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TOUGH ENOUGH?

12 events to test your mettle

Dumped on Valentine’s!

Snow storm drops up to 30 inches across state!

Guided adventures:
Vermont tours go sledding, snowshoeing & dogsledding

Vermont’s jump wows spectators!

Soaring at Harris Hill:

The Olympics you didn’t see on TV • Guide to Brews, Spirits & Wine • Events not to miss!
February - March 2014

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contents

6-7 Guided adventures!
Vermont guides create adventures on high perfomance sleds, snowshoes and dogsleds throughout the Green Mountains!

10-11 Test your mettle

Ski Ride
M A G

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Vermont

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Here are a dozen ways to test your skiing ability and stamina at some tough races held in February and March.

Editor/Publisher, Angelo Lynn
angelo@vtskiandride.com Advertising Sales Christy Lynn Assistant Editor Evan Johnson

8-9 Snow storm!

A Valentine’s snow storm dumped up to 24 inches across the state just in time for President’s Day Weekend! Skiers and riders rejoice!

20-21-22 Events!

Contributing writers Polly Lynn, Karen Lornetz Graphic Artist/Production Stephanie Manning For news tips or to advertise call 802-388-4944 or email: info@vtskiandride.com Advertising & Editorial Office: Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine 58 Maple Street, Middlebury, Vt. 05753 802-388-4944 (also offices of the Addison Independent)

Our calendar is full of exciting events and activities at Vermont’s ski resorts during February-March. You won’t want to miss the ones nearest you.

Cover Photo:
The thrill of a great day in the powder is on the face of Ry Young after a Valentime’s Day storm dumped 20-plus inches at Mad River Glen. Photo by Brian Mohr/Ember Photo

14-15 Olympic update!

See the story behind the Olympics through the eyes and voice of Killington’s Dan Egan. Also, an update on Vermonters’ fortunes at the Olympics.

Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine is owned and operated by Addison Press Inc., a Vermont company locally owned since 1946. Vermont Ski and Ride Magazine is published monthly November through March.

Amazing On-line Ticket Deals! Learn more
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Publisher ’s Desk Of big snows, guided treks, tough races & Olympic dreams
Vermont got dumped on Valentine’s Day, but it was good. Dumped on, that is, by up to 30 inches of snow over a period of 3-5 days, with some resorts reporting 22 inches in a single day. Bring the roses — and the champagne. That was one sweetheart of a snowstorm. And just in time. The bulk of the storm hit Thursday, Feb. 13, with the rest of it falling that Friday — one of the sweetest Valentine’s Days you’ll ever have the pleasure to ski or ride — to start the three-day President’s Day weekend. It brought smiles to everyone on all sides of the ledger, and it set up several more weeks of great skiing here in the Green Mountains. Photographer Brian Mohr captured some nice shots of happy skiers cruising the steeps at Mad River Glen (that’s his on the front cover as well), and shared a few more terrific photos on pages 8-9. On days when the snow tops your boots and frequently is in your face, there’s nothing better to do that ski all day long., but even the heartiest of skiers and riders need a break once in a while. When that’s your day off the mountain and you’re looking for a change of pace, consider one of dozens of guided trips offered throughout the state. Reporter Evan Johnson ventured out on a high performance sled from the top of Smuggler’s Notch, getting thrown in the process, while his guide sped past and waited with refreshments at the bottom. Then he tried something less harrowing by accompanying a musher on a dogsled, both in the Stowe area, while also learning about snowshoeing treks that include moonlit hikes and dinners in secluded cabins, as well as other sled and snowshoeing tours from a business in Waitsfield. For adventures that are as memorable as they are exhilarating, check out his report on pages 6-7. Not tough enough for you? Then test your mettle in one of a dozen upcoming events profiled on pages 9-10. These races and events go from the very tough (marathons and half-marathons on snowshoes) to ski touring treks across sections of the Long Trail. They’re tough, but all doable and worthy of the effort. Check it out and jump in; it doesn’t get any easier if you wait another year. Speaking of competition, 16 Vermonters are representing the U.S. in the Olympic games, and a few others with strong Vermont ties have been having strong games as well. We run down the roster with updates on how these Olympic athletes are doing, and what’s still to come for them over the next couple of weeks. Plus, Killington’s Dan Egan, who is in his third round of covering the Olympic games, reflects on the games at Sochi and what it means to the participants. There are also photos of ski jumping on Brattleboro’s famous Harris Hill jump, a report on how resorts are saving big on energy efficiency programs, and a run down of family-friendly amenities at more than a dozen area resorts to make your family vacation that much easier. Enjoy, and be on the lookout for more big snowstorms. March, after all, is known as Vermont’s snowiest month!
Angelo S. Lynn

A racer trains at Cochran’s Ski Area under the lights on a winter’s night. VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Photo by Oliver Parini.

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Guided adventures:
By EVAN JOHNSON
STOWE, VT. —Erin Egbert, a guide for Umiak Outfitters, trudges up Route 108 from the Stowe side of the Smuggler’s Notch Gap with an inflatable sled on her back. It is a spectacular, bluebird day in late January and the steep, windy and narrow road connecting Stowe and Jeffersonville is surprisingly busy with dog walkers, cross country skiers, and a pair of ice climbers checking their rack of gear before their ascent. In winter, the access road is closed, cutting off the shortest link between Stowe and Jeffersonville, and Stowe and Smuggler’s Notch resorts, even though they’re just a few miles apart. Instead, the twisting, switchbacked strip of pavement becomes a playground and Egbert and I are about to sled down it. At the top of the gap, wind channels up the valley and whistles through the craggy boulder field where the road flattens briefly before steeply descending down the oither side. Egbert unclips the sled from her back and nudges it toward the first pitch of the slope with the toe of her boot. She double-checks her pack and adjusts her sunglasses. Then she flashes a smile as she buckles her helmet. “Alright,” she says. “See you at the bottom.” I take off first with Egbert close on my heels. The snow has been packed down by earlier trail-users into a dense base that makes for an exhilarating ride. It’s my own skill with the slick Hammerhead Sled I’m riding on that’s the problem. Roughly halfway down the steep, a sharp turn nearly bucks me off the sled; I recover but slide into the ditch. While stuck in the snow, Egbert flashes by me in a graceful, sweeping turn around the looming boulders on the roadside and zooms out of sight. I remount but it takes a while to regain the speed I’d lost. By the time I get to the bottom, Egbert’s sitting on her sled with a thermos of hot Cold Hollow Cider and a selection of cheeses and crackers and beef jerky spread out on a spare sled. “Want some lunch?” she asks.

Snowshoeing, sledding and mushing in Vt.
duced the first aluminum snowshoes, that’s when things really took off.” Services offered by guides in Vermont have since gone well beyond snowshoeing and kayaking. In the winter, Umiak in Stowe and Clearwater Outfitters in Waitsfield offer full lines of tours, clinics and rentals as well as snowshoe walks and sledding adventures.

Snowshoes are a terrific way for friends and families to explore the outdoors in recreational and competitive capacities. Tours are available for families, couples and larger groups of friends. Umiak offers a guided half-hour tour in the nature preserve behind the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Waterbury. Along the way, participants learn about the natural history of the area. The snowshoeing is on easy terrain and finishes at the factory with a tour. For a more extended trip, Umiak also offers a nighttime trek through pine forests and wetlands to a secluded sugar shack in a stand of maples for a rest with a woodstove, Vermont cheeses,

SNOWSHOES, CABINS AND FONDUE

Musher Rob Farley works to restrain a pair of excitable Siberian Huskies in Stowe. As the owner and operator of October Siberians, Farley offers rides at the Stoweflake Inn.

too. They’re having fun and they’re also learning a lot.” Guides are also knowledgeable about Vermont’s natural history and can point out animal tracks or glacial moraines in the landscape while en route to the final destination. For the romantics, there’s also a moonlit snowshoe to the Stowehof Inn for a threecourse fondue dinner featuring potato pancakes and beef bourguignon followed by

in the Mad River Valley. For an evening in the snow, Clearwater Sports offers an outing in the woods of Waitsfield before dinner at the Lareau Farm Inn for a dinner featuring, among other fare, their famous flatbreads. Longer snowshoe treks head through beech, hemlock and maple forests to a sugaring shack for a lesson in syrup production. For those looking for a more strenuous adventure, they guide up the nearby Lincoln Gap road (which is also closed in the winter) before a thrilling sled ride back down. Even longer adventures include hikes along the spine of the Green Mountains on snowshoes with sleds in tow. In Fayston, one trek travels up the Hedgehog Brook Trail over frozen rivers and through dense forests before ascending onto the Long Trail. Then, trekkers pass through the Lincoln Gap and climb to the summit Burnt Rock Mountain. Guides will also lead up the eastern flank of Mount Abraham as well as journey on the Catamount Trail to Sunset Ledge before riding sleds down the Lincoln Gap Road and back into Warren.

Steve Brownlee, owner and co-founder of Umiak Outfitters, says a variety of tours are necessary for any guiding service, especially in Vermont. “When you work in Vermont, you have more than one job,” he explains. “Our economy is small enough that we have to be diversified to be successful. There are places in the country where the need for diversification isn’t there because they have such a strong, year-round presence. But in a place like Vermont or Maine, people have to be diversified because our seasons are more concentrated.” With that in mind, the Stowe-based outfitter has grown and expanded since he started the company 27 years ago when he split from what had been the Mad River Canoe Company. “Our passion then was canoeing and kayaking,” he says. “And we opened to be a Nordic ski shop in the winter. When Tubbs introPA G E 6

MIXING IT UP

Umiak Outfitters guide Erin Egbert stands at the top of the Smugglers’ Notch Road. Umiak, along with others, offers performance sled tours at some of the access roads around the state closed in winter, including the Smgglers’ Notch Road and the Lincoln Gap Road.
Photos by Evan Johnson

smoked meats and spreads. Max Post, winter programs director for Umiak, says the programs are on easy terrain and can appeal to people of varying fitness levels and ages. “You could send a three-year-old out there and they’d have a blast,” he says. “Or, you could send a college couple who are really fit

chocolate fondue with fresh fruit and pound cake. The tours feature Vermont products, includingStowe-based Laughing Moon Chocolates, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Cabot Cheese and Vermont Smoke and Cure meats. Clearwater Sportsin Waitsfield offers its own snowshoe outings of varying difficulties

For an exhilarating downhill ride, the newer, high performance sleds have come a long way since those flimsy plastic disks and wooden toboggans. Among the most popular tour offerings are those on Smugglers Notch and the Lincoln Gap roads, but tours are offered from one end of the state to the other. The Hammerhead sleds are reminiscent of the wood and steel Fexible Flyers, but with front independent skis as runners and a 21st century design that makes them lighter, faster and more agile. Riders wear helmets, lie stomach down and fly headfirst downhill. The steering is sensitive and is done from a prone position by adjusting a crosspiece connected to the flexible rails to create surprisingly responsive turns. At Clearwater Sports in Waitsfield, the hill for their sledding tours is the Lincoln Gap Road, featuring a steep pitch at the top and plenty of narrow, winding turns, and a few choice backcountry lines. While Umiak prefers the Hammerhead sleds, the sled of choice at Clearwater Sports is the Mad River Rocket, designed by Sellers and Company in Warren. The Rocket is like a kneeboard towed by a motorboat. Riders remain in

PERFORMANCE SLEDS

See Sledding on page 7

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Sledding
a kneeling position with the board strapped across their thighs. The sled features a negative keel that packs a monorail shape into the snow, lending stability on wider turns without runners. While the Hammerhead performs best on hardpack or even firmer conditions, the Rocket dominates in softer snow. Craig Richardson, a guide at Clearwater, says the sensation of riding these new sleds is like skiing on any powder day. “It’s got a lot of curvature to it from the front to the back,” he says. “So it floats in deep snow really well and you use your whole body to control it. It’s kind of like powder skiing only you’re sledding on a kneeboard.”

Dogsledding is another popular activity with a longstanding tradition in Vermont. The Vermont Outdoor Guides Association (VOGA) lists a number of kennels around the state with tours and clinics of varying lengths. Some even run year-round with huskies pulling carts and scooters long after the snow is gone. Musher Rob Farley, owner and operator of October Siberians has been managing his kennel in Hinesburg since he got his first husky in 1994. While working fulltime for the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, his kennel has extended its lineage and has recently welcomed its fourth generation. “I didn’t know I was going to be a musher,” he says. “But I met a husky that I thought was great,” and he was hooked. Mushers teach guests about the sport of

DOGSLEDDING

dog sledding as well as dog behavior and pack dynamics, while also allowing guests to spend some quality time with the dogs. Alaskan huskies are larger and more powerful, while Siberian varieties are smaller, a tribute to their hard-working lineage. “The native people that bred these dogs wanted an animal that would work hard, but at the same time wouldn’t eat them out of house and home,” he says. Farley has a kennel of 18 Siberians – boys and girls that he’s raised since pups. “These guys are like classic cars,” he says, describing his kennel of 18. “They had their heyday and now they’re just fun to drive.” And the dogs love to mush. As soon as Farley starts unloading them from their mobile kennel built onto the back of his truck, they bark until they’re in their harnesses, clipped into the sled and ready to go. The ride typically last 20 minutes, winding around gentle golf-course style terrain, starting and ending at a gazebo next to the Stoweflake Inn in Stowe. Farley also offers tours at Little River State park in Waterbury. In the future, he says, he hopes to offer overnight dogsled trips, staying at lean-tos and cabins in the area. “It be great to organize something more than just a brief ride,” he says. “With these dogs, there’s a lot more to experience than in just 20 minutes.” But whether it’s a dogsled ride in Stowe, an hour-long snowshoe up a gap for a thrilling sled-ride down, a snowcat or backcountry tour at Sugarbush, or any other guided treks, this take-away is worth noting: There is a lot going on at most of the state’s ski areas that offer terrific partial-day activities full of excitement for the entire family. Give a guide a call and discover for yourself.

Snowshoeing and Alpine Guides
SNOWSHOEING AND ALPINE GUIDES
Abenaki Outfitters & Guide Service Champlain Valley Canoeing, Kayaking, Nature, Hiking, Snowshoeing P.O. Box 283, Shoreham, VT 05770-0283 Adventure Spirit Guides Operating throughout Vermont and the entire Northeast Rock, ice and alpine expeditions in the Northeast Bredeson Outdoor Adventures Statewide and Beyond Guided, Self Guided, Back Country Cross Country Skiing, Snowshoeing, Inn to Inn 595 Forrest Road; Bridport, VT 05734 Clearwater Sports Central Vermont, Mad River Valley Winter Gear & Clothing, Guided Mad River Rocketsled and Snowshoe Adventures &Tours 4147 Main Street, Waitsfield, Vermont 05673 Country Inns Along the Trail Self-guided and Guided inn-to-inn Cross Country Skiing, Snowshoeing 52 Park Street, Brandon, Vermont 05733 Green Mountain Adventures & Middlebury Mountaineer Central Vermont Gear & Snowshoeing, Backcountry Skiing 2 Park Street, Middlebury, VT 05753 Head North, LLC Southern Vermont Accommodations, Survival, Guided Snowshoeing & Skiing, Yoga, P.O. Box 6 Plymouth, VT 05056 Kroka Expeditions Southern Vermont Guided, Winter Camping, Backcountry Skiing, Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing 767 Forest Road, Marlow, N.H., 03456 Petra Cliffs Mountaineering School Northern Vermont Guided Alpine Mountaineering, Ice and Rock Climbing, Snowshoeing, Telemark, Downhill 105 Briggs Burlington, VT 05401 Sugarbush Ski Resort Warren, Vermont Accommodations, Backcountry guided and self-guided snowshoe, skiing and riding 1840 Sugarbush Access Rd.,Warren VT 05674 The Woodstock Naturalist Statewide Custom nature programs and guided hikes featuring interactive training and lectures, nature writing, and special programs for corporate and professional retreats. 114 Evergreen Ct, Woodstock, VT. 05091 Umiak Outfitters Central & Northern Vermont Kayaking, Canoeing, Snowshoeing, Sled Tours 849 S. Main Street, Stowe, Vt. 05672 Vermont Adventure Tours Southern, Central Vermont Orienteering, Mountain Biking, Mountaineering, Winter Camping, Women's Challenges, Youth Programs 223 Woodstock Avenue, Rutland, VT. 05701 Wonder Walks Guided and self-guided walks in Vermont, the Adirondacks, Berkshires, Finger Lakes Region, North Carolina, California’s northern coast and Hawaii’s big island. Inn-to-innsnowshoeing, multiple-day tours or day outings. 2619 Monkton Rd., Bristol, VT 05443

DOGSLEDDING
Eden Dogsledding & Dogsledding-OnWheels Northeast Kingdom Year-round touring on groomed trails for all ages in the Eden snow-belt. 390 Square Road, Eden Mills, VT. 05653 October Siberians Sled Dog Adventures Central Vermont Operating sledding tours with Siberian huskies in Hinesburg and Stowe, Vermont. 1088 Texas Hill Hinesburg VT. 05461 Peace Pups Dogsledding Northern Vermont Dog sledding, fall dog carting, dog scooter lessons, skijor lessonsand School Presentations P.O. Box 165 Lake Elmore, VT. 05657

Erin Egbert takes a break with her clients on the Notch Gap Road.

