Volume 11 • Number 4

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

Leading in Diversity

“Empowering Communities and Changing Lives”

The Selection is Made! Page 2

What About the Children? PAGE 4

Saginaw Habitat for Humanity salutes those who have made history, and those who are making it still today. Together we can continue to grow, improving our community and shaping the future.

A February Crisis PAGE 4

CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM Legacy Celebration UNDERSTANDING OUR COURTS, CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM & BILL OF RIGHTS PAGE LB 1

A GUIDE TO MICHIGAN’S

Do You Know Your Rights? PAGE 15

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

The Saginaw Valley State University Board of Control has appointed Donald Bachand as the school’s next president. Bachand was selected from a group of four finalists who interviewed on campus January 28-31. He becomes the fourth president of SVSU, replacing Eric Gilbertson, who is retiring after more than 24 years of service. “As the Board evaluated the candidates, it became clear to us that Don best demonstrated the attributes we were seeking in the new president,” said Board chair Jeff Martin. “He is a dynamic leader and an excellent listener, and he sets high standards and expectations for faculty and staff. “We wanted someone who could maintain enrollment in the face of declining high school graduates, help students succeed academically, and improve graduation rates. We are confident that Don is ready for these challenges.” Bachand has served as SVSU’s vice president for academic affairs since 2006 and added the responsibilities of provost in 2010. Prior to that he served nearly 10 years as dean of the College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences. Bachand first joined SVSU in 1978 as an assistant professor of criminal justice. “I accept this position with enthusiasm, but mindful of the challenges that lie ahead,” Bachand said. “I have spent most of my life at this university and care deeply about its future. I will work hard to maintain the work ethic, collegiality and ‘first name’ basis of SVSU; those characteristics are integral to who we are and are what set us apart.” In his role as provost, Bachand has evaluated SVSU’s degree programs and has seen the high success rates graduates have on state licensing exams and acceptance into graduate and professional schools. He said too many people across Michigan and beyond are unfamiliar with the quality of SVSU’s faculty and its overall academic rigor; one of his first priorities will be

SVSU Board Appoints New President

leadership in implementing programs designed to increase diversity among the faculty. A native of Detroit, Bachand began his career by serving 10 years in the Detroit Police Department. He spent several years on patrol before becoming among the youngest in department history to receive a promotion to sergeant; he was assigned to the chief of police’s strategic planning division. While on the force, Bachand completed a bachelor’s degree at Mercy L-R Newly Appointed SVSU President Donald Bachand College and a master’s degree at the University Congratulated by Retiring SVSU President Eric of Detroit. After joining SVSU, he went on to Gilbertson complete a Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. A long-time resident of Midland, Bachand to change that. has been actively involved in a number of “We have an obligation to our students and organizations across the Great Lakes Bay Region alumni to improve understanding in the broader and plans to build those bonds as president. community of how good we are academically “I know how important SVSU is to the and how good our faculty are as teachers and entire region,” he said. “We prepare many of the scholars,” he said. professionals that are being hired by employers During his time on the faculty, Bachand large and small. We also serve as a cultural and received the Landee Award for Teaching Excellence, SVSU’s highest honor for classroom intellectual resource, not just in terms of what takes place on our campus, but also in the many teaching. He also served as an officer in the ways in which our faculty and staff are engaged SVSU Faculty Association, giving him the with the community.” valuable experience of having negotiated a Martin said the Board received numerous contract from both the labor and management comments from the faculty, staff and students perspectives. Martin said that experience factored into the who attended open forums with the finalists, and those were taken into consideration. Board’s decision. “We are very grateful for their valued input,” “We wanted someone who could he said. “It helped the Board reach this decision strengthen already strong relationships within and we look forward to having their continued the institution,” he said, “because in today’s support in the years ahead.” increasingly competitive market, everyone – Bachand will take office almost immediately. faculty, staff, students, donors, alumni, everyone His first day as president will be Monday, Feb. 17. – needs to be working together to provide our “I know this place, and I’m ready to hit the students with a first class college education.” ground running,” he said. Governmental affairs and private fundBachand will receive an annual salary of raising are two aspects of the presidency where $250,000, as well as a University-owned home Bachand has some experience but said he will and vehicle. He also receives the same health need to grow. He has been honored for his care and retirement benefits as other SVSU commitment to diversity, receiving SVSU’s Roosevelt Ruffin Diversity Award in 2012 for his employees. support of community outreach programs and his

The Great Women of the Great Lakes Bay Region program will be February 27, at Saginaw Valley State University, Ryder Center, 7400 Bay Road, University Center, MI, at 4 p.m. For additional information call 989.964.7311.

Great Women of the Great Lake Bay Region Honored
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February 16, 2014

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

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The Michigan Banner
1400 W. Genesee Saginaw, MI 48602 989.753-3475 publisher@michiganbanner.com Office Hours: Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Publisher Jerome Buckley Senior Editor R. L. Buckley The Latino Banner Senior Editor Rosa Morales thelatinobanner@gmail.com Circulation & Distribution: Staff Marketing & Sales Staff Sales Staff Mission: The Michigan Banner operates and serves as a print and online media venue committed to educating, informing and enlightening our readership regarding events and news that directly and indirectly affect the communities regionally and globally. Furthermore, to serve as a catalyst and a link for cultivating young adults as entrepreneurial and business leaders for the future. Disclaimer: The Michigan Banner and its staff are not responsible and will not be held liable for any mistakes, error, misspellings and false advertisements in part or whole that may be placed within its publication. Articles, information or comments printed in the newspaper are not necessarily the views or beliefs of The Michigan Banner newspaper. The Michigan Banner reserves the right to edit, change, or delete any information, or refuse to print any information, article or advertisement which is believed to be inconsistent with or conflicts with the mission of the newspaper. Deadlines: 2 weeks before each publication date of the 1st and 16th of each month Submission Procedure: Mailed or e-mailed Preferred format: Jpeg or PDF www.themichiganbanner.com Facebook.com/themichiganbanner Twitter.com/MichiganBanner Blog: www.themichiganbanner.wordpress.com Michigan Banner Classified Call 989-753-3475 or go online at themichiganbanner@gmail.com

On November 5, 2013 it pleased Almighty God to take our beloved board member, colleague and friend, Charles Braddock to His reward. Whereas, Charles Braddock was a great and humble servant of the Lord, and Whereas he provided opportunities for those in need of a hand-up and not a hand-out, Both through employment and by housing God’s people in need, and Whereas he was a faithful supporter of Saginaw Habitat for Humanity, a Christian ministry, Be it therefore resolved that we embrace the family to show our support and love to his family. For though Charles left us deeply saddened, he will be missed but not forgotten.

The Board of Directors and Staff of Saginaw Habitat for Humanity

Humbly submitted,

African-American Board Members, Current and Former: Henry G. Marsh, Honorary Blitz Chair
Rev. Dr. Marvin T. Smith, current Jerome Buckley, current Oscar Young, Jr., current Rev. Charles Braddock Kanah Franklin Rev. Willie Casey Rev. Paulette Cummings Rev. William Brown Christina Jones Karen Lawrence-Webster Debra Drake-Davis Alice Williams Amos O’Neal Mary Stephens Louis Booker Rev. Nick Hall Leola Wilson

Commentary...............................................................................................Page 4 The Latino Banner......................................................................................LB 1 - LB 4 Business.....................................................................................................Page 9 Praise Connections.....................................................................................Page 28

In This Issue

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

Opinion & Commentar y
A February Crisis
By Dr. Craig Douglas A February Crisis is in the news as I write these thoughts. Saginaw Public Schools must file an acceptable deficit reduction plan by February 18, or else the Department of Treasury will withhold the February state aid payment to the district. I believe I saw the figure for one state aid payment to be almost five million dollars. Five million dollars! Incredible! As I write, I do not know the outcome. My reason for writing goes beyond February, and five Dr. Craig Douglas million dollars to the larger questions, how did we get to this point? Why are we at this point? What is the cause and effect of the situation? To the first question, the district got to this point because the funding mechanism, upon which all schools rely, is flawed. It is unstable and creates crisis points when enrollment drops. All sorts of finger pointing can occur when enrollment drops, but in recent years, nearly three-quarters of all Michigan public schools have lost enrollment due to population decreases and lower birthrates. This is not the fault of the schools; it is a given demographic. Furthermore, the foundation grant (the per pupil allocation) has flat lined. Politicians can tell you otherwise, but ask anyone involved in school finance. It is embarrassing to say, but the State has pretty much turned a deaf ear to schools’ needs. Instead, the per pupil grant has stagnated at roughly the same levels as it was in 2007 and 2008. What was the price of fuel back then? Health care costs? You see my point. As to the question of “why” we are at this point, many of us who have been involved point to a conscious effort to dismantle public education. The simple truth, if education starves, it will ultimately die. I am repulsed by the thought. I devoted my career to public education. Not because it is perfect, nor is it easy; indeed, public education is the core foundation of our democracy. Take away public schools, and the citizenry suffers. I am not critical of private schools. Those who can afford private schooling should be allowed to purchase it. The quality is there, certainly. When I last checked, our Governor sends his child to a private school that has a hefty tuition. Fine, well, and good. For him. He can afford it. What about others who cannot afford it? Therefore, I believe the cause and effect of the situation facing Saginaw is a flawed funding model. Furthermore, consider the month this crisis came to a peak, February. The timeline leading up to February includes submission (and rejection) of the aforementioned Deficit Elimination Plan. The plan, written by the school, has been submitted (and rejected) by the same State government SEE P 10, February Crisis

