P u t t i n g Pa s s e n g e r s F i r s t

2007 year in review

Cover, Tulsa International Airport. Other photos provided by Dulles International Airport, Mattox Photography, D.C. Hughes/Drunk’n Lemur Communications, Denver International Airport, Ft. Myers International Airport, Louisville International Airport, Dane County Regional Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, Inside Tucson Business, Memphis International Airport, Portland International Airport.

ACI-NA’s Mission
THE MISSION Of AIRPORTS COUNCIL INTERNATIONAL – NORTH AMERICA (ACI-NA) IS TO AdvOCATE POLICIES ANd PROvIdE SERvICES THAT STRENgTHEN THE AbILITy Of AIRPORTS TO SERvE THEIR PASSENgERS, CUSTOMERS ANd COMMUNITIES.

ACI-NA’s Vision
ACI-NA’s vision is to be the recognized and authoritative voice of airports. Airports Council International (ACI) is recognized as the authoritative voice of airports worldwide. As one of five regions of ACI, ACI-NA airport members enplane 95 percent of all domestic and virtually all the international airline passenger and air cargo traffic in North America. ACI-NA World Business Partners and Associate Members represent a wide variety of businesses that provide products and services to all segments of the air transportation industry. Through the exchange of information and business opportunities, World Business Partners and Associate Members make their expertise available to the ACI-NA and its airport members. They are committed to help improve airport operations and development, commercial activities, safety, security and quality customer service. ACI-NA presents the unique views and recommendations of airport management to federal, state, provincial and local governments, industry, the media and the general public.

As the “Voice of Airports®” ACI-NA:
• Promotes cooperation with all elements of the commercial civil aviation industry; • Exchanges ideas, information and experiences on common airport issues; • Identifies, interprets and disseminates information to its members on current industry trends and practices; and • Creates forums of common interest, builds professional relationships and interprets key airport policy and business issues to the ACI-NA membership.

Table of Contents
President’s Message Industry Snapshot Chairman’s Message Canadian Message Legislative Update
2 4 6 8 10

Vice Chair’s Message Committee Reports Awards Capital Needs Report Leadership

13 14 22 28 29

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President ’s Message
Dear Industry Leaders, The changes at Airports Council International-North America in the last two years are making an impact in the aviation industry. We can look back with pride in the challenges that have been met: we formed a new government affairs unit, established a strong security-safety team, improved our member communications, took an active role in environmental affairs and strengthened our partnerships with other aviation organizations. Striving to be a rich source of information both for members and for policy makers, ACI-NA this year embarked on an educational campaign to win Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reauthorization legislation that meets members’ needs. One key element is the Capital Needs Study, which was released in May. In a survey of member airports, ACI-NA was able to document the need for $87.4 billion in new airport construction to meet the requirements of the ever-growing number of air travelers. Our new government affairs team has been instrumental in our education campaign. Since January, member airports and the government affairs team met with more than 60 members of Congress and congressional staff and testified at six congressional hearings. It has been our goal to convince legislators that airports are striving to put the needs of the passengers first in this debate. ACI-NA has reached out to its fellow aviation organizations in the FAA reauthorization debate to form a united front. In addition, ACI-NA obtained the support of U.S. Conference of Mayors, National League of Cities and the National Association of Counties in the effort to increase the passenger facility charge (PFC) and obtain more federal funding for airports. Indeed, ACI-NA’s policy advocacy work has been critical to making the case for higher PFCs. While FAA reauthorization is important, it is not our only focus. Our public safety and security team has been working with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and local police

Greg Principato ACI-NA President

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putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

agencies to better mesh security practices with efficient airport operations. ACI-NA talks to the TSA, almost daily, on a variety of concerns. When Congress earlier this year started to press airports to implement 100 percent screening of airport employees, ACI-NA embarked upon an educational effort that slowed down the rush to impose new untested procedures on all. Instead, six different federally-funded test programs will be tried at cooperating airports. It is our hope that only after these methods are thoroughly tested and evaluated will any new procedures be mandated. The ACI-NA environmental efforts are multi-faceted. We have worked to get new noise standards and funding flexibility included in the FAA reauthorization legislation. ACI-NA is also cooperating with our world partners in Airports Council International and the www.enviro.aero website to address pressing issues, such as carbon emissions. After surveying the membership in the spring, the Washington-based staff has taken steps to improve our communications with you. We already implemented improvements to the weekly newsletter, @irports Update, and in the near future, you should see an expanded website and revamped Centerlines, our magazine. As part of the FAA reauthorization education effort, we also created a second website, passengersfirstcommitment.org. Due to the longstanding interest expressed by our member airports to establish a forum to address key human resource issues, ACI-NA has formed a Human Resources committee. The first meeting of this group will take place during the Kansas City conference. As we continue to focus on the bedrock issues of finance, security and the environment, ACI-NA – your organization – stands ready to advance your operational, community and policy agendas for a stronger air transportation system and a stronger airport industry. I look forward to working with you in the coming year. Greg Principato President, ACI-NA

ACI-NA reached out to newspapers with letters to the editor to promote increased investment in airports.