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Valentine’s Day snow storm dumps 20 to 30 inches!
After a dry spell in January, winter has rebounded in a big way. In mid-February, snowstorms dropped several inches before the state was hit by a Valentine’s storm that dumped more than 20 inches over much of the state, and topping 30 inches in some spots. As of Valentine’s Day (just in time for President’s Day weekend), resorts in northern, central and southern Vermont were reporting fully accessible terrain and superb conditions. Here are some of those snowfall totals as compiled by the Vermont Ski Areas Association, which also promise great skiing right into the spring! Bolton Valley, 23 inches in six days; Bromley Mountain, 26 inches in a week; Jay Peak Resort, 16 – 22 inches in six days; Killington Resort, 29 inches in a week; Mad River Glen, 22 – 27 inches in six days; Magic Mountain, 23 – 25 inches in 72 hours; Middlebury College Snow Bowl, 20 inches in 72 hours; Mount Snow Resort, 31 inches in a week; Okemo Mountain Resort, 23 – 24 inches in 72 hours; Pico Mountain, 29 inches in a week; Q Burke Mountain Resort, 15 inches in four days; Quechee Ski Area, 20 inches in three days; Smugglers’ Notch Resort, 23 inches in four days; Stowe Mountain Resort, 22 inches in a week; Stratton Mountain Resort, 25 inches in six days; Sugarbush Resort, 32 inches in 72 hours; Suicide Six Ski Area, 25 inches in four days.

Photos by Brian Mohr/ Ember Photography

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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12 Events to Test Your Mettle

1

Camel’s Hump Challenge
When: February 23 Where: Camel’s Hump Skiers Association Center, Huntington, Vt.

2

Stowe Derby
When: Feb. 23 Where: Starts at the top of Stowe Mountain Resort, ends in Stowe

This event takes a page from Mad River Glen’s famous tagline, Ski It If You Can! It has become one of New England’s premier backcountry skiing events and it deserves the tough reputation, but it’s definitely something that most average skiers in good shape can handle, so don’t be afraid to give it a shot. The Camel’s Hump Challenge (CHC) is a high country traverse around the perimeter of Camel’s Hump (4083’) — the third highest peak in Vermont. Dr. Warren Beeken, the founder and organizer who passed away in 2003, conceived the CHC as a fundraiser for the Vermont Alzheimer’s Association, and the event continues to raise money for support and educational programs of that organization. Check it out, sign up and support a great cause on a great cruise around this iconic peak. To sign up, go to http://act.alz.org/

3

MRV Ski Mountaineering Race

This event is in a league all its own. The historic tale of how the race got started is compelling, the spills on the downhill are mesmerizing, and the challenge offers a true test of one’s overall skiing ability and stamina. Hundreds show up each year to ski through 20km of challenging terrain, racing down Mt. Mansfield’s Toll Road on Nordic skis and along the entire length of the Stowe Recreation Path before reaching the finish in the village. If you don’t know, the course has a vertical drop of more than 2,600 feet. The winners will complete the course in under 45 minutes, while recreational skiers can take a couple of hours to go the same distance. And if you’re really good, they have a division all your own: You can do it twice, once in classic style and again in skate skis. To sign up, go to http://www.stowederby.com

When: February 23 Where: Mad River Glen to Lincoln Peak
One of the biggest and best Randonnee races in North America is right here in the Mad River Valley. This race starts at the base of Mad River Glen, climbs to the top, traverses the Long Trail to Sugarbush’s Mount Ellen, descends into Slide Brook, climbs into the Lincoln Peak area and finishes at Valley House lodge. It’s tough and requires a fist full of stamina, but features gorgeous scenery and terrain throughout! All proceeds benefit the Green Mountain Club. Don’t forget to pack a helmet and avalanche beacon (recommended but not required). Awards will be held in the Wunderbar at Sugarbush resort. For more info or to register go to https://www.madriverglen.com/events

4

United States Telemark Ski Association’s (USTSA) National Championships
When: February 27 – 28 Where: Bromley Mountain Resort

The USTSA National Championships is the premier telemark ski event in the country, bringing at least 36 elite U.S. men’s and women’s team members from all across the country to the two-day competition. A lot of other talented tele-skiers of all classes, including the citizen’s class, will field between 50 and 80 racers each. The overall winners will be crowned National Champions on Friday evening. For more information, go to http:// w w w. u s t s a . o r g /

5

Mad River Glen Triple Crown Challenge
When: Feb. 22, Feb. 28, March 22 Where: Mad River Glen, Fayston

The first leg of Mad River’s Triple Crown Competition Series, the Unconventional Terrain Competition, is the East’s original extreme ski competition. The event is a grueling test of a skier’s ability to conquer what can be tough line down the hill. Judging for the event is based on smoothness, creativity, turn quality, and difficulty of line. “The Triple Crown, and the Unconventional Terrain Competition in particular, seem to attract the best skiers from all over,” says Mad River Glen marketing director, Eric Friedman. The event has developed a reputation for the wildest ski competition you’ll likely see at a ski resort, and that’s how they like it. Come to MRG and enjoy the show! This second leg of the Triple Crowd challenges competitors to ski as many runs as they can in one day, on Mad River’s famous Single Chair. To make things even tougher, the competitors are required to ski directly under the chair, a route that cascades down Chute and Lift Line, two of Mad River Glen’s most difficult trails. It’s a test of speed, skill, agility and stamina. Takers? The final leg of the Triple Crown is the Mogul Challenge set for March 22, also at MRG. It’s wild and woolly and worth the hooting and hollering that goes on throughout the day. The cost is $20 if preregistered per event, $25 the day of each event, or $50 for all three Triple Crown Events. For more info or to register, go to http://madriverglen.com/visit/eventc a l e n d a r.

Triple Crown Vertical Challenge, February 28

Mogul Challenge, March 22

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

6

Peak Races, Snowshoe Marathon/Half Marathon
When: March 1 Where: The Amee Farm, Pittsfield

7

Vermont Open
When: March 7-9 Where: Stratton Mountain Resort

With a course that takes participants through the snowy mountain terrain of western Vermont, the Peak Snowshoe Marathon, Half Marathon and 6-Mile Race stands out for the difficulty of the conditions and the terrain. The opening portion of the race presents a daunting 200-yard dash through three feet of pure, unbroken snow, followed by 13 miles of trails that climb more than 2,000 feet in elevation on the way toward the peak of South Mountain, the race’s high point. For the full marathon, the course remains open for nine hours. For more info go to http://www.peakraces.com/snowshoe/

Stratton Mountain and The Washed Up Cup bring you The Vermont Open with over $20,000 in prize money. The event supports the Ross Powers Foundation/Level Fund. For one weekend, snowboarders of all pedigrees come together to ride, compete, party and enjoy the snow. It’s a highlight of the season that’s not to be missed. The competition is open to all snowboarders and designed for amateurs, juniors, pros and snowboarding’s legends to compete in the same arena. For more info go to www. runsignup.com.

8

9 Jay Peak Rando
The COMP
When: March 8 Where: Mount Snow Resort Sponsored by Dynafit When: March 8 – 9 Where: Jay Peak Resort

& Snow Leopard Challenge

The second annual Carinthia Open Mega Plaza. Park builders will construct a one-of-a-kind, plaza-style setup with rails, boxes and other features that won’t be found at any other competition statewide. Athletes compete for gear from event sponsors or a piece of the cash purse.  This is the second year of the event that Mount Snow expects to grow into the biggest snowboard competition on the East Coast. The plaza will be located near the base area of Carinthia, easily accessible to spectators. For more info or to register go to http://carinthiaparks.com/

10

Bolton to Trapps Tour
When: March 9 Where: Start at Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe, finish at Bolton Valley Resort

The Jay Peak Rando is taking one large step forward this winter. USSMA has sanctioned the course as a Category II, which means the course will feature 4,000-feet of climbing, with five to ten transitions, 50 percent off-piste slopes, and a winning time of under three hours. The 2014 course will also have two boot packs, along with multiple bump and off-piste climbs/descents. This one’s not for the faint of heart. For more info or to register, contact Bryan Smith at Jay Peak at bsmith@jaypeakresort.com.

11

Bud Light Bear Mountain Mogul Challenge
When: April 5 - 6 Where: Killington Resort

Help raise money for the Catamount Ski Club’s youth program by skiing, Nordic or backcountry, from Bolton to Trapps on a classic section of the Catamount Trail. A shuttle to the start will be available in the morning and from Bolton in the afternoon. At the end of the day participants will celebrate a great day on the trail with music, food and refreshments. For more info and to register go to www.catamounttrail.org or contact gmaino@catamounttrail.org.

12

Sugar on Snow ski races at Stowe
When: April 5 - 6 Where: Stowe Mountain Resort

The annual competition will heat up on Saturday as 200 amateur bumpers take to the slopes of Outer Limits to battle for a place in the finals. The top 32 men and 16 women will return on Sunday to compete in a headto-head competition for the mogul challenge cup. This is an amateur event - no USSA members or anyone who has been a member of USSA as a competitor in the past five years will be allowed to race.  The event begins Saturday morning April 5 to pick up competition bibs. Competition lasts all weekend, ending with live music on Saturday and Sunday. To register go to http:// www.killington.com/

Open to USSA licensed racers ages 10 and up, this race attracts some of the best talent in the East. The Stowe Sugar Slalom is one of the most recognized amateur alpine races in the East. The two-day event can attract over 1,000 avid racers and up to 600 spectators. All participants are invited to dress up in costumes best representing our theme, a Spring Celebration. Originating as a celebration of the arrival of Spring and the tapping of maple trees, the Sugar Slalom is held in a Mardi Gras atmosphere complete with music, barbecue on the hill, fantastic ski racing and festive costumes. To top it all, the race also features a unique Vermont treat, maple syrup on snow, donuts and pickles at the finish! For more info, go to http://www. teammmsc.org/

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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A day spent testing skis and gear at the annual trade show
By EVAN JOHNSON
STRATTON, VT. — Imagine three days of skiing on skis that nobody else will touch until next October. It’s a special kind of a feeling that only a handful of people get to experience and two weeks ago, at Stratton Mountain Ski Resort, I was one of them. Every winter, industry representatives and shop employees from all over the Northeast gather to test the equipment they’ll be selling next year. With press credentials around my neck, I was more than willing to dive in to ski the latest innovations. On the morning of February 4, I hiked from Stratton’s parking lot with a heavy backpack and skis and was lost in the crowd of ski testers, industry reps and vendors.The scene was overwhelming. The entire slope in front of the gondola and American Express lift had been turned into a tent city clustered with trucks and vans. Various banners and flags blew in the wind and the sun off of the snow was blinding. The event was presented by Eastern Winter Sports Reps Association and New England Winter Sports Reps Association, of which 106 shops with 885 employees were preregistered for the three-day event. There were 115 vans (55 for skis, 36 snowboards, 24 accessories vans with helmets and goggles), and 40 booths (27 for skis, 10 for snowboards, and three for boot fitting) representing over 100 companies. As a rookie at these events, I asked the nearest brand rep justwhat was going on. “For hard goods, this is the single most important event of the year,” Kelly O’Flaherty at the Giro Helmets and Goggles tent told me. “The whole idea is to try it before you buy.” Sounded good. I decided to talk with some of the people doing the actual trying before buying and wound up meeting Tyler Burak, an employee at East Coast Alpine in Danvers and Boston, Mass., who was ready to demo a glossy new pair of Rossignols. Burak has been working in the ski industry for eleven years and this was his third year at the on-snow demo with East Coast Alpine. As we skated towards the gondola to meet some buddies of his from the Smith Optics crew, he told me he had high hopes for the skis on his feet and shared some of his observations on new ski technology. In the progression of ski design and shape, Burak said he’s watched the shape of skis move in a direction somewhat opposite to what it had been – away from the shaped skis and towards a straighter – but not necessarily narrower shape. He said wider skis are gradually becoming more flexible, making them easier for lighter or smaller skiers. “Unless someone’s 170 or 180 pounds, there are some skis I wouldn’t put them on because they’d get thrown. It’d be just too much ski for them,” he said. “These skis (fat skis in general) are becoming more friendly for skinny people like me.”

More than 100 vendors packed the base area of Stratton Mountain Resort at the NEWSRA/EWSRA on-snow demo in early February.

At the top of the gondola, before we took the day’s first run, I asked him how important these events are in planning for next season at his shop. His answer was candid: “When the customer asks what I think of them, I have to know and be able to tell them honestly,” he said. It’s hard to not be happy when the latest and greatest is right there for you to try a year before the rest of the country. In a previous interview, Steven Cohen, of Masterfit Inc., described the experience as “like a kid in a candy shop,” but in all seriousness, it’s an important three days for retailers and reps alike. In an industry that works well in advance of the next season, decisions made by the testers of each individual shop will have lasting effects in the months to come. It seemed like every shop was looking for something different. Steve Cody manages the rental shop at Windham (N.Y.) Mountain and relies on a handful of brands to create a dependable line-up. The brands he prefers give him a starting point for his testing, but he said that doesn’t necessarily make the task any easier. “I know what I like to ski,” he said. “But it’s tough to find something that I can trust and that I think customers will trust as well.” Meanwhile, Frankie Palacone and Tyler Breuer were looking for next year’s skis and equipment for their four shops on Long Island. They told me finding the right skis that appeal to their customer base is becoming more of a challenge and that getting the right gear into their shops early season was key to sales. As a result, Palacone said they had to move faster and work harder to get the goods on the floor. On Tuesday and Wednes-

Justin Charrier, Ryan Cook and Katie Cook, of Paul’s Sportswear & Ski Shop in Salisbury, Mass., were among the hundreds of ski industry professionals testing next year’s gear.

Photos by Evan Johnson

day, he was among the first to arrive. Fortunately, the weather cooperated. On Tuesday it was hardpack and clear; on Wednesday it dumped snow all over the state, and Thursday was a bluebird special. “This is the best possible situation,” said Ryan Cook on Thursday morning, skiing for Paul’s Sportswear & Ski Shop in Salisbury, Mass. “To go from a bluebird day to a powder day back to blue sky with even more snow gives you the best possible sense of what these skis and boards are going to do.” While I admit I’ve never worked in a ski shop, I’d like to think my experience as a ski instructor and 21 years on skis (I started at 2) allows me to know a little bit about quality skis when I click into the bindings. In three days, I sampled some great pairs of skis from both major manufacturers — including Atomic, Volkl, K2 and Line — as well as smaller brands, such as Liberty and Icelantic. All performed amazingly. Every pair was in factory condition, perfectly tuned and gave as true a performance as intended by the designers. Many of the skis I tried, which were updates to existing models, are in production and getting ready for summer distribution. Next season, skiers can expect upgrades to popular skis like the Volkl Mantra or the K2 Rictor. Common updates include increased torsional flex, reduced weight, more rocker versus camber and, of course, new graphics. For the retail reps, such events equate to long and busy days. Geoff Bruce is a sales rep for skateboard companies Matix, Globe and Dwindle in his territory of New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and Maryland. He also owns a headwear company called Pukka and a line of men’s underwear called Brass that’s earned the endorsement of rap superstar Snoop Dogg. To get one of the biggest names in the music industry to endorse your brand takes some serious legwork and Bruce is one guy who’s willing to go that extra mile. As a result, he spends lots of time on the road, traveling to Atlantic City, Orlando and Denver, depending on the sport and the season. And he said he was ready for a break. “I try and stay with companies that are all independent that don’t have a sales staff of their own,” he said. “So they have a hired gun come in and do it for them, and that’s me. That’s why I work with a lot of cool midsize companies.” No matter the size of the companies or the retailers inspecting the goods, the reaction to the scene was positive. David Nihun was working as a rep at the Icelantic tent, which is a small independent company making all-mountain skis. He also works at a shop in Portsmouth, N.H., giving him experience as both the industry rep and the guy on the floor selling the goods. “People are always coming into our shop and asking who’s got the best skis,” he said, while adjusting the bindings for my boots with a cordless drill. “I tell them that these days, everyone’s got good skis. You can’t lose.” Ten minutes later I was ripping through fresh powder with those Icelantics underfoot and let out a few hoots and hollers. I think the guy might have a point.

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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," A7#B"#4@$C7D&&@E7@9$F%&?%G"$H7=9" 2014 Olympic Update: +
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BY POLLY LYNN At the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, the United States set a record for most total medals of any country at a single Winter Olympics with 37 medals. This year the United States sent a record 230 athletes to the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and the results have been strong, thus far. Where do all these extraodianry athletes come from? California and New York are always good guesses, as they are the two most populated states. But per capita, it is Vermont who leads the way. According to Business Insider, the Green Mountain State tops that chart with one out of every 48,000 people that live in Vermont on Team USA. New Hampshire comes in second, with one out of every 147,000 people on the U.S. team. This year, Vermont has 16 athletes competing at Sochi. That is the sixth-most Olympians sent from any state, regardless of size. Here is a recap of the athletes and their standings mid-way through the games. (The games started Feb. 6 and close Feb. 23. For more info, final results and live feeds from the athletes, visit our on-going timeline at www.vtskiandride.com.) record for the longest FIS World Cup win streak in all disciplines. 3) Kelly Clark Women’s Halfpipe 2014 Results: BRONZE Home mountain: Mount Snow Vermont home: West Dover Age: 30 Olympic Experience: Won Gold in 2002, Competed 2006, Bronze 2010 Road to Sochi: Clark is a 5-time gold medalist in the Winter X Games. She is the most decorated snowboarder with more topthree finishes (67 wins and 109 podiums) than any snowboarder, male or female, in history. 4) Hannah Teter Women’s Halfpipe 2014 Results: 4th PLACE Home mountain: Okemo Vermont Home: Belmont Age: 26 Olympic Experience: Won Gold 2006, and Silver 2010 Road to Sochi: Teter is a 6-time World Cup winner, won bronze in the 2005 FIS World Championships and was a gold medalist in the 2003 Winter X Games. Teter is the youngest of five siblings who learned the sport at Okemo. Two of her brothers also competed for the U.S. Snowboard team.