What About the Children?
By Melba Denise Baldwin As a 20-year school teacher in Saginaw and Buena Vista, I have found that my love for educating our most precious treasures has been met with many barriers. In recent years, educators, along with our children, have been forced to carry the burden of our economic decline on our backs. In our local school district, teachers have been faced with pay cuts, increased healthcare costs, and a halt to our cost of living increase. Many children and parents are faced with great uncertainty as to where Melba Denise Baldwin they will be shuffled to go to school from year to year; severing bonds with friends, teachers, and their communities. In addition to these dire and traumatic experiences, we are often expected to sit silent while others speak out about what they feel are the cause and solution for these massive problems. Although I often accept the opportunity to approach the Board of Education during the public comment portion of their meetings, the 3-minute time limit never allows me to fully convey my thoughts. As the deadline approaches to make a critical decision regarding the future of our school district, I would like the following points to be considered: 1. As school districts face the challenge of eliminating budget deficits, the first answer should not be school closures. This is evident by the fact that Saginaw Public Schools has tried this before and found that it has not worked. If closing schools was the solution, we would not be at the table again faced with the same problem. Last school year, Saginaw Public Schools closed 4 buildings - Coulter Elementary, Jerome Elementary, Longfellow Elementary, and Arthur Eddy Academy (3 of them on the city’s east side). According to the Michigan Department of Education, those closures, as well as the other cost-saving measures carried out in the operating budget, have resulted in less than $15,000 in deficit elimination. Clearly, other means of deficit elimination must be explored. 2. In addition to the negative impact that abandoned school buildings have on the property value and morale of neighborhoods that they once served, students are often lost as they flee to neighboring districts and charter schools. Those who remain are then faced with the burden of long bus commutes and overcrowded classes as they are transferred to schools outside of their immediate community. 3. When public schools are shuttered and leave these educational voids in our neighborhoods, it provides an opportunity for charter schools to set up; providing monetary profit to individuals while greatly contributing to the district’s steady decline in enrollment. 4. Decisions as significant as school closures should be carried out SEE P 10, What about the Children

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Volume 2 • Number 4

Leading in Diversity

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The Latino Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Latino Newspaper

ATINO

THE

B

February 16, 2014

ANNER
Vamos Adelante

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The Latino Banner Vamos Adelante

February 16, 2014

Education ~ Educación Twenty Latino Students from Across the Nation to Work in Congress
Washington The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI), the nation’s premier Latino youth leadership development and educational services organization, welcomed the arrival of its 2014 Spring Congressional Internship class to Washington, D.C., on Monday, February 10, 2014. Twenty undergraduates arrived from nine states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico to take part in the nationally-recognized and award-winning CHCI Congressional Internship Program (CIP). The CIP provides Latino college students unmatched job opportunities in congressional offices on Capitol Hill as well as an opportunity to participate in CHCI’s nationally renowned leadership and professional training program. The goal of the program is to expose talented Latino college students to the inner-workings of the federal government while preparing them to become part of the workforce pipeline to fill leadership positions in all sectors – private, public, and non profit. “CHCI is committed to creating opportunities for young Latinos to come to Washington, D.C., and learn not only how the federal government operates, but how they can work to impact public policy for the betterment of their communities,” said Esther Aguilera, CHCI President & CEO. “For 37 years we have been educating, empowering and connecting the next generation of Latino leaders and ensuring that the current and future halls of Congress accurately represent the growing Hispanic population in America.” The 2014 Spring Congressional Internship class reflects the national diversity of the Latino community, representing eight different ethnic backgrounds, 19 academic institutions, and 15 academic majors. Fifty-five percent of the class is the first generation to attend college and 80 percent come from homes with a total income below $45,000. The CIP provides Latino college students with work placement on Capitol Hill four days a week, where they gain substantive work and networking experience. Interns also participate in once-a-week educational programs and leadership training at CHCI headquarters, where they meet with national public- and private-sector leaders and engage in national policy discussions. Interns are required to complete a community service project and are provided with housing, roundtrip transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and a stipend. All of this is possible through support from Walmart, the Ford Foundation and Southwest Airlines – official airline of CHCI’s Leadership Programs. Applicants can apply for the CIP at http://www.chci.org . The deadline for the 2014 fall session is April 25, 2014.

Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Scholarship Award
Scholarship Description: The CHCI scholarship amount and number of awards varies with a deadline of April 16, 2014. Eligibility: Applicants must be Latinos who have actively participated in public service; be accepted as full-time students into an accredited community college, four-year university or a graduate/professional program; demonstrate financial need and have good writing skills. Students should submit applications, resumes, essays, Student Aid Reports, two recommendation letters, transcripts and a self-addressed stamped postcard to be notified when application is received. Contact information is CHCI Internship Program, 911 Second Street, NE Washington, DC 20002, phone 202543-1771, Fax 202-546-2143, email chci@chci.org, or visit www.chci.org/ internships.

Disclaimer: The Latino Banner and its staff are not responsible and will not be held liable for any mistakes, errors, misspellings and false advertisements in part or whole that may be placed within its publication. Articles, information or comments printed in the Latino Banner are not necessarily the views or beliefs of The Latino Banner newspaper. The Latino Banner reserves the right to edit, change, or delete any information, or refuse to print any information, article or advertisement which is believed to be inconsistent with or conflicts with the mission of the newspaper. We encourage readers to send letters, story ideas, comments and questions. Deadlines: 2 weeks before each publication date of the 1st and 16th of each month Submission Procedure: Mailed or e-mailed to the Latino Banner@gmail.com Preferred format: Jpeg or PDF

1400 W. Genesee Saginaw, Michigan (989) 753-3475 The Latino Banner – thelatinobanner@gmail.com

February 16, 2014

The Latino Banner Vamos Adelante

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Community ~ Comunidad

The Aleda E. Lutz Veterans Affairs Medical Center National Salute to Veterans Sweetheart Dinner & Dance

Photos Courtesy of Frank Medel

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The Latino Banner Vamos Adelante

February 16, 2014

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February 16, 2014

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

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Intersection of Business & Wealth

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

FROM P 4, February Crisis that now threatens to hold back the funds. Hmmm.... the State reads and rejects......then the State sets a drop dead date for one final submission or else the funding stops. This is yet another flaw in the funding system; it is yet another way to starve the school district into near-death. It is yet another way to dismantle public education! My final question to readers is this. Can you name one urban school district in Michigan that is financially stable? Seriously, can you name one? Let me try a few for you.........Detroit? A resounding “NO.” (Two state takeovers and all sorts of reorganizations, refinancing, and any other “re” words you can muster, the answer is “no.” In fact, Saginaw is very small in comparison.) Pontiac? “NO.” The State recently allowed Pontiac to refinance its debt (and keep its doors open). Hmmm.... so much debt it had to be financed? Really? Who approved that one? I bet it is someone who has not read the Saginaw Deficit Elimination Plans up to this point....... Flint? “NO.” (See ABC 12 news any weekday for more details.) Grand Rapids? “NO.” Lansing? “NO.” Benton Harbor? “NO.” Sad. Again, I am sure you see my point. If I were running for statewide office, I would not point with pride to the tremendous job I am doing in urban public schools. Personally, I hope for the best for Saginaw and all other schools in such challenges. Until the political will exists to stabilize the funding mechanism, I am fearful we will continue to see a February crisis like this one repeat in other schools~ to no one’s benefit, I might add~ most certainly not the students and parents caught in the middle. Dr. Douglas is a retired Superintendent of Schools of the Carrollton School District. After retirement, Dr. Douglas has remained an active participant in the GLBR because of his interest and concern for our communities.

Libraries of Saginaw
In celebration of African-American History Month, the Public Libraries of Saginaw will be hosting master puppeteers Linda Bryant and Rhonda Farrell-Butler for a special show, “Anansi and the Moss Covered Rock.” Children under 7 must have adult supervision. A small snack will be provided. Below are dates and times for this program: Monday, February 17, at 4:30 p.m. Wickes Library – 1713 Hess Wednesday, February 19, at 2 p.m. Hoyt Library – 505 Janes Saturday, February 22, at 2 p.m. Butman-Fish Library – 1716 Hancock Tuesday, February 25, at 4:30 p.m. Claytor Library – 1410 N. 12th

FROM P 4, What about the Children with true community engagement. Although recent days have shown an outpouring of community concern, manifested in packed auditoriums and strong vocal sentiment, more should be done to engage the communities most impacted by the pending decisions. Where are the voices of the Coulter, Eddy, Heavenrich, and Ruben Daniels families? To ensure that everyone has a chance to be heard, the Board of Education should consider developing policy and procedure to adequately guide this engagement process. Everything from the method of communication to the location and structure of community forums should be carefully planned and developed before such meetings become a necessity. 5. As those most impacted are given a proper seat and voice in the decision-making process, we can safeguard ALL of our children from the trauma of repeated school closures. If the current proposed plan is approved by our school board, a significant number of children will face their 3rd school closure in 2 years: a. August 27, 2012 - Parents and students learned of the school board’s approval to close Coulter Elementary just days before the start of the school year. b. A meeting was held at Coulter in which parents had the opportunity to enroll their children into another school and establish transportation. Children who once walked to school would now be bused to either Jesse Rouse, Longfellow, or Arthur Eddy Academy. c. Many who chose to transfer to Arthur Eddy were comforted by the fact that their principal from Coulter, Mrs. Spiller, was moving to that building with them. In addition, the facility at Arthur Eddy had received a $6 million renovation in 2002 and was a physical upgrade from their former building. d. March 20, 2013 - It was decided, without clear justification and amid much opposition, that Arthur Eddy Academy would shutter its doors. Students were transferred to Heavenrich and Ruben Daniels Middle School. Many of these students were met with over-crowded classes and some were even turned away as Heavenrich quickly reached full capacity in some grades. In addition, the closure of Longfellow and Jerome schools was approved on this date. e. February 3, 2014 - It was proposed that Heavenrich Elementary, Ruben Daniels Middle School, and Saginaw High School (all on the city’s east side) should close to meet the state’s requirement to develop a revised, approvable deficit elimination plan that shows “the district’s BEST EFFORT at eliminating more of the deficit in 2014-15 and the remainder of 2013-14” or face the withholding (not forfeiture) of February’s state aid. While I understand that the challenge of eliminating our district’s deficit is difficult, it is imperative that we consider EVERY line item in the district’s operating budget. In my opinion, school closures should be the last resort, not the first option. The past decade in Saginaw Public Schools has shown us that the more schools we close, the more schools we have to close. My hope is that we (students, parents, teachers, school staff, administrators, board members, advocates, community members, and business leaders) will continue to work collaboratively, tirelessly, and transparently to ensure that we create a bright future for ALL of the children of Saginaw Public Schools. They deserve nothing less!

