!

RIVATE "RANCH E#CHANGE
Merídían 1 - Optíon 81C
CONTENTS
BASIC TELEPHONE SYSTEMS. ......................................
MERIDAIN SYSTEM MODELS. .......................................
M1 SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE .......................................
MERIDAIN 1 HARDWARE .........................................
COMMON EQUIPMENT..
NETWORK EQUIPMENT. ..........................................
PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT .........................................
E1 SIGNALING .................................................
OPTION 81C BLOCK DIAGRAM..
M1 CONFIGURATIONOVERLAYS .....................................
PROBLEM DETERMINATION TOOL..
GENERAL INFORMATION - MULTI-GROUP SYSTEMS. .......................
MERIDAIN 1 SYSTEM HEALTH CHECK. .................................
REFERNCE ....................................................
This document is Ior you iI you want to learn a bit more about how Meridian 1 Option 81C PBX system works. This document will
be good Ior those who need to know about the conIiguration oI Meridian 1. A little bit telecommunication knowledge is required to go
through this document.
This document has been made with the Iull reIerence oI M1R25 document oI Nortel Networks. So, thanks Ior the Nortel Networks.
1
Types of telephone systems
When telephones are required in a building for a group of users, there are several options from which to choose
There are three main types of systems are:
• Centrex
• Key System
• Private Branch Exchange
Nortel Networks manufactures systems of all the three types.
• The Nortel Networks system that servers Centrex telephones is called the DMS systems
• The Nortel Networks system that servers Key System telephones is called the Norstar systems
• The Nortel Networks system that servers Private Branch Exchange are called the Meridian 1 systems
PBXs, trunks, and Central Offices
PBXs provide telephone service to large numbers of users, usually between 30 and 10,000.When you are connected to a PBX
and you lift the handset of your telephone, the dial tone you hear is coming from the PBX.
The PBX receives the digits you dial, interprets them and connects you to the destination you want. Sometimes the destination
is an internal telephone, connected to the same PBX. Sometimes it is an external telephone connected to the PBX by a trunk.
Trunks are pairs of wires or optical fiber that connect the PBX to an outside system. One of these systems is called a Central
Office. The Central Office (or CO) provides telephone service to businesses and residences in your local area.
Central Offices are sometimes called exchange offices. When your call goes out to one of these offices you have accessed the
exchange network, sometimes called the public exchange network.
If you have more than one trunk connected to the same end-system, handling the same kinds of calls, arrange them in trunk
groups (also called trunk routes). For example, trunks connected to the Central Office that handle public exchange network
calls are called Central Office Trunks (COTs).
2
Analog and digital
There are trunks that handle analog signals and those that handle digital signals. There are analog and digital PBXs as well as
analog and digital telephones.
Analog signals are transmissions that travel along in a wave format. They might travel through a wire (when a signal is
traveling along a trunk) or the air (when you are speaking to someone beside you).
Digital signals are on and off pulses put together in a particular sequence. The pulses and the sequence are deciphered by
equipment at the other end that can either read the message and understand it digitally or change it into an analog format to
be heard and understood by a person. When a telephone or system is called digital it means it is built to send and receive
signals in a digital format.
The Meridian 1 is a digital PBX system
The Meridian 1 can be connected to both analog and digital trunks
System models
There are three distinct families or generations of PBX systems manufactured by Nortel Networks. The most recent generation
is called the Meridian 1. The earliest Generation was called the SL-1, followed by the generation called the Meridian SL-1.
Each generation has at least three models.
Each model is designed to handle different quantities of telephones. Generally, you can divide each generation into the
categories of small, medium and large systems. In the most recent Meridian 1 generation there is also a system that handles a
very small number of telephones.
