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EXTRA RA MEMOIR MEl! OF


r-.

THE EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND.

TWO HIEEOGLYPHIC PAPYEI PKOM TANIS.


I. THE SIGN PAPYRUS
(a

Syllabary),

i;y

F.

Ll. GiiiFiTni.

11. THE

GEOGRAPHICAL PAPYRUS
AVITII

(an Almanack), uy ^V.

M.

F. Pktuie.

REMAKKS BY PROFESSOR HErXRICII

BRUGSCII.

FACSIMILES

AND

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.

PUBLTSUEl)

BY ORDER OF THE COMMITTEE.

LONDON:
TRU13XER &
CO., 57

&

5'J,

LUDGATE

HILL,

E.G.

1889.

lontion:

riUNTED BV GlLnKRT AND RIVINGTON, LIMITED, ST. JOHN'S HOUSE, C-LERKENWELL HOAll, EX.

CONTENTS.

I.

Tun Sk!\

P.\i'Yi;i-s

(iiY

F. Ll. Griffith)

TuA.MSciiiiTiox

oi'

Plates

21
(iiv

....
:\r.

II.

Till-;

Gkcxikaimiical PAi-Yiuis

\V.

P. Pi;ti;ii;)

l21

THE SIGN PAPYKUS.


By
F. Ll. Griffith.'

Tuis papyrus
glypliics

is

the

first

native

list

of liiero-

the parallel

lists

of hieroglyphics

and

hieratic

that

lias

curac

down
It

to

us

from
the

on

its

dark pages

is

a very considerable one.

ancient times.

It is at onco biglily interest-

Some account

of the discovery

and condition of

ing and

very

disappointing.

is

of

these papyri, the first obtained in the Delta,

highest interest as being the only document

may be

interesting.

bearing upon the system by which the Egyptians arranged and taught their huge syllabary.
It
is

In the spring of 1884, after the sm-vey of


the temple area at

San had been completed,


it.

disappointing, because
it.

we

find so

little

Mr. Petric turned


of the

his attention to the remains It struck

system in
logical

We

should have expected a more


of

town enchcling

him that
the

arrangement
in

the signs, and more


;

those houses which had been burnt would yield


the most profitable results.

method

naming them

more

indication of
if

In case of

fire,

a fixed order in the alphabetical signs,

not
that

owner would snatch up

his valuables, leaving

some correspondence with the order alphabet which the Phoenicians seem
borrowed from the Egyptians.
siderable care with

of

the mass of the household property to the flames.

to have

From

the con-

which the hst has been prepared, and from its extent, we must suppose that if any rigid method was customary it
would have
bceil

wovdd cover them with man would not care to disinter his burnt and broken jars, The reddened earth and tools, and papyri. bricks betray the site to the modern explorer,

The house

falling in

rubbish, from which the unfortunate

adopted here

and wo are

and a few days' work


has spared.

in the friable
all

and

easily-

driven to conclude that the Egyptians possessed

searched rubbish yields him

that the fire

no such system. Apart from


wi-iting, the

Putting this theory into practice,

its

value

in

the

history

of

papyrus forms a kind of dictionary


give the philologist valuable hints

which
for

will

determining the meaning of


collection

many

doubtful

words.

The

from which

it

was selected for


first

Mr. Petrie obtained a large collection of pottery and other antiquities, together with a number In some cases the documents stowed of papyri. away in a corner of the house had been damaged beyond recovery. Lying in a basket on the mud-floor the damp had reached them, and
with the weight of rubbish on
the
top,

publication

by Mr. Poole

who

detected

had

reduced them to a mass scarcely distinguishable

from the clay beneath


memoir was written, and tiie pl.ites drawn, in Nov. 1885. I made some additions in 188G, when my
This

and although the writing

much-regretted friend, Mr.


jfroofs.

II.

']'.

Talbot, read tlmuigli the

was still partly legible, it was found impossible to remove even fragments of auy value. Others,
although not actually burnt, had been baked
c

THE SIGN TAPYRUS.


violently

by the heat
less

of the conflagration,

and

sides of Avhich can thus be seen.

The fragments

lying

amongst

compact rubbish, had better

are kept in place under the glass with shell-lac.

resisted the destructive

damp
of

of the marshes.

The task

of

mounting the papyri was a simple,

number

of these

were recovered and brought


a yellowish-brown

although a delicate one.

The

rolls

had been
roll.

to England.

Tliey are

crushed flat, and so consisted of a series of flakes,


each the same breadth as the crushed
flakes

and with a tendency to turn to Large flakes, however, can be separated from some of them, so as to
colour,
soft,

The

dust on being handled.

were removed with a paper-knife from


roll alternately,

each side of the

the order thus


it

leave the written surfaces successively visible,

obtained being fairly correct.

In some cases

but the flakes cannot be preserved.

Copies

was found more convenient

to divide the roll in

must therefore be made


gist standing

of these

by an Egyptoloto

the middle, and, beginning from the centre, to

by as they are gradually taken


are
several

take flakes alternately from each half.

pieces.

Amongst them

minutely

Some
rolled

of the papyri

were fovmd

to

have been

written demotic documents, with the red and

tightly

round a piece of reed, others


this central support.

black ink well preserved.

were without

Some

still

The most
these, too,

satisfactory class in the collection

showed the thread with which they had been


tied.

are those that have been carbonized.

Some

of

have become a homogeneous mass that


flake.

The papyrus described in this report seems to have been wrapped round with a piece
had a
religious text on a separate
it.

cannot be induced to
remains but white ash.
easily, are of too thin

Of others

little

torn from another document, while the geographical papyrus

A few,

though flaking

a substance to be pre-

sheet I'olled up with

served, while a large number, probably, as Mr.

Mr. Petrie found


dynasty.

some papyri associated

Petrie sug<2;ests, through the use of a veg^etable


ink,

with glazed pottery figures of the style of the


thirtieth

have

lost the writing wholly, or it is too

But most
is

of

those that
date.

faded to be read.