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PA G E 1 4

1) Devin Logan Women’s Freeskiing Slopestyle 2014 Results: SILVER Home mountain: Mount Snow Vermont home: West Dover Age: 20 5) Sophie Caldwell Add: Home-made Corned Beef Hash, VT sausage/bacon, Canadian Taylor Pork Olympic Experience: First Olympics Women’s Nordic Bacon, Cross-Country Road to Sochi: Logan’s professional 2014 Results: 6th Place in Women’s Free career began in 2011 at the age of 17 when Sprint, 32nd Place in Women’s 10k Classic she was the only female to compete in both Vermont home: Peru superpipe and slopestyle at the Winter X Age: 23 Games. That year, as a rookie, she earned Olympic Experience: First Olympics the Association of Freeskiing Professionals Road to Sochi: Born in Rutland, Vt., (AFP) Overall World Championship. She Caldwell placed 20th in the individual won the same title again in 2012. A native sprint at the 2013 World Championships. of West Dover, she grew up skiing at Mount She was a five-time All-American at DartSnow and trained in the Mount Snow Acad- mouth. Caldwell’s uncle and grandfather emy program. She is currently enrolled at were both Olympic skiers. Westminster College in Salt Lake City. 6) Liz Stephen 2) Hannah Kearney Women’s Nordic Cross-Country Women’s Freestyle Moguls 2014 Results: 12th Place in the women’s 2014 Results: BRONZE 7.5k skiathlon Home mountain: Waterville Valley Resort Vermont mountain: Burke Mountain (NH) Vermont home: East Montpelier Vermont home: Norwich Age: 27 Age: 27 Olympic Experience: Competed 2010 Olympic Experience: Competed in 2006, Road to Sochi: Stephen’s earned 15th in won Gold 2010 the 2013 World Cup distance standings and Road to Sochi: Kearney is a two-time was 4th in the 4x5 km relay and 5th in the World Cup champion and two-time overall 10km freestyle at that year’s World ChamWorld Cup winner. pionships. After switching from alpine to A member of Dartmouth College Class Nordic mid-way through her high school of 2015, Kearney had hoped to become the years at Burke Mountain Academy, Stephen first woman to win back-to-back Olympic won her first U.S. championship at age 19. gold in moguls. Kearney posted a recordbreaking winning streak from 2011-2012, 7) Ty Walker where she notched 16 consecutive victories, Women’s Snowboard Slopestyle eclipsed Alpine legend Ingemar Stenmark’s 2014 Results: 14th Place

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

An inside view of the Sochi Olympics from Killington’s Dan Egan
By KAREN D. LORENTZ
Dan Egan, known throughout the ski world as one of the best extreme skiers of all time, and who now leads backcountry clinics for Killington Resort, has been in Sochi as a commentator for Boston.com, where he has a weekly blog and radio show. Egan has been at the forefront of the extreme-sports scene since the mid-1980s and has led adventure trips from the Alps to the Arctic. One of his companies, Skiclinics.com, runs camps and clinics across North and South America and Europe. Another company, Degan Media, a consulting, marketing and production company, leverages his 25 years of experience in the action-sports industry. As a producer, his programs have run nationally via broadcast and cable syndication. Corporations, universities and schools around North America have also hired him as a motivational speaker over the last decade. Egan began commentating in 1996, and also hosts sports shows for NESN. He has been on television and radio since then and currently is a reporter on Extreme Sports for Boston.com. This is Egan’s third Olympics commentating gig — he covered Vancouver (2010) for Sprint, and the 2012 Summer Olympics in London for Sperry Shoes. With his diverse background, we asked Egan if he would share a few thoughts on the Sochi Olympics games. S&R: What events have you been covering? DE: My assignment has been all snow sports, so I’m based at the Mountain Cluster at Sochi. S&R: What do you look for when covering an event? DE: I like the personalities that work at and participate in the Olympics. Interviewing people who are “peak performers” is always educational and motivational. I like to see what drives people to reach the top of their sport. S&R: How long are you there? DE: I left the states on January 31 and will be back on the 24th of February. So long enough to miss the great USA and also long enough to settle into the Olympic vibe. S&R: How is Sochi as an Olympic venue? DE: Well, this is my second trip to Sochi. I came over in 2010 when I was a finalist to be the general manager at the resort holding the games. It is amazing to see how the whole city has been transformed in such a short time. The Olympic movement is a powerful one and it is a transformative one as well. The Olympics leave an impression on those who view it, those who experience it, and the places that host it. S&R: What insights can you offer readers on the significance of the games — for the athletes, for the U.S., for the world? DE: The Olympics always bring the spotlight to the smaller sports — Nordic, bob sled, luge, and skeleton. These sports shine at the games and they bring out some amazing stories from all over the world. I am going to cover the South African and Thailand skiers, one in skier cross and one in GS. S&R: Can you give us insights as to why you personally like to attend the Olympics? DE: I have been associated with Olympians for a long time, and now covering the Olympics you really start to understand what it’s all about. The athletes always talk about the dedication it takes to get to the Games and it does, it takes a lot of focus. The qualifying process for the Games is brutal and long. Attending the Olympics is special because it’s about national pride, and it’s my country against yours competing in sport. The essence of that is good-hearted, friendly competition and above all it’s fun. The Olympic movement brings together people of all nations from all economic situations and fosters communication, relationships and experiences that transcend even our electronic culture — and that’s a good thing. S&R: Can you share any insights from your observations about the Olympians as people? DE: There are two questions I always ask Olympians. One is, “What would a medal mean to you?” The common answer is “Everything!” My follow-up is always, “Can you define everything?” That is when the conversation turns interesting because now they have to think about their past, where they came from, who helped them, and how they got to the Olympics. Olympians are not made by themselves. It’s their parents, their coaches, their mentors and the people surrounding them who create, shape and define them. When the athlete appreciates that, it is usually a special moment in time. Readers can follow Dan Eagan’s travels and thoughts at www. boston.com; Sugarbush’s two-time Olympian Doug Lewis is also covering alpine racing at the Olympics for NBC Universal radio and Westwood One.

Vermont Olympians...
Home town and mountain: Stowe Age: 16 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Walker was ranked 16th overall in 2012 and 10th overall in 2013 in the World Snowboard tour rankings. Growing up in Long Island, N.Y., the Walker family would spend most winter weekends at their second home in Stowe. Ty was identified as a rising star before she was 10-years-old. 8) Susan Dunklee Women’s Nordic Biatholon 2014 Results: 14th Place in 7.5km sprint, 18th Place in 10k Pursuit, 34th Place in 15k Individual Vermont home: Barton Age: 27 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Dunklee placed 5th in the 2012 World Championship individual race. After graduating from St. Johnsbury Academy, Dunklee helped Dartmouth win its first NCAA ski championship in 31 years in 2010; she then switched from cross-country to biathlon. Her father, Stan, was a two-time Olympian in cross-country. 9) Andy Newell Men’s Nordic Cross-Country

2014 Results: 18th Place in Men’s Free Sprint Vermont mountain: Stratton Vermont Home: Shaftsbury Age: 30 Olympic Experience: Competed 2006, Competed 2010 Road to Sochi: Newell has competed in World Championships six times and had six top-10 finishes in 2013. Had the first U.S. cross country World Cup podium race in two decades in 2006. 10) Ida Sargent Women’s Nordic Cross-Country 2014 Results: 19th Place in Women’s Free Sprint, 34th Place in Women’s 10k Classic Vermont Home: Orleans Age: 26 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Sargent has had five top-5 World Cup finishes in 2013. Placed 25th in the 30km classical race at the 2013 World Championships. Sargent was an All-American at Dartmouth. 11) Hannah Dreissigacker Women’s Nordic Biatholon 2014 Results: 23rd Place in 15k Individual, 65th Place in 7.5km sprint Vermont home: Morrisville

Age: 27 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Placed 56th in individual and 71st in sprint at the 2013 World Championships. A People’s Academy graduate, Dreissigacker was a Dartmouth teammate of Susan Dunklee and Sophie Caldwell. Her parents were both Olympic rowers and own the Craftsbury Outdoor Center. RESULTS TBA 12) Mikaela Schriffen Women’s Alpine, giant slalom and slalom 2014 Results: NA (GS, Feb. 18. Slalom, Feb. 21.) Home mountain: Burke Mountain Home town: Eagle-Vail, CO Age: 18 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Schriffen became the youngest women’s slalom world champion in 2013 and has already won seven World Cup events and finished in the top three 14 times in two years. She emphasized training over racing earlier in her career, which was molded at Burke Mountain Academy. She won the 2013 World Championship title for slalom and also captured the season-long World Cup slalom title last winter. She brought

home the 2011 and 2012 US championship slalom titles before her 18th birthday and is considered a rising star on the Alpine team. 13) Nolan Kasper Men’s Alpine, Men’s slalom 2014 Results: NA (Slalom, Feb. 22) Home mountain: Burke Mountain Vermont Home: Warren Age: 24 Olympic Experience: Competed 2010 Road to Sochi: Kasper had a second-place World Cup slalom finish in 2011 and five top-10 WC races. He is a graduate of Burke Mountain Academy and attends Dartmouth in the off-season. He rose to the World Cup level in time for the 2010 Olympic season, resulting in a slalom finish of 24th in Vancouver. Hip surgery and subsequent tearing of his ACL and meniscus in 2012 did not deter his determination, and the slalom specialist who now calls Warren, Vt., home is eager to excel at Sochi. 14) Alex Diebold Men’s Snowboardcross 2014 Results: NA (Snowboard cross, Feb. 17.) Home mountain: Stratton (See VT. Olympians on Page 32)
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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Come Home To The Heart Of Stowe

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Maple syrup, ski resorts, craft beer, artisan cheeses, cows – all common thoughts when you say Vermont. What about craft distilleries? Everyone covets the hand-made, locally crafted, ‘from me to you’ concept these days, especially in Vermont and why not extend it to whiskeys, vodkas, and other spirits that people have a taste for? Bluebird conditions always make us happy in Vermont., even when its freezing, at least the sun is there to shine on our faces. Those picture perfect ski days, (hopefully not bulletproof) deserve the right cocktail to celebrate because lets face it...we aren’t in Colorado with 300 days of sunlight. Bring on the Sunshine. Green Mountain Distillers have been around since 2002 producing vodka, gin and delicious maple liqueur all with 100% certified organic grain. Not only are they crafted meticulously but are then distilled six times producing pure high quality spirits. Celebrate your perfect day with a perfect dose of Vermont known as the Sunshine Mapletini; Sunshine Vodka, Green Mountain Organic Maple Liqueur, and a little Maple Sugar for pizzazz! If the –tinis aren’t your style, try adding a splash of bubbles with a Sunshine Turbosa; Sunshine Vodka, Champagne, Orange Liqueur, and Orange Juice. In the wave of new distillers, Smugglers’ Notch Distillery from Jeffersonville, VT is coming in hot! A father and son team are producing it all with award-winning Vodka, true

distilled Gin, single-barrel extra aged amber Rum and a new straight Bourbon Whiskey. Select any of these for your Après cocktails and you can’t go wrong. When you ski in Vermont you always will endure the days of brutal winds and crippling cold. Nothing like a bit of Bourbon to thaw you out....and even better a hot toddie to melt the icicles dangling from your nose. Try this favorite known as ‘End of Time’ from Prohibition Pig; 2 oz. Bourbon, 0.5 ounces of Maple Syrup, 0.25 oz. Apple Cider Vinegar, 3 dashes of Pechaud’s bitters, 6.5 oz. hot water, star anise, and flamed orange peel. Maybe now you’ll enjoy tea-time! Now whether you’re celebrating your awesome day or trying to thaw out your toes, everyone loves a fun new drink. Sometimes you just need a little extra to jazz up your favorite cocktails. Caledonia Spirits, while known for their incredible Barr Hill Gin and Vodka, also produce the Elderberry Cordiala great addition to cocktails or your glass of bubbly! Other great mixers-- Eden Ice Cider, Eden Ice Orleans, Green Mountain Distillers Maple Liqueur, etc. Après or not, these locally crafted spirits are worth the taste. Just ask your bartender... maybe they have another specialty cocktail for your après needs as well!

Stowe Mountain Resort Reaches Settlement With Condominium Owners
STOWE, VT. — The parties in a longstanding lawsuit disputing the amount of condominium and hotel service fees charged by Stowe Mountain Lodge have tentatively reached an agreement. Officials of Spruce Peak Realty, LLC and Stowe Mountain Lodge, LLC, which are affiliates of Stowe Mountain Resort, along with a group of owners of 40 condominium units at Stowe Mountain Lodge, announced on Feb. 13 that they have reached an agreement in principle as to the terms of a settlement resolving a putative class action lawsuit alleging that condominium and hotel service fees are much higher than anticipated by owners at the time of purchase at Stowe Mountain Lodge.

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PA G E 1 6 VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

An architectural drawing of the proposed Stowe Mountain Club Alpine Clubhouse sports an ice skating rink in the center courtyard.

Stowe Resort & Spruce Peak Realty to build new facilities
STOWE – In order to meet the demands of a rapidly growing slope side community, Stowe Mountain Resort and Spruce Peak Realty will begin construction of facilities this spring to expand family amenities and services at the Spruce Peak site. Several new facilities will be built around a new ice rink that will double as a community plaza and green in the summer. These amenities will include a new state-of-the-art children’s Adventure Center with ski/ride school, year-round daycare facilities, and a children’s activities center. A new adult-friendly Stowe Mountain Club Alpine Clubhouse will also be part of the expansion, accompanied by more retail shops, restaurants, food markets and a parking garage for club members. The new facilities will replace existing buildings that were temporary since the nearly $500 million Spruce Peak expansion was launched almost a decade ago. Preliminary costs for the new project are estimated to be around $80 million. “As with everything we do at Stowe Mountain Resort, this new phase will adhere to the development principals that guide the resort and Spruce Peak Realty; commitment to family, community, the environment, and the legacy and traditions of Stowe,” said Sam Gaines, VP of Spruce Peak Realty, at a media gathering Saturday, Jan. 25 at the Spruce Peak Club House. “It’s a collective vision that will serve our families for years to come and will ultimately be a preeminent part of the Stowe legacy.” In brief comments introducing the project, Spruce Peak Lodge president Robert McEleney said the project would start later this spring, proceed through next winter and, if things go as planned, be ready for occupancy before the 2015-16 ski season. And that’s not all. In comments after the press conference, Communications Director Michael Colburn said resort officials would announce later this spring plans for more nonwinter activities at the resort, including the construction of a zip line that would start at the top of the gondola and proceed down the mountain in a few segments. Resort officials also stressed their desire to keep the projects “green,” noting they would tap into geothermal heat for part of the new development. Stowe Mountain resort is one of only four “sustainable communities” recognized by Audubon International. While the resort has not yet selected a general contractor, Gaines said he was not anticipating any problems or delays because the project was part of the company’s approved master plan. “It’s a fluid process,” Gaines told the Stowe Reporter in a Jan. 22 story. “We’re fortunate in Vermont. You can talk with the local people in advance of projects to get advice on how to navigate the permit process.” The look of the new building, according to the Reporter, “will blend old and new styles and tie into nature motifs. It will be congruous with other buildings in the area, like the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center and the base lodge. The buildings that house the existing Adventure Center and Alpine Club are intentionally rudimentary, with designers knowing they were only temporary. “The new Adventure Center will have two levels. The connected Alpine Club will be taller and harken to the local forest, with a pinecone inspired shape.” The Reporter also noted there would be “a smaller structure at the base of the small ice rink to serve as a shelter where people can lace up their skates, inspired by the old Civilian Conservation Corps buildings.”

Construction on the new facility will begin in the spring of 2014 and be ready for occupancy before the 2015-16 ski season.

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

PA G E 1 7

Breweries & Wineries
1. Lawson’s Finest The Warren Store 4. Boyden Valley Winery
4 8 5 2 9 11 19 10

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brews and wines, the Vermont Brewers 13 Association and Vermont Wine and Grape Council 14 1 18 have developed Vermont 6 12 Passport Challenge 15 prgrams for guests who visit breweries and wineries in the state. 17 Those who visit four breweries, get a “Drink Vermont Beer” bottle opener; those who 7 visit 10 breweries earn a “Drink Vermont Beer” t-shirt; and those 3 who visit all the breweries get the grand prize: a “Collectors Set of Vermont Beer Gear.” The rules are simple: Visit a brewery or brewpub that is part of the challenge (listed on the Vermont Brewer’s Association website (www. vermontbrewers.com); enjoy a glass or pint and get your “passport” stamped at that brewery with their 16 official VBA symbol. (The passport card is available on the VBA website or at most of the breweries.) VBA Prizes are given out when the passport is mailed into the and Vermont Vermont Brewers Association, 142 Grape & Wine Kirk Meadow Rd., Springfield, Vt. 05156.    (Be sure to indicate your Council initiate size if you qualify. The offer is Passport programs shirt valid while supplies last and is good only for breweries & brewpubs, not for guests who at wineries or cideries.) visit Vermont’s A similar program is being run breweries and through the Vermont Grape & Wine Council. For info on rules go to www. wineries. VermontGrapeandWineCouncil. If you’re a lover of micro- com.