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a i r P o r t s 2 0 0 6 at a g l a n c e
fOR NORTH AMERICAN AIRPORTS, 2006 wAS A gOOd yEAR wITH MOST Of THE MAjOR STATISTICAL MEASUREMENTS gOINg UP. STATISTICAL MEASURE
U.S. Airport U.S. Airport U.S. Airport U.S. Airport U.S. Airport U.S. Airport U.S. Airport U.S. Airport Industry Industry Industry Industry Industry Industry Industry Industry Revenues (Aero) Revenues (Non-Aero) Total Operating Revenues Total Non-operating Revenues Total revenue Expenses Operating) Expenses (Non-Operating) Total Expenses

2005
$7.01b $6.1b $13.1b $5.6b $18.7b $8.6b $2.9b $11.5b 1.52b 30.9M 35.6M 735.7M 508.3M 145.5M 58.3M 22.7M 70% 25% 5% $15.1M $426,715 -$5.7M 15.8M 19.8M 29.1M 64.8m C$35.3M 773,260 22% 50.6

2006
$7.08b $6.3b $13.4b $6.3b $19.8b $9b $3.1b $12.1b 1.53b 31.8M 34.6M 736.8M 510.9M 145.7M 57.9M 21.4M 67% 28% 4% $163.8M $7.5 million $3M 16.5M 20.6M 31M 68.2M C$38.3M 726,319 23% 53.2

% CHANgE
1.1% 4.2% 2.5% 12.5% 5.5% 5.2% 6.9% 5.6% 0.5% 2.8% -3% 0.2% 0.5% 0.2% -0.8% -5.7% -4.3% 12% -20% 8.3% 1668.1%

North American Total Passengers North American Total Cargo North American Total Aircraft Movements U.S. U.S. U.S. U.S. U.S. Passenger Enplanements Enplanements at Large-Hub Airports Enplanements at Medium-Hub Airports Enplanements at Small-Hub Airports Enplanements at Non-Hub Airports

Airline Market Share/Network Carrier Airline Market Share/Low Cost Carrier Airline Market Share/Regional Carrier U.S. Airlines Financial Performance (Operating Revenue) U.S. Airlines Financial Performance (Operating Profit/Loss) U.S. Airlines Financial Performance (Net Profit/Loss) Canadian Air Passenger Traffic/International Canadian Air Passenger Traffic/Transborder Canadian Air Passenger Traffic/Domestic Canadian Air Passenger Total Canadian Airport Capital Assistance Number of U.S. Flights with Delayed Arrivals Percentage of U.S. Flights Arriving Late Average Length of U.S. Arrival Delays (in minutes)

4.5% 3.9% 6.7% 5.3% 8.2% -6.1% 2.7% 5.1%

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Top 10 U.S. AirporTS in 2006 rAnked by ToTAl pASSengerS
RANK
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

AIRPORT
Atlanta Chicago O’Hare Los Angeles Dallas/Ft Worth Denver Las Vegas New York-JFK Houston Phoenix Newark

TOTAL PASSENgERS
84.8M 77M 61M 60.2M 47.3M 46.1M 43.7M 42.5M 41.4M 36.7M

% CHANgE
-1.2% 0.7% -0.7% 1.8% 9.1% 5.0% 4.5% 7.1% 0.5% 7.9%

Top 10 U.S. AirporTS in 2006 rAnked by Air CArgo
RANK
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

AIRPORT
Memphis Anchorage Louisville Los Angeles Miami New York-JFK Chicago O’Hare Indianapolis Newark Dallas/Ft Worth

TOTAL TONS
3.6M 2.6M 1.98M 1.9M 1.8M 1.6M 1.5M 987,449 974,961 757,856

% CHANgE
2.6% 5.4% 9.2% -1.6% 4.3% 0.2% 0.8% 0.2% 2.6% 2.1%

SOURCES: ACI-NA DATA, CAC, FAA, TRANSPORT CANADA, ATA

Top 10 U.S. AirporTS in 2006 rAnked by ToTAl MoveMenTS
RANK
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

AIRPORT
Atlanta Chicago O’Hare Dallas/Ft Worth Los Angeles Las Vegas Houston Denver Phoenix Philadelphia Charlotte

TOTAL OPERATIONS
976,447 958,643 699,773 656,842 619,486 602,672 598,489 546,510 515,869 509,559

% CHANgE
-0.4% -1.4% -1.7% 1.0% 2.4% 7.1% 6.7% -3.0% -3.7% -2.4%

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chairMan’s Message
Dear Colleagues, Airports are making a difference this year. The aviation industry – and airports in particular – face a number of challenges: crowded skies, aging infrastructure, tighter security demands and a heightened awareness of environmental issues. Just as predicted, air travel is now back to pre-September 11 growth patterns. With the greater demand, airlines are flying full. The full planes and a swamped air traffic control system are putting the pressure on airports to move more people, yet still treat them as honored and invited guests. We are putting passengers first. Airports are rising to meet these challenges and in doing so, we are getting results.
Rick Piccolo 2007 ACI-NA Chair

Without a doubt, the challenge this year has been the reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) legislation with its companion issues, including a new air traffic control system, funding formulas and regulatory flexibility. To meet these challenges, we are now telling our story – a story that many apparently never heard before. We are demystifying our funding system, clarifying our role in airport security and itemizing our capital needs. Airports – many for the first time – are stressing their vital role in keeping their local economies rolling. I have enjoyed seeing my colleagues animated and inspired as they tell their stories to their Washington representatives. And, what have we discovered? Airports do have clout. People are listening, in both Washington and back home. Airports may not be getting everything on our wish list, but we are getting much of what we need. In the pending FAA legislation, we are getting a much more realistic ceiling on passenger facility charges and increased funding for the airport improvement program – two areas vital to funding our future capital needs.