This, however,

may be due
Notwith-

have been mounted are of


these the writing

Eoman

In

to the practice of erasing a text

when no longer
one.

in linear hieroglyphic, a

required, to give place to a

new

small and neat

hieratic,

demotic of several

standing

all this,

Mr. Hunt,

of the

MSS. Depart-

ment of the British Museum, to whom the task of mounting the papyri was intrusted (and to whom great praise is due for the care and discrimination

stylesfrom large and coarse to fine and very minute, and Greek. The Greek papyri give

the

names of

several emperors, the

name

of a

private

person,

Hadrian, being perhaps

the

with

which he has executed


filled

it,

latest indication of date in the collection.

under Mr. Petrie's directions), has


with fragments of 156 papyri.
are

sixty

The best preserved papyri


shiny surfoce, as
black, or yellowish
if

are
;

stiS",

with a
ink
is

frames, of an average surface of two square feet,

blackleaded

the

Some

of these

mere

scraps,

and

will

probably afford no

where it was originally red. They have been thoroughly charred most in
;

information, but

many

are of real value, not

fact
All,

only giving a connected sense, but containing

have had the largest part burnt away. except two, are from the house of

matter of high interest, as the two specimens


copied by Mr. Peti'ie and myself will show.

Bakakhuiu, whose
religious

numerous

rolls

contained
were,

as well as legal texts.

Some

in frames

The papyrus fragments have been mounted formed by two sheets of glass, held
both

perhaps, connected with


or restored temple.
Usts
in

the plans of a new The geographical and other

apart by a thin piece of cardboard round the

the papyrus,

which

Mr. Petrie has

edges to allow for wrinkles in the papyri

copied (No. 103), with the scraps of a similar

THE

SIGN PAPYRUS.
evident that this last was the outside fold of the
roll,

one (Nos. 130 and 131), where the entries of nomes, feasts, marshlands, &c., are corrected

by notes
especially

in

minute hieratic at the

foot,'

and
in

the

columns

of

hieroglyphics

and that the Egyptian owner had turned end of the papyrus, probably owing to its being torn, and to prevent damage to the
in the

papyrus 118, in which the gods grant divine


gifts to

writing at the edge.

Two

small

fragments

a king or emperor, whose cartouche


left

is

placed by the side of this page must have

unfortunately

blank, seem as

if

they were

belonged to an outside wrapping, for which a


piece of papyrus torn from
in hieratic of the roll

sketches and notes to be expanded

on some

some

religious

work

temple-wall at Tanis.

was made

to

do duty.

The beginning

can be recognized in the three frag-

The Sigu Papyrus was found


Bakakhuiu.
lection.

in the

house of
col-

It

fills

two largo frames, and forms


roll

ments which, when placed together, appear doubly forked below. This indicates another
turning in of the edge.
consider that
the
roll,
is

one of the most complete documents in the

We may

therefore
of

The crushed
fire
is

has been burnt at the

we have

the

commencement

lower end, the


while the top
five pairs of

spreading up one side, so that


nearly complete, the twenty-

since part of the external wrapping

even

preserved.

fragments taper to a point at the

bottom throughout.

The papyrus was divided


which are not numbered,

The writing is in many parts easily legible, especially when light is thrown at right angles
upon the
are,
flakes.^

into thirty-three pages,

Horizontal and vertical lines

but the order of which can be found from a

however,

difficult to distinguish

from the

comparison of the arrangement of the fragments

lines of the

papyrus, and the play of light on


surface
strips

mounted "with the order to be obtained from Only one fragment their form and contents.
as
still

the shiny and irregular


difficulty.

adds to the
at

Six

narrow

the

end,

remains without a likely place.


in the frames, the pairs of fragkei)t together,
is

As arranged
ments arc
in

making together about five inches, are blank, and the last two pages have lost much of the
writing, probably on account of the tightness
of the roll

most cases
and

but the

order of the successive pairs


of the correct one,

often the reverse

round the stick


to

in that part,

causing
is

at the

beginning of the

the

flakes

adhere together.

There

no

papyrus, through no fault of the mounter, there


is

writing on the back.


other from right to left
;

The pages

follow each

considerable confusion.

succession

may

the papyrus

was

rolled

be noticed from the large flakes two inches

from

left to right.

The

thirty-three pages are


first of

which come from the outside of the roll, where the fire burnt them unequally, to the
across,

narrow but
centre.

little
is

damaged

strips

from

the

which contains a row of hieroglj'phic signs, enclosed by vertical linos. To the left of them are hieratic trandivided into columns, the
scriptions of the

There

an abrupt change of form in


final

same

signs.

The remainder

the middle of the foui'th page of the

arrangement, the pairs on the right being reversed copies of those on the while the
first

of the page contains corresponding groups in The width of each page is two inches, hieratic.

left of that point,


is

that of the hieroglyphic column alone half an


inch.

piece to
;d!,

the left

the

most
It
is

The

total

length of the i)apyrus as

it

fragmentary of

Ihrough crushing.

have to thank Mr. Petrio


also for

for helping

me

over the

diflicnlties of lighting, as
'

much

assistance in pre-

Unfortunatolj', only

tlio

lower edges of these pa])yri are


the

paring

preserved,

showing portions of nome-standards, and

In the copy I have tlie work for publication. marked the burnt edges with a fringe, as these are of grx'at
importance in determiuing the position of fragments.

rare corrections.

THE SIGN PAPYRUS.


existed

whcu

rolled

up for

tlic

last

time was

animals, heads of birds, head of reptile.

On
(?),

therefore nearly six feet.

page
contained in a page
largest

13,

bird's

wing,

crocodile's

tooth

The number

of signs

followed by the crescent of the moon, figures of


sky, stars,

seems to have varied.

The
left in

number
is

of

and

disks,

which are continued on


this

which traces are now

a page

fourteen.

page

14.
its

The

setting sun leads to the earth

From
it

the succession in

some

of the early pages

and
14

symbols.

From

point

regular
of

seems probable that this was

about

the

classification
is

ceases.

The remainder

page

original average.

The

thirty-three pages
signs, not

may
of

devoted to some round and oval objects.

then have contained 462

a large
list

Vases appear on the next page, as also on


pages 16, 20, 22, and 23
;

number

in

comparison with a complete


It will be seen that

plants on 16, 27,

hieroglyphic signs.
classes of signs are

many
a

and
are

31,

and so

forth.

In most cases the signs

represented, including

connected with those that precede

and

large proportion of the most usual signs that

follow in some

way by form, and


is

often fall into

occur
gods,

in.

hieratic.