284 Main St. Warren, Vt 05674 802-496-3864 www.warrenstore.com Lawson’s Finest Liquids Warren, VT 05674 802-272-8436 www.lawsonsfinest.com The Warren Store is open 7 days/week, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m, bringing in a rotating line-up of bottles delivered every Friday. “Straight from the Green Mountains to your head!” The Warren Store is the best location to find Lawson’s beer, a small batch artisanal microbrewery. Lawson’s goal is to provide local brews of the highest quality and freshness, while crafting unique new recipes and emulating the best of widely appreciated styles.

2. Shelburne Vineyard

6308 Shelburne Road Shelburne, Vt 05482 802-985-8222 www.shelburnevineyard.com Open 7 days/week, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tastings and Tours Taste our internationally recognized, awardwinning red, white, rose and dessert wines; tour our state-of-the-art winery; picnic & stroll through our vineyard and discover how we make world-class wines from regionally grown grapes.

64 Vt Route 104 Cambridge, Vt 05444 802-644-8151 www.boydenvalley.com Open May – December, 7 days/ week, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Jan – April, Friday – Sunday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Wine Tasting ($6+tax) all day, Tours (FREE) 11:30am & 1:00pm, “French Gourmet” Cheese Plates ($19.95+tax) seasonally 10am-4pm Boyden Valley Winery, a fourth generation family farm, produces international awardwinning Vermont wines; bold red wines, elegant white wines, light and flavorful rose and fruit wines, “Vermont Ice”: the premier line of Vermont ice wines, and the NEW Vermont Ice Apple Crème and Vermont Ice Maple Crème liqueurs. We offer tastings daily from 10am5pm, “French Gourmet” cheese plates seasonally from 10am-4pm, and FREE tours daily at 11:30am and 1:00pm.

5. Vermont Pub & Brewery

3. Harpoon Brewery

336 Ruth Carney Drive Windsor, Vt 05089 802-6475491 www.harpoonbrewery.com Open daily, Sun-Weds 10am-6pm, Thurs-Sat 10am-9pm. We started the Harpoon Brewery in 1986 because—like today—we loved beer and wanted more quality choices, and we have spent as much time spreading the joy of beer drinking as we have focusing on recipes, ingredients, and brewing equipment. Hopefully our sense of gratitude is reflected in both the quality of the beer and the spirit of fun and enjoyment surrounding our beer and breweries. We invite all of you to visit our beautiful brewery in Windsor, Vermont.

144 College St. Burlington Vt, 05401 802-865-0500 www.vermontbrewery.com Open 7 days/week, 11:30 a.m. – 1 a.m. (ThuSat open until 2 a.m.) Vermont Pub & Brewery is Vermont’s original brewpub. Opened in 1988, it continues to be a celebrated landmark and produce world-class beer selections, which are all unfiltered with no preservatives.

6. Otter Creek Brewing Company

793 Exchange St. Middlebury, Vt 05753 802-388-0727 www.ottercreekbrewing.com Open 7 days/week , 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Offers self-guided window tours and great food. Founded in 1991, Otter Creek is one of the oldest craft breweries in the State. We brew all of our beers in small batches to ensure freshness, using Vermont water, the best domestic malts and hops, and our own top fermenting yeast. Otter Creek is also home to Wolaver’s Fine Organic Ales and The Shed. Wolaver’s

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

was the first USDA-certified brewer, leading the industry since 1997. The Shed has been a Vermont staple for generations and a local secret that is now available region-wide.

5520 US Route 4 Bridgewater Corners, VT 05035 802-672-5011 www.longtrail.com Open 7 days/week, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Sales and sampling and self-guided tours at the visitor center. Enjoy Vermont’s #1 selling craft beer at one of the most popular destinations in the state, the Long Trail Visitors Center. Whether you are interested in enjoying some of our yearround, seasonal, cask-conditioned or limited “pilot brew” releases, you will find there is a flavor for everyone!

7. Long Trail Brewing Company

E. Calais Vt 05650 802-456-7012 www.grandviewwinery.com Open May – October 7 days/week, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tours, tastings and retail store Grand View Winery specializes in non-grape wine produced with character and not sweet. It won a double gold award for its Cranberry wine, gold for its Strawberry Rhubarb wine, and silver for its Pear wine this year at the Finger Lakes Int’l Wine Competition among other awards.

here at the farm. We also offer delicious local cheese plates to enjoy with the wines as well as unique and locally selected gifts. Check our website for hours and different events like live music, sushi, and yoga happening throughout the year. Open Wed-Fri 11-7, Sat & Sun 11-6.

17. Jasper Murdock’s Alehouse at The Norwich Inn

14. Lincoln Peak Vineyard

11. Magic Hat Brewery and Artifactory

8. Rock Art Brewery

632 Laporte Rd./Rt. 100 Morrisville, Vt 05661 802-888-9400 www.rockartbrewery.com Open Monday – Saturday, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tasting daily until 5:30 p.m. (with purchase of $4 souvenir glass) Tours run at 2 & 4 pm daily and you are welcome to watch from the viewing window on your own ANYTIME! We are celebrating 15 years! Enjoy samples of our beers during your visit and have a growler filled to take home and enjoy later. We have the best selection of our bottled beers and we also have several local Vermont foods and cheeses to pair nicely with the beers.

5 Bartlett Bay Road South Burlington, Vt 05403 802-658-BREW MagicHat.Net Winter Hours: Winter Tours Mon-Thurs 10-6, Thurs-Fri 3,4,5; Fri-Sat 10-7, Sat 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Sun 12-5, Sun 1:30 Where ancient alchemy meets modern-day science to create the best tasting beer on the planet.   Come watch our spores dance and play!   Visit the Artifactory for FREE samples, FREE Tours and the most unusual shopping experience!

142 River Rd New Haven VT 05472 802-388-7368 www.lincolnpeakvineyard.com Nov-Dec: Wed-Sun 11-5 Jan-May: Sat 11-5, M-F by chance or appt Jun-Oct: Daily 11-5 Tastings; wine by the glass We—the Granstrom family—grow 12 acres of grapevines, make wine right here from our own grapes, and love to share how grapes grow in Vermont. Come taste our wines, enjoy a glass by the cozy wood stove or on the winery porch, and walk around the vineyard. Our wines have won three best-inshow awards at the Intl Cold Climate Wine Comp in recent years. 3 miles north of Middlebury, just off Rte 7.

325 Main Street Norwich, VT 05055 (802) 649-1143 www.norwichinn.com Yearly Hours: Monday 5pm-9pm Tuesday Thursday 11:30am - 9pm Friday & Saturday 11:30am - 9:30pm Sunday 12pm - 9pm Jasper Murdock’s Ales are crafted from fine English malts, with hops grown in England, locally, and in our own hop garden at the Inn. Our beer is pumped underground from the beer cellars to our pub at the Inn. Our brewery is not open for tours but the Alehouse is open for you to wet your whistle during the above hours. Our ales have won 4 silver medals and 1 gold medal in the last three years at the Great International Beer Competition and are sold only at The Norwich Inn.

18. East Shore Vineyard

15. Champlain Orchards

9. Zero Gravity

American Flatbread 115 St. Paul St. Burlington, VT 05401 802-861-2999 www.americanflatbread. com Zero Gravity Craft Brewery is located inside American Flatbread Burlington Hearth where you will find 10-15 house brews on tap all year long. Beers that are brewed for food are our main focus and German and Czech-style lagers and a variety of Belgian styles are usually well represented. Our TLA I.P.A. is a crowd favorite as is our medieval style Gruit ale, released twice a year on the summer and winter solstices.

153 Pond Lane, Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-0700 www.woodchuck.com Facility not set up for public tours Cider can be purchased in all 50 states The Vermont-based, independently owned and operated cidery is now leading America’s fastest growing alcohol beverage category, through its visionary mix of innovation and tradition. Their signature high quality production is naturally gluten-free, which is something that sets them apart.

12. Woodchuck Cidery

3597 Route 74 West Shoreham, VT 05770 802-897-2777 w w w.champ lainorchards.com Open daily 10-4 November-June Open daily 9-6 July-September Please call ahead if possible. We offer guided tastings of our Pruners Pride, Pruners Promise, Semi-Dry, and Cranberry Hard Ciders, as well as our Sparkling and Honeycrisp Ice Ciders - all made onsite with our ecologically grown apples. Picnic or take a short walk for stunning views of Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks.

Sugarbush - Lincoln Peak Sugarbush Access Rd. Warren, VT 05674 and 28 Church St Burlington, VT 05401 877-ESV-VINO www.eastshorevineyard.com. Sugarbush Tasting Room: Open Friday-Sunday – Noon to 6PM. Burlington Tasting Room: Open Everyday except Tuesday - Noon to 6PM, open later weekends – Call for details. Wine tasting ($7+tax) receive complimentary glass. Join us at our two premier tasting rooms for tastings and pairings with some of Vermont’s finest chocolates and cheeses. East Shore Vineyard produces a variety of international award-winning Vermont made wines including: Traminette, Summer Snow, Cab Franc, Marquette, and Vidal Ice Wine.

16. Saxtons River Distillery

13. Fresh Tracks Farm Vineyard & Winery
4373 VT Route 12 Berlin, VT 05602 802-223-1151 www.freshtracksfarm.com Come visit our beautiful and sustainable tasting room just 3 miles south of Montpelier. Sit and enjoy sampling and sipping our selection of wines all grown and produced on premise

10. Grand View Winery
Max Gray Road

485 West River Rd. Brattleboro, VT 05301 802-246-1128 www.saplingliqueur.com Tasting room hours: Tues-Friday 9-5, Saturday 10-5. Saxtons River Distillery is the home to Sapling Vermont Maple Liqueur. We will be adding new products soon, so stop by and see what has just been bottled!

19. Trapp Lager Brewery

700 Trapp Hill Road Stowe, Vermont 05672 802-253-5705 • www. trappfamily.com The Trapp Lager Brewery offers a selection of authentic Austrian lagers. Stop by for a pint and enjoy our mountaintop views in our DeliBakery, lounge, or dining room. The Trapp Family Lodge is a mountain resort in the European tradition by the family that inspired “The Sound of Music”

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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FEBRUARY/MARCH EVENTS
February 17 – 21 Stowe Mountain Film Festival at Stowe Mountain Resort Each year the newest releases from the outdoor film industry’s top production companies, along with submissions from promising amateur filmmakers converge on the Green Mountains. The result is 5 days of adrenaline-pumping action, stunning cinematography and intense documentaries that remind us why we love Vermont and our shared outdoor community.Proceeds benefit the Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum, whose mission is to collect, preserve and celebrate Vermont’s skiing and snowboarding history. $12 per person. http://www.vtssm.com/filmfestival/380 February 20 – 22 The North Face Park & Pipe Series at Stratton Mountain Resort The North Face Park & Pipe series is a grassroots pipeline for athletes hoping to develop their skills and eventually qualify for top-level competitions such as X Games, Grand Prix and the Olympics. In addition to providing an open competition opportunity for athletes, The North Face is also the charter sponsor of U.S. Freeskiing through 2018. For more info go to www.stratton.com. February 22 Winter Gala at Stratton Mountain Resort Organized by the Stratton Foundation, the annual gala raises funds to help families directly affected by hardship or disaster. This year features a cocktail hour, raffle and live classical guitar in the west wing of the Resort Base Lodge. $100 per person. www.stratton.com February 22 Triple Crown Unconventional Challenge at Mad River Glen The first leg of Mad River’s Triple Crown Competition Series, the Unconventional Terrain Competition is the East’s original extreme ski competition and challenges competitors with a grueling test of their abilities. The expert terrain at Mad River Glen is recognized as the most difficult terrain in New England and the Unconventional Terrain competition is a test of a skier’s ability to conquer it. Judging for the event is based on smoothness, creativity, turn quality, and difficulty of line. “The Triple Crown, and the Unconventional Terrain Competition in particular, seem to attract the best skiers from all over,” says Mad River Glen marketing director, Eric Friedman. The event has developed a reputation for the wildest ski competition in the East. The cost is $20 if preregistered, $25 the day of the event, or $50 for all three Triple Crown Events. http://madriverglen.com/visit/event-calendar February 22 Magic WinterFest2014 at Magic Mountain

2014
February 24 – 28 2014 East Coast Expression Session at Stratton Mountain Resort The largest gathering of alpine snowboarding in the East, spend five days on groomed trails on Stratton Mountain. This is a non-competitive event that is open to all ages and carving abilities featuring demos, free clinics, and a closing party on Thursday. Group rates are available for one to multi-day passes as well as lodging. February 27 – 28 United States Telemark Ski Association’s (USTSA) National Championships at Bromley Mountain Resort USTSA National Championships is the premier telemark event in the country, bringing at least 36 Elite US men’s and women’s team members from all across America to the two day competition. Combined, all classes, including the citizen’s class, will field between 50 and 80 racers. The overall winners will be crowned National Champions on Friday evening. February 28 Triple Crown Vertical Challenge at Mad River Glen Mad River Glen’s Triple Crown Vertical Challenge. This grueling event challenges competitors to ski as many runs as they can in one day, on Mad River’s famous Single Chair. To make things even tougher, the competitors are required to ski directly under the chair, a route that cascades down Chute and Lift Line, two of Mad River Glen’s most difficult trails. The cost is $20 if preregistered, $25 the day of the event, or $50 for all three Triple Crown Events. http://madriverglen. com/visit/event-calendar February 28 – March 2 Girls Time Out Snowboard Camp at Stratton Mountain Resort The Shred Betties of Stratton offer this two-day camp designed exclusively for women by women. The camp teaches all levels of snowboarding from beginner to advance in all disciplines. www.stratton.com March 1 - 2 Windells On The Road Camp at Stratton Mountain Resort Windells offers a weekend of private coaching and park progression. Participants walk away with free gear from Windells’ sponsors, a bag of new tricks and all campers will be entered to win a Free Session to Summer 2014 at their home base in Oregon.www.stratton.com March 1 Helly Hanson Big Mountain Battle at Killington Resort Team-based event, open to all ages and skier/rider skill levels and allows exploration of the entire mountain. Each team of two must cover all the checkpoints around the mountain in a three-hour time period. Every team will be given a course

FEBRUARY

Magic celebrates the spirit and camaraderie of winter sports with the Black Magic Extreme Challenge is open to all 10 years old+. 8:30-9:30 registration at the lodge (pre-register by downloading the form below or fill out form at Group Sales Office); 11:00 start (Qualifier for Ski The East Free-ride Tour event at Magic on 3/1.Apres ski party and silent auction benefiting the Alpine Club until 7; buffet dinner from 5:30 to 7 (tickets purchased at event $20 adults/$10 kids); torchlight parade down the slopes of Magic at 7:30p.m. (sign up at group sales office). Fireworks at 8p.m. with live band, The Resistors. February 22 K-Town Showdown at Killington The third and final in the K-Town Showdown series. The series features divisions for all ages with prizes for winners. www.killington.com February 23 Hope on the Slopes at Jay Peak Resort A vertical challenge event to benefit the American Cancer Society. Registration begins at 7:30 in the Stateside Hotel and the event runs all day into the evening for live music, food and a 50/50 raffle. www.jaypeakresort.com February 23 Stowe Derby at Stowe Mountain Resort Participants ski through 20km of challenging terrain, racing down Mt. Mansfield’s Toll Road and along the entire length of the Stowe Recreation Path before reaching the finish in the village. The course has a total vertical drop of over 2,600 feet. $30 to $90 depending on race and date of entry. stowederby@teammmsc.org, http://www.stowederby.com/ 802 253 9216 February 23 29th Annual Telemark Festival at Bromley Mountain Resort The Kåre Andersen Telemark Festival comes to Bromley for its 29th year with tele-events, an annual race and clinics for the entire family. www.bromley.com February 23 Camel’s Hump Challenge at Camel’s Hump Skiers Association Center One of New England’s premier backcountry skiing events - The Camel’s Hump Challenge (CHC) – is a high-country traverse around the perimeter of Camel’s Hump (4083’) — the third highest peak in Vermont’s Green Mountains. Dr. Warren Beeken, the founder and organizer, who passed away in 2003, conceived the CHC as a fundraiser for the Vermont Alzheimer’s Association, and the event continues to raise money for support and educational programs of that organization.

MARCH

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

FEBRUARY/MARCH EVENTS

2014
March 9 39th Annual North American Telemark Festival at Mad River Glen The world’s largest and oldest gathering of Telemark skiers. March 7 – 9 Vermont Open at Stratton Mountain Resort Stratton Mountain and The Washed Up Cup bring you The Vermont Open with over $20,000 in prize money, which supports the Ross Powers Foundation/Level Fund. www.stratton.com March 9 Bolton to Trapps Tour at Trapp Family Lodge Help raise money for the Catamount Ski Cubs youth program by skiing from Bolton to Trapps on a classic section of the Catamount Trail. A shuttle to the start will be available in the morning and from Nebraska Valley Road to the finish in the afternoon. At the end of the day we will celebrate a great day on the trail with music, food and refreshments. For more info please visit www.catamounttrail.org or email gmaino@ catamounttrail.org

Skiers and snowboarders get an early morning start on the trails at Pico.