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February 16, 2014

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

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Local Organizations Collaborate to Bring Unique Public Safety Initiative to Saginaw County
The Harvey Randall Wickes Foundation and United Way of Saginaw County recently aligned together to create a new initiative focused on strengthening our community. Sheilda Braddock The Strengthening Our Community Initiative will focus on youth services and neighborhood development, as well as working together to create a safer community. This will be facilitated by identifying best practices and helping to channel resources to the programs that are achieving the greatest success. Sheilda Braddock has been hired as Advisor to the Wickes Foundation/Community Liaison. Braddock’s position will be housed at United Way of Saginaw County and funded through the H.R. Wickes Foundation. She will serve as the advisor for the direction of internal and external financial and human resources towards the most effective youth oriented programs, thereby accelerating the pace of progress. “We are at a special moment in time in Saginaw County and we cannot afford to leave another generation of children behind,” said Braddock. “This program reflects the urgency of strengthening our community through public safety programs and I am honored to serve our community in this new capacity.” “United Way of Saginaw County’s vision is to create a safe nurturing community where all families can thrive, thus this new initiative ties perfectly in with the impact we are trying to create and will allow for maximization of community resources” said Cherrie Benchley, United Way president/CEO. “Braddock is a great addition to our team and we are proud to continue our partnership with the H.R. Wickes Foundation in this new, unprecedented avenue.” For information on the Strengthening Our Community Initiative, please contact Braddock at 989,776.0550 or sbraddock@ unitedwaysaginaw.org.

50 years after the Civil Rights Act was passed, our march towards equality continues.
Paid for by Friends of Dan Kildee • PO BOX 248 • Flint, MI 48501

February at the Castle Museum

Tuesday, February 18 Saginaw at Home: 1850 – 1963 This new exhibition showcases homes of Saginaw from the 1850s to the 1960s through photos, artifacts and architectural drawings. Tuesday, February 18 Pages of History Book Club Noon This month’s selection is Detroitland: a collection of movers, shakers, lost souls and history makers of Detroit’s past by Richard Bak. Tuesday, February 25 Lunch and Learn – Legendary Locals of Saginaw Noon Join Roberta Morey as she introduces her latest book Legendary Locals of Saginaw. Learn about Saginaw’s legendary leaders and heroes in the area of medicine, education, agriculture, business and industry.

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

CMURC President and CEO Receives Top Honors from the Michigan Business and Professional Association
Mount Pleasant - Central Michigan University Research Corporation President and CEO, Erin O’Brien, was honored at the Michigan Business and Professional Association’s 18th Annual “Women and Leadership in the Workplace” Symposium and Awards program recently held on February 4, at The Henry in Dearborn. The selection committee, together with the planning board, awarded Mrs. O’Brien with the Shooting Star Award for achieving extraordinary accomplishments under the age of 40. “It was an honor to be recognized for my achievements by the MBPA,” said CMURC President and CEO Erin O’Brien. “To stand alongside the other honorees was a rewarding and inspiring experience.” Mrs. O’Brien accepted her award with this year’s honorees including: • Alyssa Martina, Metro Parent • Jayne Homco, Kroger-Michigan • Loretta Davis, Institute for Population Health • Donna Inch, Ford Land • Kristina Marshall, Winning Futures • Ann Thomas, WJR • Shooting Stars (women under age 40): Clarinda Barnett-Harrison, MEDC; Deidre Greene Groves, Challenge Detroit/The Collaborative Group “Today’s women business leaders need to be recognized for their contributions to our economy,” said Jennifer Kluge, MBPA president. “This year our honorees are great examples of how women are making an impact in Michigan and we are pleased to give them the recognition they so richly deserve.” The mission of the Women & Leadership in the Workplace Conference and Awards program is to provide education, encourage leadership, high professional standards, and assure equal opportunities for women to demonstrate these qualities in the workplace. CMURC is a nonprofit business incubator focused on advancing economic development in the community by leveraging the resources of Central Michigan University, the Mount Pleasant SmartZone and its local, regional and statewide partners to accelerate the success of entrepreneurs, growing businesses and jobs. CMURC is a single source of contact providing physical space and essential business services that supports emerging businesses.

Employment Opportunity
Responsible for the day-to-day operations, administration, and management of the Senior Citizen Center. The activities of the Center are geared to meet the specific needs and interests of older adults. Activities may include planning, coordinating, and implementing a wide variety of social, educational, and recreational programs centered around a Meal Program. Must have a high school diploma or GED.A valid Michigan Driver’s License with a good driving record. Experience working with older adults and food service is highly desired. INDIVIDUAL MUST SUCCESSFULLY PASS A PRE-EMPLOY-

Senior Center Coordinator, Buena Vista Charter Township
MENT DRUG TEST. $9.00/hour, MondayThursday. Please submit application and resumes by February 25, 2014 to: Buena Vista Charter Township Attn: Manager’s Department 1160 S. Outer Drive Saginaw MI 48601 “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.” If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, found online at http://ascr.usda.gov/ complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S. W. Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, or by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at program. intake@usda.gov.

Flint – Calling all current or aspiring entrepreneurs on February 27, at 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., at the Holiday Inn Gateway Center, located at 5353 Gateway Centre, in Flint. The highlights include this year’s keynote speaker-Flint native, David Tarver, author of “Proving Ground: A Memoir” – meet your eTEAM of resources, and

JumpStart Entrepreneurship Conference, Smart Business for Small Business
participate in the following breakout sessions. • Inventors—Idea to Market • Lending—What to Expect • Legal and Tax Planning for Startups • 21st Century Marketing and Sales To register online visit www.flintandgenesee.org/events/jumpstart-entrepreneur-conference-2/ Breakfast and lunch provided for a cost of $ 20. For student rates call Karena Hamelt at 810.600.1440. The conference is presented by Flint Genesee Chamber of Commerce & entrepreneurship eTEAM.

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

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Attorneys The Law Offices of Alan A. Crawford PLLC Alan A. Crawford, Attorney At Law 615 Griswold Ste. 1215, Detroit, MI 48226 803 Court Street, Saginaw, MI 48602 313.559.7881 313.556.2487 (Fax) www.acrawfordlaw.com Authors W. James Richardson 1356 Woodside Street Saginaw, MI 48601 988-753-0233 www.wjamesrichardson.com Auto Labadie Olds 711 S. Euclid Bay City, MI 48706 Terry Reed Sales Professional 989-667-2000 Ext. 341 Direct 989-460-0341 Fax 989-667-0103 E-mail terry.reed@labadieauto.com Website www.labadieauto.com McDonald Pontiac-GMC, Inc. 5155 State Street Saginaw, MI 48603 Leon V. Washington Sales & Leasing Professional 989-790-5155 Leonwa1@yahoo.com Saginaw Valley Ford Lincoln 4201 Bay Road Saginaw, MI 48603 Parys Liddell Sales Consultant-Lincoln Certified Representative 989.792.2453 Auto Detail Morningstar Auto Detail Shop 306 East Remington Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989-482-6505 www.MorningStarDetail.com Bakeries Lighthouse Bakery 285 S. Outer Drive Saginaw, MI 48601 989-754-7088 Fax – 989-754-7099 Sweet Creations Owner Anesha Stanley Address: 116 N. Michigan Avenue Phone: 989-797-6727 www.sweetcreationsmi.com Banquet Facilities Rowan - West Facility 1400 W. Genesee Saginaw, Michigan 48602 989-753-3475

Beauty Illusions Beauty Salon Valerie King Owner/Operator 1400 W. Genesee Street Saginaw, MI 48602 989.755.2666/989.755.3883 Reflection of U Too Louise McKinnie, Owner 2103 Sheridan Ave. Saginaw, Michigan 48601 989.753.4600 Sports Barbershop 1400 W. Genesee Saginaw, Michigan 48602 989-992-2600 Unique Cuts & Massage 1502 Court Street Saginaw, MI 48602 989-327-2338 Unique Cuts II 3125 E. Holland Saginaw, MI 48601 989-327-2338