System Name Size Range
Option 11, Option 11E, 11C, 11C
compact
Very Small Systems
Option 21, Option 21E Small Systems
Option 51, Option 51C
Option 61, Option 61C
Medium Systems
Option 71, Option 81, Option 81C Large Systems
3
CONTROL
NETWORK
PBX BASIC ARCHITUCTURE M1 System Architecture
Network Control Bus
Control
Network Control Bus
Network Loop
Network
ACCESS Network Loop
s
TERMINALS TERMINALS
Control
• Controlling elements of the system
• Controls high-level call processing, maintenance and I/O
Network Control Bus
• Carries messages between the control and network elements
Network (Digital Switch)
• Connects data (conversations) from Network loop as instructed by main computer
• Controlled by the main computer
4
CPU
Peripheral
Equipment
Switching
Network
USER
INTERFACE
MEMORY MASS
STORAGE P
O
W
E
R
Network Loop
• Routes inIormation Irom terminals into the Network (digital switch)
• Carries messages and conversations between the access and network components
• TIME DIVISION MULTIPLEXING (TDM): Several conversations share the same wire path, but at different times - time is
divided up into time slots
Access
• Distribution/Multiplexing
• Concentration
• Protocol conversion
Terminals
• Analog Telephone sets
• Digital Telephone sets
• Trunks
MERIDIAN 1 HARDWARE
The hardware components of the system belong to three main groups of equipment.
• Common Equipment (CE)
• Network Equipment (NE)
• Peripheral Equipment (PE)
COMMON EQUIPMENT (or) CONTROL EQUIPMENT
CALL PROCESSOR (CP)
The components in this area of the machine can be called the computer because they control the operation of the rest of the
system.
• Central Processing Unit (CPU)
• Memory
• Disks
• Input/output ports
5
The CPU performs the functions required by the telephones and trunks connected to the system.
The memory has all the instructions stored so the CPU can operate.
The disks have a permanent record of the instructions. If the memory is erased because of a power failure, for example, the
instructions stored on the disk are automatically loaded into the memory when the power failure ends.
The input/output ports are called Serial Data Interface (SDI) ports. They allow your system maintainer to connect a terminal
to the system for programming purposes. If you are going to move, add and change telephones, you will be using this terminal
as well. Other devices, such as printers for traffic studies and call detail records, are also connected to these ports
Inter-Processor bus to communicate with in the Control Equipment
INPUT/OUTPUT DISK UNIT WITH CD- ROM (IODU/C)
Software is delivered to Meridian 1 systems by CD-ROM. IODU/C applies to Options 51C, 61C, 81, and 81C.
CORE NETWORK INTERFACE (CNI)
• It provides interface between the inter-processor bus and the network shelves
• It provides interface between the Call Processor and the Three Port Extender (3PE) cards, each CNI can be connected to
two 3PE cards
NETWORK EQUIPMENT
The telephones and trunks interconnected by the PBX are connected using the Network Equipment components of the system.
Time slots
The system uses timeslots to connect each party on an active call. If two internal telephone users are speaking, the system
uses two timeslots to connect them, one for each telephone. If a telephone user is calling out on a trunk, the system uses two
timeslots, one for the telephone and another for the trunk.
Loops and Super loops
These timeslots are present on Network Equipment components called Loops. Each Loop has 32 timeslots, if it is an Enhanced
or Standard Loop. Meridian 1 systems use Enhanced Loops. Meridian 1 systems can also use newer versions of Loops called
Super loops. Super loops have 128 timeslots. Loops and Super loops are cards that sit in the Network Equipment area of the
6
machine. A Virtual Super loop has been introduced in X11 Release 25 to support i2004 Internet Telephones. Up to 1024
telephones can be configured on a single Virtual Super loop for a system, compared to the traditional 512 telephones.
Collectively, 32 loops are called a group. The Option 81C is called a multi-group system because you can equip up to five
groups.
Introduced in X11 Release 25, Fiber Network fabric (FNP) allows the expansion of Meridian 1 Option 81 and 81C systems from
five Network groups to eight Network groups, a 60% increase in port and trunk capacity. A Dual Ring fiber optic network has
replaced the intergroup cards and intergroup module in pre-Release 25 Meridian 1 systems.
A Fiber Network provides 7680 timeslots for 3840 simultaneous conversations. This significantly enhances the number of
telephones that you can configure on a system.
Network Controller cards ENET - Enhanced Network card (handles 2 network loops, max. 8 per N/W shelf), XNET -Super
loop Network card (handles 1 super loop - equivalent to 4 network loops), max. 4 per network shelf)
Digital Trunk Cards DTI - Digital trunk interface (E1 for Europe, T1 for North America), PRI- Primary rate interface (PRI2 for
Europe, PRI for North America)
Conference and Tone and Digit Switch Cards
When you look at your system you will notice there are also Conference cards and Tone and Digit Switch (TDS) cards sitting
near the Loop and Super loop cards. They are also part of the Network Equipment. The Conference card supplies extra
timeslots to a conversation when additional people are added in a conference. The TDS card supplies tones like dial tone and
busy tone, when told to do so by the computer in the system. On some systems, the Conference and TDS functions are
combined on dual-function cards.