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I think our efforts to date have been successful primarily because we are getting our message out – that first and foremost, we are in the people business. Airports are committed to putting our passengers’ needs first. We are not viewed in Washington as a special interest group. Instead, our national leaders realize that supporting airports is part of the public fabric necessary to keep the economy growing. We have also discovered that airports can influence security and environmental regulations. The airport community – represented by individual airports and ACI-NA – is sitting at the table with the Transportation Security Administration. When we speak, they are now more accommodating to our needs and concerns. In addition, airports are working with the Environmental Protection Agency and others so that a holistic approach for environmental concerns, airport operations and construction becomes the norm. We realize we need to be good neighbors. Airports are striving to blend the need to expand our operations to meet future air travel demands and the need to promote sustainability and other “green” operating and building practices. As I wrap up my term as chair of ACI-NA, I want to thank you for your involvement and your support.Yes, airports do have clout. I have discovered this past year that this clout and influence has been underestimated – and more importantly – underutilized. In the coming year, we need to collectively – and individually – reach out to more people, back home and in Washington, to tell our story. Our story empowers us. Fredrick J. (Rick) Piccolo Chair, ACI-NA 2007 Board of Directors President, Chief Executive Officer Sarasota Manatee Airport Authority

If Congress doesn’t support airport development today...
Millions of passengers will be stuck at the gate tomorrow.
One out of four flights were delayed last year, as our aviation infrastructure struggled to meet demand. And it’s only going to get worse. The FAA projects the number of annual air travelers to increase 35 percent by 2015 to over one billion. Without new runways or terminals, airports will become chokepoints in the nation’s aviation system.

Congress needs to put passengers first.
Raising the cap on airport Passenger Facility Charges (PFCs) will ensure that necessary airport capital improvement programs can move forward, increasing capacity, enhancing security and promoting new competition.
Passengers First Commitment

For more information visit www.passengersfirstcommitment.org

ACI-NA’s Passenger First Commitment ads appeared in Roll Call and The Hill in 2007.

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c a n a d a’ s a i r P o r t s … . d o i n g o u r Pa r t For canadian coMPetitiveness
The Canadian Airports Council (CAC) stepped up its efforts in several key areas through continued collaborative efforts with the federal government. A central theme of “competitiveness” emerged for the year’s work, as the CAC attended to a number of dossiers impacting the competitiveness of Canada’s airports in the world.
INTERNATIONAL AIR POLICy

The federal government unveiled its much-awaited new international air policy. Dubbed “Blue Sky,” the new policy committed the federal government, as a primary objective, to seek to negotiate reciprocal “Open Skies”-type agreements. Shortly after Blue Sky was announced, the European Commission (EU) signalled to Canada its interest in exploring an Open Aviation Area. The EU is Canada’s second biggest trading partner and source of tourists and Canada’s airports strongly endorsed the move toward Open Skies to provide new opportunities for service and to remain competitive with airports in the U.S. In June, after several senior-level exchanges between Canada and the EU, Canada’s Prime Minister announced that talks would get underway this fall. Meanwhile, other bilateral talks continued and Canada announced Open Skies agreements with Ireland and Iceland over the summer.
AIRPORT COMPETITIvENESS

Jim Facette CAC President and CEO

As a competitiveness issue, airport rent continues to challenge Canada’s airports’ ability to compete for traffic. The CAC’s position remains that rent should be eliminated in recognition of the importance of air transportation to Canada and Canadian competitiveness. As an interim measure, the CAC continues to seek a redefinition of revenue used to calculate rent in order to exclude revenue raised to cover debt. This would eliminate the current penalty on airports that have used the capital markets to fund infrastructure expansions and improvements.
bORdER SERvICES ANd NEXUS AIR EXPANSION

Canada’s airports remain concerned about the provision of airport border services

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from the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). The CAC participated in two consultative hearings related to a review of the agency’s budget and its strategic direction. There were some bright spots in border facilitation as early progress was signalled in airport efforts to secure a national transit without visa program and a pilot electronic primary inspection line (PIL) for the border. Expansion of the NEXUS Air program should be complete by the end of the year at all of Canada’s eight largest airports. As a technology-based program, NEXUS Air allows for a more efficient use of border resources. The CAC has been a strong proponent of its expansion.
SECURITy ANd LAgS

this area, however, and with the European Union on recognition of Canadian security measures for LAGs on connecting flights.
REPLACEMENT wORKER LEgISLATION

Two opposition party private members bills were introduced in 2006 and 2007 seeking to ban the use of replacement workers at federally regulated organizations. As the CAC notified the Minister of Transport, if passed, the legislation could cause the shut-down of one or more of Canada’s airports in the event of a strike or lock-out. With the first bill defeated in a vote in the spring, a second bill largely mimicking the first was immediately introduced. CAC efforts are ongoing to inform legislators about the potentially negative consequences of this legislation.
NEXT yEAR

As 2007 comes to a close, the CAC and its members join the rest of Canada in monitoring the developments with Canada’s minority federal government and its progress in key policy areas. Three themes are expected to continue to occupy CAC time: environment, financial/ economic viability of the airports system, and the facilitation of passengers. Canada’s airports are doing their part to facilitate Canada’s competitiveness in the world but this requires government direction – domestically and internationally – consistent with its commitment to Canadian competitiveness. Jim Facette President and CEO Canadian Airports Council

An expansion is now underway at Ottawa International Airport.

Through the CAC, Canada’s airports are participating in the federal government’s cargo security pilot project, which parallels efforts also underway in the U.S. The financial impact on airports from a security ban on liquids, gels and aerosols (LAGs) continued through 2007, most notably for pre-clearance airports on flights into the U.S. Some progress was made in

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l e g i s l at i v e a n d g o v e r n M e n t a F Fa i r s
ACI-NA Urges Congress to Provide Airports with Tools for the Future
IN PREPARATION fOR THE CONgRESSIONAL dEbATE ON fEdERAL AvIATION AdMINISTRATION (fAA) REAUTHORIzATION, THE AIRPORTS COUNCIL INTERNATIONAL–NORTH AMERICA’S (ACI-NA) bOARd Of dIRECTORS IN fEbRUARy LAId THE fOUNdATION TO MAKE THE CASE fOR AIRPORT MOdERNIzATION by dEvELOPINg SIX “gUIdINg PRINCIPLES” fOR THE INdUSTRy’S LObbyINg EffORTS.