Business Directory

Dentists Jack W. Nash, DDS Cosmetic and Restorative Dentistry 1320 S. Washington Ave. Saginaw, Michigan 48601 989-752-1200 Fashion Where Did U Get That Hat? Specialize in Custom Designs “Sunday’s Best” Yvonne Ellison/Milliner Phone 989-529-4193 E-mail: yeellison@aol.com Financial City of Saginaw Block Grant & Rehab Program 1315 S. Washington Avenue, Room Saginaw, MI 48601 989-759-1530 Saginaw Economic Development Corporation Shontaye Bibbs 1315 S. Washington Avenue, Room 207 Saginaw, MI 48601 989-759-1395 sbibbs@saginaw-mi.com Florists Erika’s Flowers 214 Federal Ave. Saginaw, MI 48607 989-755-9330 www.erikasflowerssaginaw.com Food & Dining Spencer’s Route 46 Spence Dambro Proprietor 5530 Gratiot 989-793-3400 Saginaw, MI 48638 www.spencersfinefood.com Funeral Homes Deisler Funeral Home 2233 Hemmeter Rd. Saginaw, MI 48603 989.799.1151 Graphics/Digital TBF Graphics Digital 803 S. Washington Ave. Saginaw, Michigan 48601 989-752-5540 TBFGRAPHICS.COM TBFDIGITAL.COM Heating and Cooling HORIZON Azola Williams 989-755-8650 Business 989-233-3295 Cell

Home Health Care Services Comforcare Home Care 320 S. Washington Ave. Ste. 202 Saginaw, MI 48607 989.752.5502 www.mbsmichigan.comforcare.com Painting Services Resurrection Painting Scott Severin 989.792.2009 Interior/Exterior Drywall Repair/Power Washing Deck Staining Free Estimates Photography E.B. Studio 212 Washington Ave. Saginaw, MI 48607 989-397-4144 Publications David Hall Crimiel Publications LLC POB 20061 Saginaw, Michigan 48602 Restaurants Brother Arthur’s Fish & More 2522 E. Genesee Saginaw, MI 48601 989-752-0200 Rite Spot 1205 Lapeer Saginaw, MI 48601 989-754-6001 Savoy Bar & Grill 127 S. Franklin Street Saginaw, MI 48607 989.754.9660 Retailers GREEKS “R” US 2203 E. Genesee Saginaw, MI 48601 989-755-4925 riggins52@charter.net Shoe Repair Morgans Shoe Repair 308 Federal Ave. Saginaw, MI 48607 989-754-6155 Tax Services Robert McDuffy Tax & Accounting Service/ERO e-file 2127 Ledyard Saginaw, MI 48601 Business - 989-443-0115 Fax 989-752-1467 rmcduffy@aol.com

Business Solutions The Growth Coach Cal Talley, Owner 293 Provincial Ct. #78 48602 989-401-6229 C.Talley@The GrowthCoach.com www.The GrowthCoach.com Cleaning Services Extreme Carpet & Upholstery William & Denise Murphy - Owners Commercial & Residential Janitorial Services 989-753-3335 Best Choice Floor Maintenance & Carpet Cleaning 989-316-8327 bestchoicefmandcc@hotmail.com Community Centers and Services First Ward Community Services 1410 N. 12th Street Saginaw, Michigan 48601 989-753-0411 Construction Kingdom Builders Jim Shafley, President 2210 Annesley Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989. 948.8094 www.kingdombuildersmi.org Consultants EnviCare Consulting, Inc. Billy J. Strawter, Sr., President 2809 Blairmont Drive Midland, MI 48622 989.839.9177 www.envicareinc.com

Advertisers Are Talking 24/7 Around The Great Lakes Bay Region And Beyond @ www.themichiganbanner.com! To Join The Conversation Contact The Sales Staff at 989.753.3475, or themichiganbanner@gmail.com.

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A GUIDE TO MICHIGAN’S CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
UNDERSTANDING OUR COURTS, CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM & BILL OF RIGHTS

HON. M.T. THOMPSON, JR. & PROF. MONICA R. NUCKOLLS
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February 16, 2014

THE DIFFERENT STEPS IN A CRIMINAL CASE
This chart is designed to familiarize you with what happens at each stage of a criminal case and how a case moves through Michigan’s Court System.

Arrest
Based on the police department’s initial investigation, suspects 17 or older are arrested and taken to the county jail. Suspects 16 and under are taken to the Juvenile Detention Center.

Booking and Questioning
Suspects are booked into jail, fingerprinted and photographed. Police officers may continue their investigation.

Complaint and Warrant
The complaint is a written accusation that a person committed a specific criminal offense. It sets forth the specific charge(s) against the defendant. The arrest warrant is the court’s order to arrest the defendant and bring him/her before the court to answer the outstanding charges. The Prosecutor determines what charges to bring and prepares the complaint and warrant. It may charge the defendant with a felony, misdemeanor, or a combination of both. Misdemeanors are those crimes which have a maximum possible jail sentence of one year or less. These include shoplifting, driving while intoxicated, driving without a license and domestic violence. Felonies are crimes of a more serious nature that carry a possible prison term of more than one year. These include murder, armed robbery and rape. The complaint and warrant are signed by a District Court Judge.

District Court Arraignment
The arraignment is the first formal court proceeding in both misdemeanor and felony cases. The defendant is advised of the charges against him/her and the potential penalties. He is also advised of his constitutional rights, including his 5th Amendment right to remain silent and his 6th Amendment right to be represented by an attorney. If the defendant cannot afford an attorney, an attorney is appointed to represent him at public expense. If the defendant is eligible for a court appointed attorney and the judge refuses to appoint one, the judge cannot sentence the defendant to jail if he is convicted.

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Bond
During arraignment, the District Court must order that pending trial the defendant be: 1. Held in custody if he/she is charged with certain serious felonies; 2. Released on personal recognizance or an unsecured appearance bond; or 3. Released conditionally, with or without money bail (ten percent, cash or surety). Bail must be set for all persons charged with misdemeanors. Bond is designed to protect the public and ensure that the defendant appears at all scheduled court proceedings. In setting bond, the judge considers several factors, including the defendant’s prior criminal record, record of appearing in past court proceedings, the seriousness of the charges, the presence of abuse or threats, and the defendant’s ties to the local community. The 8th Amendment prohibits excessive bail.

Felony Cases
(felony cases only)

Misdemeanor Cases

Preliminary Examination
The preliminary examination is held in District Court and must be scheduled within 14 days of the arraignment. The 14 day requirement and the preliminary examination itself may be waived by the defendant. The purpose of the preliminary examination is to determine: (1) Whether or not there is probable cause to believe that a felony was committed and, if so, (2) If there is probable cause to believe that the defendant committed it. The prosecutor is required to establish probable cause on both of these issues through witnesses, exhibits and other evidence. Defense counsel has the opportunity to cross examine the prosecutor’s witness and challenge the admission of any exhibits. Probable cause is a reasonable belief that the defendant is guilty as charged. This is a much lower standard than the standard of “beyond a reasonable doubt” needed for a criminal conviction. A preliminary examination is not a trial to determine guilt or innocence. If the prosecutor establishes probable cause, the defendant is “bound over” or sent to Circuit Court to stand trial. If the defendant is charged with both a felony and a misdemeanor, the misdemeanor will follow the felony to Circuit Court for trial. If the prosecutor fails to establish probable cause, the charges may be dismissed or the defendant may proceed to trial in District Court on any remaining misdemeanors.

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Circuit Court Arraignment
(felony cases only)
The defendant is arraigned in Circuit Court on those charges, which were bound over at the preliminary examination. The defendant may plead guilty, not guilty, no contest or stand mute. The court schedules the trial.

Pretrial Proceedings
(both misdemeanor and felony cases) Prior to trial, defense counsel or the prosecutor may file one or more motions with the court. A motion is an oral or written request asking the court to make a specific finding, decision or order a specific action. The types of motions typically filed include: Motion To Reduce Bail; Motion For Discovery; Motion To Suppress Evidence; Motion To Dismiss Charges; and Motion For Continuance.

Trial or Plea
Defendant may plead guilty or proceed to trial before a judge or jury. A trial follows this procedure: jury selection; opening statements; presentation of evidence; closing arguments; jury instructions, and verdict. A jury’s verdict must be unanimous. If the defendant is convicted, he/she may be referred to the local Department of Corrections Office (felony cases) or to the District Court Probation Department (misdemeanor cases) for a Presentence Investigation Report (PSI). The PSI is like a resume and provides the judge with a detailed summary of the defendant’s personal and criminal history. It may also contain a sentencing recommendation, which the judge is not obligated to follow.

Sentencing
A hearing is conducted at which time the judge imposes sentence. A sentence may include probation, fines, cost, restitution, community service and jail or prison. Some crimes have mandatory sentences and some are covered by sentencing guidelines.

Punishment
The sentence is served by the defendant.

© 2009 M.T. Thompson, Jr. and Monica R. Nuckolls, All Rights Reserved

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THE MICHIGAN COURT SYSTEM Supreme Court
The States highest court. It consists of seven justices who hear appeals from the lower courts. It also supervises the operations of all the other Michigan Courts, establishes their rules of procedure and oversees the professional conduct of Michigan lawyers and judges.

Court of Appeals
Hears appeals from the Circuit Courts, Court of Claims and certain administrative agencies. All criminal defendants have an automatic right to appeal their conviction to this court. Each appeal is heard by a panel of three judges in one of the court’s four divisions throughout the state.

Circuit Court
This Court is responsible for: • All civil cases involving more than $25,000.00 • All domestic relations cases, including divorces and related matters such as child custody, parental visitations and paternity. • All felony cases. Felonies are those crimes which carry a possible prison term of more than one year. The Circuit Court also hears appeals from the District Courts, Probate Courts and certain administrative agencies.

Court of Claims
Hears claims against state departments and agencies, including, lawsuits by Michigan prison inmates and disputes between contractors and state government.

Administrative Agencies District Court
This court is responsible for: • All civil cases involving $25,000 or less • All misdemeanor criminal cases. Misdemeanors are those crimes which have a maximum possible jail sentence of one year. • All traffic, Landlord-Tenant and Small Claims Court.