Peripheral Signaling provides buffering and signaling interface between CPU and peripheral equipment
Clock Controller Provides a stable clock reference for synchronization with the public network (PSTN); requires when system
uses digital trunks
PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT
Line cards and trunk cards
The telephones and trunks on your system are connected to the system with cards that sit on shelves. There are line cards for
telephones and trunk cards for trunks.
On the newer Meridian 1 systems these shelves for cards are housed in modules.
There are unique cards designed for each type of telephone and trunk. More than one telephone or trunk is connected to a
card. The version of the card determines how many can be connected. When you add more telephones and trunks to your
system, you will need to add more cards when the existing ones are fully utilized.
Density
7
A term, density, is used to describe, in general, the vintage and capacity of a card. For example, when line cards were
introduced in 1975, they had four units on them to connect up to four telephones. These are called single-density cards. Later,
line cards were introduced with twice as many units for twice as many telephones and these are called double-density cards.
The development of new cards continued, with the introduction of quad-density cards that connect up to 16 telephones, and
then octal-density cards. These have 32 units, 16 of which are for digital telephones and the other 16 are for associated data
terminals that you can connect to the telephones.
PE cards vs. IPE cards
There are two versions of cards:
• Intelligent Peripheral Equipment (IPE)
• Peripheral Equipment (PE)
Meridian 1 systems can accommodate IPE cards and PE cards. Only upgraded SL-1 and Meridian SL-1 systems can handle IPE
cards. If not upgraded, they can only have PE cards.
Intelligent line cards and trunk cards can have more telephones and trunks connected to them than the older, non-intelligent
kinds of cards. This saves room in your system and keeps your system small.
XPEC- Controller card - performs protocol conversion between DS30Y (used in super loop side) and DS30X (comm.b/w xpec &
ipe). Intelligent cards are served by Super loops. Non-intelligent cards are served by Loops.
Other line cards placed in PE XALC, XDLC, XUT, LSE1 and XEM
Ring Generator - generates the electrical signal, which causes an analog set to ring
Digitone receiver (DTR)
If you use Digitone-type telephones, your system has digitone receiver (DTR) cards. Digitone-type telephones are sometimes
called 2500 or DTMF telephones. They are analog telephones that out pulse tones when keys on the keypad are pressed.
The CPU of your system requires assistance in interpreting these analog tones. The DTR card was designed to interpret these
tones and change each tone into a digital signal, suitable for the CPU.You need DTR cards if your system has any Digitone-type
telephones, or Digitone-type trunks which carry these tones into your system from other systems.
STIPULATION
The greater the number of Loops or Super loops equipped on your system, the greater the number of timeslots you have. As
you add more telephones and trunks to your system it is important to keep the timeslots in mind.
If you do not provision sufficient timeslots, or manage the system properly, the users on your system might begin to complain
of poor service. This usually appears first in the form of dial tone delay problems.
When users lift their handsets to make calls, it is called taking their telephones off-hook. The system attempts to provide dial
tone to the telephone that is off-hook. Timeslots are needed in order to provide dial tone. An under-provisioned system will not
have enough timeslots for the demand, especially during busy times of the day. If there are not enough timeslots available for
dial tone, a user must wait until another user on the same Loop (or Super loop) hangs up. Since Super loops have far more
timeslots than Loops, dial tone delays usually do not occur when you use Super loops on your system.
8
This demand for timeslots is called traffic. You can predict the expected demand with the help of your system supplier. The
occurrence of service problems is sometimes called blockage. There are many things you and your system supplier can do
initially, and on an ongoing basis, to eliminate blockage. Refer to the module called Traffic for many suggestions.
DTI TRUNK CARDS - E1 SIGNALING (Connecting PBX to the External world)
CAS CCS
Channel Associated Signaling Common Channel Signaling
The signaling associated with a channel Same signaling channel for all the channels
Not many features/services possible Many features/services are possible
In-band Signaling (same channel carries both voice & data) Out of band Signaling (separate channel for signaling)
Eg. DTI Eg.ISDN (PRI)
OPTION 81C BLOCK DIAGRAM
Inter Processor Bus (IPB) Network Bus
9
CORE MODULE 0
ENET
XNET
SDI
XCT
PRI
DTI

LOOPS 0 - 15
CABLES TO INTER-GROUP
MODULE
Inter CPU Cables SCSI bus cables
M1 CONFIGURATION - OVERLAYS
What are Overlays?