“With these principles, we will be seeking Congressional approval of an FAA reauthorization bill that provides airports with the necessary tools to fund projects benefiting their local communities and help continue to meet growing airline and passenger demands,” said Rick Piccolo, chairman of the ACI-NA board and president and chief executive officer of the Sarasota Bradenton International Airport in February 2007. ACI-NA staff realized that the first step in building momentum for FAA reauthorization was to provide information to Congress about the importance of airports. Despite the fact that airports are gateways for trade and commerce, generating significant economic and transportation benefits, we found that we needed to do significant work to better educate policymakers about the best ways to finance the expansion of airport infrastructure. Meeting with staff from nearly every member of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, we emphasized that airports are not only catalysts for economic growth, but also a critical component in the FAA’s Next Generation air transportation system to modernize aviation. The next step was to provide the facts and data on airport capital needs and why airports must plan now to accommodate the more than one billion passengers expected to travel by air in the United States by 2015. The Passengers First Commitment campaign (www.passengersfirstcommitment.org) was then developed to publicize the respected ACI-NA Capital Needs Survey results and the important role that an increase in the passenger facility charge (PFC) ceiling would play in airport project financing. Further, with airline passengers experiencing higher ticket prices and more inconvenience, we have publicized the fact that PFCs facilitate the

construction of new terminals, runways and taxiways – reducing delays and providing more service and price competition. Additionally, ACI-NA has been very successful in securing publication of “Letters to the Editor” and guest editorials in congressional, aviation trade and general media publications on the importance of

ACI-NA’s sIx GUIdING FAA ReAUThoRIzATIoN PRINCIPles
• Increase the Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) rate ceiling and give airports flexibility in rate-setting • Streamline FAA’s management of the PFC Program • Increase and strengthen the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) • Improve the Airport and Airways Trust Fund to foster financial stability • Treat airport bonds as tax-exempt public purpose bonds • Allow airports more financial flexibility

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expanding airports as part of modernizing the nation’s aviation system. ACI-NA also successfully collaborated with the National Association of Counties, the National League of Cities, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National Association of State Aviation Officials to lobby Congress for increased AIP funding and an increase in the PFC ceiling. Recognizing the importance of the Small Community Air Service Development and the Essential Air Service (EAS) programs, the coalition also urged continued funding for these important programs administered by the Department of Transportation (DOT). While the need for more funding tools has been the focus for reauthorization, it is not the only issue on which we are working. Air traffic control (ATC) reform is a critical issue affecting the future of the airport industry and ACI-NA is playing a key leadership role. We are participating with FAA, the airlines and the general

aviation community in numerous Joint Policy and Development Office (JPDO) committees, as well as educating congressional staff on the ATC programs that are essential for U.S. airports. Additionally, in May ACI-NA submitted testimony regarding FAA reauthorization that outlined the most important ATC initiatives for the airport industry: Airport Surface Detection Equipment-Model X; Automatic Dependent Surveillance–Broadcast; Performance Based Navigation; and Wake Vortex Detection and Avoidance Programs. Recognizing that environmental issues are a key focus for many in Congress, ACI-NA also vigorously advocated a number of innovative airport environmental programs in FAA reauthorization. In late April, ACI-NA staff met with the House Transportation and Infrastructure staff to urge the inclusion of 12 specific legislative provisions. A month later, ACI-NA testified on behalf of the airport industry on climate change and energy efficiency before the committee. We were very pleased that the committee supported many of the programs we discussed in testimony in the final legislation. The Senate and House FAA reauthorization bills differ in their emphasis on the tools necessary for airport modernization and much work remains to be done. ACI-NA is confident that when the conference committee completes its work and the legislation is ultimately passed by Congress and signed by the President,

ACI-NA President Greg Principato testifies before the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Transportation Security and Infrastructure Protection. Lauren Stover, Miami-Dade’s assistant aviation director for security and communications, and William E. Holden, senior vice president of Covenant Homeland Security Solutions, look on.

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the airport industry will have the additional tools necessary to better serve passengers by providing safer, more efficient, and environmentally-friendly facilities. The DOT appropriations were also an area in which the Government Affairs team has been very active. With the assistance of our member airports, we lobbied successfully against the President’s request for a significant cut in AIP funding for fiscal 2008. Given the difficult budgetary environment and the fact that there is no authorization in place for the program, this is an important achievement for the airport industry. We were also pleased with Congressional support for funding the EAS and Small Community Air Service Development programs. Because of the critical impact aviation security and TSA programs have on airport operations, it is no surprise that ACI-NA was involved in legislation to implement the 9/11 Commission recommendations and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) appropriations bill. Funding for in-line explosive detection systems (EDS), TSA and Customs staffing, as well as cargo screening, were all areas where ACI-NA’s participation benefited the airport industry. We also lobbied extensively for funding EDS in the Iraq Supplemental legislation that was ultimately signed into law in early August. Additionally, ACI-NA staff influenced the congressional debate on employee screening and airport badges. We represented the airport industry on 100 percent employee screening at a House hearing in April, advocating a multi-faceted, risk-based program, developed collaboratively by airports, airlines and TSA. This program would serve to enhance the security of the traveling public by strengthening airport and airline employee screening while appropriately using resources across the aviation industry. While the House legislation moved out of committee and could move to the floor for consideration, the more likely vehicle for the employee screening issue will come from

passengersfirstcommitment.org

Chairman Jerry Costello (D-IL) confers with Ranking Member Rep. Thomas E. Petri (R-WI) during a meeting of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Subcommittee on Aviation.

a possible conference on the House and Senate DHS appropriations measures. This is due to the fact that both bills include language and limited funding to pilot test physical screening of airport and airline employees. A conference report on DHS appropriations is far from certain, and the President has threatened a veto unless the spending levels are reduced. Regarding the security of airport badges, our efforts were directly responsible for the addition of a provision that recognized the challenges and role of airport operators as governmental entities in collecting access badges from terminated employers. Many challenges remain for the ACI-NA staff and airport industry as a whole. These include but are not limited to the passage of FAA reauthorization legislation, as well as educating Congress on airport safety, security, funding, efficiency, and environmental issues. We appreciate your assistance and support and look forward to working with you for the success of the industry.