Yet no

birds,

figures of

groups, but there

no

principle

observed
in

or numerals, occur in

the

remaining

throughout.

have noticed no instance


arrangement,
it,

fragments.

which the

hieratic

form can be supposed to


nor
does
either with

As
is

to the order of the signs, the

first

page

have influenced the

headed by the bee, a royal emblem. Then Figures of men, denotingfollows a male child.
dignities, are followed

phonetic value have any share in

regard to similarity of sound or number of


syllables.

by other male human


2.
is

am

inclined

to

think

that

the
for

figures extending into page

It is possible to be considered

alphabetic signs are separated, not so

much

that the
as

first

sign of page 1

phonetic reasons, as for the different part they

the end

of a list of divine or royal figures in

played from the rest of the signs of the hieroglyphic system.

which occupied a page torn off The unplaced fragment (A. times.
be assigned to this position.

ancient

The order

of

the Egyptian

13)

cannot

alphabet, as given in the papyrus, has been

no

standard for the arrangement of the remainder


a
title,

The
and

list

was probably preceded by


is is

of the signs.

since there
its

no endorsement to the papyrus,


to be

The hieroglyphics
head
of
slip

in the

papyrus are some-

loss

regretted.

It

was

to

times very delicately

drawn.
is

The

reptile's

prevent further damage to the written portion


that the end

(p. 12) in the original


skill,

a good instance

was turned wrapped round outside.

in,

and an extra sheet

Egyptian
in

but the scribe has made a


of

the

figure

the

priest,

where the
of

On page

we
4,

see figures of

women, and
appears

water
hands.

pours over

his

back

instead

his

seated figures,

which

are

continued to the

middle of page
in the hieratic.

where the

mummy

As

to the hieratic signs, they are carefully

Page 5 brings us to reptiles and animals, pages 6 and 7 deal with alphabetic signs. At the end of page 7 the series of parts of the human body begin. This is carefully arranged from the head, with eyes, ears, beard,
&c., the neck, breast, and back (p. 8), hair and
(p. 9), fingers, heart,

RTitten in a peculiar, rather small hand.

In
sign

the second column the scribe has wi'itten the


hieratic

equivalent of

the hieroglyphic

alone.

In a few cases, however, he has substiit

tuted the group in which

usually appears.

At page
The

26. 8. the

simjDle

sign

is

evidently

arms

&c. to legs

(p. 10).

omitted by error.
object of the first

On page
egg, &c.

11

we

see symbols for flesh


12, legs, horns,

and bone,

two columns
of

is

clear

On page

and heads of

enough.

parallel list

hieroglyphic

and

THE SIGN PAPYRUS.


hieratic signs

would be as useful
of the third

to a student

Nor, again, are these groups a series of notes


illustrating the

of Egyptian writing then as now.

use of the sign in practice.

The object
tained in
it

column

is fairly

clear

For the particular sign does not always appear


in

after a little study.

The

hieratic

notes con-

them

consist sometimes

simply of the

as, for instance, p. 1. 4, |4

/^ S

Jj

completed group of the corresponding sign with


its

On
felt in

the other hand, a need

phonetic complement or determinative, as,

Egypt

of

must have been some means of distinguishing

for instance, 20. 4.

=J J

14. 2.

(Oj

=
1.

^^
i^^

sometimes of the phonetic transcription, with


the sign as a determinative, e.g. 16.

hieroglyphic signs viva voce, both in the schools and in ordinary life. Names must therefore

have been attached to the immense hieroglyphic syllabary, and taught with care, from the earliest
times.
If

^^c^^

"'^

*'^ values are indicated, they arc

we

consider the

third

column as

separated by a point on the level of the bottom


of the characters, as for instance 13. 9,

where

devoted to the names of the signs, find a fair explanation.

wo

shall

= Jl "
fl

[11

"^ ^

The following

are
;

Or, again, a phrase of

some of the commoner

several groups
1

may

occur, as 13. 11 5Q

forms of the names


in several
I.

many can be

"^
(]

interpreted

ways

O
I

J;8.1,^ = -^(]P^S^;

8.2,

If contained in one group, they are either

(1) the simple

names of objects represented by

the signs as pictures; as page 14. 3, ^w?

This third column seems to contain names by which the signs were ordinarily known,
or

'earth;' 12.1, <f^^


is

= ^1^7

'

haunch
^
'

:'

the mirror

might

be recognized.
as so

It

evidently was
of
plionetic

apparently called

^^'

see face,' p. 27. 6.

not

intended
for
in

syllabary

The

scribe has not always taken the trouble to

values,

many
;

cases

the

sign

is

repeat the sign in such cases as


p. 29,

^^^ ='/(,'
name
'

not transcribed, while in others the note is expanded into a phrase nor a glossary of ideographic meanings, for the alpliabotic signs

5;

-^

='sct;

p. 25.2.

(If the object occurs in pairs, the

of the

which are included


is,

have no such meaning;

sign

is

in the dual, as

nor again of explanations of the form, that vei'y condensed descriptions of the sign,

- =
lips,' p.

| = <=^ J ^ ||
^--^

sandals,'

==:

'

the eye-brows,'

c^:;

the

11. G, p. 8. 3

and

5.)

for in the group |

=|

^^ ^|^

0.

(2)

Or

the group

may

be derived from the

"6^"^^]
We

^'''^^

" known concrete meaning.


possibly translate

ideographic or symbolic meaning of the sign,


or that indicated by the action in
of
the case
'sit,'

might, however,

'the

finger pointing.'

This would be a now shade

human

beings; as,

^* = ;^<==a^

of meaning for the root


sary.

^1

and

is

unneces-

Again
in

in

(j

.^(2 . fD 'V'
'

mil

'sod-'

cannot

any Avay be a description of tlio sign ami we are prevented from translating the
or
'in the day-time'
(itself

Two groups may form one word T


^(]p5,p.l5.2;<;H^

(]

><,i^

disk of day,'

an

= (|ew^p.24.3.

awkward
words.

expression), by the point dividing the

These names are derived from the ideographic meaning of the signs.

THE SIGN rAPYRUS.


II.

If the
it

o-roups,

name is contained in two or more may be (1) a compound name of the


noun and
participle
'

The

spelling of

the words agrees with the


;

Eoman
to the

date attributed to the papyrus

and as
not

object formed by a

grammar, although the


except perhaps
in

article does

.^^-^Qe'^^'^es^V
p. 17. 1.

wood-cut,

occur,
ticipial

p. 30. 7.

the par-

forms used in the compound names are


than the eighteenth dynasty.

not found, I believe, in inscriptions or papyri


earlier

These
popular

p. S.'l.
(]

of

names,

however,

may belong

to

dialect in
/v
'

inverted-eye,' p. 8. 2. at

much

which such forms can have existed earlier period, and it must be
for
is

In

this

class

name

the second

member

remembered that they wore probably never


written

distinguishes

two

of a class

by

detail of the

down except
There

occasional

teach-

form.

ing in schools.
it

Or

may

be (2) formed by a noun followed

m
list

their construction.

no careful principle Probably no complete

by another
?Q

in the genitive, as
'

=
p. 13. 11.

was ever drawn up, and perhaps it was not until the decline of the ancient learning
the
sun,' in

the

disk of

Roman
at

times that such written


all.

lists

were

made
'

The names probably embody


signs,
;

''^

i)

th*?

l^P

^'

crescent of

the
cs::

ancient and original ideas about the form, meaning,


'I

moon,'
'

p. 13. 4,

opposed to

/-^

and sound of the


[|

as for instance

the

lips.'