Photo courtesy of Pico Mountain Resort

map and team card and willbe tracked by GPS.The top three teams with the best times to complete all checkpoints will receive awards, but the top team will win the biggest prize of all - $2,000 worth of Helly Hansen gear of their choice and an invitation to participate in the Battle in the Bowls finals at Aspen/Snowmass. March 1 34th Annual George Syrovatka Race at Jay Peak Resort Annual ski race to benefit Leukemia research. In addition to being a timed race, a speed trap will be placed at the fastest part in the course. $500 cash prize to the fastest racer. Après party at the Stateside Day Lodge to follow. March 1 Women’s Only Telemark Clinic at Mad River Glen Women’s only clinics focus on positive attitude, tactics and techniques to help you achieve your skiing goals. Clinics include all day coaching and lunch. March1 Bud Light Mardi Gras at Mount Snow Resort Mount Snow turns into Bourbon St with Bud Light sponsored parties at resort bars and over 10,000 beads to giveaway. March 2 FAT Ski-A-Thon Presented by Vermont North Ski Shop, Sugarbush Resort. Participants will complete as many laps on the Summit Quad lift as possible on “fat” skis with a waist of 70 millimeters or wider (if possible). It will not be a race, but a casual event to have fun and enjoy the outdoors in the name of philanthropy. Participants will raise money for each completed lap and also gather flat donations with proceeds going to the High Fives Non-Profit Foundation. March 2 SVSS Banked Slalom Championships at Stratton Mountain Resort A banked slalom race held on Suntanner. The event with be the only in the series and will serve as the SVSS National qualifier. First place finisher in each age group qualifies for USASA Nationals. All competitors take two runs and the fastest single run time determines ranking. www.stratton. com

March 3 – 8 Mardi Gras at Jay Peak Resort Jay Peak offers a week’s worth of activities including live music, food specials and parties – most of which are free www.jaypeakresort.com March 8 Women’s Only Alpine Ski Clinic at Mad River Glen Women’s only clinics focus on positive attitude, tactics and techniques to help you achieve your skiing goals. Clinics include all day coaching and lunch. March 8 Marchdi Gras at Stratton Mountain Resort Stratton celebrates Marchdi Gras and the Annual Village (Southern-Style) Block Party. Enjoy live music, food and drink vendors, ice bar, celebrity mixologist and chef and activities for the kids like face painting, caricaturist drawings, acrobatics, stilt walking and more. March 8 The COMP at Mount Snow Resort The second annual Carinthia Open Mega Plaza. Park builders will construct a one-of-a-kind, plaza-style setup rails, boxes and other features. Athletes compete for gear from event sponsors or a piece of the cash purse. www.mountsnow.com March 8 Mountain Dew Vertical Challenge at Killington Resort Free race open to all ages. March 8 – 9 39th Annual NATO Telemark Festival at Mad River Glen The “mother” of all telemark festivals returns again to MRG with two days of nonstop telemark clinics, races and an afterparty. March 9 Jack Jump World Championships at Mount Snow Resort A combination of homemade Jack Jump design, old school ingenuity, and user skill will factor into determining who can make it down a dual paneled slalom course with the best combined time. After party complete with awards and raffle prizes for all competitors will follow.www.mountsnow.com

March 9 – 11 Women on Snow Ski Camp at Stratton Mountain Resort A multi-day women’s camp coached by elite guest coaches and Stratton’s top women’s instructors. Open to intermediate and advanced level skiers. www.stratton.com March 14 – 15 Carinthia Freeski Open at Mount snow Resort Annual AFP certified event. This season features a cash purse up for grabs for the pros and gear for winners in the amateur division. March 15 – 16 24 Hours of Stratton at Stratton Mountain Resort Teams of four to twelve ski from noon on Saturday to noon on Sunday. Each athlete can ski for as long as they want over the entire 24-hour period. Each individual’s vertical as well as the team’s combined vertical feet skied is tracked for prizes. March 15 – 16 Burton Stash Gathering at Killington Resort Snowboarders gather at Killington’s Stash to take advantage of natural terrain. Saturday will be a banked slalom open to all snowboarders. There will be a cook out lunch provided for all competitors to enjoy as well as a live DJ playing during the entire event. The action will continue on Sunday with a shop team banked slalom event where local board shops will enter their own teams to compete. March 17 Shamrock Scavenger Hunt at Killington Resort Ski/ride around the resort to find strategically placed Shamrock logos and return to the Killington tent to win a prize. All Shamrock logos will be hidden on green circle trails only and there will be only one prize per participant. March 22 Backcountry Challenge presented by Wolaver’s and MRG Mad River Glen This is not a race. There are no winners and no losers - only those who finish the course and those who don’t. Choose your gear - telemark, snowshoe, or randonee - as you adventure through the rugged terrain of the Green Mountain spine. A raffle follows. March 22 Triple Crown Mogul Challenge at Mad River Glen

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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FEBRUARY/MARCH EVENTS
The third leg of the Triple Crown Competition Series Tuesdays: Trapp Nordic Cup Time Trial Series at Trapp Family Lodge XC Center Every Tuesday for ten weeks, compete each week on a marked racecourse complete with timing and start area. You pick your start time each day between the hours of 9a.m. and 4p.m. It’s a 10-week series with prizes for both skate and classic. Wednesdays: Race Series: Ski Bum at Killington Teams of local skiers race down Highline for the best time. Each race finishes with a party. www.killington.com Fridays: Free Heel Fridays at Pico Available Fridays beginning January 3, excluding February 14 and 21, Designed for all ability levels, participants are responsible for providing their own equipment, telemark rentals are not available at Pico Mountain. Lift ticket not included, helmets recommended. Season Pass holders receive a 15% discount Call 866-233-1195 Saturdays: Bolton After Dark at Bolton Valley

2014

ONGOING:

Saturday nights from 4-8 p.m. Bolton Valley throw’s a mini party complete with skiing and riding for all ages, food and drink specials at Fireside Flatbread, and a public screening of a movie by Meathead Films, a local film studio based in Williston, VT. Night skiing tickets will be $19 for all ages, and when you’re finished for the night, head inside for $2 flatbread slices and sodas, nightly beer specials and screening a different movie every week. Mountain Moments at Mad River Glen Every Saturday throughout the ski season in the Kent Thomas Nature Center, MRG’s on-staff naturalist will be on hand to answer questions and expose visitors to the wildlife and ecosystems on the mountain. Sundays: Free Nordic Clinics at Bolton Valley The 2013-14 Season offers free Sunday morning clinics from 10-11am. Please arrive at 9:30am to get setup. The classic skiing clinic is taught by our instructors and qualified guest Nordic instructors. Free clinics are limited to one session per person per lifetime. Clinic participants receive $5 off rentals. Reservations required, call (802)-434-6876. Complimentary ticket for the length of the class is provided, participants must purchase a ticket if they would like to ski for the remainder of the day.

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PA G E 2 2 VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Vt. ski resorts respond to climate change predictions
dairy farms. As well, Bolton Valley has installed a mountaintop wind turbine that SOUTH ROYALTON — One would produces 300,000 kilowatt hours of electricexpect, at an event entitled “Brown Slopes, ity annually. “We are leading by example,” said Riehle. Bare Trails? The Impact of Climate Change on Winter Sports,” that glimmers of hope “If others can follow, maybe there is some for Vermont’s winter recreation prospects hope of turning this ship around.” “Enough people acting in concert is somein the 21st century would be faint. But takeaways from the expert panel at thing that can make a difference,” BuraVermont Law School last week were not kowski added. But it was Burakowski’s role, as the panel’s all gloomy. Juxtaposed with talk of a negative feedback loop in the Northeast, where climate scientist, to present some sobering warming reduces snowpack and reduced facts. Many came out of a report she cosnowpack exacerbates warming, there were authored in 2012 while at the University ideas to which the Vermont snowsports of New Hampshire: “Climate Impacts on the Winter Tourism Economy in the United community could cling. The panel included Elizabeth Burakowski, States.” The report was co-sponsored by a climate scientist and New Hampshire the non-profit Protect Our Winters and the native who works for the National Center Natural Resources Defense Council. Warming in the north country, including for Atmospheric Research in Boulder; Parker Riehle, president of the Vermont Ski the Arctic, is accelerating faster than warmAreas Association; Rikert Ski Touring Center ing near the equator, she said, and winter is warming faster than Director Michael the other seasons. Hussey of MidThe loss of snowpack dlebury; and Ian makes it harder for Jarrett of Massathe atmosphere to chusetts-based retain cold air, which HDK Snowmakincreases the warmers. ing effect. Similarly, The panelists the loss of Arctic ice pointed out that VSAA President Parker Riehle creates open ocean elevations along water that absorbs the spine of the more of the sun’s Green Mountains will help Vermont retain snow longer than heat, increasing the pace of melting. Buraits flatter counterparts in the region, and kowski predicts we will see an ice-free Arctic that the state has a cutting-edge snowmak- sea by the end of the century. From a snowsports business perspective, ing industry that an increasing number of Nordic ski areas are taking advantage of, as the report found that Vermont skier visits well as most of the state’s alpine ski areas. have dropped by 9.5 percent during the (Over 80 percent of Vermont’s trails at its lower snow years from 1999 to 2010 comski areas are covered by snowmaking — the pared to higher snow years. That resulted in a loss of roughly 700 jobs and $40 million in most of any state in the Northeast.) Vermont winter sports centers have also annual economic impact, according to the developed adaption strategies for warmer report. Nationally, the winter sports industry temperatures that include off-snow offerings. Jay Peak has famously installed an accounts for 212,000 jobs and $12.2 billion, indoor water amusement park at the base Burakowski said. Ski areas in the Northeast of its chairlifts. Smugglers Notch has built are more vulnerable economically to low a zipline canopy tour around its forested snow years than Western resorts because base. At Rikert, where they are making snow it is easier for people to cancel plans when this winter for the second season — one of airlines aren’t involved, she said. New Engsix Nordic centers in the state to do so — land resorts primarily draw on Northeastthey have added “fatbikes” to their fleet of ern urbanites and suburbanites who travel rental equipment. The bikes have enlarged by car. Also, the “backyard syndrome” is particutires designed for snow, but can also ride larly pronounced in the Northeast, Riehle over mud and dirt. “It’s a way to get people outdoors in said, explaining that when suburbanites to the winter when there isn’t enough snow,” the south don’t have snow in their yards, it’s Hussey said, adding that diversity at all hard to sell them on a trip to ski country winter recreational areas is becoming stan- even if the mountains have snow. “It’s the most challenging aspect of our dard fare. While enacting adaptive strategies for business,” said Riehle. And the industry is bracing for even the climate that scientists like Burakowski are predicting for the coming decades, Ver- steeper challenges based on the sobering mont ski areas are also working to curb the climate predictions (all forecast warmer greenhouse gas emissions that are blamed temps to come) highlighted at last Thursfor the phenomenon. The Killington gon- day’s forum, which was a collaboration dola, for example, is powered exclusively between Vermont Law School’s Sports Law by “Cow Power” — manure from Vermont Institute and its Environmental Law Center.

By JASON STARR

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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Vermont resorts soften expansions with efficiency projects
BY EVAN JOHNSON
From new hotels to slopes lined with new snowguns, resorts have increased in both output and capacity in recent years. This winter has been a major season for resort expansions, and thanks to solar panels, windmills, incentives from nonprofits and big piles of compost, resorts are combatting cost and energy use through new methods, while at the same time increasing capacity. At Mount Snow Resort, a recently released case study showed that a 2,500light fixture upgrade in the Grand Summit Hotel will save 419,773-kilowatt hours annually – a total of $39,126 in electricity costs. In total, efficiency measures resort-wide at Mount Snow in 2013 saved 1,063,797-kilowatt hours annually or about 6.4 percent of Mount Snow’s 2012 electric use. “Usually when you make a car more efficient, you sacrifice horsepower,” says Dave Meeker, communications manager for Mount Snow. “But here that’s really not the case,” adding that new technologies have allowed ski resorts to increase energy efficiency plus gain output. Chuck Clerici, an account manager with Efficiency Vermont, a nonprofit that helps individuals and small businesses improve energy efficiency in existing buildings and new developments, says that as older buildings are due for upgrades and renovations, efficient options are the logical choice. “A lot of the mountains are saddled with older properties that weren’t built at a time when energy management was very important,” he says. “They’re leaky, not well insulated and use old motors. It doesn’t necessarily pay to replace it.” As a result of their work, Mount Snow has been nominated this year by Efficiency Vermont for a Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnership award (NEEP), which recognizes “business leaders for energy efficiency.” Mount Snow Resort isn’t alone. Stowe Mountain Lodge received Audubon International’s Green Leaf certification in 2009 as well as Audubon’s Green Community award for the residences at Stowe village as well as the Audubon International Signature Sanctuary certification for the resort’s club golf course. In 2010, Stowe Mountain Lodge was awarded 5 Green Keys – the maximum rating – by Green Key Global. Sugarbush Resort received the Governor’s Award in 2012 for cleanup efforts of Rice Brook, a tributary of the Mad River that had been contaminated by stormwater runoff. The brook was removed from the state’s list of impaired waters. Smugglers’ Notch Resort was awarded the Green Mountain Awards for Environmental Excellence in 2013 and was designated as an “environmental leader” by the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation. And that’s just a sampling of how resorts across the state are moving toward energy efficiency programs for one obvious reason: Conservation and energy efficiency measures save money. At Sugarbush Resort, Margo Wade, director of planning and regulatory compliance, says much of the resort’s projects at the base lodge and Sugarbush Inn have centered on diverting as much waste as possible from the landfill. Sugarbush has diverted 35 percent of its waste by composting, recycling or separating the waste the resort produces. Food services has been able to compost roughly 12 tons of food scraps every year, a number she says is conservative. Other food scraps are composted and used in landscaping. While it costs $140 per-ton to send garbage to the landfill, recycling is able to save $95 on every ton. When the Stowe Mountain Lodge opened in 2005, recycling programs were diverting 70 percent of waste from the landfill. Today, the lodge sends compostable waste to Grow Compost in Moretown, which produces compost adhering to Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) standards. Cutting costs goes well beyond sorting trash. Aside from managing their waste stream, the Stowe Mountain Lodge monitors energy usage and performance of every piece of machinery in every one of its 300 rooms. Every fan, valve, coil and pipe

Dan Maxon, planning and permitting manager for Smugglers’ Notch Resort, helped oversee the installation of 35 solar trackers in 2012 that produced 200,000-kilowatt hours of electricity in their first year.
Photo by Evan Johnson

New snowmaking increases output with lower costs
BY EVAN JOHNSON We all know that snowmaking is expensive in terms of fuel use and requiring a huge amount of water capacity. We also know in this era of global warming, that it’s necessary if we’re going to have reliable snow. To reduce cost and fuel use, which also helps the environment, resorts have been making large investments in new snowmaking technology that increases energy efficiencies. Alan Herbert, Strategic Planning Manager for Hospitality and Small Businesses, works with ski resorts around the state with Efficiency Vermont. He says ski resorts are unique clients to work with due to fluctuating costs because of variable weather. “It’s an industrial process,” he says. “You’re making a widget and that widget is a snowflake. It’s an industrial process in an uncontrolled and uncontrollable environment.” That uncontrollable environment can mean big costs for lots of snow. At Mount Snow Resort, electricity for snowmaking totals $1 million every year. Of all the operations at Mount Snow Resort, Brendan Ryan, Operations Manager, says snowmaking continues to be the largest in terms energy use and cost. When snowmaking operations are running full-tilt, the system uses 12 megawatts every hour.. “No matter what technology you use, if the gun needs 25 gallons of water, that’s basically a fixed clock that I can’t change,” Ryan says. “I’m always going to have to spend electricity to get water to my guns. The variable is compressed air.” The lower mountain snowmaking system at Mount Snow includes a buried airline that is nearly 30 years old and was previously known to leak. Prior to 2013 efforts, that airline was used for the entire duration of snowmaking operations – typically 1,300 hours every season. By installing a new valve on the line, Mount Snow was able to eliminate the leak rate for all but about 150 hours every season.  By the end of 2013, Mount Snow’s energy efficiency projects included fixing the buried airline, re-plumbing airlines leaving the compressor house, adding electrical power to a trail to enable use of lower energy fan guns, an air flow meter to collect air flow rates over the season and testing 10 new lowenergy snow gun towers on sleds. Additional improvements included stripping old snowmaking pipe from trails and replacing them with more mobile snowguns that use onboard electric air compressors, eliminating the need for diesel compressors and saving the cost of 200,000 gallons of diesel fuel every year. The newest snowmaking equipment is able to maximize output while using less water. In 2008, Bolton Valley increased the size of its main snowmaking pipe by two inches, allowing the area to pump water uphill at a rate of 1,000 gallons every minute. After retrofitting their old Ratnik snow guns with new spray heads, their energy usage from 2008 to 2009 dropped almost ten-fold — from 83,048-kilowatt hours to 8,849 kilowatt hours. This summer, Sugarbush Resort added 76 new HKD snowmaking guns as well as 12 Snowlogic 4 stage towers. Margo Wade, director of planning and regulatory compliance, says the new guns save $164,000 and 1.9 million kilowatt hours annually. While it is possible to measure the rate and amount of snow being produced, it is more difficult to calculate the exact cost of producing snow at a given rate. By standardizing measurements, areas are able to see how much they spend. Efficiency Vermont encourages areas to use the Snowmaking Efficiency Index (SEI) as a kind of “miles-per-gallon” measurement. Herbert says a calculation like this can help save tens of thousands of dollars, even while acknowledging that statistics in the snowmaking world have limits. “It’s great from a numbers perspective,” he says. “But we’re not on the mountain 24/7. We’re not working on the mountain at two in the morning dealing with pipes that are frozen or hoses that are leaking. The problem is what is the reality,” adding that while resorts across the state are making great strides in energy efficiency with their physical plants and

Monitoring the waste

See Efficiency on page 25
PA G E 2 4 VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Efficiency
can be monitored for damage or wear from a single computer. Blais says the system helps save not only energy, but also the staff’s time: With the two systems, they can know exactly which appliances need maintenance and which parts need to be replaced. New expansion projects using energy efficient systems have demonstrated fast returns on investment. Bolton Valley Resort constructed the first wind turbine at a Vermont ski area in 2009 at a cost of over $800,000. It was projected to produce in excess of more than 300,000 kilowatt-hours annually, or the same power used by 45 Vermont households. Every year, the windmill has saved over $70,000 every year in electricity costs. One of the larger endeavors at Smugglers’ Notch was the installation of 35 solar trackers near the resort. The installation was completed in 2012. In the first year, the array produced 200,000 kilowatt hours of electricity, exceeding original estimates. Today, Smugglers’ purchases the produced electricity under a lease from All Earth Services and in five years, will have the opportunity to purchase the array. Dan Maxon, Planning and Permitting Manager, anticipates it will take six to eight years to recoup the investment while producing up to $50,000 worth of electricity every year.

