Guidelines for conducting environmental engineering tasks to tailor environmental tests to end-item equipment applications.

Test methods for determining the effects of natural and induced environments on equipment used in military or commercial applications. Environment Altitude Temperature Rain and Dust Humidity Cold Storage Vibration Shock Drop MIL-STD 810F Method Method 500.3 Method 501.3(high), 502.3(low) Method 506.3 Method 507.3 Method 510.3 Method 514.4 Method 516.4 Method 516.4

MIL-STD 810F 500.3 High Altitude Operation These tests are carried out in low pressure (altitude) chambers to determine if the test item can withstand and operate in a low pressure environment. The test apparatus and auxiliary instrumentation used must be capable of maintaining and continuously monitoring the specific conditions of low pressure. Two test procedures are used: Primary Factors: 15,000ft, 8.29 psi, 572mb, 1 hr This procedure is used to ensure that the Getac computer can be stored at high ground elevations or transported in its shipping/storage configuration at high altitude. The procedure tests for storage survival at low pressure (equivalent to transit in unpressurized aircraft). Testing to the 15,000ft equivalent altitude ensures that the equipment shipped by air will successfully withstand the low pressure environment. The computer is subjected to low pressure for a period of 1 hour, after which functional tests are performed to validate the unit's survival. MIL-STD 810F 500.3 II - High Altitude Operation Primary Factors: 10,000ft, 7Mb operating This procedure is used to determine the product's performance under low pressure conditions. This test is designed to simulate land operation at high altitudes (when used in passenger aircraft low pressure should not be experienced). The computer must operate normally throughout this test.

MIL-STD 810F Method 501.3 High Temperature

These tests are carried out in high temperature chambers to determine if units can withstand, and operate in, hot climatic conditions without experiencing physical damage or deterioration in performance. The test apparatus and auxiliary instrumentation used must be capable of maintaining and continuously monitoring the required conditions of high temperature throughout an envelope of air surrounding the equipment being tested. To prevent unrealistic heat transfer in the test item, the air velocity in the vicinity of the test item must not exceed 1.7m/s (325ft/min). Two procedures are used: MIL-STD 810F 501.3 I - Hot Storage Primary Factors: 71 deg C for 7 days This test determines how storage at high temperature affects the computer's safety and performance. The test procedure includes exposure to high temperatures that may be encountered in storage. The computer is stored at a constant temperature of 71 deg C for 7 days, after which period functional tests are performed to test for survival. MIL-STD 810F 501.3 II - Hot Operation Primary Factors: 71deg C operating This test procedure determines the computer's performance during exposure to high temperature conditions. The operational test differs from the storage test in that the computer is conditioned to temperatures determined to be applicable to, or resulting from, exposure in its operational configuration. This test is performed after the computer has stabilized at 71 deg C. Keyboard operation is tested manually and other unit functions, including communications and software/data integrity, are tested automatically using a software test program. Screen contrast and visibility are visually checked.

MIL-STD 810F 503.3 Thermal Shock Primary Factors: -33 / +71 deg C and 71 / -33 deg C Temperature shock tests are conducted to determine if an item can withstand sudden changes in the temperature of the surrounding atmosphere without experiencing physical damage or deterioration in performance. The test apparatus consists of two chambers in which the test conditions (temperature extremes) can be established and maintained. The chambers are equipped with auxiliary instrumentation capable of maintaining and continuously monitoring the test conditions throughout an envelope of air surrounding the test item. The two objectives of the temperature shock test are set to determine whether the test item can satisfy its performance requirements and be safely operated after being exposed to sudden changes in temperature of the surrounding atmosphere. Units are stabilized at -33 deg C then immediately placed into a chamber where the temperature is +71 deg C and vice versa, after which functional tests are carried out for unit survival and software/data integrity. The method used is chamber to chamber transfer with up to 5 minutes maximum dwell time, but typically just a few seconds. The computer is subjected to one shock in each direction between the temperature extremes