<

~ A <=>

P 5

b'-it

in

course of time,

Here the second group marks


the derivation of the sign.

distinction

by

being transmitted principally by word of mouth, they became much modified in form.

Or

it

may

(3) consist of

two groups separated

The Transcription
it,

will

Ijo

seen
it

to

be

in-

by a point

complete, but I have thought

right to
fall

add

O
the
latter

partly because the Avork will

into the

group distinguishes
its

this
;

from
thus

hands of some who arc not acquainted with


hieratic,

other 'disks by
also
'

phonetic value

but

who

will be interested

to

know

hieratic )

!]?

^^S^l
hieratic
|]
i

somethiu"- of the contents of the third colunm


in order to

the finger, qevunn,' opposed to


,

draw their own conclusions about the

papyi-us; partly also to justify

my

reading of

the finger simply

J\
to

<?

the original to those Avho arc familiar with the


script.

The name-forms seem


determinative, &c.

have no reference

It also affords a convenient

to the classes of signs as alphabetic, ideographic,

adding such notes as seem required.

means of M. Naville

was able
no

to spare several valuable hours during

As

to the date of the papyrus, there is


its

his short stay in

England

in

1885 for the tedious pages of


noted

doubt of

having been written in the Roman It is not a direct copy of an earlier list, period. although it may be an adaptation and selection from a list of Eamesside times.

task of comparing the

first

my
in

copy
the

with the original.


o-estions

The

corrections and sug-

whicli

he made are

course of the Ti-anscription.

TRANSCRIPTION OF PAGES

TO XXI.
Bee.

(Sign of royalty in

Lower

Egj'pt.)

^
3.

(1,

(?)

Human

being

iis

ciiild.

Qiicf.

Elder.

Prince.

Ruler.

7.

Old age.

1^

1
9.

High.

Fall.

10.

Speak.

11.

AdillO.

1
Turn back.

12.

13.

Buil.l.

II.
1.

2.

lost

3.

'f

4.

h
Li

'

Till' |iriiit(d
iiu

liioroglyphics do not

always represent exactly the form


lirst

in

tlio

original.

Tlic

most important instances

are marked witli

asterisk (*).

The reading of the

sign

was suggested by M.

Naville.

III.
1.

g* m

4.

1
{')

G.

2
7.

8.

0.

(female)

10.

11.

13.

(^*

(female)

14.

IV.
1.

TRANSCRIPTION OF PAGES
IV.
7.

TO XXI.

8.

(??)or

/^

V.
1.

^^i-

$mf

Tadpole

(?).

<i3=ci

3.

Body.

4.

\{'^-)\

Urxus.

5.

^'

^(^m)!?)

Suakc.

G.

Worm.

lost

y.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

VI.
1.
1

e ^

'^ ^ S=> 111

(^) '

Moutli of liumaii being.

String twisted, tied.

'

Of

tho fnigmcnts of this page,


in.

lA
1

2, wjis

evidently on the ontsido of the


the most
likely place
4 arc for

roll,

while
;

tlie

piece

lA 3

to tlic
is

end of

the pa].yni.s w;i turned

This
I

is

therefore

lost

page

moreover there

no distinct

connection between the fragments


'

and

2.

lA 3 and

probably portions of the outer wrapping.

N.B. Alphabetic

signs.
is

'

M.

Naville's suggestion, which

certainly correct.
is

M. Naville

roads this

^^
.5

think however that the calf


is

correct.

The continuity
(?)

of pages

and U

not certain.

This

list

of al])lial.etic signs iuclndes four(?)

<^^,

U,

0,

^'"1

that might have been placed in the ne.xt series of parts of the

hnman body.

On

the other hand, two alphabetical

10

THE SraX PAPTRUS.


VI.
3.'

u
e e

O C3a,
y'ca
(?)

Ui

The arms " ka."

<^flfl^'^
f]
(9

measuring:

line.

Measuriii'r lino.

if\)

(P)

PWi
Bolt.
lost

(
<2

si.rns, 't.=^,
lie

.aii<l >

aiT inclmlctl in the animal scries preceding.

The

scribe seems to have


list

aimed at making each

list

as

came

to

it

complete at the expense of the others.

In the alphabetic

no stringent order, phonetic or otherwise,

is

arrangement of the other signs. observed, nor does the arbitrary order here a<lopted influence in any way the number on page C, and assume that the original On paf'e 7 fourteen signs remain. If we take this as
lis.t

the

alphabetic

begins at the top of page

C,

we

obtain

fourteen on page
first

G,

and ten on page 7


column.
|.

24 alphabetic signs.
in the usual

There are twelve certain signs remaining


phonetic order are as follows
:

in

the

hieroglyphic and
I

hieratic
Zl,
list,

These arranged

p,

a]

0, <=>

|,

O, |, <>-=;

U, S;
namely,

Of
l\l\,

the remaining twenty-six

stood in the signs that are usually conshlcred alphabetic, or might have

^,

\,

S, [

J,

^,

the
''fek

two %>

reptiles

~
'^

and

'-^

have appeared

on

the

preceding
the

page

the

birds

and animals,
:

five

in

number,
^v^^j,

^
the

-Sss
five

"i^y perhaps be relegated to

bottom of pages 4 and 5


"i^ij
'"^

"^^

is

equivalent to

on the last page:

others,

[
i\i\,

*
J,
/

an.l

c^

or

replaced as

in

tlie

transcription.
=""^

Thirteen signs remain, namely,

["[],

'"'^j

^j
in

^^^^>

M^'

^^^' 1' ^=*' ^=^^'


page 17, the sixth

*"

Of

these

first

may
nine

well

have been

omitted, the third .seems to occur on


this position.

may

not have been

considered alphabetic.

The

last

is

doubtful and unlikely

The

total

would thus bo twelve certain

five

proljable

twenty-six, or two more than the estimate.


fifteen signs to
is

These two

may
five

have found a place at the bottom

of pasres 5 and G,

making

a page.
one,
1

With

the

frasments of page

included
p'.iir.

13",

witli

remains

of

hieratic groups.