-Prompt - Response systems used to configure M1 switch.
-Used to Create, Modify & Delete configurations
-Are identified by "LD xxx¨ where "xxx¨ are numbers.
CLASSIFICATION OF OVERLAYS
-Administration Overlays
-Maintenance Overlays
-Print Overlays
10
Call
Processor
IODUC
Core to
Network
¡CNI]
Three Port
Extender
(3PE)
Peripheral
Signali
ng
$!%&
DUAL
Inter-group
Switch(fnp)
ADMINISTRATION OVERLAYS
Configuration Record (LD 17, LD 97)
Hardware of the System
! Loops
" To peripheral equipment (ENET)
" ConIerence and Tone loops (XCT)
" T1/E1 (DTI, PRI)
! Super loops to IPE shelI IPE segmentation
! TTY`s, Number oI CPUs
! Background and Midnight routines
! Call Processing Data structure allocation
Digitone Receivers (LD 13)
CDB (CUSTOMER DATA BLOCK) - (LD 15)
" Characteristics applying to all customer resources are deIined in this data block
ROUTES (LD 16)
" Logically groups multiple trunks coming\going to a common destination
" Each route is assigned an Access code (ACOD) which determine which calls it will handle
Trunks (LD 14)
" Links trunks with routes
11
" Has a physical location called a Terminal Number (TN)
- TN consists oI loop, shelI, card, unit (lscu)
Digital Sets (LD 11)
M39XX sets
Analog Sets (LD 10)
500, 2500 sets
Attendant Console (LD 12)
2250 sets
MAINTENANCE OVERLAYS
LD 30 - Network and signaling Diagnostics
LD 31 - Telephone and Console Diagnostics
LD 32 - Network and peripheral Diagnostics
LD 34 - TDS and DTR Diagnostics
LD 2 - Traffic
• Set time and date
• Set traIIics report schedules, print reports
LD 1 - Audit (template audit)
• Audits the PBX and BCS template data structures
LD 44 - Software Audit
• Audits data structures: Call registers, queues, etc
• Checks/Repairs network connections, linkages
12
PRINT OVERLAYS
LD 20 - Prints TN related data (sets, trunks, DTRs, Dn blocks)
LD 21 - Prints Customer Data Block
LD 22 - Configuration Record Data Block
LD 81 - Print a list or count of sets with selected features
LD 82 - Prints hunting patterns and DN blocks
LD 83 - Prints a list of TNs in DES order
LD 97 - Administrates and Print some portions of Configuration record
PROBLEM DETERMINATION TOOL (PDT)
-PDT can be invoked by typing Cntrl+P Cntrl+D Cntrl+T (^P^D^T)
-The user interacts with PDT by means of PDT Shell
-To switch between PDT and Overlays,
- From Overlay (OVL000) prompt type ^P^D^T
- From PDT (pdt>) prompt type "sl1input¨
-PDT has two special operating modes
- Debug mode
- Super-user mode
- Default is regular mode
-At any time only one PDT shell can be in super-user mode or debug mode.
-In Super-User mode, PDT invokes VxWorks native shell and operates in its context. All VxWorks shell functionality is available
in this mode.
Security
-General User Security Level
13
-Restricted set of PDT commands
-Expert Security Level
-Full set of PDT commands
-Debug operation mode of PDT shell
-Superuser operation mode of PDT shell
-Direct Access of operating System subroutines and data
-Passwords
- (<Rls 22) - xxxxxxxx (Hidden)
- (>= Rls 22) - xxxxxxxxx (Hidden)
Debugging
-PDT provides tools for debugging SL1 tasks and other tasks too
- Debugging activities are based on "Debugging events¨ and "Debugging Actions¨.
- PDT provides access to
- Memory [examination and modification]
- CPU registers [examination and modification]
- Symbolic task trace printing
- Retrieving details of system INI
- Capturing of Rdtail file
Maintenance Commands
-rds n Opens a particular record
-rdgo n Goes to a particular record of the system
-rdtail n Prints the latest records of the switch.