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vice chairMan’s Message
Dear Airport Leaders and Partners, Next year, with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reauthorization campaign behind us, the work is not done, as we must ensure adequate funding for airports in the appropriations legislation. ACI-NA’s Passengers First Commitment awareness campaign is not a public relations effort in the FAA reauthorization debate, but a covenant with our customers.The association and each airport will continue to keep customers focused on why additional construction – and the resulting disruptions – are needed. Security will continue to be a critical issue. We are burdened with an inefficient system and we must work with the Transportation Security Administration to reduce the hassle-factor for our customers. We need to convince the Administration to give us the resources to move our passengers with more technology and less intrusive, cumbersome screenings. And, at the top of that list should be funding to install inline explosives detection systems in at airports on a timely basis.
Randall H. Walker 2007 ACI-NA First Vice Chair

For returning passengers, ACI-NA will continue its efforts to get more custom inspectors and to streamline the Custom and Border Protection efforts. The association is working on the Secure Borders and Open Doors Advisory Committee, formed as part of Rice-Chertoff initiative, dealing with all modes of transportation. ACI-NA is a member of Ports of Entry Working Group. Also on the international travel front, the United States and the European Union will begin second phase talks in the Open Skies agreement to work for a smooth, customer-friendly implementation. ACI-NA will again be an active participant in these talks. The environment remains a concern and likely a larger political issue. As the EU works to limit greenhouse emissions on a number of sectors, including airlines, the pressure for similar action in the United States will increase.We have already partnered with ACI to support an initiative developed by the Air Transport Action Group. In the coming months ACI-NA will be streamlining its committees to improve their efficiency and ability to respond to these pressing issues. As I step forward to fill the chair, I ask that each of you get involved in our committees and support our government and regulatory affairs teams in their efforts to create a better working environment for your airport. Randall H. Walker First Vice Chair, ACI-NA 2007 Board of Directors McCarran International Airport

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coMMittee accoMPlishMents
Business Information Technologies Committee
THE bUSINESS INfORMATION TECHNOLOgIES COMMITTEE (bIT) CONTINUEd TO wORK ON COMMON USE PASSENgER PROCESSINg (CUPPS), wIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS (wI-fI) ANd AIRPORT INfORMATION SySTEMS.

One of the most significant technology issues involves payment card industry security, a critical issue for an airport that accepts consumer credit cards. American Express’ Michael Mitchell briefed the group on this topic during the spring conference. The committee remains very interested in CUPPS. The success of the CUPPS initiative requires participation from both airports and airlines. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) invited Sam Ingalls of McCarran International Airport to chair a new committee revising 25-year-old standards for common use terminal equipment. The IATA committee has worked along with airports and the Air Transport Association

on a recommended practice as well as detailed technical specifications. These projects, when completed and implemented, will allow airports to install passenger-processing equipment that can be used by multiple airlines. This will allow airport equipment to be used more efficiently and give airlines the opportunity to take advantage of airport facilities on short notice.

Commissioners’ Committee
THE COMMISSIONERS’ COMMITTEE, COMPOSEd Of AIRPORT bOARd MEMbERS, COMMISSIONERS ANd TRUSTEES, RAISEd A RECORd AMOUNT – NEARLy $40,000 – fOR ITS SCHOLARSHIP PROgRAM ANd AwARdEd fIvE COLLEgE SCHOLARSHIPS.

At its spring Leadership Conference, the group honored U.S. Rep. Bennie G.Thompson (D-MS) with its 2007 leadership award for his ongoing support of the aviation industry. Thompson is the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee. Over the past several months, the committee members have been actively and effectively educating their local congressional representatives about ACI-NA reauthorization goals.

In June, more than 100 attended the committee’s annual conference held in Atlanta. AirTran CEO Joe Leonard was a keynote speaker.

Stephen J. Mitchell, chair of the Commissioner’s Committee, honors U.S. Rep. Bennie G. Thompson.

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economic Affairs Committee
THE ECONOMIC AffAIRS COMMITTEE ACTS AS THE fOCAL POINT fOR THE ASSOCIATION’S EffORTS ON A bROAd RANgE Of AIRPORT-RELATEd ECONOMIC ISSUES. AIRPORTS’ AbILITy TO ACHIEvE THEIR PUbLIC SERvICE RESPONSIbILITIES dEPENdS UPON THEIR ECONOMIC vITALITy.

The Economic Affairs Committee is responsible for the management of six subcommittees: Air Cargo, Airline Business, Business and Commercial Management, Business Diversity, Finance and Administration, and Insurance and Risk Management. The Insurance and Risk Management Subcommittee last year began a benchmarking study of Airport Operating Agreement Insurance Requirements. In order to assist airports in assessing the adequacy of insurance coverage requirements on airports’ business partners, the subcommittee rolled out a pilot project at the end of 2006. More than 50 airports participated in the full study of both limits and general insurance requirements. The Air Cargo Subcommittee’s security working group developed a new chapter for the ACI-NA Air Cargo Handbook, which details the latest security practices. The Alternative Land Use working group is developing a paper that

will examine alternative land use and critical operations and security, physical and environmental, business and financial considerations airports should take before undertaking such projects. Other committee projects include analyzing the emergence of secondary gateways, open skies agreements and the China and Southeast Asian market. The Finance and Administration Subcommittee established a benchmarking task force to consolidate all benchmarking efforts and came up with recommendations to enhance the ACI-NA Airport Performance Benchmarking Program. At the suggestion of the subcommittee, the Airport Cooperative Research Program will prepare a paper on trends, methods and best practices for airportairline agreements. The Economic Affairs Committee is also responsible for holding several industry-related conferences per year, including the Economic and Finance Conference, the Insurance and Risk Management Conference, the Air Cargo Conference, the Airport CFO Fly-in Summit and the Concessions Conference, as well as making contributions to the ACI-NA Annual Conference. Additionally, the committee also conducts the Richard A. Griesbach Excellence in Airport Concessions Contest.
UPS will be spending $250 million to expand its WorldPort facilities at Louisville International Airport.