It is evidently

broken from the right hand fragment of a

Tlie groups

may

|M-haps be transcribed as follows:

Cl

(Jo))

Leg(?)

Wooden instrument
Lake, water.

used

in

winnowing

(?)

(-('))
4.

(mo))

Lotus

5.

(W
rather a tour ,h fo,re, but
it,
it

(^)il
the fragment
it,

Tl,is is

is

a puzzle.

It certainly does
it

not belong to page 8

but being

nm.mted with
n.^ar the

should be placed near

nor can any place be found for


lost

with the other fragments.


t'.is

Also a page

outside would

be more probably ,lamaged and

than

those inside, and

part of the papyrus was near

TIIANSCUIPTIOX OF PAGES
VII.
1.

1 to

XXI.

11

Water

plant.

^
3.
lost.

Stomach.

o
o

or

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

.^&-

tlio

cmtsiilo

(if

tllo

roll

[cj.

supra).
is

riglit

liaiiJ

fragment would

liere

contain

the

name column.
i-')

On

the -whole,
If

it

.seems

j)riil)alile

that the fragment


left

the last remainder of a lost pair to


(i.e.,

be inserted between

or 5-().

we look

upon the fragments on the


of two inches to a ])age,

of page 4

starting from
first

2) as consecutive,

and take the known measurement


lias

wo

lind that

between the
;

and second pairs three-quarters of an inch


ne.\t,

bceu burnt away


jiairs

between the next two, a quarter of an inch


join.
If,

between the
lost

one-eighth or thereabouts
first

while the next


in

practically

however, we allow that a pair has been


f,
J, ^,
i,

between the

and second, the jiroportion


is

the gaps will be

more nearly equalised, say


pages 5 and
(j.

0.

At
it

least this

proves that there

a possibility of inserting a pair between


it

Also,

if

we attempt
at

to place

near the beginning of the papyrus,


it

must be alphabetical,

for there is
it

no indication of any other category into which

might

fall

iu

any of the early pages.


But supposing that
first
it

And

if it

is

alphabetical,

must precede page

fl,

for

page 7 another series begins.


1

precedes page

C,

and

therefore

corresponds partly to fragments


least, of

3 and

G,

it

forms part of the

of two lost pages of fourteen signs each at


7.

which the right hand one contained alphabetic signs which were continued into page
all
is

There woidd indeed


besides.

be room enough for


the small fragment

the binls ami animals belonging to the alphabetic section, and

much more

Altogether

a puzzle.
11, the scries of parts uf the

At page

7,

No.

human body

begins.

12

THE SIGN PAPYRUS.


1.

VIII.

sr
^^
I

Eye weeping.

U
1
I

/v
A^/vW^

Eye

inverted.

The eyebrow.s.

Si

A II
'

The

ear8.

The

lips.

c.

The tongue.

Tooth, the teeth

(?)

(?)

(1.

(3

(?)

10.

J'
(J)

(?)

11.

Beard.

12.

Throat.

^n^
13.

Breast.

14.

Back-bone.

IX.
1.

1
Q

^*
.-WWW

Ribs.

it)
3.

^
D n

Lock

of hair.

Hair

(?)

lost.

*=^

lost.

TR.^SCRIPTION OF PAGES
IX.
8. lost.

TO XXI.

13

11.

12.

(?)

13.

X.
1.

ll

^
3.

Z]

O
1

^
IS)

l=U)

%^(?)
O

10.

&

11.

^
i

12.

13.

14.

It

THE SIGN rATYRUS.

XL
1.

11
>oc
x=>c

n
o

55

(?)

P^lo

(>.

1(1.

XII.
1.

r^<^

1
;?.

V
n.

CO

10.

TRANSCRIPTION OF PAGErf
XII.

TO XXI.

l"i

n.

lost.

lust.

12.

^
4^:3

13.

XIII.
1.

<=

^'5

iTJjj^

o
10.

I
o
J^

11.

12.

o
(}(<))

13.

XIV.
1.

2.

3.

.4.

(o

oj

ir,

THE SIGN rAPYRUS.


Q.

XIV.

Land aA.
I

eit^

d')

(')

Foundation.

lost.

(9)

Sep (a kind

of cake).

Id.

(G?)

()-^^;('o
lost.

Cycle.

I.

12.

'1
\

(^)

XV.

y^^rio)
1
.5.

Canopy.

Enibalmeil.l

m
I

nii
lost.

Gods.

4.

^
House.

XVI.
1.

Fields, or

fielil.

c>

(^3)

Loaf of bread.

q.5|jps
'

Tie of linen.

i.e.,

duly luirled and therefore Jeijled, beini; assimilated to Osiris.


the iiatchet neter
for tlie

This notion

is

common

in

the religions texts.


.

The name of
I'xpression

means god, but


of
tlie

this

word was no doubt required


is

for another sign /j^

Why

the above

was chosen

name

Iiatchet sign
'liatcliet'

not easy to understand, since the hatchet .seems to have no


lost in

rounection witli luirial;

probably the notion of

was
so,

that of 'god,' and perhaps in


inscriptions
;
|

deceased person was spoken of as the god, or neter, so and

where

in

commonest
lifter v,'^^
-

apiilication of the

word

nelcr furnished a

name
tlie

for the sign

but

common parlance a we find maalcherii. Granting this, the know of nothing to support the view that
Mr. Renouf's Hibbert Lectures, 1870.)
tlie

generally applied to deceaseil persons.

(For

exact meaning of neter,

.see

.\n

important transcription, which however .scarcely settles the question xs to the reading of

sign.

TRANSCRIPTION OF PAGES
XVI.

TO XXI.
Hi.lc

17

I
6.

[1

J^

c^

^
<^

(?)

V;uie.

^J
"^I

Libation

va.sc.

Bunch

of herbs.

Bunch of

flowers, rccJs (?)

10.

f>

JIa, i)apyrus.

Thicket of
11.

i)ai)yrus, mefi, or ddhii-iA:inl.

Thicket of
12.

/-fi-plant

lost.

13.

XVII.
1.
c:^
I

C3r:i

e^

Wood,

cut.

Seed

(?) of acacia (?).

Seed of date.

lost.

4.

__ 0^
G.

Arms

dhauti.

!M.

\N

Fight.

Place.

8.

ra
!).

Jlilk jug.

10.

is
GO)
e
<o
I

Subjugate.

11.

Arm
*=*

presenting.

12.

>
1

l',;r

tlio

Jetcrminutivo,

rf.

(]

..^ {>

Xtl masculine like Coptic eye.

'

I'^q'y"

IS

THE SIGN PAPYRUS.