-pstat Lists the total number of patches in system
-pload file Loads a particular patch into the system
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-pins Inserts a patch into the system
-poos Puts a particular patch into out-of-service
-pout Removes a particular patch from the memory
-osVersion Lists the current software release of the switch
-cd /u/ Used to change directories
-ll Long listing of file in that directory
-rm Removes that particular file name
-tree /u Lists all the directories in u partition
-mv Used to rename a file
-cp Used to copy a file
-reboot -1 Cold Start
-reboot Warm start
-sl1Version Lists the current version & the processor type.
General Information
All the terminals connected (access) to the M1 have their individual Physical Address called as TNs and their respective DNs
TN (Terminal Number) consists of Loop, Shelf, Card, unit (lscu)
Option 81C - Multi-group Systems
What's a Group?
Up to 16 loops (or 4 super loops) can be equipped on a single network shelf.The back plane of a network shelf has 32 traces (or
links), each of which carries traffic for a single network loop, 2-network shelves together (32 loops) max out the capacity of the
back plane, these two shelves constitute a "Network Group¨ Or "Group¨
Multi-group systems require additional equipment
- For network connections between groups
- To interface with the core equipment
Maximum 5 groups, 160 loops, 10,000 ports - IGX
Maximum 8 groups, 256 loops, 20,000 ports - FNP
MERIDIAN 1 SYSTEM HEALTH CHECK
CPU REDUNDANCY AND STATUS:
>LD 135
CCED000
15
. stat cpu
cp 0 16 PASS - ENBL
TRUE REDUNDANT
DISK STATE = REDUNDANT
HEALTH = 28
VERSION = Oct 3 2003, 19:23:08
Síde = 0, DRAM SIZE = 256 Mbytes
cp 1 16 PASS -- STDBY
TRUE REDUNDANT
DISK STATE = REDUNDANT
HEALTH = 28
VERSION = Oct 3 2003, 19:23:08
Síde = 1, DRAM SIZE = 256 Mbytes
CNI CARD STATUS:
>LD 135
. stat cní
cní 0 9 0: remote = group 0 ENBL
cní 0 9 1: remote = group 1 ENBL
cní 0 10 0: remote = group 2 ENBL
cní 1 9 0: remote = group 0 ENBL
cní 1 9 1: remote = group 1 ENBL
cní 1 10 0: remote = group 2 ENBL
. stat mem
Síde = 0, DRAM SIZE = 256 Mbytes
Side ÷ 1, DRAM SIZE ÷ 256 Mbytes
MMDU AND ELNK STAUS:
>LD 137
. stat
CMDU 0 ENABLED (ACTIVE)
CMDU 1 ENABLED (STANDBY)
RDUN ENABLED
ELNK ENABLED
16
SDEV 0 OK (KC VALID)
. stat elnk
ELNK ENABLED
Ethernet (Iei unit number 0):
Host: PRI¸IP
Internet address: 10.10.10.11
Broadcast address: 10.255.255.255
Ethernet address: 00:01:aI:04:6c:e0
Netmask: 0xII000000; Subnetmask: 0xII000000
23237272 packets received; 23574397 packets sent
0 input errors; 0 output errors
0 collisions
ELAN STATUS:
>LD 48
. STAT ELAN
SERVER TASK: ENABLED
ELAN #: 16 DES: SCCS
APPL¸IP¸ID: 10 .10 .10 .10 LYR7: ACTIVE EMPTY APPL ACTIVE
ELAN #: 17
APPL¸IP¸ID: 10 .10 .10 .13 LYR7: ACTIVE EMPTY APPL ACTIVE
ELAN HOST CONFIGURATION:
>LD 117
÷~ prt host
ID Hostname IP Address
1 LOCAL¸PPP¸IF 137.135.192.4
2 REMOTE¸PPP¸IF 100.1.1.1
3 PRI¸IP1 10.10.10.11
4 SEC¸IP1 10.10.10.12
OK
÷~ prt route
ID Network Gateway