The payoff, he says, is a means to avoid electricity costs in the future. “This power, in effect, pays-off commercial and overhead costs,” he says. “If we can save $50,000 a year on electricity, that’s $50,000 less we have to build into our price structure,” adding that helps contain the cost of lift tickets. This past September, the state greenlighted a $200 million development at Okemo Mountain Resort, and in January, plans were unveiled at Mount Snow for an EB-5 project including the construction of a new storage reservoir for snowmaking with capacity of up to 120 million gallons, three new pump houses and the installation of new pipelines and trail upgrades as well as a 36,000-square-foot base lodge at the Carinthia base area. And progress on Jay Peak Resort’s EB-5 projects continues unabated. While these projects and others are underway and good for the state’s economic growth, Chuck Clerici at Efficiency Vermont says it’s still possible for resorts to maintain commitments to environmental stewardship. The secret, he says, is for developers to put in little more effort and investment early on that will pay off in the future. “You’re going to have to put lighting in these buildings,” he says. “Are you going to put in the base package that barely meets code? Or are you going to go an extra step or two with project efficiency, determine

Moving forward

New technology, big savings

Snowmaking at Mount Snow Rosort and other resorts throughout the state has become more energy efficient with new technology.

the return on investment and justify spending little more on your lighting up front so that it doesn’t cost as much over time?” By shrinking the energy bill, resorts can spend money on things that actually draw more people, like snowmaking, marketing and improved terrain. Alan Herbert, also an account manager at Efficiency Vermont, says new developments will expand the size and health of one of the largest sectors of the Vermont economy. “The ski industry plays a big role in the state’s economy bringing in millions of dollars every year,” he says. “If we can help them be more sustainable both environmentally and economically, that’s going

to help drive the economy and the money they bring into the state.” To maximize the guests’ experience and maintain high efficiency standards, Andre Blais at the Stowe Mountain Lodge says the way forward is to include the guests as much as possible. “There’s no carrot,” he says. “You don’t get a free room for a night if you choose to recycle. But by offering the opportunity and then educating them that the opportunity is there, that’s two steps you’ve taken towards helping them make the decision to do the right thing,” which also allows the resorts to keep providing the amenities guests want.

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PA G E 2 5

Continued from page 16
“We have enjoyed working with the condominium owners of Stowe Mountain Lodge to enhance the benefits of ownership and to simplify and reduce the costs that owners pay,” said Sam Gaines, Director of Real Estate and Development at Stowe Mountain Resort. “We now look forward to continuing our partnership with the owners so that we can deliver the best possible experience to our owners and guests.” Patrick Sullivan, one of the lead plaintiffs in the lawsuit, said reaching the proposed settlement was “a great achievement for the owners, who will see their costs go down significantly, while maintaining the same level of service owners enjoy at Stowe.” Both Stowe management and the plaintiff owners expect homeowner association fees and service fees to be reduced by as much as 26 percent for new and existing lodge con-

Settlement

dominium owners. Under the terms of the settlement, condominium owners will also have greater representation in the condominium’s governance. Coming off the strongest real estate sales season in the last five years, the reduced fees should provide continued sales momentum heading into 2014, adding to nearly $200 million in sales that have occurred at Spruce Peak since 2004. Stowe Mountain Resort currently offers the Residences at Stowe Mountain Lodge, Front Four Private Residence Club, Mountain Cabin luxury townhomes and a limited number of ski-in/ski-out home sites. The settlement is subject to finalization of amendments to the governing documents and the parties’ Stipulation of Settlement, as well as court approval of the class action settlement, which the parties expect to be finalized in the first half of 2014. As part of the settlement, Stowe Mountain Lodge does not admit to any wrongdoing and expressly denies any liability.

FAT Ski-A-Thon Presented by Vermont North Ski Shop Scheduled for March 2
WARREN – On Sunday, March 2, Sugarbush Resort will host the third annual FAT Ski-AThon from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Participants will complete as many laps on the Summit Quad lift as possible on “fat” skis with a waist of 70 millimeters or wider (if possible). It will not be a race, but a casual event to have fun and enjoy the outdoors in the name of philanthropy. Participants will raise money for each completed lap and also gather flat donations with proceeds going to the High Fives Non-Profit Foundation. “VT North Ski Shop is excited to see the

See Ski-A-Thon on page 27

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Ski-A-Thon
FAT Ski-A-Thon return to the Mad River Valley and raise funds for the High Fives Foundation on the slopes at Sugarbush Resort,” said Jesse Murphy, Vice President ofSales and Marketing. “Although fat skis make powder skiing easier, the same does not hold true for making as many laps as possible for six hours. We can’t wait to gather pledges and have a blast on March 2nd!”

Pre-registration and kick off is scheduled for Saturday at 6:00pm at the Localfolk Smoke House in Waitsfield. Cost is free to participate and a discounted lift ticket is available. Schedule: 8 a.m. -9 a.m. — Meet at Mount Ellen Lodge for Registration for “FAT Ski-A-Thon” 9 a.m.— Load Summit Quad and start “FAT Ski-A-Thon” 3 p.m. — End “FAT Ski-A-Thon” 3:30 p.m. — Awards at Mount Ellen Lodge.

US Snowshoe Championships set March 2
By EVAN JOHNSON
This February, Prospect Mountain Ski Center in Woodford will host the 14th annual US National Snowshoe Championship. The series will run from February 28 through March 2 and is expected to draw as many as 800 participants from around the United States. The championship will also feature international and veterans divisions. The National Snowshoe Championship rotates locations every year. The 20122013 championship was held in Bend, OR. The race was last held in Vermont in 2006 at Bolton Valley Resort. Organizer for the race, Mark Elmore, says races in the Northeast and Midwest typically draw the most competitors. “Because of the location of Prospect Mountain, we’re expecting a great turnout for this year,” he says. The host community for the race is Bennington, located between the Green and Taconic Mountain Ranges. Dion Snowshoes, a Bennington-based snowshoe manufacturer, is the event’s principal sponsor and will provide a limited number of loaner snowshoes to participants. International athletes (non-U.S. citizens) may compete alongside the national championship competitors in the men and women’s 10-kilometer fields. The top ten international men and women will earn awards. Competitors must qualify to compete in the race. An athlete must be a current member of the U.S. Snowshoe Association. Athletes must register for USSSA membership prior to competing in their regional qualifying event. The USSSA hosts a series of 38 qualifying events from January 5 through February 23. An athlete must complete a recognized USSSA qualifying event and record a “qualifying” finish performance to be eligible for the national championships.For more information on registration go to ussnowshoechampionships.com.

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PA G E 2 7

The Family Ski Vacation made easy
By EVAN JOHNSON
Vacations with kids can be tricky. Over-plan and nobody gets a minute to rest. Under-plan and you might have a bunch of bored family members on your hands. Fortunately, thanks to programs and deals at a number of ski areas, the Vermont Ski Vacation needn’t be a hassle. Dana Freeman is the founder of FindandGoSeek.net, an online resource for families looking for activities in their own communities. When Freeman was growing up and learning to ski at Windham Mountain in New York, skiing wassomething her whole family did — no exceptions. “We (kids) were just expected to ski with everyone else,” she says. It wasn’t until she came to Vermont that she began to notice a number of changes in the way that ski areas took to families. Her two kids, now 12 and 15, learned to ski at Bolton Valley and Stowe. The whole family skis all over the state, Freeman says, all thanks to the programs and amenities geared towards families. “If you look at Vermont resorts, they’re starting to offer more secondary amenities,” she says. “They’re beginning to realize that families are viewing ski resorts as more than just a destination during the daytime. People don’t just want to go to the hill and then go back to their hotel room.” From dog sledding to ice skating to guided snowshoe hikes, there’s a lot more to do at ski resorts than just ski and ride. Myra Foster, marketing director at Stratton Mountain Resort, says that while the skiing and riding remains the main draw for visitors, it’s no longer a one-sport day. “There are so many groups of families or friends where skiing may not be their number

See Vacation on page 29

Activities at Smuggler’s Notch Resort, above, and most other resorts throughout Vermont have adopted programs that keep families entertained and engaged.

Photo provided by Smuggler’s Notch

BROmlEY MOUNTAIN
FEATURES:
1 Lodge, 2 Restauants, Swimming Pool, Adaptive

JAY PEAK RESORT
FEATURES:
4 Lodges, 5 Restaurants, Spa, Swimming Pool

KIllINGTON RESORT
FEATURES:
5 Lodges, 50 Restaurants, Spa, Swimming Pool

MAD RIVER GlEN
FEATURES:
2 Lodges, 3 Restaurants

MOUNT SNOW RESORT
FEATURES:
4 Lodges, 19 Restaurants, Spa, Swimming Pool, Adaptive

ACTIVITIES:
Racing, Snowshoeing, Ice Skating Snowmobile Tours Featured Family Activity: Skating at Riley Rink at Hunter Park in Manchester, Sleigh Rides, Dogsledding

ACTIVITIES:
Racing, Snowshoeing, Ice Skating, Featured Family Activity: Pump House indoor waterpark

ACTIVITIES:
Tubing, Racing, Snowshoeing, Ice Skating, Snowmobile Tours Featured Family Activity: Snowcat-drawn sleigh-ride to the Ledgewood Yurt for a family dinner

ACTIVITIES: ACTIVITIES:
Racing Featured Family Activity: The Mad River Glen Co-Op has events year-round for members and their families including parties, races and voting rights. Tubing, Racings, Snowshoeing, Snowmobile Tours Featured Family Activity: Mount Snow offers an array of activities including snowmobile tours, moonlit snowshoeing, tubing, torch parades and fireworks

LESSONS:
private lessons, kids programs, group clinics, multi-week clinics, team programs

LESSONS:
Kids and adults programs for beginner to advanced

LESSONS:
Located at the Ramshead Family Center with group sizes not exceeding five students, ages 12 weeks to 17 years of age

LESSONS:
Lessons available for skiers at the MRG Ski School

LESSONS:
Three separate areas for toddlers (3-6), kids (7-14) and adults (15 and older) in ski or snowboard. Group or private lessons.

CHIlDCARE:
State licensed, six weeks to six years of age, 8:30 - 4:30

CHIlDCARE:
State licensed “Jaycare” facilities in two locations, 8:30 am to 4pm

CHIlDCARE:
State licensed, 12 weeks to 12 years, 8:30 am - 3:45 pm

CHIlDCARE:
State licensed, 9:30am - 4pm

CHIlDCARE:
State licensed, ages six weeks to six years. 8 am to 4:30.

OKEmO MOUNTAIN RESORT
FEATURES:
8 Lodges, 19 Restaurants, Spa, Swimming Pool,

SmUGGlERS’ NOTCH
FEATURES:
3 Lodges, 8 Restaurants, Swimming Pool, Adaptive

STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT
FEATURES:
2 Lodges, 6 Restaurants, Spa, Swimming Pool, Adaptive

STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT
FEATURES:
2 Lodges, 8 Restuarants, Spa, Swimming Pool, Adaptive

SUGARBUSH RESORT
FEATURES:
7 Lodges, 8 Restaurants, Spa, Swimming Pool, Adaptive

ACTIVITIES:
Tubing, Ice/Rock Climbing, Snowshoeing, Ice Saking, Snowmobile Tours Featured Family Activity: FunZone Family Entertainment and Recreation Center

ACTIVITIES:
Ice/Rock Climbing, Racing, Snowshoeing, Ice Skating Featured Family Activity: The Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center in the Village of Stowe features a variety of family-oriented events including lectures, ballet, concerts and the Stowe Mountain Movie Festival.

ACTIVITIES:
Tubing, Racing, Snowshoeing, Ice Skating, Snowmobile Tours Featured Family Activity: Family Adventure Zone

ACTIVITIES:
Tubing, Racing, Snowshoeing, Ice Skating, Snowmobile Tours Featured Family Activity: Saltwater swimming pool, full moon snowshoe hikes to bonfires

ACTIVITIES:
Ice/Rock Climbing, Racing, Snowshoeing, Ice Skating Featured Family Activity: Sugarbush Adventure Learning Center, led by renowned skier John Egan

LESSONS:
Clinics for children, specialty clinics, private lessons, group clinics, programs just for women

LESSONS:
Private, and group programs for adults and children through the Snow Sport University

LESSONS:
Full ski school with group, season-long and private programs for children, teens and adults in alpine, cross-country skiing and snowboarding

LESSONS:
Clinics for 4-6, 7-12, private lessons available

LESSONS:
Ages 3 – 15 with placement in five different age-based clinics at The Schoolhouse.

CHIlDCARE:
State liensed, six months to four years old, 8 am - 4:30 pm
PA G E 2 8

CHIlDCARE:
State licensed, six weeks to four years old, 8:30am - 4pm

CHIlDCARE:
Cubs Childcare Center facility, state licensed ages six months to three years. 8 am to 4 pm

CHIlDCARE:
State licensed, 9:30am - 4pm

CHIlDCARE:
6 weeks to six years, state licensed, 8 am to 4 pm

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Sugarbush files permit with USFS to replace Valley House chairlift
WAITSFIELD, VT. — Last month Sugarbush filed permit requests with the United States Forest Service seeking approval to replace the Valley House lift at Lincoln Peak with a fix grip quad. Sugarbush president Win Smith said the USFS application was preliminary. “The permitting could take a year or two between the forest service and Act 250, so we wanted to get started,” Smith said. “It could be done next year or in three years from now.” When completed, the upper terminal will be slightly lower to reduce crowding when skiers coming along the traverse to Upper Snowball cross under the existing lift. According to the forest service application, Sugarbush operates 10 lifts with an uphill capacity of 11,000 people per hour at Lincoln Peak. The Valley House lift travels 350 feet per minute and can carry 750 people per hour. Newer, high–speed lifts can travel 1,000 feet per minute. The new lift would start in the same location and would feature 17 new towers and foundations in the same alignment as the current lift, with a new unload area 50 feet below the existing unload area. Trail reconstruction on Valley House Traverse would include widening the trail between 10 to 20 feet for about 250 linear feet just above the lift unload area. The present lift would be removed from the site. Concrete tower foundations would be removed to at least below grade level and covered with fill. The removal would begin shortly after the end of the ski season in late April or early May. Replacing the lift is approximately a $2 million capital expenditure. The quad would be useful when other lifts are on wind hold and would give the resort more uphill capacity when the slopes are full. Smith said the resort might sell the old 1960 Valley House double lift in its entirety or sell the chairs to individuals.

Bromley telemark races set Feb. 22 & 27-28
BROMLEY MT.  – Kåre Andersen’s 29th Annual Telemark Race & Festival, which will showcase the top free-heel skiers in the Northeast on Sunday, Feb. 23, will serve as a warm-up to the United States Telemark Ski Association’s (USTSA) National Championships, at Bromley on Thursday and Friday, Feb. 27-28. “This is really wonderful timing,” said Bill Cairns, Bromley President and telemark skier. “Kåre’s Festival, which is a great time by itself, offers a great cram-course on teleskiing for competitors and spectators, with races and clinics for all ages and abilities. Anyone interested in coming up to watch or compete in the National Championships couldn’t ask for a better primer.” The USTSA National Championships is the premier telemark event in the country, bringing at least 36 Elite US men’s and women’s team members from all across America to the two-day competition. Combined, all classes, including the citizen’s class, will field between 50 and 80 racers. The overall winners will be crowned National Champions on Friday evening. for varying ages is always helpful. But the most important thing when planning a vacation for a week or just a weekend, she says, is to go with the flow. “It’s not going to be perfect, but no family is and nor are their vacations,” she says. “It’s important to take the good with the bad, the good weather with the bad weather. There’s always something to do.” With so much to do, Vermont Ski & Ride compiled a handy list of things to keep you and your family occupied in these boxes:

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Vacation
one activity for one day or this year,” she says. “Our guests are getting up and doing yoga at 7 o’clock in the morning and out getting first tracks at 8:30. By 1 o’clock they’re onto something else.” Voted Number 1 for family vacations in the east by Ski Magazine in a reader survey running 15 years, Smugglers’ Notch Resort has developed award-winning programs for kids from six weeks to 16 years old. Activities Director Stacey Comishock says having a variety of trails and activities

Q BURKE MOUNTAIN RESORT
FEATURES:
2 lodges, 1 restaurant

MAGIC MOUNTAIN
FEATURES:
1 lodge, 2 restaurants, rentals

SUICIDE SIX
FEATURES:
1 lodge, 2 restaurants, rentals

ACTIVITIES:
Dogsledding, ice fishing, snowshoeing, cross country skiing all available in the area. Featured Family Activity: Cross country skiing at Kingdom Trails

ACTIVITIES:
Tubing Featured Family Activity: TimberQuest Ropes Course

ACTIVITIES:
Nordic center, ice skating, pool/hot tub, sleigh rides Featured Family Activity: Woodstock Inn Nordic Skiing Center.