XVIII.
1.
r^-^^^ ^^N/1

Hill country.

Uast (Thebes).

userti,

BACAi' vulpcs

(Bni.i;seli).

Hoe

(?)

tlie

name

iivaii

would

refer to

the fastening together of the wooil.


5.

ftAA/%^A

r"^"^

lost.

XIX.
1.

pai)yriis.

Complete.

Black.

JCM)
^^
c.

Net, snare.

hieratic

Porter's knot.

lir^-pH-^'))

=j -r
n.

()

Utensils, an, or writing utens

Knife

(at/).

10.

Knife

11.

Adz
.4.

12.

East.

13.

West.

14.

lost.

'

For remainder, see

plate.

TRANSCRIPTION OF PAGES

TO XXI.

19

XX.
1.

C/.

(?

scpptr

P
3.

'

'

CO
Sceptre ams.

\
D

r-^^"^

1(0
(J.

Jp
^=\

p '*=\

-J I
p

^ r :

^ ^- 2

Vessels

(?) to

be

full.

=j 1 - - :
=0=
1

Vessels (?), iSd) to be si^ueezed out, enipty.

0.

-^

Flower vase

(?).

10.

11.

Great.

12.

\\
(

^
Arr&w.
Slienu or Jchenu.

13.

t:
o e

XXI.
1.

f.
csilfca

1^k<!r
O
(|

Sein (herb).

riifc.

j|

e ^

Basket of metal worker

(?)

4:

Javelin.

<--^
(!)

i7
i

\\

_a

P'loin this jjoiiit

muiiy of the groups arc

transcription.

1 will only

cut (quarries

-^ =

^cca^

difficult, and there would be little gained by further add the name of the sledge used in conveying stone from the deep-

"jackal," xxix,

1.

The phonetic equivalent

of this sign

is

i/((.

TI.

THE GEOGEAPHICAL PAPYEUS.


By W.
II.

V.

Petiue.

^f

B.
{Paper presented
to the

one side of the

roll

were burnt to white ash,


;

leaving the other side carbonized


Committee, Jidij 28, 1885.)

hence we

On my
I
'

return from Egypt this summer, Mr.

only have about ^ to f of the whole length, in a series of separate strips, -8 to 2-2 inches wide,

Poole showed

me some
List

of

the papyri which

and each about four inches


whole height of the
that the papyrus
roll.

long, in place of the

had brought

year from San, and which,

From

these I gather

despite their completely charred state,


satisfactorily

had been

was a

sort of religious Gazetteer


parts.

unrolled

MSS. Department.
which Mr. Poole saw

by Mr. Hunt, of the Among these were two

and Calendar, divided into thirteen


Part
1.

A Hst of great festivals, &c., beginning A list of the nome capitals in


forbidden
of

to be of particular interest.

with the new year.

One was

a hieroglyphic-hieratic sign-book, of

Part

2.

succes-

which some three hundred hieroglyphic signs, with their transcriptions and pronunciations
written in hieratic,
is
still

sive columns,
tree,

naming the sacred bark, sacred


objects,

cemetery, feast-day,

remain.

As Mr.

Griffith

agathodaimon, land,

and lake

each city.

now engaged on

this, I will leave this

on one

side.

The other papyrus contained

parts of a

calendar of feasts,

and two mentions of the name of Khufu. I at once said that it ought to be published, so that students could work on it
Avithout the vast risk of its travelling.

The town-names are altogether burnt away. The first four remaining are not identical with any of the Edfu list, though they should, by
their
position,

be Tentja-a,' Diospolis parva,


;

Abydos, and Panopolis

but the rest are the

As no
illegilsle

same

as at

other copyist was available for such an

tions),

Edfu (excepting some curious variaand we stUl have here Hermopolis,


Cynopolis,
.

manuscript, the whole of


'

it

being burnt entirely

Hibiu,
Apis,
.

.Memphis,

Lctopolis,

black, I set aside other matters,

and have pro-

Busiris,

Athribis,

Cynopolis,

and

duced a copy of
the lithographer.
shortly be
in the

all

the fragments, ready for

It is

hoped that proofs may


;

hands of students

but meantlie

Towards the end, however, it appears as if two nomes had been omitted, as The last there is not space for all the number.
Sebennytus.

while 1
I

may

give a

few notes on

points

column gives the


"

title

of each

of

the lines,

have observed, the copying, however, having taken so much time that I cannot attcmjit to
w.ork on the reading.

name

of tree," "

name

of cemetery," kc.

Part 3. Lists comprising the sacred animals, and apparently arranged according to them.
"We see the piebald
Ka-^ir,
bull. bull,

The
it

original papyrus

was about twenty-five

Bain, the black


Bc-lchat
;

bull,

feet long,

and probably about six inches high

the

white

the

ram,

was rolkd up as usual, and both ends and

monkey,

jjauthor,

pig, jackal,

and the birds

22

THIO GEOGIiAI'IIU'AL rAPYllUS.

follow.

Lakes, cemeteries, and sacred trees are

Part

9.

List of about thirty gods, with various

also

given in
;

connection

with

names

for instance, the tree

some townAsht is given to

entries to each, arranged alternately east

and

west.

Pi-Bast, rectifying an erroneous sign at Edfu.


Part. 4. Apparently mentions various priests

Part 10.

A A

long

address

in

horizontal

columns, naming Khufu.

and goddesses.
Part
5.

Part 11.

long address in vertical columns,

Similar to Part 2, giving trees, ceme-

naming Khufu.
Part 12.
text.

teries, feasts,

forbidden things, agathodaimons,

A
A

diagram

of six

hours

(?),

with

lands,

and

lakes, of

more than
;

fifty places,

of

which eighteen are preserved


are
all

the place-names

Part 13.

long

statement

dealing

with

burnt aAvay, and none of the entries have


This

fabulous numbers, as hundi-eds of thousands,

I been able to identify with those in the list of

and

millions.

nomcs.

may be

list

district or

nome.
class.
list

It also

some ended with a column


of towns in

"We

may hope
this shall

for

some interesting

results

naming each
Part
G.

when
fish,

have been studied in connection


lists.

with other calendars and geographical


of sacred
&c.,

and

deities

It
is

is

by the merest chance that

this

document

to which they belong, arranged according to


localities.

not complete, as
;

many
it

I discovered

and

other rolls were which shows ns the great imto

Part

7.

list

of feast days, of deities,


;

and

of

portance of the closest attention

papyri,

processions of sacred barks


entries originally.

over a hundred

even when found under most


circumstances.

unfavourable
hieratic pa-

The demotic and

Part

8.

