  it—I  didn’t  say  that  to  a  nun.  
 
Telling  me  my  body  is  a  temple  of  the  Holy  Spirit  didn’t  help  me.  These  words  had  
meaning  to  me  in  the  context  of  my  church  of  origin  where  I  had  the  status  of  a  
sinner  and  of  being  impure  as  compared  to  the  perfect  purity  of  the  Blessed  Virgin  
Mary.  It  has  taken  me  a  long  time  to  absorb  the  deeper,  more  accurate  truth.  We  are  
made  in  the  image  and  likeness  of  God,  and  God  saw  that  we  are  good.