LESSONS:
Kids and adults Available for kids ages 5 - 12, adults and private lessons programs for beginner to advanced

Open Daily

LESSONS:
Full lessons for kids three and older as well as freestyle and racing clinics

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

PA G E 2 9

The Alchemist looks to expand with second brewery
WATERBURY –The Alchemist brewery in Waterbury recently announced they are looking to open a second brewery with a tasting room and retail shop. Owners Jen and John Kimmich had initially planned to open a small retail shop that would allow them to continue to sell their beer, but after surveying options in the Waterbury area they have yet to find any that meet the needs of the brewery. One location had seemed promising until a traffic study determined that The Alchemist would have to widen Route 100 and put in turning lanes to accommodate the volume of cars traveling to and from the brewery. Instead, The Alchemist islooking for property on which to build a second brewery to make beer for sale on the premises. The new brewery will include a tasting room and retail shop. Meanwhile, the old location will continue to produce 9,000 barrels of their signature double IPA a year and will continue to serve as its distribution base. “We have many properties under consideration and are confident that we will find something ideal and close to home,” Jen Kimmich said.

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Mount Snow set to build new pond, plus new Carinthia Lodge
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WEST DOVER– A 120-million-gallon water storage pond for snowmaking and a new 36,000-square-foot base lodge for skier services are two of the projects Mount Snow will fund through EB-5, an immigrant investor program. The projects, newly approved under the Vermont EB-5 Regional Center, total $52 million in investments. The West Lake Project will increase Mount Snow’s current snowmaking water storage by nearly 500 percent. It will bring existing water withdrawals into compliance with state and federal regulatory standards. Additional project components include three pump houses, pipelines, a new magic carpet lift and other snowmaking improvements. Carinthia Ski Lodge, a new three-story, 36,000-square-foot skier service building located at the base of the Carinthia Slopes at

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See Mount Snow on page 31

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PA G E 3 0

Mount Snow
Mount Snow, is the first phase of a redevelopment of the Carinthia Base Area. The new lodge will include a cafeteria, restaurant, bars, retail shop, convenience store, ski/snowboard rental, ski school and ticketing. Future development at Carinthia will include more than 100 ski-in/ski-out residential units. The EB-5 program, run by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), encourages foreign investment in approved projects that create American jobs. For each investor a minimum of 10 jobs must be created, or in some cases preserved. If the requisite number of jobs are created within two years, the investor will receive a permanent green card. Mount Snow’s offering is under the oversight of the state of Vermont EB-5 Regional

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Center, the only USCIS designated regional center owned, controlled and supervised directly by a state government. Vermont has a long record of successful EB-5 projects, including successful projects at Jay Peak and Sugarbush resorts. “We are excited about the future growth and re-development at Mount Snow,” says Richard Deutsch, V.P. of Peak Resorts, the parent company of Mount Snow. “The EB-5 Program has proven it’s a successful way to raise capital and create jobs. We’re looking forward to bringing this success to the southern part of the state. “This is the first phase of what we hope will be many successful projects at Mount Snow,” Deutsch continued. “With a state-approved master plan for the redevelopment of up to 900 units and 200,000 square feet of skier service space, we expect to have many future projects at Mount Snow.”

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Logan lands slopestyle silver in Olympic debut
ROSA KHUTOR, Russia – West Dover native, Devin Logan,made history Tuesday, earning asilver medal in the Olympic debut of slopestyle skiing at the 2014 Sochi Games. “I was really happy with my run and couldn’t have asked for anything better,” said Logan. “I skied one of my best days today even with everything: the conditions, the slushiness, seeing a lot of girls go down. I put it down and wouldn’t take it back. I felt great.” Logan shot into second with a solid first run behind Canadian Dara Howell, who went on to win the first-ever gold medal with her teammate Kim Lamarre taking bronze. “Dara had the sickest run of the day,” Logan added.“I’m so happy she was the one to beat me. I was up on the podium with my friends, and I couldn’t have asked for a better day. She killed it and we deserve it, especially after X Games.” Now that she’s finished with her event, Logan said she intends to stay in Sochi for the remainder of the games before traveling back to the United States to celebrate her 21st birthday on Feb. 17 in Las Vegas.

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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PA G E 3 1

Vermont Olympians...
Vermont home: Manchester Center Age: 27 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Deibold has six top-10 World Cup finishes and finished second in the World Cup event held on the Sochi Olympic course last February. A Stratton Mountain School graduate, Diebold began in halfpipe before concentrating on snowboard cross. He began snowboarding at age 4. 15) Lindsey Jacobellis Women’s Snowboardcross 2014 Results: NA (Snowboard cross, Feb. 16) Home mountain: Stratton Vermont Home: Stratton

Continued from Page 15 Age: 28 Olympic Experience: Silver 2006, Competed 2010 Road to Sochi: Jacobellis is a three-time world champion who has won seven golds at the Winter X Games. Jacobellis earned a third Olympic berth after missing most of the last two seasons with knee injuries. 16) Jackie Hernandez Women’s Snowboardcross 2014 Results: NA (Snowboard cross, Feb. 16) Home mountain: Mount Snow/ Hunter Mountain (NY) Vermont home: Londonderry Age: 21 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Hernandez started skiing at Mount Snow with her family when she was five-years-old. Three years later the Hernandez family moved to Hunter, N.Y., and the entire Hernandez family switched to snowboarding. She hasn’t looked back since. Hernandez won six of eight Nor-Am events in 2012 before moving up to the national team and earning a World Cup victory in Italy. VERMONT TIES Nick Goepper Men’s sopestyle 2014 Results: BRONZE Home mountain: Mount Snow Age: 19 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Indiana native and US C-Teamer Nick Goepper was the first athlete to qualify for the slopestyle men’s ski team back on December 21. Goepper has been a member of the Carinthia Pro Team at Mount Snow for three years and has taken the professional freeskiing world by storm. Shortly after earning slopestyle Gold at the 2013 Winter X Games, he made it to the top of the AFP men’s slopestyle world rankings and hasn’t relinquished that position since. Julia Ford Women’s alpine 2014 Results: NA Home mountain: Okemo Home: Holderness, N.H. Age: 23 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Ford grew up in a ski racing family on the slopes of Okemo and attended OMS while in middle school. She moved on to the Holderness School (NH) for high school and was named to the U.S. C Team in 2011. The 2011 and 2012 U.S. downhill champion suffered a crash in December 2012 and subsequently moved to Utah to train full-time. Jared Goldberg Men’s alpine 2014 Results: Home mountain: Killington Age: 22 Olympic Experience: First Olympics Road to Sochi: Goldberg was born in Boston and cut his teeth at Killington as a young skier. He joined the US Ski Team in 2010 and continued his junior success in 2011, taking second at the US championships in the downhill and third in GS. Goldberg won his first US championship title in 2013 when he won the downhill at Copper Mountain in Colorado. He made his World Cup debut in 2012.

PA G E 3 2

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Romp To Stomp
Photos and text by EVAN JOHNSON
STRATTON – On Dec. 26, 2012, Dena O’Shaughnesy, a young and energetic teacher from Hopkinton Mass., was in line at Starbucks waiting to order her coffee when she got a phone call from her doctor. Her tests had come back indicating she had breast cancer. While teaching third grade every day and taking classes for her master’s degree, chemotherapy was not a welcome addition to her busy schedule. So she started something new – snowshoeing. “It was something to keep myself healthy and get outside and clear my head,” she says. When buying her first pair of snowshoes, she noticed a tag promoting the annual Romp to Stompfundraiser through the Susan G. Komen for the Cure. On Jan. 25 this year, she joined 600 other participants with 47 teams at Stratton Mountain Resort for the annual event, raising over $53,000 over a morning with 3k and 5k snowshoe loops.The annual event has raised $659,766 for the Vermont/New Hampshire affiliate of the Susan G. Komen Foundation since starting in 2003. The national series has raised $2.5 million for the Susan G. Komen Foundation and the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation since its start. Making the event even more memorable for O’Shaughnesy was that tests in early January found she was cancer free at her first check-up since her operation. That news made her participation the event as celebratory as it was solemn. “It’s wonderful to see everyone teaming up and doing this,” she says, admitting that “it’s emotional as well.” Donna Gordonwas also one of 40 breast cancer survivors in attendance at the Romp To Stomp event at Stratton this year. Shehas participated in the event for four years as well as Race

for the Cure for 14 years and says the energy at these events keeps her coming back year after year. “The first year, it was so emotional,” she says. “Going through the tents and the demonstrations they had, I became much more aware and when I found my lump, that’s what helped me.” Ten years after attending her first Romp to Stomp event, she discovered a lump using a self-check technique she learned at prior demonstrations. She went to her doctor right away and underwent surgery to remove the stage 1 cancer. Radiation treatment followed and she’s been cancer-free for the past five years. Gordon participated this year in honor of a co-worker’s friend whose cancer is in a more advanced stage.

Patty Lewis is a seven-year survivor who has been coming to Romp to Stomp for nine years. The first time she participated, she hadn’t yet been diagnosed with cancer. The second year was just ten days after her last chemotherapy treatment, the side effects of which made the trek even more difficult. “I wanted to just die out there on the trail,” she says, describing how nauseous and tired she felt. “But my team pulled me through it all.” That sense of team-building, camaraderie among cancer survivors and just enjoying a day of outdoor fun is the essence of the Romp to Stomp campaigns, and part of the reason the event at Stratton has grown over the years and become an East Coast success story.

More than 600 participants joined the Romp to Stomp festivities on Jan. 25 at Stratton Mountain Resort making up 47 teams. with more than 40 breast cancer survivors. They raised over $53,000 during a morning with 3k and 5k snowshoe loops around the Sun Bowl Base Lodge area. 

Photos by Evan Johnson

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

PA G E 3 3

CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREAS
N RTHERN VERM NT
Bolton Valley XC
Nordic and backcountry skiing are hallmarks of Bolton Valley Ski Resort. The highest elevation of Vermont’s cross-country ski areas ensures great snow, usually from early November well into April. With over 100 km of Nordic trails, Bolton is considered by many to be the ‘best backcountry in Vermont’. The Nordic Center offers both Classic and Skate skiing lessons as well as guided tours and ski clinics. Snowshoeing is another popular activity; the resort uses Tubbs Snowshoes as rentals. Nordic ski and snowshoe packages with lodging are available. CONTACT: 4302 Bolton Valley Access Rd., Bolton Valley, VT 05477 Main phone: 802.434.3444 Phone 2: 877.9BOLTON • Fax: 802.329-6871 nordiccenter@boltonvalley.com STATS: Typical season:..............................................December - early April Total Terrain........................................................................................88 km Machine-tracked.............................................................................26 km Skating Terrain..................................................................................26 km Main phone: 802.626.0737 Phone 2: 802.535.5662 info@kingdomtrails.org STATS: Typical season:............................................mid December - March Total Terrain........................................................................................80 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................50 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................35 km STATS: Typical season.............................................mid December - March Total Terrain ...................................................................................135 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................85 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................85 km

Hazen’s Notch
Located at the top of Vermont in the “Covered Bridge Town” of Montgomery near Jay Peak Resort, Hazen’s Notch is on the western edge of the snowy Northeast Kingdom. 70 Kilometers of groomed and marked trails pass through mixed maple, birch and evergreen forest and across gentle, open meadows. There are spectacular views of Hazen’s Notch and numerous peaks over 3,000 in elevation in the Jay Range and Cold Hollow Range of the Green Mountains, which completely encircle the trail system. 30 trails for all abilities provide loops of different lengths for classical cross-country skiing and or snowshoeing. Trail difficulty is evenly divided between easy, moderate and difficult. CONTACT: P.O. Box 478, Montgomery Center, VT 05471 Main phone: 802.326.4799 • Fax: 802.326.4966 www.hazensnotch.org STATS: Typical season...........................................................December - April Total Terrain ......................................................................................70 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................60 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................20 km

Catamount Family Center
All year long enjoy recreating on our trails as you discover the four corners of our beautiful family farm. Go at a leisurely pace, taking time to enjoy yourself and your family. You can pull off the trails at scenic points to soak up memorable views of Mt. Mansfield or Camel’s hump to the east or Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks to the west. This farm is rich in history. The first governor of Vermont, Governor Chittenden, built the main house in 1798 for his son Giles. It has since passed to our family and is in its 6th generation of ownership. CONTACT: 592 Governor Chittenden Rd, Williston, VT 05495 Main phone: 802.879.6001 Phone 2: 888.680.1011• Fax: 802.879.6066 www.catamountoutdoor.com STATS: Typical season.............................................mid December - March Total Terrain........................................................................................35 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................35 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................35 km

Burke XC/Kingdom Trails
Two centers located on Darlng Hill and near Burke Mountain offer something for everyone. At Kingdom Trails the atmosphere is noncompetitive, our focus is the quality of skiing and your awareness of the surrounding countryside. Eight main loops make up 50 km of trails to accommodate all skiing abilities. At the two Nordic centers on Darling Hill and Burke XC you can warm your feet and enjoy the splendid views. CONTACT: PO Box 204, East Burke, VT 05872

Highland Lodge & XC Center
Ski through fields and valleys, delineated by rows of trees and sugar bushes, with stunning views over open pasture lands of Mount Mansfield to the west, Burke Mountain to the east, the Lowell Mountain Range to the north and Caspian Lake below. There is no finer place for spring skiing and picnics. CONTACT: Caspian Lake, 1608 Craftsbury Rd., Greensboro, VT 05841 Main phone: 802.533.2647 • Fax: 802.533.7494 www.highlandlodge.com STATS: Typical season.......................................................December - March Total Terrain ......................................................................................60 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................60 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................40 km

Craftsbury Outdoor Center
For over 35 years, this year-round resort in the Northeast Kingdom on over 400 private acres has offered outdoor activities for the whole family. In 2008, it was re-organized as a non-profit entity whose mission focuses on lifelong sports, stewardship and sustainability. Members (both day or annual) and winter time guests can enjoy 85k of groomed nordic ski trails, snowshoeing, orienteering, ice-skating, backcountry tours, biathlon programming, and more. The Center has space for up to 90 houseguests in its variety of trailside accommodations. Choose from private cabins to comfortable lodges - all room prices include your meals in their Vermont Fresh Network Member dining hall. You’ll enjoy lots of fresh, local ingredients with every meal! If you’re ready for some indoor time, guests have access to amenities such as free wifi, massage therapists, sauna and fitness room - plus homey public spaces. Babysitting can be arranged with advance notice. CONTACT: 535 Lost Nation Rd, Craftsbury Common, VT 05827 Main phone: 802.586.7767 • Fax: 802.586.7768 www.craftsbury.com

Rikertnordic.com
• Cross Country Skiing • Snowshoeing • Snow Bike Rental • Pulk Rental • Day Passes

Join Us!

• Snowmaking on 5km • Private lessons • Group lessons • PSIA Instructors

Jay Peak Nordic and Snowshoe Center
The Jay Peak Nordic and Snowshoe Center is located in the Golf Clubhouse and offers 20km of groomed and tracked terrain for beginners and experts alike. Pristine winding trails that amble through unspoiled wilderness coupled with unparalled mountain views are the hallmarks of our trail network. Snowshoers are welcome to experience the backcountry by day or be guided in the evenings on our fireside tours. A true destination resort, Jay Peak also offers ice skating, curling, lodging , dining, an indoor water park and plenty of night life. CONTACT: 830 Jay Peak Road, Jay, Vermont 05859. Main Phone (802) 988-2611 x4653 Reservations 1-800-451-4449 • Fax (802) 988-4049 info@jaypeakresort.com. STATS: Typical season..........................................Thanksgiving - mid-April Total Terrain........................................................................................25 km Snowshoeing trails.............................................................................5 km

Located at the Breadloaf Campus, Rt 125 in Ripton, VT 802-443-2744 • rikertnordiccenter@middlebury.edu Open 7days a week 8:30 - 4:30, November – March
PA G E 3 4

Morse Farm Ski Center
Visit Vermont’s newest, family friendly cross-country touring

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREAS
center, with views of Camel’s Hump and the Hunger Mountain range. Professionally designed scenic trails offer a diverse choice of terrain, through softwood forests, sugarbush and across gently rolling open pastures. Suitable for all skill levels, from firsttimers to seasoned experts, who will appreciate the banked turns on our many challenging downhill slopes. CONTACT: PO Box 1200 • 1168 County Rd., Montpelier, VT 05601 Main phone: 800-223-0090 www.skimorsefarm.com STATS: Typical season.......................................................December - March Total Terrain ......................................................................................20 km. Machine-tracked ............................................................................20 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................15 km Main phone: 802.644.1173 Phone 2: 800.451.8752 • Fax: 802.644.2713 smuggs@smuggs.com • www.smuggs.com STATS: Typical season.........................................................December – April Total Terrain ......................................................................................34 km. Machine-tracked ............................................................................23 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................28 km

CENTRAL VERM NT
Blueberry Hill
Blueberry Hill Blueberry Hill is continually expanding its trail network and maintaining high grooming standards. The ski lodge sits at just over 1,600 feet, ensuring a fair dumping with any snowstorm. 65 kilometers of groomed and wilderness trails spread across the beautiful Vermont countryside, with connections to the Catamount Trail and Vermont’s Long Trail. The Halfdan Khlune Trail climbs to 2,800 feet, making it the highest maintained ski trail in Vermont. The rental shop offers a full line of touring, backcountry and skating skis on a fi rst come, first served basis. We also have 40+ pairs of snowshoes, for both adults and children. CONTACT: RFD 3, Goshen, VT 05733 Main phone: 802.247.6735 Phone 2: 800.448.0707 • Fax: 802.247.3983 info@blueberryhillinn.com www.blueberryhillinn.com STATS: Typical season.........................................December to mid-March Total Terrain ......................................................................................65 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................25 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................25 km

