Do Plants Feel? Ionic Signaling in the Arabidopsis Root.

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Symposium V: President's Symposium: Cellular Dynamics and Plant Growth
Add this abstract to my Itinerary Abs # 50004: Do Plants Feel? Ionic Signaling in the Arabidopsis Root. Presenter: Gilroy, Simon , Contact Author Authors Gilroy, Simon (A) Bibikova, Tanya (A) (A) Monshausen, Gabriele Richter, Greg (A) Swanson, Sarah (A) Affiliations: (A): Pennsylvania State University Web Site: http://www.bio.psu.edu/people/faculty/gilroy

(A)

Shi, Chen

(A)

Roots must sense and respond to a variety of stimuli such as the direction of gravity, availability of nutrients and water and mechanical signals from objects they touch as they grow through the soil. This complex stimulus-rich environment is sensed and processed to an appropriate integrated growth pattern. We are interested in defining the signaling processes that underlie the integration of a range of these stimuli and how they are translated to control topic growth and whole root system architecture. We have found that touch sensing triggers a self-propagating Ca2+ wave that moves from cell to cell and likely carries the mechanosensory information throughout the root apex. Touch and gravity appear to interact through this Ca2+ increase. Thus, the touch-induced Ca2+ increase propagates from the stimulated surface cells to the gravity sensing cells of the root cap where it represses gravity-related pH signaling and inhibits the subsequent gravitropic response. Although the touch-sensitive channel responsible for initiating these Ca2+ signaling events has yet to be defined, mechanosensing is intimately linked to the activities of the microtubule cytoskeleton and Ca2+-signaling elements such as the ACA12 Ca2+-ATPase and calmodulin. For example, disrupting microtubule dynamics with taxol or oryzalin inhibits the generation but not the propagation of the touch-induced Ca2+ signal. The actin cytoskeleton also acts to repress the gravitropic signaling system. Thus, depolymerizing actin causes an enhanced tropic response, likely mediated through enhanced auxin redistribution by the gravity sensing cells of the cap. In addition to its role in cell-to-cell communication, we have found touch-induced Ca2+ increases also trigger root cells to undergo rapid (within 1 second) membrane turnover coupled to an alkalinization of the apoplast, likely reflecting a rapid stress-related defense response. Thus, Ca2+ may be carrying a wide spectrum of information and trigger diverse response coupling in the plant. We are using a range of GFP- and dye-based sensors to both monitor and manipulate these events in Arabidopsis with the goal of characterizing the degree to which sensory integration reflects interactions of ionic signaling systems. In addition, we are trying to understand the web of responses that are triggered by the initial stimulus-induced Ca2+ signal. This work is supported by NASA, USDA and NSF. Abstract Center . Session List . Itinerary . Search:

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2/16/2008

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