MIL-STD 810F Method 510.3 Cold Storage These tests are carried out in low temperature chambers to determine if test units can withstand and operate under pertinent low temperature conditions without experiencing physical damage or deterioration in performance. The test apparatus and auxiliary instrumentation used must be capable of maintaining and continuously monitoring the required conditions of low temperature throughout an envelope of air surrounding the equipment being tested. To prevent unrealistic cooling (heat transfer) in the test item, the air velocity in the vicinity of the test item must not exceed 1.7m/s (325 ft/min). Two procedures are used : MIL-STD 810F 510.3 I - Cold Storage Primary Factors: -33 deg C for 72 hrs This procedure is used to determine how storage at low temperature affects the computer's safety and performance. The computer is stored at a constant temperature of -33deg C for a period of 72 hours, after which time functional tests are performed to test for survival. MIL-STD 810F 510.3 II - Cold Operation

Primary Factors: -33 deg C operating This test determines the performance of the computer during exposure to low temperature conditions. The operational test differs from the storage test in that the computer is conditioned to temperatures determined to be applicable to, or resulting from, exposure in its operational configuration. This test is performed after the computer has stabilized at -33 deg C. Keyboard operation is tested manually and other unit functions, including communications and software/data integrity, are tested automatically using a software test program. Screen contrast and visibility are checked visually

MIL-STD 810F Method 510.3 Blowing Sand and Dust This test is divided into two procedures. The small particle (dust) is used to ascertain the ability of equipment to resist the effects of dust particles which may penetrate into cracks, seals, keyboards, etc. The blowing sand test determines whether the computer can be stored and operated in blowing sand (149-85um particle size) conditions without experiencing degradation of its performance, effectiveness, reliability and maintainability due to the abrasion/erosion or clogging effect of large, sharp-edged particles. The test chambers used, together with all necessary air conditioning and circulation equipment, with its auxiliary control instrumentation, particle storage and moving equipment, must be capable of maintaining and continuously monitoring the required conditions throughout an envelope of air surrounding the test item. MIL-STD 810F 510.3 I - Blowing Dust Primary Factors: 8.9m's nominal for 6 hrs Tests for sealing of the unit to prevent the ingress of dust and against keyboard clogging. Humidity is kept low at less than 30%. This test also provides conformity to IP6X (totally protected against dust). The BS5490 test is also carried out to prove conformity with IP6X standards. MIL-STD 810F 510.3 II - Blowing Sand Primary Factors: 18 to 28m/s for 1.5 hrs x 3 faces This test is used to assess the unit's resistance to general abrasive environments

MIL-STD 810F 514.4 1.8 Random Vibration Primary Factors: 0.04g2/Hz, 20-1000Hz for 3 hrs Vibration testing is performed to determine equipment's resistance to vibration stresses expected in shipment and application environments. The test procedure covers use of the equipment in ground mobile vehicles where broadband random vibration results from the interaction of vehicle suspension and structures with road surface discontinuities. In general, the vibration spectrum of wheeled vehicles and trailers is predominantly random with peaks and notches considerably higher and lower than the mean level. The environment is simulated using a wide band random vibration test similar to the minimum integrity spectrum defined for aircraft. The tracked vehicle environment is characterized by the strong influence of the track laying pattern. The unit is subjected to random vibration within the parameters indicated. This test is used to prove the unit will function correctly when used in wheeled vehicle applications where varying degrees of vibration are experienced.

MIL-STD 810F 516.4 Free Fall Drop MIL-STD810E 516.4 IV - Free Fall Drop Primary factors: 48", 26 drops Free fall drop tests (shock) are performed to ensure that equipment can withstand the relatively infrequent, non-repetitive shocks or transient vibrations encountered in handling, transportation and service environments. Field data research has

shown that a typical piece of man-portable equipment will be dropped from heights of up to 122cm (48") an average of 4 to 6 times during its life cycle. The 26 drop requirements of this test exist to ensure that each vulnerable place (faces, edges and corners) of a typical test item receives an impact. Drops are made from a quick release hook or drop tester onto 2" thick plywood backed with concrete. The test item is so oriented that, upon impact, a line from the struck corner or edge to the centre of gravity of the case and contents is perpendicular to the impact surface. EN50082; IEC801-2 - ESD Immunity This test is the opposite of that for EMC emissions in that the unit should operate normally when in the vicinity of other electronic devices/apparatus.

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