Probate Court
Hears cases that include: Administration of Trust and Estates, Guardianship, Conservatorships, and committing people who are mentally ill to hospitals.

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YOUR GUARANTEED RIGHTS IF YOU ARE ACCUSED OF A CRIME
The Bill of Rights gives everyone who is accused of a crime certain guaranteed rights. These rights are spelled out in the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution. These amendments are designed to make sure that everyone who is accused of a crime is treated fairly and gets a fair trial. The Fourth Amendment guarantees that law enforcement officers cannot search or arrest you, or search your property, without “probable cause.” This means a reasonable belief that a crime has been committed by a specific person. The Fifth Amendment gives a criminal defendant three separate types of protection. First, it protects him from self-incrimination. This means that when you are accused of a crime, you have the right to remain silent. Any confession must be voluntary. The government cannot obtain a confession through force, coercion or deception. Second, it protects you from “double jeopardy” or being tried more than once for the same crime. Without this protection, the government could try you over and over again for the same crime until it won. Third, it requires the government to follow “due process of law.” Due process of law means that people have the right to the benefit of certain rules and procedures designed to assure fairness. For example, they have a right to be informed of the charges against them, to confront the witness against them, to a fair hearing and to an impartial judge. The Sixth Amendment assures that if you are accused of a crime, you have the right to a jury trial, a lawyer to represent you, the right to call witnesses in your defense, and to question the government’s witnesses against you. It also guarantees you the right to a speedy trial. The Eighth Amendment protects you against “cruel and unusual” punishment. It forbids the use of physical torture. It also prohibits excessive bail and fines. The Fourteenth Amendment gives all citizens the right to “due process of law” and to “equal protection under the laws.” The Fourteenth Amendment encompasses all of the rights, privileges and protections spelled out in the 1st, 4th, 6th and 8th Amendments and makes them applicable to state court proceedings. It also incorporates all of the protections and requirements of the 5th Amendment, except the requirement for a grand jury in criminal proceedings.

QUESTIONS
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. How many different courts are there in the Michigan Court System? What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony? What court conducts the trial in felony cases? Who decides what charges to bring against a defendant? What is a Complaint? What is a Warrant? What is the first formal court proceeding in a criminal case? What occurs at the District Court Arraignment? What factors does the judge consider when he/she sets bond? What is the purpose of a Preliminary Examination? What is the Bill of Rights and what protections does it provide to criminal defendants?
The materials in this pamphlet are excerpts from How Criminal Justice Works In Michigan by Hon. M.T. Thompson, Jr. & Prof. Monica R. Nuckolls. © 2009 M.T. Thompson, Jr. and Monica R. Nuckolls, All Rights Reserved

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Sabrina Beeman-Jackson Saginaw ISD Head Start/Early Head Start Program Director

NHSA’s Annual National Head Start Conference is the nation’s largest gathering of Head Start and Early Head Start professionals. More than 2,500 directors, administrators, managers, teachers, supervisors, parents and policy council members, from hundreds of programs and from every state are “Driven to Make a Difference” and will attend in 2014, in Long Beach, CA. The NHSA Vision All children should reach their full potential, • Every child can succeed, • We can impact the success of at-risk children, and • Quality early education fundamentally transforms children and families To lead - To be the untiring voice that will not be quiet until every vulnerable child is served with the Head Start model of support for the whole child, the family and the community. To advocate - To work diligently for policy and institutional changes that ensure all vulnerable children and families have what they need to succeed. NHSA Mission Our mission is to coalesce, inspire, and support the Head Start field as a leader in early childhood development and education. The National Head Start Association is a nonpartisan, not-for-profit organization committed to the belief that every child, regardless of circumstances at birth, has the ability to succeed in life. The opportunities offered by Head Start lead to healthier, empowered children and families, and stronger, more vibrant communities. NHSA is the voice for more than 1 million children,
The goal of the Head Start program is to give atrisk children all across our Nation a fair chance at succeeding in the educational system Joe Baca

200,000 staff and 1,600 Head Start grantees in the United States. Since 1974, NHSA has worked diligently for policy changes that ensure all at-risk children have access to the Head Start model of support for the whole child, the family and the community. NHSA offers an impressive portfolio of professional development services and programs for the entire early childhood community. These include the annual National Head Start Conference, the largest national event devoted to the Early Head Start and Head Start community, and the National Parent Conference, the only national event devoted to parents and families. NHSA has several donation opportunities for supporting NHSA. Dollar Per Child Donate $1 per child enrolled in your program to help fund NHSA advocacy efforts.

Scholarships and Awards The National Head Start Association’s Scholarships & Awards Program is open to individual, program and affiliate members of NHSA in good standing. Ron Herndon Scholarship The Ron Herndon Scholarship celebrates Head Start parents who, through their own efforts to mobilize other parents and community members, have affected real change in their Head Start programs and communities. Disaster Relief The Disaster Relief Fund is used to assist NHSA member Head Start and Early Head Start programs and their staff and families who become victims of natural disasters. General Fund Donations to the General Fund are used to support the programs and services of NHSA. Source: www.nhsa.org

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‘Better Choices, Better Medicine, Better Healing’

Health
By MMR Staff

Establishing Goals to Realize Your Dreams
Melanie Johnson started work at MMR in 2000; even then she could tell she was going to be successful and proud to work at the well-organized agency. She set goals Melanie Johnson back then and where Communications Supervisor she is now is where she wanted to be professionally, this is what she wanted to do. Melanie started in an entry level position as an equipment technician, responsible for things from detailing ambulances to making sure medics had the equipment needed for daily work. She knew that she didn’t need to be an EMT or Paramedic to be a part of a team that provided excellent pre-hospital care to our communities. Melanie explains “the equipment technician’s responsibilities make it possible for crews to check into service as quickly as possible and in turn allow for unrivaled access to medical care.” Melanie had goals and she knew that acquiring her EMT/Paramedic, license was next on the list. This would provide her the opportunity to work on an ambulance and that was exciting! She describes “working side by side with Law Enforcement, and Fire Departments from all over the county established a series of friendships that I still have to this day.” “I was a part of a team and we were the “boots on the ground” I had the opportunity to work with many different partners and they all had great advice and life experiences to share which helped me become the person I am today.” Working in the field for several years, Melanie made the transition into the Communications Center. She relates that as a huge change from the road, “I’ve loved every second of it. It was both fun and exciting to have the chance to learn a whole new process all within the same amazing company. Here I really felt like I found my niche. Every day is a different experience for me and it keeps things from getting stale.” Several years ago Melanie earned the opportunity to be promoted to Communications Supervisor. This was both a personal and professional goal she’d had for a long time. “I take great pride in this new role and have learned so much.There are plenty of people here at MMR that I work with who can share the same, or similar stories about how they got started and through opportunities given by management have been able to achieve their goals. This is a company I take pride in working for, and with. I honestly have to say the key to my success has been my family and my MMR family who encouraged me and pushed me to be better than I ever thought I could be. For that I am so grateful and blessed for a company like MMR that cares and wants every employee to enjoy great success.” Mobile Medical Response has current openings for the positions of Equipment Technician, Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and Paramedic. MMR provides Medical, Dental and Life Insurance to Full Time staff. Tuition education assistance is available to employees with 90 days and 500 hours worked with PT staff receiving $600.00 annually and FT staff receiving $1200.00 annually. Requirements of Positions Equipment Technician: Must possess a valid MI driver license, have a clean driving record, High School Diploma or GED. The position is responsible for washing, cleaning, sanitizing and stocking of ambulances. The position is comprised of 8hr. shifts 24 SEE P 23, Establishing Goals ...

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February 16, 2014
FROM P 22, Establishing Goals... hrs. per week. An excellent position for an individual seeking or considering a career in EMS, this position will introduce you to the organization, the people who work within it, the equipment and training necessary to continue on a career path to becoming a Paramedic within Mobile Medical Response. Emergency Medical Technician: Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT’s) work on the ambulance and are responsible for safe, professional and caring patient transports as well as responding to and assisting on the scene of a medical emergency.

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper
EMT Training consists of candidates learning Anatomy, developing assessment skills, learning medical conditions, CPR, splinting and safe transport techniques. An upcoming program begins on May 06, 2014 and will be conducted on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursdays from 9 am to 2 pm thru July 17, 2014. If you are interested in the program you may contact the MMR Education Department by visiting the website www.mobilemedical.org Paramedic: In order to become a Paramedic the candidate must first complete training and be a licensed EMT.

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Paramedics work on the ambulance and are responsible for safe, professional and caring patient transports as well as primary care of patients with acute and/or chronic illness. They have received several years of clinical and classroom training in Anatomy and Physiology with a focus on Cardiology as well as advance airway management, Medications, Medication dosages and administration techniques to list a few. Mobile Medical Response (MMR) has been in operation in Saginaw County for nearly 20 years. We employ 124 people within Saginaw and nearly 530 within our 13 County service area in Michigan.

Just In Case You Missed It—Check out The Michigan Banner February 1, 2014 Edition for tips for a healthy heart @ www.themichiganbanner.com!

February is Heart Health Month!

Follow Us @ www.facebook.com/michiganbanner for up-to-date news
Independence. Dignity. Quality of Life.