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coMMittee accoMPlishMents
environmental Affairs Committee
THE ENvIRONMENTAL AffAIRS COMMITTEE INCLUdES NINE wORKINg gROUPS: AIR QUALITy, CAEP/INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, LANd USE COMPATIbILITy, NATURAL RESOURCES, NATIONAL ENvIRONMENTAL POLICy ACT (NEPA), NOISE, SUSTAINAbILITy, wASTE MANAgEMENT, ANd wATER QUALITy.

The NEPA Working Group remained active in 2006-2007, working jointly with the Airport Consultants Council (ACC) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to organize a series of workshops focused on FAA’s Order 5050.4B, National Environmental Policy Act: Implementing Instructions for Airport Projects. An October 2007 workshop will focus on the new FAA Environmental Desk Reference for federal airport actions. The workshop participants will better understand how FAA integrates over 20 environmental laws into the NEPA process. This group is also collaborating with members of the Operations and Technical Affairs Committee to explore ways to integrate physical planning and the NEPA process in an effort to streamline airport project development. A significant focus of the committee continues to be the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) development of effluent limitation guidelines for airport deicing practices. The Water Quality Working Group recently established a task force to work with EPA throughout the rule development process, which should be finalized in 2009.
Madison’s Dane County Regional Airport won the mitigation award in the 2007 Environmental Achievement Awards. This is an aerial view approaching Runway 14. The runway safety improvement project (lower right area) involved realigning a railroad over a marsh, relocating a creek bed, and realigning a portion of a county highway and the airport perimeter road, all accomplished while minimizing the impact on the surrounding marsh, and improving the hydrology in the area and the water quality of the stream.

What started as a joint initiative of the Environmental and Operations and Technical Affairs Committees, the Sustainability Working Group is expanding to include interaction and input from all ACI-NA committees. The Working Group is examining how airports are informed, enabled and ultimately empowered to make better decisions that holistically integrate how they do business, treat the environment, work with their business partners and tenants, and are perceived by their neighbors and the public.

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putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

U.s. International Air service Program
THE INTERNATIONAL AIR SERvICE PROgRAM, fUNdEd THROUgH A SPECIAL ASSESSMENT ON INTERESTEd U.S. AIRPORT MEMbERS, PROMOTES U.S. AIRPORT INTERESTS IN INTERNATIONAL AIR SERvICE.

The program was an active participant in the consultations with China, which led to an agreement in May to expand significantly passenger and cargo rights. After four years and 11 rounds of consultations, of which ACI was an active player, the European Union (EU) and the United States reached an Open Skies-Plus Agreement in March 2007.

The group was involved in efforts with other major partners such as Argentina, Japan, and Mexico. The program has established a working group – consisting of member airports – to participate in the second stage negotiations with the EU. As called for in the accord, talks are to begin in June 2008 to discuss follow-up items, including traffic rights, foreign investment opportunities, access to government-financed traffic and the effects of infrastructure and environmental. The working group will develop ACI-NA’s approach and views prior to the start of these talks.

Facilitation Working Group
THE fACILITATION wORKINg gROUP AddRESSES ISSUES INvOLvINg THE U.S. AgENCIES THAT CONTROL THE MOvEMENT Of INTERNATIONAL AIR PASSENgERS ANd CARgO ENTRy THROUgH U.S. AIRPORTS.

The group has focused its efforts on U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) staffing, model airports program and the Rice-Chertoff Initiative on Secure Borders and Open Doors. Because of the group’s efforts with Congress, CBP is now posting more detailed wait times for 16 US airports. However, more work is needed to ensure the accuracy of this data and inclusion of more airports.

The group worked with the Canadian Airports Council to mitigate the impact of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative on air travel. The facilitation group will intensify its work on US-VISIT Exit, which has implications for all U.S. airports.The move by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will impact airports because the agency wants the airlines to collect the fingerprints of departing visitors. Congress wants DHS to implement US-VISIT by December 2008, which is a very tight timetable.

A Chinese dragon was part of the festivities at Washington Dulles International Airport on March 28 to mark United Airlines first daily non-stop flight from Dulles to Beijing. United won the flight after a new agreement with China was reached. ACI-NA’s International Air Service Program participated in those negotiations.

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legal Affairs Committee
THE LEgAL AffAIRS COMMITTEE PARTICIPATEd IN SEvERAL SIgNIfICANT CASES LITIgATEd dURINg 2006 ANd 2007.

These cases include: McCarran v. Sisolak,Vacation Village v. Clark County and Alaska Airlines v. Los Angeles World Airports. The committee also continues to be involved in land use issues, particularly the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) treatment of airports that acquired land with Airport Improvement Program (AIP) funds for noise compatibility. In McCarran v. Sisolak, the Nevada Supreme Court issued a decision in 2006 finding that a Clark County height restriction “took” the property of a nearby landowner. McCarran International petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to review the decision. ACI-NA filed a “friend of the court” brief in the Nevada court and, together with five other aviation trade associations, filed a brief in support of McCarran’s petition to the U.S. Supreme Court. However, in January, the U.S. Supreme Court decided not to review the case. In the Los Angeles case, 21 airlines sued Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA) in a U.S. Department of Transportation administrative court, claiming that the airport’s increased

terminal rental charges, and maintenance and operations (M&O) charges, violated applicable law and AIP grant assurances. ACI-NA participated as an intervenor in the proceeding. LAWA prevailed on the issue of M&O charges, but the airlines were successful in convincing DOT that most of the challenged rental rate increases were unjustly discriminatory. Both parties are appealing the DOT to the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., and ACI-NA has been asked to intervene in the case.