Another

list

of fifty or sixty feast

pyri await examination, and


perfect.

many

of

them are

days, not of deities.

The

Geographical Papyrus

lias

not been laid

aside during the three and a half years that have

!" Tableau. Liste synoptique des 12 mois de I'annee moderue des Egyptiens, avec les noms des fetes des
mois et avec
les (noras des
?)

elapsed since Mr. Petrie copied


trary, with his leave I

it.

On

the con-

Leures du jour en ordre

have at various times spent

consecutif et distribuees, par des motifs que j'ignore, sur les J 2 mois en question.
1^ Tahleau. Les
;i'"

hours, and even days, in verifying the words that

noms
!J0

des 12 heures de la nuit.

occur iu
tionary,

it,

by means of the Geographical Dictemple


lists,

Tableau. Les

jours de la lune avec les

noms

cor-

the

the

copy,

and

respondants des divinitos lunaires de cliaque jour.

the

1,""'

Tableau. Sujet astrouomique en rapport avec la lune


le
soleil.

extremely obscure original.

At length,

in accord-

ou

Les

cbiffres

ajoutes au

mot pour

la

ance with the wish expressed in Mr. Petrie's report,


proofs were sent to Professor

mesure

\\

<g^

(selioiuos) indiquent,

a ce qu'il parait,

H. Brugsch, who

des calculs astronomiques.


5'"' Tableau.

returned

them

covered

with annotations, and


letter
:

Tableaux des nomes de

la

haute et de

la

accompanied by the following


Monsieur,

basse JSgypte, avec les indications et designations des


arbres sacres, des Surapees, des fetes, des choses defendues, des serpents

Agathodemous, des

territoires et

Quoique je n'aie eu que quel([ues heurcs u ma disposition pour examiner les I'euillcs impriraues que vous avcz
cu
la

des terrains inoudes.


Qcmt Tableau.

Listes et

noms des
metaux

pretres et pretresses des

bonte de rcconimander
mil jjIhh /uiute
(VceU.

a,

mes

exaniens, je peus

sauetuaires situcs dans lesdits nomes.


jemc

vous assurev de
le

siirjjrise

apres avoir jeto

premier coup

sur les testes.

Les travaux que


])our reeonstruire

Tableau. Liste de

(p. *

ex.

i=i
o o o

ba-ni-pe, la *

j'ai faits
les

pendant prcsque 40 annees

fer) et d'autres

miuuraux.

Noms des animaux divins

notions geoyraphiqucs et caleudriques des anciens


!

Elgyptiens, ont eu leur precedent

Un lilgyptien vivant
la

a Topoquc Romaine, peut-etre vers l'(5poque de


sition

compoces

du tableau
le

caleiidriciuo sculptc sur les murailles

du

teiuiile d'Esneli, se

fut

amuse a reuuir toutes

villes du pays (Apis de Memphis, Mncvis d'lleliopolis, Bakliis d'Hermonthis, le bouc de Mendcs, etc.). Qimi Tableau. Les fetes priueipales fetees dans le courant de I'annee et rapportees aux jours correspondants du

veneres dans un nombre de

module d'un tableau syuo])tique pour faciliter leur connaissance a ses lecteurs. Mais quel dommaf,'c que le ]iapyrus renfermant son travail a du
notions et sur
soullrir par
les

calendrier moderue.
9*"' Tableau.

Liste

de I'hiorarchie u la cour

royale

d'apros les titres des diguitaires,

y compris

les

m6tiers

deplorables laeuncs qu'il odVe


il

Ueudes

occupes

i\

la cour.

rcusement

il

en est reste assez pour servir

nous guider
ccrivain

sur les idoes de I'ancien compositeur et


divers tableaux.

tcrmiue i)ar un tcxtc cxplicatif avec des notions historiques qui mcritent uue etude parliculiere
se

Le tout

D'apies mes observations, qui ne font que corroborer vos ])ropres vues, la composition enibrasse les sujets suivauts que j'ai traitus dans men Thesaurus
(Inscriptt. Astron.) et

sur I'original.

further

contribution

from the same hand

dans

le

sans avoir pu pressentir que


voici le

j'ai

Dictionnaire Geof^rajiliique, eu nion dcvancier. En

having been most kindly promised, the publication

was delayed

for a time.

Meanwhile the original

resume

was re-examined, proving the correctness of several

24

THE GEOGRAPHICAL PAPYRUS.


lists

emendations in the calendrical


ilhistrions Egyptologist

-which the

mois de I'an sous


roraaine (voir
le "

la

forme connue a I'epoque grecop.

had suggested

to

me.

Un-

The?:iurHS,"

472
le

suiv.).
le

Mis en

rapport aveo

les
le

13 heurcs du jour,

premier mois

hapjiily a serious illness intei-vened,

but on his

(Thoth) y porte

nom

de

recovery Professor Brugsch was good enough to

[V2v],
ce
S^*^^

seconde celui de
V\\a.-opJii),
le

Api (d'ou I'appelation de


3ime
gst;

mois
;

send

me
j'ai

the following valuable and interesting


indique par
le

observations.
Plus
etudio
les

groupe

c'est le

mois de

la

tristes
j'ai

frajjments

dii

precieux

deesse Hathor representee par


I'iraage

le scribe

papyrus de Tanis, plus


calendriques qu'il

trouve roceasion de

me
que

con-

d'une

vache couchee.

du papyrus par Malheureusement les


la

vaincre que sa valeur principale consiste dans


renferme.
II

les

notions
j'ai

noms

des

mois suivants ont dlsparu par suite de


mutilation

confirme ce

iachfiuse

du papyrus, a

la seule

exception
:

pvetcndu depuis de longues a'nnees dans mes recherches calendriques, en d'autres termes I'existence de deux
annees, du moins pour la derniere epoque de I'histoire egyptienne, dont I'une n'est pas different de I'annee
religieuse, appelee
I'autre,

du dernier (Mesori), qui


\J/

est appele

tres-clairement
I'an,"

V^V

" m.ois

du commencement de

avee

la

curieuse remarque qui I'accompagne:


le soleil

^r=
Le
il

"descend

" ou peut-etrc "


soleil

le

jour."

sens de cette
s'agit de la

ordinairement sothiaque, tandis que


est

k'gonde est faeilcment a


deseente du

eomprendre;

I'annee

civile,

identique a celle qu'on a

vers I'hemisphere inferieure dans la

La premiere de nommer I'alexandrine. commengant a la rentree de chaque periode sothiaque par la date du l"^ Thoth, correspondant au ^^/2o juillet du calendrier julien, la seconde par la meme date du
I'habitude
l^"-

seconde moitie de I'an.


qui

-En parlant de
"

la deesse
I.,

Venus
c.

deplore

Adonis, Macrobe
:

(Saturnall.

xxi.)

s'exprimc ainsi la-dessus

Thotli, mais cette fois correspondant


il

au

29/30

aoiit

julien,

en resulte neeessairement le nombre de40 jours qui separe les dates identiqucs dans les deux calendriers, Les preuves evidentes nous le religicux et le civile.
sont fournies par la trouvaille du papyrus de Tanis.

quod Sol annuo gressu per duodeeim signorum ordinem pergens, partem quoque heviispJi(erii inferwris imgredHiir, quia de duodeeim signis Zodiaci sex

superiora, sex inferiora censentur


et

et

cum

est

in

inferiorihiis

idco dies

breviores

facit,

lugere creditur Dea, etc.