10.0.0.0 10.10.10.0
OK
÷~ prt elnk
ACTIVE ETHERNET: "PRI¸IP1" "10.10.10.11"
INACTIVE ETHERNET: "SEC¸IP1" "10.10.10.12"
17
OK
FIJI RING AND CARD STATUS:
>LD 39
. stat ring 0
RING STATE: DRIVES HALF (000 - 479)
RING AUTO RECOVERY IS ON
FIJI 0 0 ENBL
FIJI 1 0 ENBL
FIJI 2 0 ENBL
FIJI 3 0 UNEQ
FIJI 4 0 UNEQ
FIJI 5 0 UNEQ
FIJI 6 0 UNEQ
FIJI 7 0 UNEQ
. stat ring 1
RING STATE: DRIVES HALF (480 - 959)
RING AUTO RECOVERY IS ON
FIJI 0 1 ENBL
FIJI 1 1 ENBL
FIJI 2 1 ENBL
FIJI 3 1 UNEQ
FIJI 4 1 UNEQ
FIJI 5 1 UNEQ
FIJI 6 1 UNEQ
FIJI 7 1 UNEQ
SUPERLOOP STATUS:
>LD 97
SCSYS000
MEM AVAIL: (U/P): 22193398 USED U P: 6143328 236966 TOT: 28573692
DISK SPACE NEEDED: 329 KBYTES
2MB BACKUP DISKETTE(S) NEEDED: 1 (PROJECTED LD43 - BKO)
REQ prt
TYPE supl
18
SUPL
SUPL SUPT SLOT XPEC0 XPEC1
004 STD LEFT 01 0 3 -- - -
008 STD RGHT 06 0 3 -- - -
020 STD LEFT 02 0 1 -- - -
024 STD RGHT 02 2 3 -- - -
036 STD LEFT 03 0 1 -- - -
040 STD RGHT 03 2 3 -- - -
052 STD LEFT 04 0 1 -- - -
056 STD RGHT 07 0 3 -- - -
068 STD LEFT 05 0 1 -- - -
084 STD LEFT 05 2 3 04 2 3
248 ---- ---- PHANTOM -- - -
252 ---- ---- PHANTOM -- - -
>LD 97
REQ prt
TYPE xpe
XPEC
S0 S1 S2 S3 LOC DIS RGTP
01 004 004 004 004 NO 08
02 020 020 024 024 NO 08
03 036 036 040 040 NO 08
04 052 052 084 084 NO 08
05 068 068 084 084 NO 08
06 008 008 008 008 NO 08
07 056 056 056 056 NO 08
E1 LOOP STATUS:
LD 60
. stat 18
DTI2 LOOP 18 - ENBL
REF CLK: DSBL
SERVICE RESTORE: YES
ALARM STATUS: ACCEPTABLE
CH 01 - BUSY TIE VOD CH 02 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 03 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 04 - IDLE TIE VOD
19
CH 05 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 06 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 07 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 08 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 09 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 10 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 11 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 12 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 13 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 14 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 15 - BUSY TIE VOD CH 16 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 17 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 18 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 19 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 20 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 21 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 22 - IDLE TIE VOD
CH 23 - BUSY TIE VOD CH 24 - BUSY TIE VOD
CH 25 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 26 - IDLE TIE VOD
CH 27 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 28 - IDLE TIE VOD
CH 29 - IDLE TIE VOD CH 30 - IDLE DID VOD
LSE1 CARD STATUS:
>LD 32
. stat 68 0 4
00 ÷ UNIT 00 ÷ IDLE (L500)
01 ÷ UNIT 01 ÷ IDLE (L500)
02 ÷ UNIT 02 ÷ BUSY (L500)
03 ÷ UNIT 03 ÷ BUSY (L500)
04 ÷ UNIT 04 ÷ BUSY (L500)
05 ÷ UNIT 05 ÷ BUSY (L500)