COMFORCARE HOME CARE ®
A Dedicated Non-Medical Home Care Agency

The ComForcare Mission To improve the quality of life and level of independence for every client and family receiving our services. We focus on four initiatives that are critical to the well-being of seniors: • Fall Prevention • Medication Adherence • Chronic Disease Management • Transition of Care

Wilbert J. Smith and Alois B. Smith Owner/Operators

Contact us today to learn more about our Quality Care Guarantee! 320 S. Washington Avenue Suite 202 • Saginaw, MI 48607 989-752-5501 • 989-752-5503 FAX Email: mbsmichigan@comforcare.com Website: www.mbsmichigan.comforcare.com

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In light of Michigan’s recent Medicaid expansion, are you optimistic about the future of mental health coverage and available services to the African American population in Saginaw County? Why is this important to our community?
In light of Michigan's recent Medicaid expansion I am optimistic about the future of mental health coverage available to the African American population in Saginaw County. This new coverage is very important for this community, which has the second highest poverty rate in the state and whose demographics are made up of 14.3% African Americans. My only concern is if the African American population will take advantage of the available services. We have to get the message out to them.” - Pastor Otis Dickins New Beginnings Life Changing Ministries

“In light of Michigan’s recent Medicaid Expansion, I am optimistic about the future of mental health coverage and available services to the African American population in Saginaw County mainly because expanding Medicaid will fill critical gaps in access to health and mental health care, reduce uncompensated crisis care and pave the way to recovery and economic self-sufficiency for families within Saginaw.” - Keva Clark, Lead Family Representative Saginaw MAX System of Care
“I am optimistic for all individuals that will now be eligible for Medicaid with Medicaid expansion. Many individuals have had to ignore their health concerns, including their mental health concerns, because they simply could not afford to go to a doctor and they made just a little too much money to eligible for Medicaid. This is very important to our community because the health statistics for Saginaw County are very poor. We are not a healthy community. Some of that is related to the fact that many people just did not have access to needed services. I am optimistic that through Medicaid expansion, more people will get the health care, including mental health care, that they need and we can become a much healthier community.” - Linda Schneider, Director of Clinical Services Saginaw County Community Mental Health Authority

“I am absolutely optimistic about the future of mental health coverage and services that will be afforded to African Americans in Saginaw. It will provide services not covered by private insurance, but more importantly, it will provide services for people that did not qualify for Medicaid previously. Diagnosis and treatment will definitely make a difference in children with behavior problems in school, juvenile cases, children harming themselves, street violence and much, much more.” - Deborah Davis Association of Children’s Mental Health

“I am very optimistic about the future of mental health coverage and services for the African American population in Saginaw County, especially the youth. With high rates of poverty and trauma in Saginaw, its important that there be adequate support readily accessible to our youth to help them through the tough times, and this Medicaid expansion is definitely going to help make more of these services available to the ones who have fallen through the cracks and the ones that need it the most.” - Willie Hillman, Youth Involvement Coordinator Youth M.O.V.E. Saginaw

“I am absolutely optimistic about the future of mental health coverage and services for the African American community in Saginaw County. This Medicaid expansion will provide access to mental health services for those who need support the most but were previously uninsured, underinsured, or couldn’t get mental health coverage from private insurance. The more options for service available, the healthier our community will be.” - Greg Carter, Support Coordination Towerline Site Manager Saginaw County Community Mental Health Authority

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A child with Severe Emotional Disturbance gets support from many places. But that support only helps that child if each provider works as part of a well coordinated team. We maximize teamwork — by making sure every step the team takes is focused on the betterment of that child.
Contact Wardene Talley

Teamwork

Maximize

989-754-2288

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FUNdraising Good Times

Mutuality-A Must in Fundraising-It’s Not All About You
By Mel and Pearl Shaw As you prepare for your next meeting with a current or potential donor, funder or sponsor we suggest focusing on what you want to learn from the meeting. This is distinctly different from a focus on what you want to share. Of course you need to be prepared to discuss the accomplishments, challenges, and vision of the nonprofit organization or institution you represent. But that is not enough. As you prepare determine what you want to accomplish as a result of the meeting, which three pieces of information you want to share, what you would like to learn, and how you can engage the person you are meeting with. Here’s what you don’t want: a one-sided meeting where you share all the wonderful things your nonprofit has accomplished followed by an ask for a gift or involvement. You definitely don’t want a meeting where you talk about all the challenges that are threatening your nonprofit. Even if you were to walk away with a big check, we believe you would have neglected to secure the most valuable resource: the birth or growth of a mutually beneficial relationship. Here’s an alternative: Engage your current and prospective donors in meaningful conversation. Think about it this way: if you were going out to lunch with a friend, would you want to spend all of your time hearing about how wonderful she is? Wouldn’t you want her to ask about you, your successes, and your challenges? Maybe you want the opportunity to congratulate her on her successes, to connect her with likeminded men and women, or to offer guidance for how she can grow to the next level. If she does all the talking, you leave without having shared your suggestions for how she can experience even more success. Here are a few questions you can consider including in your conversation: From your vantage point, what do you see as our strengths? Our challenges? How does our work fit with what you are seeking to achieve through your philanthropy? Do you have suggestions or guidance you could offer on how we could sustain and grow our organization? What trends are you seeing nationally? How are these manifesting in our community? Practice having a conversation with another member of your board or a fellow volunteer. Make a video so you can review your presentation and make appropriate adjustments. Practice until you like what you see and hear. Leave room in the conversation - and in your heart – for guidance and suggestions. Know when to be quiet. Listen. The more people feel they can help you succeed the more successful you can be. You can accomplish more with others than you can on your own. Mel and Pearl Shaw help nonprofit organizations grow their fundraising. Services include coaching, campaign preparation and proposal writing. Learn more at www.saadandshaw.com. Copyright 2014 – Mel and Pearl Shaw

NON PROFIT DIRECTORY
A.Philip Randolph Institute POB 1107 Saginaw, MI 48606 American Red Cross 1232 N. Michigan Saginaw, MI 48602 989-754-8181 Boys & Girls Club of Bay County 300 Lafayette Ave. Bay City, MI 48706 989-892-6723 CAN Council Saginaw County 1311 N. Michigan Avenue Saginaw, MI 48602 (989) 752-7226 / fax (989) 752-2777 www.cancouncil.org Castle Museum of Saginaw County History 500 Federal Ave. Saginaw, MI 48607 Circle of Love 1809 Durand Ave. Saginaw, MI 48602 989-754-2377 Emmaus House of Saginaw 733 S. 15th Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989-755-7538 THE EZEKIEL PROJECT ezekielprojectnow@yahoo.com P.O. Box 3470 Saginaw, MI. 48605-3470 Phone: 989.755.1620 Fax: 989.755.4038 First Ward Community Center 1410 N. 12th Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989-753-0411 Girl Scouts Heart of Michigan 5470 Davis Rd. Saginaw, MI 48604 989-799-9565 Good Neighbors Mission 1318 Cherry Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989-399-9918 Health Delivery, Inc. 501 Lapeer Ave. Saginaw, MI 48607 989.759.6400 Houghton-Jones Task Force 1708 Johnson Street Saginaw, MI 989-752-1660 Lighthouse Outreach Center 808 Janes Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989.928.9096 Michigan Banner Outreach 1400 W. Genesee Saginaw, MI 48602 989-714-2240 Operation Reach 119 S. Jefferson Avenue Saginaw, MI 989-754-4444 Pit and Balcony Theatre 805 N. Hamilton Saginaw, MI 48602 www.pitandbalconytheatre.com 989. 754.6587 pitandbalconytheatre@yahoo.com Public Libraries of Saginaw Butman-Fish, Claytor, Hoyt, Wickes & Zauel Libraries 505 Janes Avenue Saginaw, MI 48607 989-755-0904 www.saginawlibrary.org Restoration Community Outreach 1205 Norman Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 753-1886 / fax (989) 753-2880 Email: rcosag@yahoo.com Saginaw County Community Action Agency, Inc. (CAC) 2824 Perkins Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989.753.7741 The Saginaw Community Foundation 1 Tuscola, Suite 100 Saginaw, MI 48607 989-755-0545 Women of Colors POB 5525 Saginaw, MI 48603 989.399.9275 or 989.737.9286

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February 16, 2014

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

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SAGINAW INCREDIBLE YEARS
We began our third Incredible Years class series in October 2012. On the first day of classes we do “We believe this paperwork and story shows just introductions. how vital the During the first Incredible Years class, my co-group leader and Project and I began Launch are to introductions by our community.” saying what our jobs are and what our background is. Then it was the parents’ turns to share. This group went way above and beyond the typical name and brief background (number of children, gender and ages) that most parents give when they first meet each other. These parents voluntarily opened up and shared difficulties they were having with each child including the troubles and barriers their families were facing. Several of the parents cried when they shared. Each parent spent a good ten minutes or more telling their story and what had led them to be in the class. They chose not to hold back! We believe this story shows just how vital the Project Launch-funded Incredible Years is to the community. The parents in our current session had these feelings and concerns bottled up just waiting for someone to listen to them. Just waiting for someone who had support to offer them. When adults who have never met are willing to open up to strengthen their families, you know the services being provided are exactly what they were hoping for! ~ Danelle Elliott Incredible Years Group Leader CAN Council Great Lakes Bay

Are you or someone you know having child behavior problems?

Incredible Years

The CAN Council, through Project LAUNCH funding, offers FREE parenting classes. The program is called Incredible Years and is an evidence based curricula targeting parents with 3 to 6 year old children. The parent training program is designed to work jointly to promote emotional and social competence and to prevent, reduce, and treat behavioral and emotional problems in young children. There have been 40 parents and caregivers who participated in 3 series of 20 sessions each. Is IY helpful? National studies have shown promising results:  Increased positive and nurturing parenting  Decreased harsh coercive negative parenting  Reduction in children’s home and school behavior problems  Increased positive behaviors at home and school  Increased parent-child bonding

For more information about Incredible Years, please contact Vera, CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region CAPE Director and Incredible Years Group Leader, at vharrison@cancouncil.org or 989-752-7226.

