ATribute to

;I
I

f the music had been right, Ben
Franklin and Thomas Paine
might've become rock'n'rollers.

They knew the need for rebellion
when they saw it, and with others,
told the King, "Don't tread on me."
Years later, Carl Perkins wrote-and
Elvis Presley sang-of those very
same sentiments: Do what You have

to do, but don't step on mY blue
suede shoes.

At a Hudson River pier'cum-studio,
Perkins himself, on a break from his
cameo as a bartender in this video
tribute to Presley, recalls the inspira'
tion behind his rockabilly classic.
"Doing this video, mah mind went
back to a project house 29 years ago.
Ah heard some guy say that to a girl.
'Don't you step on my shoes, baby!'
Ah couldn't get to sleep that night.
Ah knew what he was sayin', and ah
had to write that song."
To commemorate the 50th anniver'

sary of Presley's birth this January 8,
1985, the King's record company,
RCA, chose rock-clip veteran Martin
Kahan to direct the "Blue Suede

Shoes" video. Kahan's worked with
as disparate a range of performers
as Melba Moore to Motley Crue. Yet,
his exclusively filmed (rather than
videotaped) clips are characterized
by a familiar, James Dean yearning
that almost always circles around
some sweetly mythic girl-next-door.
That's who the painfully shy young
Presley sang to, hoping to find her. ln
Kahan's video, that same misunderstood, wistfulness imbues our hero,
The Boy, played by theater veteran
Scott Plank. He's the odd man out in
a very '80s town, stoically withstanding the local louts' jeers. Until
he gets to his room, his private
world, a world that suddenly erupts
to reveal the spirit of Elvis Presley

fronting a hot-rod rock'n'roll band.

BLUE SUEDE SHOES
(As recorded by Elvis Presley;
words and musiC by Carl Perkins)

Well, it's one for the money,
two for the show,
three to get ready, now
Go, Cat, go! But
don't you step on my BLUE SUEDE SHOES.
You can do anything-but lay off of my
BLUE SUEDE SHOES.

Well, you can knock me down,
step in my face,
slander my name all over the place;
Do anything that you want to do,
but uh-uh, honey,lay off of my shoes
Don't you step on my BLUE SUEDE SHOES.
You can do anything-but lay off of my
BLUE SUEDE SHOES.

Like Dorothy in Oz, The Boy gets a
pair of enchanted shoes. And just
like Dorothy, he finds that what he
was looking for was inside of him
all the time.
The band in this 35mm film cliP is
a crazy-quilt of New York Gity pros:
Sally Cato of Smashed Gladys; Den'
nis Feldman of the Michael Schenker
Band; Danny Johnson; Steve Fraser,
and Kim Gittens. Curiously, the
Presley figure himself first time we
see him here may not be actor Mark
Bove, who plays the part. When
some wires got crossed and Bove
was unavailable, clip choreographer
Margo Sappington had to fill in

for him.
Whether that shot was or wasn't
used doesn't matter. The spirit
behind the song speaks as much to
women as it does to men. At least
Carl Perkins seems to think so.
Lovece

-Frank

Well, you can burn my house,
steal my car,
drink my liquor from my old fruit jar;
Do anything that you want to do,
but uh-uh, honey,lay off of my shoes
Don't you step on my BLUE SUEDE SHOES.
You can do anything-but lay off of my
BLUE SUEDE SHOES.

Well, it's one for the money,
two for thg show,
three to get ready, now
Go, Cat, go!! But
don't you step on my BLUE SUEDE SHOES.
You can do anything-but lay off of my
BLUE SUEDE SHOES.
Copyright O1956 by Hi Lo Music
All rights controlled by Hill and Range Songs, lnc.,
New York, N.Y.
Southern Music Publishing Company
All Rights Reserved; Used by permission.