06 ÷ UNIT 06 ÷ BUSY (L500)
07 ÷ UNIT 07 ÷ BUSY (L500)
08 ÷ UNIT 08 ÷ BUSY (L500)
09 ÷ UNIT 09 ÷ BUSY (L500)
10 ÷ UNIT 10 ÷ BUSY (L500)
11 ÷ UNIT 11 ÷ BUSY (L500)
12 ÷ UNIT 12 ÷ BUSY (L500)
13 ÷ UNIT 13 ÷ BUSY (L500)
14 ÷ UNIT 14 ÷ BUSY (L500)
15 ÷ UNIT 15 ÷ BUSY (L500)
STATUS OF DLC, FALC AND MFC CARDS:
DLC STATUS:
>LD 32
.stat 20 0 4
00 ÷ UNIT 00 ÷ IDLE (3904 LOG OUT)
20
01 ÷ UNIT 01 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
02 ÷ UNIT 02 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG IN )
03 ÷ UNIT 03 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
04 ÷ UNIT 04 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
05 ÷ UNIT 05 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
06 ÷ UNIT 06 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
07 ÷ UNIT 07 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
08 ÷ UNIT 08 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
09 ÷ UNIT 09 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
10 ÷ UNIT 10 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
11 ÷ UNIT 11 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
12 ÷ UNIT 12 ÷ BUSY (3905 LOG IN )
13 ÷ UNIT 13 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
14 ÷ UNIT 14 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
15 ÷ UNIT 15 ÷ IDLE (3905 LOG OUT)
16 ÷ UNIT 16 ÷ UNEQ
17 ÷ UNIT 17 ÷ UNEQ
18 ÷ UNIT 18 ÷ UNEQ
19 ÷ UNIT 19 ÷ UNEQ
20 ÷ UNIT 20 ÷ UNEQ
21 ÷ UNIT 21 ÷ UNEQ
22 ÷ UNIT 22 ÷ UNEQ
23 ÷ UNIT 23 ÷ UNEQ
24 ÷ UNIT 24 ÷ UNEQ
25 ÷ UNIT 25 ÷ UNEQ
26 ÷ UNIT 26 ÷ UNEQ
27 ÷ UNIT 27 ÷ UNEQ
28 ÷ UNIT 28 ÷ UNEQ
29 ÷ UNIT 29 ÷ UNEQ
30 ÷ UNIT 30 ÷ UNEQ
31 ÷ UNIT 31 ÷ UNEQ
FALC STATUS:
21
.stat 4 0 0
00 ÷ UNIT 00 ÷ IDLE (L500)
01 ÷ UNIT 01 ÷ IDLE (L500)
02 ÷ UNIT 02 ÷ IDLE (L500)
03 ÷ UNIT 03 ÷ IDLE (L500)
04 ÷ UNIT 04 ÷ IDLE (L500)
05 ÷ UNIT 05 ÷ IDLE (L500)
06 ÷ UNIT 06 ÷ IDLE (L500)
07 ÷ UNIT 07 ÷ IDLE (L500)
08 ÷ UNIT 08 ÷ IDLE (L500)
09 ÷ UNIT 09 ÷ IDLE (L500)
10 ÷ UNIT 10 ÷ IDLE (L500)
11 ÷ UNIT 11 ÷ IDLE (L500)
12 ÷ UNIT 12 ÷ IDLE (L500)
13 ÷ UNIT 13 ÷ IDLE (L500)
14 ÷ UNIT 14 ÷ IDLE (L500)
15 ÷ UNIT 15 ÷ IDLE (L500)
MFC STATUS:
.stat 20 0 0
00 ÷ UNIT 00 ÷ IDLE MFC
01 ÷ UNIT 01 ÷ IDLE MFC
02 ÷ UNIT 02 ÷ IDLE MFC
03 ÷ UNIT 03 ÷ IDLE MFC
How to list the patches installed in the Meridian?
>LD 22
REQ: issp
Site ID
>LD 22
REQ: tid
22
HOW TO IDENTIFY A SYSTEM PROCESSOR AND GENERIC
'16' => '81C/CP1',
'17' => '51C/CP1',
'18' => '61C/CP1',
'19' => '81C/CP2',
'22' => '51C/CP2',
'23' => '61C/CP2',
'24' => '51C/CP3',
'25' => '61C/CP3',
'26' => '81C/CP3',
'28' => '51C/CP4',
'29' => '61C/CP4',
'30' => '81C/CP4',
'96' => 'INSTALL',
'97' => 'MDCS ',
'98' => 'FoxPSDL',
'99' => 'PSDL ',
'00' => 'Info ',
1611 = 81/81C CP1
1711 = 51C CP1
1811 = 61C CP1
1911 = 81/81C CP2
2111 = OPTION 11C (not supported)
2211 = 51C CP2
2311 = 61C CP2
2411 = 51C CP3
2511 = 61C CP3
2611 = 81/81C CP3
2811 = 51C CP4
2911 = 61C CP4
3011 = 81/81C CP4
PROBLEM DETERMINATION TOOL (PDT PROMPT)
PDT: login on /sdi/tty3
Password:
PDT in Progress. Please Wait....