Stowe XC
Stowe Mountain Resort’s 35 kilometers of groomed and 40 kilometers of backcountry trails are the highest in Stowe. Also available are 5 kilometers of trails specifically for snowshoeing. They’re all part of the largest connected cross-country trail network in the East... a nordic skier’s dream, that also connects with the Trapp Family Lodge XC Center, Topnotch and Edson Hill ski touring centers. CONTACT: 5781 Mountain Rd., Stowe, VT 05672 Main phone: 802.253.3688 Phone 2: 800.253.4754 * Fax: 802.253.3406 info@stowe.com • www.stowe.com STATS: Typical season.................................................December - late April Total Terrain ......................................................................................70 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................35 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................35 km

Sleepy Hollow Inn & Bike Center
Come cross-country ski or mountain bike with us! Our trails are challenging and great fun. Visit Butternut Cabin, with a stunning view of Camel’s Hump and Vermont’s rolling Green Mountains. Our eight bedroom newly renovated country inn is gaining a reputation for great service and hospitality. We offer skiing, ice-skating, night skiing, snowshoeing, single-track mountain biking, and hiking. Our full line of rentals will surely make your visit hassle-free and memorable. CONTACT: 1805 Sherman Hollow Rd, Huntington, VT 05462 Main phone: 802.434.2283 Phone 2: 866.254.1524 info@skisleepyhollow.com www.skisleepyhollow.com STATS: Typical season.......................................................December - March Total Terrain ......................................................................................40 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................30 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................25 km

Blueberry Lake
“The Snow Bowl of Sugarbush.” For the last two years, we have skied everyday of the season after opening. The ski area offers 31 km of trails all of which are groomed. Some of the trails are lit for night skiing. CONTACT: 424 Robinson Road, Warren, VT 05674 Main phone: 802.496.6687 • Fax: 802.496.5198 STATS: Typical season.........................................December to mid-March Total Terrain ......................................................................................31 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................31 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................31 km

Trapp Family Lodge Cross Country Center
Located on the spine of the Green Mountains, they are blessed with good snow conditions all season long. The center offers 55 km of groomed trails that are interconnected to the Stowe Mountain Resort, Topnotch and Edson Hill ski touring centers, making a trail network of 120 km groomed trails and another 100 km of back country trails. The center has a complete retail store with accessories, clothing and equipment, a repair shop, a ski school and rentals of all kinds. CONTACT: 700 Trapp Hill Rd, Stowe, VT 05672 Main phone: 802.253.8511 Phone 2: 800.826.7000 • Fax: 802.253.5757 info@trappfamily.com • www.trappfamily.com STATS: Typical season.........................................................December – April Total Terrain ...................................................................................100 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................55 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................55 km CENTRALR EGION

Smugglers’ Notch Cross Country
Smugglers’ Notch Nordic Ski and Snowshoe Adventure Center is conveniently located at the center of this year-round resort, providing a host of exciting activities for every member of the family. PSIA-Certified instruction in both classical and skate skiing; daily guided snowshoe treks and night tours on 24 kilometers of dedicated snowshoe trails; ice skating on a natural outdoor rink. With over 100 pair of Red Feather Snowshoes and plenty of skis, boots, poles and ice skates, Smugglers’ can outfit age 5 and older. CONTACT: 4323 VT Route 108 South, Smugglers’ Notch, VT 05464

Catamount Trail Association
The Catamount Trail is a 300-mile public cross country ski trail that spans the length of Vermont. It offers a mixture of ungroomed backcountry terrain and groomed trails - a ski experience for everyone. Guidebook available. Maintained by the member-supported nonprofit Catamount Trail Association. CONTACT: Main phone: (802) 864-5794 info@catamounttrail.org www.catamounttrail.org

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

PA G E 3 5

CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREAS
Mountain Meadows XC Area
Located in the heart of the Green Mountains, Mountain Meadows cross-country ski area has been attracting skiers from all over the world for the past 35 years. Snowmaking, new trail marking system, improved trails through spectacular meadows and hard woods. CONTACT: 209 Thundering Brook Rd, Killington, VT 05751 Main phone: 802.775.7077 Phone 2: 800.221.0598 • Fax: 802.747.1929 www.xcskiing.net STATS: Typical season........................................................ November – April Total Terrain ......................................................................................57 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................57 km Skating Terrain..................................................................................57 km Main phone: 802.228.1396 Phone 2: 800.78.OKEMO • Fax: 802.228.7095 info@okemo.com • www.nordic.okemo.com STATS: Typical season.........................................................December – April Total Terrain ......................................................................................22 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................22 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................22 km Total Terrain: ....................................................................................50 km Machine Tracked:...........................................................................50 Km Skating Terrain:.................................................................................40 km

Three Stallion Inn Touring Center
Come and enjoy the “Sporting Life” on 35 km of x-c skiing and snowshoeing trails that criss-cross our 1,300 wooded acres and open pastures. CONTACT: Three Stallion Inn, Randolph, VT 05060 Main phone: 802.728.5656 Phone 2: 802.728.5575 • www.3stallioninn.com STATS: Typical season..................................................... December – March Total Terrain ......................................................................................50 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................35 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................17 km

Ole’s Cross Country Center
The combination of snow and scenery at Ole’s Cross Country Center in the Mad River Valley is perfect for skiing and snowshoeing. Discover 30 miles (50K) of moderately rolling trails groomed for classic skiing and ski skating. All abilities can ski to panoramic views of Sugarbush or into the rare quiet of the deep woods. Rent cross country ski gear and snowshoes at Ole’s, including skating skis. Learn to cross-country ski better. We offer fun lessons for beginners to coaching for racers. We love to share our favorite sport. Adventure with us on a guided ski or snowshoe tour. CONTACT: PO Box 1653, Waitsfield, VT 05673 Main phone: 802.496.3430 Phone 2: 877.863.3001 • Fax: 802.496.3089 www.olesxc.com STATS: Typical season........................................................ November – April Total Terrain ......................................................................................50 km. Machine-tracked ............................................................................50 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................45 km

Mountain Top Inn and Resort
Eleven miles from Killington, 60km trails (40km groomed) classic, skate and pristine backcountry for skiing or snowshoeing on 350 of acres at elevation up to 2,100 ft. Varied terrain for all skill and age levels. Private or group lessons, rentals, snowmaking, daily grooming, ski shop (Rossignol demo equipment & rentals, Tubbs snowshoe rentals), snack bar. Designated pet friendly trails. Nordic ski and other seasonal packages available. CONTACT: 195 Mountain Top Rd, Chittenden, VT 05737 Main phone: (802) 483-2311 Phone 2: (802) 483-6089 Reservations: (802) 483-2311 • Fax: (802) 483-6373 stay@mountaintopinn.com STATS: Typical season.................................................................late Nov.-April Total Terrain ......................................................................................60 km. Machine-tracked ............................................................................40 km. Skating Terrain .................................................................................60 km

Woodstock Nordic Center
Just out from the ski center are 10 km of gentle “meadow” skiing that connect to our fitness center and the 20 km of woodland trails on Mt. Peg. There are also 30 km of trails located across the village green on Mt. Tom – and these quite often become the favorites of those who discover them. Skiing or snowshoeing Mt. Tom puts you on century old carriage roads in the midst of Vermont’s first tree farm and Vermont’s first National Park site. CONTACT: Route 106, Woodstock, VT 05091 Main phone: 802.457.6674 Phone 2: 800.448.7900 • Fax: 802.457.6699 email@woodstockinn.com • www.woodstockinn.com STATS: Typical season..................................................... December – March Total Terrain ......................................................................................60 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................50 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................20 km SOUTHERNR EGION

Rikert Nordic Center
Located 12 miles east of Middlebury on Route 125 in Ripton, VT - 2 miles west of the Middlebury Snow Bowl. Situated on the Bread Loaf Campus of Middlebury College bordered by the Green Mountain National Forest and the Robert Frost Homestead, the center offers 50 km of carefully groomed trails for classic and skate skiing and snowshoeing for all abilities. Included in this terrain is a new world class 5km FIS sanctioned race course that was built this fall. The newly renovated shop offers rental equipment, repairs and maintenance and is fully ADA accessible. A staff of instructors offer both private and group lessons. CONTACT: Route 125 Middlebury College Bread Loaf Campus, Ripton,VT Phone: 802 - 443- 2744 mhussey@middlebury.edu • www.rikertnordic.com STATS: Typical Season: ...................................................December - March

Okemo Valley Nordic Center
Okemo Valley Nordic Center features 22 km of traditional Nordic track trails and skating lanes that wind their way through pristine meadows and Nordic hillsides and along the Black River. The Nordic Center also has an additional 13 km of dedicated snow-shoe trails. Okemo Valley features modern trail grooming and terrain ideally suited for all ability levels. Cross-country ski and snowshoe rentals are available, along with group and private lessons. CONTACT: 77 Okemo Ridge Rd, Ludlow, VT 05149

S UTHERN VERM NT
Brattleboro Outing Club

The BOC Ski Hut is the place to cross-country ski in Brattleboro. It’s so close and convenient, it’s practically XC in your backyard! Just two miles from town, the Ski Hut is where friends and family gather to make the most of winter. Learn-to-ski programs after school, ski and snowshoe rentals on weekends, special events that celebrate the gift of winter. We maintain trails for all tastes- — Classic-only trails meander through the woods, while our fairway trails are groomed wide with both skating lanes and stride & glide tracks. In fields adjacent to the fairways, our

Enjoy 60km 25km of groomed groomed trails, trails, rated rated as as some some of the nicest trails in New England! Enjoy lunch at the Ski Center and and stay stay in one of Vermont’s most scenic and historic inns tucked in the Vermont’s most scenic heart of of Robert RobertFrost Frostcountry countrywith withexquisite exquisite dining. dining. heart For For more more information information go go to to www.blueberryhillinn.com www.blueberryhillinn.com

Blueberry Hill Ski Center
Goshen,Vermont Vermont • 802-247-6735 Goshen, • 802-247-6755
PA G E 3 6 VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREAS
Hunde-loipes (Hound loops) for dog-lovers and their pets are groomed regularly. CONTACT: 348 Upper Dummerston Rd. • PO Box 335 Brattleboro, VT 05302 Main phone: 802.254.4081 Contact our web page at BrattleboroOutingClub.org xc@brattleborooutingclub.org STATS: Typical season...........................................mid December – March Total Terrain ......................................................................................33 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................25 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................20 km Grafton Ponds Outdoor Center Grafton Ponds focuses on cross country skiing, snowshoeing, ice Skating (no ice skating) Biathlon, and tubing on a 600-foot hill. There are 15 km of Nordic trails groomed with a snow-cat and a tiller (which includes 5 km with snowmaking) and 15 km of back-country trails, along with another 10 km of snowshoe trails. They offer a wide variety of terrain and a full service cross country center including rental, retail and snacks. A series of winter activities, including family and kids programs, demos, clinics and races, take place throughout the season. Grafton Ponds is part of the Grafton Inn, which offers special ski & stay packages. CONTACT: 783 Townshend Road, Grafton, VT 05146 Main phone: 802.843.2400 Reservations: 800.843.1801 • Fax: 802.843.2245 info@graftonponds.com • www.graftonponds.com STATS: Typical season..........................................December – Mid-March Total Terrain........................................................................................45 km Machine-tracked.............................................................................15 km Skating Terrain..................................................................................15 km Main phone: 802.442.2575 STATS: Typical season........................................................ November – April Total Terrain ......................................................................................35 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................35 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................30 km your own lunch for a picnic at our warming hut overlooking Vermont’s Stratton Mountain. CONTACT: 615 Little Pond Rd, Londonderry, VT 05148 Main phone: 802.824.3933 Fax: 802.824.4574 www.vikingnordic.com STATS: Typical season..................................................... December – March Total Terrain ......................................................................................40 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................35 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................30 km

Stratton Mountain Nordic Center
Stratton Mountain Nordic Center is located out of the Sunbowl Lodge at Stratton Mountain Resort. We offer 10 km for cross country skiing and for snowshoeing. The beautiful wooded trails are groomed for both classical and skate skiing. The terrain offers something for novice to advanced skiers. Inside the base lodge we have a full service rental and retail shop. Open daily from 8-5. Lessons available. CONTACT: RR 1 Box 145, Stratton Mountain, VT 05155 Main phone: 802.297.4114 Phone 2: 800.STRATTON • www.stratton.com STATS: Typical season..................................................... December – March Total Terrain ......................................................................................10 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................10 km Skating Terrain .................................................................................10 km

Wild Wings Ski Touring Center
Classic skiing at its best. Family skiing or ski to train. Tracks set with Piston Bully — they last longer. Ski through the woods or along the brook. The animal tracks we see regularly include bobcat, rabbit and deer. Rental and lessons available. CONTACT: Box 132, Peru, VT 05152 Main phone: 802.824.6793 wwxcski@sover.net • www.wildwingsski.com STATS: Typical season..................................................... December – March Total Terrain ......................................................................................25 km Machine-tracked ............................................................................25 km Skating Terrain ....................................................................................0 km

Timber Creek Cross Country Ski Area
Across from Mount Snow, cradled by the Green Mountains, is Timber Creek… a very high quality cross country ski area. With a dependable mountain climate and a high elevation, an abundance of snow becomes a way of life at Timber Creek. The skier has a choice of adventures on a trail system that meanders and explores where you can ski the forested hills or reach up to the high Green Mountain ridges. CONTACTS: Route 100 North, West Dover, VT 05356 Main phone: 802.464.0999 Fax: 802.464.8308 www.timbercreekxc.com STATS: Typical season.................................... December – March Total Terrain........................................ 14 km Machine-tracked............................. 14 km Skating Terrain ................................. 14 km

Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home
Hildene is a historic house built by Robert Todd Lincoln primarily as a summer home. It is open year-round and includes the mansion and gardens, farm and restored Pullman palace car. In the winter months, we offer ski and snowshoe rentals for children and adults, and lessons by appointment. CONTACT: 1005 Hildene Rd, Manchester, VT 05254 Main phone: 802.362.1788 • Fax: 802.362.1564 www.hildene.org STATS: Typical season..................................................... December – March Total Terrain........................................................................................14 km Machine-tracked.............................................................................14 km Skating Terrain.....................................................................................0 km

Viking Nordic Center
Viking Nordic Centre is one of the oldest cross-country ski centers in North America. With 40 kilometers of trails we offer something for every skier. From the rolling gentle terrain of our inner trail system to the long loops through the woods of our outer trail system, beginners and experts can find terrain that will both please and challenge them. After a long day of skiing you can enjoy a hearty cup of soup in our Olympic Café; or bring
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Prospect Mountain Cross Country Ski Center
Prospect Mountain Cross-Country Ski Center is located on Route 9 in Woodford, Vermont, just 7 miles east of Bennington. At the highest base elevation of any ski area in the state, Prospect Mountain has earned its reputation of being the “snow magnet”. Prospect has over 35 km of expertly groomed ski trails, and offers excellent skiing to everyone from racers to families. The full service ski shop includes a heated waxing room and a professional waxing service. Adult and children’s skis, snowshoes and baby sleds are available for rent. The spacious Base Lodge Restaurant is open 7 days/week. Open everyday from 9 am to 5 pm. CONTACT: Route 9, Woodford, VT 05201

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Visit us at clearwatersports.com

The Valley’s Outdoor Store Since 1975

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Patagonia Outdoor Research Merkell G3 Voile Garmont Madshus Fischer Alpina MSR Thule

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4147 MAIN STREET, WAITSFIELD, VERMONT • 802-496-2708 open every day

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

Soaring at Harris Hill
More than 40 skiers from the United States, Norway, Sweden, Slovenia, Italy and Canada competed in the 26th annual FIS Cup at the Harris Hill Ski Jump in Brattleboro, Vt. on Feb. 15-16. The jump is the only 90-meter ski jump in New England and the newest Olympic size 90-meter jump in the country designed to International Ski Federation specifications. Miran Zupancic, Mitja Meznar and Ernest Prislic, all of Slovenia, took first through third, respectively.

Photos by Herb Swanson

VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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Valid three of four consecutive days. Start dates: 2/24 – 3/1. 48-hour advance online purchase required. Ages 3 – 12, reservations required. Midweek only.

3-DAY MT. ELLEN TICKET FOR $89
2-FOR-1 YOUTH LESSONS

BUY A YOUTH LESSON, GET AN ADULT TICKET FREE
Ages 3 – 12, reservations required. Midweek only.

Show us your pass from another mountain, and we’ll show you our mountain. Valid midweek, non-holiday with a 2013/14 season pass from another resort.

ADULT ALL MOUNTAIN LIFT TICKETS YOUTH/SENIOR ALL MOUNTAIN LIFT TICKETS
To redeem please present pass from another resort at any season pass or ticket office.

$50

$25

3/2 3/8 3/8 3/15 3/15

High Fives Fat Ski-A-Thon Castlerock Extreme “Wines of Spain” Dinner Sugaring Time Festival Tour de Moon Guided Skin & Ski at Mt. Ellen 3/17 $17 St. Patrick’s Day Tickets at Mt. Ellen 3/29 Pond Skimming

For more information on restaurants, live music, activities and events call 800.53.SUGAR or visit sugarbush.com.

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VERMONT SKI AND RIDE MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY/MARCH

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