Project LAUNCH stands for Linking Actions for Unmet Needs for Children’s Health. The Michigan Department of Community Health was awarded a grant from the federal government and they chose Saginaw as the area to provide services. If you want to learn more about Project LAUNCH contact Pamela at (989) 202-1485 extension 102 or pamela@urbanregenerationllc.com.

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February 16, 2014

Praise Connections and Life
Dr. Tony Evans writes about unity, racial reconciliation and working toward oneness in Christ.
Dallas - Something I sometimes hear from my white brothers and sisters when it gets around to Black History Month each year is, “Tony, tell me again … why we have to have Black History Month? And shouldn’t we have White History Month, too?” That statement is usually followed up by a chuckle in an attempt to take the edge off of what has the potential of turning into an awkward conversation. But I welcome discussions like these because they provide an opportunity to place a subject front and center that often only lurks in the shadows of Christendom. That may sound like a strong statement—that black/white relations or racial reconciliation across any racial barrier needs to be a “front and center” subject—but I say that in light of the emphasis God Himself places on His body living, acting, moving, communing and serving in oneness and unity in His Word. What does unity really mean? God does His best work in the midst of unity. In fact, so essential is the issue of oneness in the church that we are told to be on guard against those who try to destroy it. (Romans 16:17). God has intentionally reconciled racially divided groups into one new man, (Ephesians 2:14-15) uniting them into a new body, (Ephesians 2:16) in order that the church can function as one (Ephesians 2:13). When the church functions as one, we boldly brag on God to a world in desperate need of experiencing Him. But how do we as a Church function as one? We don’t. He does—both in us and through us. When we got saved, we were baptized into the body of Christ. No matter what our race, gender, or class is, when each of us came to faith in Jesus, we entered into a new family. We didn’t create God’s family. We became a part of it. That is so important to realize because far too often we are trying to force unity when authentic unity cannot be mandated or manufactured. Instead, God says we are to “preserve the unity of the Spirit” (Ephesians 4:3). The Holy Spirit has created our unity. It is our job to preserve it. The reason why we haven’t solved the racial divide in America after hundreds of years is because people apart from God are trying to invent unity, while people who belong to God are not living out the unity that we already possess. The result of both of these situations has been, and will continue to be, disastrous for our nation. Let alone disastrous for the witness of Christ to our nation. So what does this have to do with Black History Month? Everything. Unity through working together I read an eye-opening paragraph in a popular book the other day that will help explain my answer. It highlighted the reality that we still don’t get it about race. It said, “I know many of my white friends and colleagues, both past and present, have at times grown irritated by the black community’s incessant blabbering about race and racism and racial reconciliation. They don’t understand what’s left for them to do or say. ‘We have African Americans and other people of color on our staff. We listen to Tony Evans’s broadcast every day. We even send our youth group into the city to do urban ministry. Can we get on with it already? Haven’t we done enough?’” To be fair, we have come light years away from slavery, Jim Crow laws, and other overt displays of racial hatred. But tolerance is still a far cry from reconciliation. The mere fact that we remain relationally separated most of the time, only coming together for an event or cross-cultural seminar, shows how far we need to go. The proof of this is that we do not have a collective restoring effect in our society. We have limited the degree to which God’s presence will flow in us and through us because if what we call unity is not transforming individuals, churches and

Why the Church Needs Black History Month
communities, than it is simply sociology with a little Jesus sprinkled on top. Unity can be defined in its most basic of terms as oneness of purpose. It means working together toward a common goal. Unity is not achieved through seminars, but rather through service—together. Unity is not uniformity either. Just like God is made up of three distinct Persons—each unique and diverse—unity does not negate individuality. Unity embraces diversity to create a stronger whole. My son Jonathan got called to practice with the Arizona Cardinals a few weeks ago. As a fullback, he’s had success in college and has been trying his game out for a few years in the NFL. But if Jonathan were to show up at practice and start playing like the quarterback, or the center, or even the wide receiver, he’d be kicked off the team before practice was even over. Jonathan is a fullback, and if he doesn’t play like a fullback then the team is worse off because of it. A football team is eleven unique players working together to reach the same goal. The body of Christ is no different. We are each gifted with certain strengths and skills, but unless we intentionally (and with race in America, we must be intentional) bring these together under the over-arching purpose of God, we will continue to run in circles on the field and never cross the goal line together. We’ll have programs, without power. Know who your teammates really are A problem would also occur if Jonathan didn’t know what the quarterback did, or could do. Or if the wide receiver didn’t know who the quarterback was, or what he was supposed to do. A successful football team is made up of players who not only know who they are, but who also know who everyone else is. Growing up in urban America during the Civil Rights Era in a Christian context of racism, segregation and an incomplete historical education didn’t give me an opportunity to know who I SEE P 29, Why We Need Black History Month

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February 16, 2014
FROM P 28, Why We Need Black History Month really was. In my all-black classrooms, I learned about white culture and white history. I read about Paul Revere and his midnight ride. But what my teachers failed to mention was that on the night of Paul Revere’s ride, another man—a black man—Wentworth Cheswell also rode on behalf of our nation’s security. He rode north with the same exact message. Reading my Scofield Bible each week at church, I was reminded that we as blacks were under a curse of slavery. After all, it wrongly referenced it in the notes in my bible. What I didn’t learn was the rich heritage of blacks in the bible,

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper
and even that there were black men and women in the lineage of Jesus Christ. Without an authentic self-awareness, African-Americans often struggle as we seek to play on the same team toward the same goal in the body of Christ. But just as relevant is the need for awareness among my white brothers and sisters concerning who we are, and who God has created and positioned us to be at this critical time in our world. Black History Month gives us an opportunity to intentionally familiarize ourselves in such a way that will enable us to embrace our diversity to its fullest, putting unity to use for good. When

Page 29
we do that—when we knowledgeably serve side by side—there will be no stopping what we can do in the name of Jesus Christ. Dr. Tony Evans is Senior Pastor of Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship in Dallas and President of The Urban Alternative, a ministry dedicated to restoring hope in our churches and society. He is the author of over 50 books including Oneness Embraced, an intimate look at racial unity, Black History and social justice. Visit TonyEvans.org for more information. BlackChristianNews.com

Delta Pioneer Opportunity
Delta College is offering Baseball Clinics to boys ages 8-13. Players will receive individual, hands-on baseball training by current Delta College coaches and players. It’s the perfect environment to prepare a player for their upcoming season and is scheduled for five evenings with participants allowed to attend any session for $20 or all five sessions for $80. Dates and times are February 16 and 23 and March 16, 23 and 30 from 4-6 pm in the Delta Pioneer gymnasium. Registration is at the door at the time of the event. For additional information contact Head Baseball Coach Dan Smith at 989-6869477, or email at danielsmith4@delta. edu.

Business

Wedding

Church

Saginaw Suits and Alterations
402 N. Michigan, Saginaw, MI 48602
Tel: (989) 752-5169 Come see Sal for more Deals and Discounts.

Suits, Shirt, Tie Starting at: $149
1400 W. Genesee Saginaw, Michigan (989) 753-3475 www.themichiganbanner.com

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

Saginaw
Bethel AME Church Pastor P. David Saunders 535 Cathay St. Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 755-7011 Bethlehem Baptist Church Pastor Ernest W. Bothuel 3309 Bundy Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989-752-5866 Bread of Life Harvest Center Senior Pastor Rodney J. McTaggart 3726 Fortune Blvd. Saginaw, MI 48603 (989) 790-7933 Christ Disciples Baptist Pastor Eddie Benson 3317 Lapeer Street Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 754-2444 Christ Fellowship MBC Pastor Robert Davis 818 N. Washington Ave. Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 754-4435 Corinthian Baptist Church Pastor Roy L. Manning 104 S. 10th St. Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 754-1820 Faith Harvest Church Bishop Ronald E. Chipp Faith Harvest Church 1734 N. Mason Saginaw, MI 48602 (989) 799-4200 Website: www.faithharvestministry.org E-mail: office@faithharvestministry.org Greater Freewill Missionary Greater Williams Temple Bishop H.J. Williams 608 Remington Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 755-5291

Jacob’s Ladder Pastor Dempsey Allen 1926 Fairfield Street Saginaw, MI 48602 989-799-6601 Life In Christ Ministries Pastor Dennis Cotton, Sr. 2915 S. Washington Ave. Saginaw, MI 48601 989-752-2837 LifeInChristMinistries07@gmail.com Messiah Missionary Baptist Church 2615 Williamson Road Saginaw, MI 48601 Pastor Otis Washington Phone: 989-777-2636 Fax: 989-777-2640 Email: Messiahmbc@att.net Website: www.Messiahsag.org Mt. Olive Baptist Church Pastor Marvin T. Smith 1114 N. 6th Street Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 752-8064 New Beginning Christian Church Reverend Dr. Willie F. Casey 1016 Sherman Road Saginaw, MI 48604 989-754-2963 New Beginnings Life Changing Ministries Pastor Otis Dickens 2312 S. Washington Ave. Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 755-3650 New Birth Missionary Baptist Pastor Larry D. Camel 1418 S. Warren Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 755-6604 New Covenant Christian Center Pastor Ron Frierson 523 Hayden Saginaw, MI 752-8485