ACI-NA intervened on behalf of Los Angeles International Airport when 21 airlines challenged the airport’s new terminal rental rates.

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Marketing and Communications Committee
ACI-NA’S MARKETINg ANd COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE, COMPRISEd Of AIRPORT ANd ASSOCIATE PROfESSIONALS IN CUSTOMER SERvICE, AvIATION EdUCATION, AIR SERvICE, MEdIA RELATIONS, PUbLIC RELATIONS ANd COMMUNITy RELATIONS, fOCUSEd ON CONTINUINg TO PROvIdE EXCELLENT LEARNINg ANd NETwORKINg OPPORTUNITIES fOR ITS MEMbERS IN 2007.

The committee planned the April Customer Service and Aviation Education Seminar held in Columbus, Ohio. The seminar attracted 85 participants and included valuable exchanges on research, investing in the community, translating feedback into customer service solutions and best practices. The June 2007 Marketing and Communications Conference & JumpStart® Air Service Development Program was held

in Tucson, Ariz., with 377 registrants. US Airways CEO Doug Parker keynoted the conference. One air service planning session used audience response units that resulted in enthusiastic participation from the audience. The other popular sessions covered social media, including blogs and web sites, and providing excellent customer service. JumpStart®, ACI-NA’s signature air service development program, connected 141 airports with airline route planners from 36 airlines at 740 one-on-one meetings on June 20. The committee also oversees ACI-NA’s Excellence in Marketing and Communications Contest. In 2007, 73 airports entered almost 300 entries. Judges bestowed the prestigious Peggy G. Hereford Award for Overall Excellence to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

operations and Technical Affairs Committee
CONTINUINg PRObLEMS wITH vARIOUS ObSTRUCTION ISSUES THAT ARE NOT bEINg EffECTIvELy RESOLvEd by CURRENT fAA PROCEdURES.

More than 36 airlines met with 141 airports in Tucson in the annual JumpStart® Air Service Development Program which resulted in 740 one-on-one presentations. (Anthony French, Inside Tucson Business)

THE OPERATIONS ANd TECHNICAL AffAIRS COMMITTEE HAS bEEN fOCUSEd ON ALTERNATIvE CONTRACTINg METHOdS, NEXT gEN CAPACITy ISSUES ANd THE

The alternative contracting project offers members a forum and guidance materials to help them progress from the traditional design, bid, build contracting methods to contracting tools like construction manager

at risk and design-build frequently used in the private sector. To date, the committee has held two successful two-day educational seminars, published a white paper and supported continuing sessions at committee meetings to advance the state of members’ knowledge in this area.

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coMMittee accoMPlishMents
Public safety and security Committee
THE PUbLIC SAfETy ANd SECURITy COMMITTEE HAS bEEN wORKINg wITH AIRPORTS ANd THE TRANSPORTATION SECURITy AdMINISTRATION (TSA) TO IMPROvE SECURITy fOR THE PASSENgERS ANd EMPLOyEES AT THE AIRPORTS.

In addition, it has revitalized its public safety component with a working group focused on some of the most pressing public safety issues. • Employee Screening. In response to congressional interest and pending legislation, the committee has worked to deal proactively with the issue. A united industry effort has pushed the government to include a range of actions and required that these options must first be pilot tested – with the testing funded by the federal government. • Next Generation Airport Security Regime. The committee has been working on new concepts and providing input to TSA that will ensure that airports are part of the decision-making process. Among the issues vetted are how to enhance employee background checks and access authority, improve perimeter security, improve access control systems, improve airside response and surveillance. • Risk Based Security System. The committee has been working with TSA to develop a methodology to assist the agency and the industry in assessing security risk. A risk-based system will help TSA and airports in responding more quickly and efficiently to threats. • Safety Management System. The Public Safety Working Group is helping airports prepare to implement new Safety Management System changes as part of new International Civil Aviation Organization requirements, helping airports share information and best practices regarding mass terminal evacuations and reducing runway incursions on the airfield though better training.
A TSA agent at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport inspects carry-on items.

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putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

small Airports Committee
THE SMALL AIRPORTS COMMITTEE HAS AddRESSEd NUMEROUS ISSUES Of CRITICAL IMPORTANCE TO THE OPERATIONS ANd SURvIvAL Of THE SMALL HUb ANd NON-HUb AIRPORTS.

At Springfield-Branson National Airport, Lead Agent Anders Mercer stows a Comair passenger’s wheelchair in the belly of a regional jet bound for Cincinnati. Mercer is part of the airport’s ground services staff.

The committee focused on two areas to help small airports to sustain access to the national air transportation system: Airports providing support services to airlines, and the delays and cancellations of flights at small airports due to congestion at New York LaGuardia and at Chicago O’Hare. The primary reason small airports are evaluating whether to provide ground services is to enhance, or even to maintain, air service by decreasing the overhead costs for airlines.

Congestion at the major hub airports, especially at LaGuardia and O’Hare, has had a devastating effect over the past year on delays and cancellations of flights at the small airports that feed the hub airports. • At the committee’s winter meeting, Pinnacle Airlines discussed the process airlines utilize in determining which flights to delay or cancel when congestion at the hub airports necessitates a reduction in flights. • At the committee’s summer meeting, United Express talked about its success with the procedures the carrier is implementing to reduce delays and cancellations at the small airports that feed O’Hare.

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awa r d w i n n e r s
2006 ACI-NA Richard A. Griesbach
excellence in Airport Concessions Contest
OvERALL gRIESbACH AwARd Of EXCELLENCE

Memphis International Airport – Concourse B

bEST fOOd ANd bEvERAgE PROgRAM MEdIuM AIRPoRtS

1st Place – Memphis International Airport – Concourse B
LARGE AIRPoRtS

The rotunda in Concourse B at Memphis International Airport reflects the community’s heritage. Memphis won the 2006 Richard Griesbach Award of Excellence.