Done!
pdt> hiHealthShow
23
Local (Side 1, Active, Redundant):
sio8 1 16 1: 0002
sio8 1 16 2: 0002
sutl 1 15: 0002
strn 1 15: 0002
xsmp 1 15 1: 0002
cnib 1 9: 0002
cnib 1 10: 0002
cnip 1 9 0: 0002
cnip 1 9 1: 0002
cnip 1 10 0: 0002
cnip 1 10 1: 0000 (OutOfService)
cmdu 1 16 1: 0008
eth 1 16 0: 0000 (OutOfService)
Local Total: 0028
Remote (Side 0, Inactive, Redundant):
sio8 0 16 1: 0002
sio8 0 16 2: 0002
sutl 0 15: 0002
strn 0 15: 0002
xsmp 0 15 1: 0002
cnib 0 9: 0002
cnib 0 10: 0002
cnip 0 9 0: 0002
cnip 0 9 1: 0002
cnip 0 10 0: 0002
cnip 0 10 1: 0000 (OutOfService)
cmdu 0 16 1: 0008
eth 0 16 0: 0000 (OutOfService)
Remote Total: 0028
value = 0 = 0x0
RDTAIL
pdt> rdtail
RPT: ... rdNotify: SWO happened,default rptFile will open.
RPT: ...rd : 1017 new reports arrived since last command
RPT: ...rd : showing 16 records up to the newest record (rec 86)
24
71 :(5/6/05 2:00:08.538) SRPT773 TOD 1: Starting midnight job 'rstThr'
72 :(5/6/05 2:00:08.538) SRPT774 TOD 1: Midnight jobs completed
73 :(5/6/05 2:01:57.257) TEMU049 WARNING: record no mismatch, curr= 2, rec= 5
74 :(5/6/05 2:01:58.338) CIOD157 INFO: CMDU 1 is ACTIVE, RDUN is ENABLED
75 :(5/6/05 2:02:00.630) HWI0009 HI FS: saving data to directory "/u/db/hi_b"
76 :(5/6/05 2:03:51.055) TEMU129 BackUP process ended successfully.
Number of floppy diskette(s) used: 1
Amount of space remaining on the last floppy: 1055
77 :(5/6/05 2:14:16.369) HWI0655 SUTL: sutlBackGrndTest invoked
78 :(5/6/05 2:14:17.394) SRPT770 TOD 1: Midnight job server started.
Number of jobs to do: 2
79 :(5/6/05 2:14:17.394) SRPT773 TOD 1: Starting midnight job 'pchMidNite'
80 :(5/6/05 2:14:32.342) SRPT773 TOD 1: Starting midnight job 'kcm_24h'
81 :(5/6/05 2:14:33.385) SRPT774 TOD 1: Midnight jobs completed
82 :(5/6/05 2:32:52.359) ELAN011 ELAN 17 host IP=10.10.10.13 disabled due tot
83 :(5/6/05 2:32:52.359) ELAN011 ELAN 17 host IP=10.10.10.13 disabled due tot
84 :(5/6/05 2:42:02.145) ELAN014 ELAN 17 host IP=10.10.10.13 is enabled
85 :(5/6/05 2:42:05.684) SRPT093 AML: local side AML connection 17 to 10.10..
86 :(5/6/05 2:42:05.684) SRPT091 HB: Local side AML health change:4.
value = 0 = 0x0
RDSHOW
pdt> rdshow
Work file : "/e/rpt/rpt.log"
RPT: ... GetTod: record 87 without time_stamp (ROM Report)
File status : full(old reports are replaced by new ones)
File capacity : 1372
oldest rec : 87 ( 0/ 0/00 00:00:00)
current rec : 86 ( 5/ 6/05 02:42:05)
newest rec : 86 ( 5/ 6/05 02:42:05)
display size : -16 ( 5/ 6/05 19:21:32)
value = 0 = 0x0
DISK STATUS:
pdt> drShow
Disk State is: Master
Redundant
Normal
25
Partition 0:
Status: active Type: primary
Offset: 63 Size: 626472
Partition 1:
Status: inactive Type: extended
Offset: 626598 Size: 626472
Partition 2:
Status: inactive Type: extended
Offset: 1253133 Size: 626472
value = 17 = 0x11
Reference:
M1R25 - Nortel Networks
26