D'apres

le calendrier

alexandrin

le

mois Mesori em-

En

etudiant attentivement

la

serie des fetes,

accom-

pagnees de leurs dates, sur les fragments du Part 7 (planclie IV.), on fera la curieuse observation que les ietes du mois, au commencement des douze mois de
I'annee egyptienne, ne se trpuvent pas a leurs places
qu'elles occupent
ainsi

brasse les 30 jours a partir du 25 juillet jusqu'au


aovit Jul., ou,
les

23

qu'au 28
roraaine,

aoiit.

5 jours epagomenes y compris, jusD'apres le calendrier d'Esneb, de I'epoque


le

deux jours avant


le

commencement du mois
\

dans

les

calendriers antiques.
fete
le

C'est

Mesori, ou
"celle de Sa

29 Epiphi, la fete nommee V^V \ ^ Majeste" (deesse) etait celebree en Fhonla

que la fete

nommee

d'Hatlior,"
le

neur du lever de

constellation d'Isis-Sothis, lequel

nom
date du

sous lequel se cache

nom

gree Atliyr pour

gpme mois
l^"-

de

I'annee egyptienne,
c'est-ii-dire

est

notee sous

la

au mois suivant celui d'Atbyr. En procedant on remarquera egalement que la fete du mois de Choiak, nommee t_]"''j_] V4V Kihak, se
.Cboiak,

trouve inserite sous

la

date du

1" Tybi.
la

Un

troisicme

cxomple, c'est

le

dernier conserve sur les fragments

du

anciennement etait censee ouvrir la nouvelle annee. Le 29 Epiphi en question repond au 23 juillet jul., c'esta-dire a la date que les Alexandrins notaient comme C'est jour du lever de I'etoile Sotbis a leur epoque. confirme par les temoignages do Theon et de Ptolemee On se (voir linger, Chronol. de Manethon, pag. 51). convainc done que le mois de Mesori portait de tout
droit le

papyrus, se prescnte au-dessous de

date du

mois

nom

de \j/

V5V

''mois de I'ouverture, ou du
II

Mechir

c'est

le

groupe encore assez reconnaissable


(voir

commencement de
de Thoth et
fetes de
il

I'an."

rempla9ait

le

mois antique

g^
mon

^%

qui, a

Tepoque ptolema'ique, par exemple,


la

fut cause que, de cette fa^-on, toutes les

page4T2), sert a designer la fete du mois de Tybi, mais non pas celle du Mechir, qui porte
le

" Thesaurus" a

I'ancien

mois.avan^aient d'un mois entier les mois de II en resulte neeessairecalendrier religieux.


les dates

ment que

nom

de '^^li.r-Tr-, rokh-ner.

Comme

on

le

voit,

d'apres I'annee alexandrine et que


ete compose a une epoque ou
etait d'usage.
le

du papyrus de Tanis sont indiquees le papyrus doit avoir


calendrier alexandrin

les fetes

des mois ne correspondent plus aux mois aux-

quels elles appai'tiennent, mais elles les avancent d'un

mois

entier.
fait,

dont on ne pourra pas s'en douter, est corrobore par les fragments du Part 1 (a la planche I.), qui
ont conserve
les

Ce

Avant de terminer cette petite remarque au sujet des notationscalendriquesquiserencontrent sur les fragments
dudit papyrus, je voudrais encore fixer I'attention sur
texte, mutile
le

derniers restes de la notation des 12

du

reste

comme

tout ce qui precede, qui

THE GEOGRAPHICAL PAPYRUS.


est public sur Ics clLTiiiercs ]ilanclu's
ilu

la

i)ul)lieation.

Ce

teste dubute par une Ibrinule bieu coniuie par d'autres


ag'e

specimens d\ui

de beaucoup anterieur
s'adresse
a,

a,

la redaction

du papyrus.

Le compositeur

tous ceux qui

pasasauver ees niysteres inconnues au monde vivant, en dressant en forme de tableaux les matieres saerees de I'ancienne sagesse sur le papyrus. 11 termine son travail par I'expression de son desir qu'en revanche de ses
actions, son

vivent et qui vivront sur la tcrre, uotamment au.x classes savantes des pretres, jjour leur recommander le souvenir eternel de son noni et de ses oeuvres. Parmi Ics dernieres,

nom

Ic

survive.

est restu ijue quelques signcs u la fin

Malheureusement du papyrus.

il

n'en

a ce

qu'il parait, la
le

composition du papyrus en
rang-.

(juestion

occupa

premier
ii

Ayant
de
il

visitu
la la la

un tom-

beau appartenant

un

di{,mitaire

eour et de

I'epoque du roi C/w!//on-Ch6ops,

eut

chance d'y

plus haute par exemple, uue coudue de Thot qu'il avait trouvee sur le sol de la tombe. 15rcf, il ne tarda
valeur.
II cite,

dccouvrir des textes et des objets sacrus do

to-day revised portions of the last two Mr. Pctrie's division of the pai)yrus into parts has been preserved, but I have added a running number for the fragments.
I liave

plates.

F. L. G., '30th Jan., 1889.

EllRATU]\r.
Transcription VI. 2.

Dot only

(.)

between

ha'i

and

kk^.

PL.

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:=

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II.

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>lL4UlUiUlU,.jt,

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PL.

III.

fl

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>

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(0

-.-_5_^UJ__.{?^_

lb

^\ >

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8

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fe:

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EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND PUBLICATIONS.


[.

"t.

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With^Chapters by Cecil Smith, Ernest A. Gardner, and Barclay V. Head. With Forty-si\ Plates and Plans. Second Edition iSS.s
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Sir

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