New Hope Missionary Baptist Church Pastor Floyd A. Logan 1721 Tuscola Street Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 753-7600 Email: NewHope1721@yahoo.com New Life Baptist Church Pastor Rufus Bradley 1401 Janes St. Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 753-1151 New Mt. Calvary Baptist Pastor Robert Donald 3610 Russell Street Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 754-0801 Ninth Street Community Church Pastor William L. Scott, Jr. Assistant Pastor Rex Jones 1118 N. 9th Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989-752-7366 Prince of Peace Baptist Church 825 North 24th Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989.754.2841 Pastor Robert B. Corley, Jr. Resurrection Life Ministries Church Pastor Carolyn L. Wilkins 2320 Sheridan Avenue Saginaw, MI 48601 989.754.9466 St. Paul Baptist Pastor Vincent D. McMillon 120 N. 15th St. Saginaw, MI 48601 (989) 752-5023 Saginaw Valley Community Pastor Richard Sayad 3660 Hermansau Saginaw, MI 48603 (989) 752-4769

St. Lukes CME Church 1121 Tuscola Saginaw, MI 48607 (989) 755-0351 Transforming Life Ministries Pastor William Brown 3024 South Washington Avenue Saginaw, MI 48601-4353 (989) 754-9573 Truevine Baptist Church Pastor Paul E. Broaddus 2930 Janes Street Saginaw, MI 48601 989-752-0751 Victorious Believers Ministries Church Rev. Christopher V. Pryor 624 S. Outer Dr. Saginaw, MI (989) 755-7692 Wolverine Baptist State Convention 615 S. Jefferson Ave. Saginaw, MI 48607 World Outreach Campus of Greater Coleman Temple Ministries Supt. H.J. Coleman Jr. 2405 Bay Rd. Saginaw, MI 48602 (989) 752-7957 Zion Missionary Baptist Church Pastor Rodrick Smith 721 Johnson Saginaw, MI 48607 (989) 754-9621

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February 16, 2014

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

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The Societ y Page
The Saginaw County Chamber of Commerce 2014 Chairman’s Ball All Good News
The Chairman’s Ball, one of the premiere events in the region, was enjoyed at the Horizons Conference Center, February 8, by 539 guests with dinner, cocktails programming and dancing to live music by the Flint-based band NewsMaker. The program’s theme this year was All Good News and was co-hosted by Saginaw County Chamber President Bob VanDeventer and Cathy Brock, Special Markets Account Manager for the Premiere Event Sponsor Blue Cross/Blue Shield Blue Care Network of Michigan. At the event, the 2014 Corporate Community Service Award Recipient SSP Associates Inc. was honored, with Peter, Patricia and Dr. Samuel J. Shaheen accepting the award on behalf of the company. The award was presented to them by Matt Davis, Corporate Vice President of Global Public Affairs and Government Affairs for award sponsor The Dow Chemical Company. Davis delivered a Toy-Story themed message as well as a congratulations letter written by The Dow Chemical Company CEO Andrew Liveris. The event also served to honor 2013 outgoing Chamber Board Chair Ellen Crane who was roasted in a video parody of Weekend Update with Tina Fey from Saturday Night Live.

Cathy Brock of Blue Cross Blue Shield as Premiere Sponsor co-hosted Chairman’s Ball 2014 with Chamber President Bob VanDeventer

2013 Departing Chamber Board Chair Ellen Crane reflects on a busy year at the Chambers 2014 Chairman’s Ball

Patricia Shaheen offers acceptance remarks for Corporate Citizenship Award at the 2014 Chamber Chairman’s Ball

Friends and guests at 2014 Chairman’s Ball honor SSP Associates Inc. and the Shaheen Family with Corporate Citizenship Award

Dancers highlighted the Chairman’s Ball theme All Good News

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

Women of Colors, Inc. 21st Anniversary Celebration ~and~ 2014 Leadership Awards Banquet Saturday, March 29, 2014
at Saginaw Valley State University “Curtiss Hall”
Doors Open at 5:30 pm Dinner at 6:00 pm Tickets: $40.00 per person or two for $75.00 Awards Presented
  

Achievement Award

Distinguish Gentleman Award Volunteer Award

Community Service Award (Business/Organization)
 

Woman of The Year Award

Woman of The Future Award (Age 18-25 years old)

*Silent Auction*
The Atheunium Suite Hotel (2 Night Stay) Detroit, MI and more...."

*Guest Speaker*
Barbara M. Littles, Business Attorney

*Live Entertainment*
Chet Allen
*Application must be submitted by Friday, February 14, 2014* For Application Information or To Order Tickets Please Contact : (989) 399-9275 or (989) 737-9286 Email: Womenofcolorsinc@att.net

Women of Colors, Inc. (WOC) mission strives to promote multi-cultural diversity and enhancing community relations in Saginaw County. This year, WOC will be celebrating 21 years of uninterrupted service. Join WOC in hosting the first Annual WOC 2014 Leadership Awards Banquet to recognize outstanding individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to enrich the lives of others. The event will be held at Saginaw Valley State University (Curtiss Hall) on March 29, 2014. The doors will open at 5:30 p.m. and dinner will be served at 6 p.m. Ticket cost for one person is $40 and the cost for two is $75. You can nominate yourself, one or more individuals, a business, or an organization in Saginaw County. The awarded nominees will be recognized individually for their leadership skills to improve the quality of life for others. The organization will recognize one individual in five (5) categories to include Achievement Award; Distinguish Gentleman Award; Volunteer Award; Woman of the Year Award; Woman of the Future Award (ages 18-25), and Community Service Award to one business or organization. WOC has formed Great Empowering Motivational Sessions (GEMS) comprised of Girl Pride, Sugar & Spice, and Young Men Who Dare for youth (ages 5-18). WOC has a mentorship program for youth at the Saginaw County Juvenile Detention Center and the Saginaw Intermediate School District, provides Tuesday Tutoring, and distributes an Annual WOC Scholarship for a deserving student, has an involved GEMS Parent Committee, and more. For over fifteen (15) years, WOC has mentored youth with committed and great volunteers! Without the community’s support the organization could not sustain and provide quality services for youth, women, and families. WOC takes pride in womanhood and the advancement of the Saginaw community. To learn more about WOC and GEMS or to join in the celebration and awards ceremony call 989. 737.9286 / 989. 399.9275 or email womenofcolorsinc@att.net.

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February 16, 2014

The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

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Ar ts and Enter tainment Overcoming –‘A Raisin in the Sun Review’
By Tamar Chipp Special thanks to Pit & Balcony Community Theatre, The Michigan Banner, and the cast and crew of A Raisin in the Sun for sharing the gift of theater with Saginaw. I was proud to watch Saginaw’s own vividly portray the struggle and triumph of a family dealing with issues that we all can identify with. The audience connected with each scene and its emotions, and somehow, we all saw a piece of ourselves in the characters. We all experience disappointment, fear, restlessness, and mistakes, but as demonstrated in the play, the fight of the human spirit and love always conquers. I am grateful for this reminder. Sometimes we have to sit down and look through the lens of a play to see ourselves and realize that we can overcome. Our strength lies in unity and that’s exactly what Saginaw needed to see.

Photos Courtesy of Robert Bruce Rindhage

Terry Reed
Sales Professional Used Cars

A special thanks to all of my customers. I appreciate each one of you.
Phone (989) 667-2000 Ext 341 Direct (989) 460-0341 Fax (989) 667-0103 E-Mail terry.reed@labadieauto.com Website www.labadieauto.com
Labadie Buick Cadillac GMC 711 S. Euclid Ave. • Bay City, MI 48706

5530 Gratiot Road, between M-47 & Center Rd. in Saginaw M-F Open for Lunch 11:30 a.m. Sat Open at 5 p.m. CLOSED Sun Spencer Dambro, Owner

Spencer’s Restaurant
989.793.4500

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

SPORTS BARBERSHOP
1400 W. GENESEE SAGINAW, MI TUESDAY TO SATURDAY 9 A.M. – 6 P.M.
EXPERIENCED BARBERS

WELCOME TWOYN

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285 S. Outer Drive

Tel: 754-7088 Fax: 754-7099
Stop in Today and Try One of our Homemade Specialities
The Michigan Banner is @ www.themichiganbanner.com for you 24/7! www.almanac.com

Long-Range Weather Forecast

FEBRUARY 2014: temperature 29° (2° above avg.); precipitation 0.5” (1.5” below avg.); Feb 1-4: Snow showers, mild; Feb 5-8: Lake snows, cold; Feb 9-18: Sunny, then sprinkles and flurries, turning mild; Feb 19-25: Snow, then sunny, seasonable; Feb 26-28: Snow showers, cold. 1400 W. Genesee Saginaw, Michigan (989) 753-3475 www.themichiganbanner.com

February 16, 2014

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The Michigan Banner First Great Lakes Bay Regional Newspaper

February 16, 2014

i am

a role model
Tackling life is a matter of problem solving — that’s Terrance Moore’s way of thinking. And what better way to improve the world than to help others as they leap life’s hurdles? The junior criminal justice major likes to be there when someone can use a helping hand: Terrance serves as a resident assistant, helping his students overcome the roadblocks of college life, and as vice president of the Cardinal Military Association, supporting veterans through any difficulties they might face. A firm believer in support systems, Terrence is also a member of the National Leadership and Success Society, an organization that unites students who want to set and achieve goals. And as part of the Greek fraternity Tau Kappa Epsilon, the Criminal Justice Society, and the co-ed service fraternity Alpha Sigma Pi, he’s learned that the best way to lead is by example. “If I don’t help,” he said, “who will?”

Prospective or transfer students can check out SVSU by taking a campus tour and meeting with an admissions representative. Call (989) 964-4200 or email admissions@svsu.edu.

Visit us online at svsu.edu

1400 W. Genesee Saginaw, Michigan (989) 753-3475 www.themichiganbanner.com