1st Place – Detroit Metropolitan Airport – Edward H. McNamara Terminal 2nd Place – John F. Kennedy International Airport – Terminal 6

bEST RETAIL SPECIALTy PROgRAM MEdIuM AIRPoRtS

1st Place – Southwest Florida International Airport – New Terminal 2nd Place – Memphis International Airport – Concourse B
LARGE AIRPoRtS

1st Place – Detroit Metropolitan Airport – Edward H. McNamara Terminal Honorable Mention – Houston George Bush Intercontinental Airport – Terminal E

MOST INNOvATIvE CONCESSION LARGE AIRPoRtS

1st Place – Washington Dulles International Airport “Vino Volo” 2nd Place – La Guardia Airport “Cibo Express Gourmet Market”

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putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

excellence in Marketing & Communications Contest
THE ANNUAL EXCELLENCE IN AIRPORT MARKETINg ANd COMMUNICATIONS CONTEST HAS gROwN SIgNIfICANTLy IN SIzE ANd SCOPE SINCE ITS INCEPTION IN 1990. ACI-NA RECEIvEd MORE ENTRIES THAN EvER bEfORE, NEARLy 300 ENTRIES IN 21 CATEgORIES fROM 73 MEMbER AIRPORTS. THE QUALITy Of wORK ENTEREd IN THIS yEAR’S CONTEST CREATEd A gREAT CHALLENgE fOR OUR PANEL Of 37 jUdgES. CONgRATULATIONS TO ALL THE wINNERS!

PEggy g. HEREfORd AwARd wINNER

Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
SEATTLE ALSO PLACEd IN THE fOLLOwINg CATEgORIES:

1st Place: Newsletters – Internal 2nd Place: Special Events 2nd Place: Partnering with Carriers 2nd Place: Marketing Campaigns
1. ANNUAL REPORTS

1st Place: San Diego County Regional Airport Authority 2nd Place: Portland International Airport 3rd Place (tie): Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority 3rd Place (tie): Halifax International Airport Authority
2. bROCHURES

1st Place: Nashville International Airport 2nd Place: Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport 3rd Place: McCarran International Airport (Las Vegas)
Seattle-Tacoma International Airport’s outstanding communications and marketing programs earned the airport ACI-NA’s Peggy G. Hereford Award.

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3. NEwSLETTERS – INTERNAL OR EMAIL 8. AvIATION EdUCATION & TOUR PROgRAMS

1st Place (tie): Seattle-Tacoma International Airport 1st Place (tie): Pittsburgh International Airport 2nd Place: Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport 3rd Place: Reno-Tahoe International Airport
4. NEwSLETTERS – EXTERNAL

1st Place: Reno-Tahoe International Airport 2nd Place: Van Nuys Airport 3rd Place: San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
9. PARTNERINg wITH CARRIERS

1st Place: Portland International Airport 2nd Place: Denver International Airport 3rd Place: Ottawa International Airport Authority
5. PRESS KITS

1st Place: Edmonton Airports 2nd Place: Seattle-Tacoma International Airport 3rd Place: Blue Grass Airport (Lexington, KY)
10. MARKETINg CAMPAIgNS

1st Place: El Paso International Airport 2nd Place (tie): Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority 2nd Place (tie): Sacramento County Airport System 3rd Place: General Mitchell International Airport (Milwaukee)
6. fLIgHT gUIdES

1st Place (tie): Minneapolis St. Paul International Airport 1st Place (tie): Oakland International Airport 2nd Place: Seattle-Tacoma International Airport 3rd Place: Boston Logan International Airport
11. PUbLIC RELATIONS CAMPAIgNS

1st Place: Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport 2nd Place : Brownsville South Padre Island International Airport 3rd Place: Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority
7. SPECIAL EvENTS

1st Place: McCarran International Airport (Las Vegas) 2nd Place (tie): Edmonton Airports 2nd Place (tie): Miami International Airport 3rd Place: John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport (Ontario)
12. CORPORATE bRANdINg CAMPAIgNS

1st Place: Vancouver International Airport 2nd Place: Yeager Airport (Charleston, WV) 3rd Place: Mineta San Jose International Airport

1st Place: Southwest Florida International Airport 2nd Place: Seattle-Tacoma International Airport 3rd Place: Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport

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putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

13. CUSTOMER SERvICE INITIATIvES

17. vIdEO & fILM PROdUCTION

1st Place: San Diego International Airport 2nd Place (tie): Winnipeg International Airport 2nd Place (tie): Mineta San Jose International Airport 3rd Place: Columbus Regional Airport Authority
14A. PRINT AdvERTISINg – bLACK & wHITE

1st Place: Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport 2nd Place (tie): Brownsville South Padre Island International Airport 2nd Place (tie): Denver International Airport 3rd Place: LA/Palmdale Regional Airport
18A. CREATIvE INNOvATIONS – PROMOTIONAL ITEMS
ACI-NA President Greg Principato and 2006 Chairman Steve Grossman present the 2006 Downes award to Jim DeLong.

1st Place: LA/Ontario International Airport 2nd Place: Mineta San Jose International Airport 3rd Place: Fort Wayne-Allen County Airport Authority
14 b. PRINT AdvERTISINg – COLOR

1st Place: McCarran International Airport 2nd Place: Huntsville International Airport 3rd Place: Detroit Metropolitan Airport/Wayne County Airport Authority
18b. CREATIvE INNOvATIONS – TECHNOLOgy

downes Award
jIM dELONg

1st Place: LA/Ontario International Airport 2nd Place: LA/Palmdale Regional Airport 3rd Place: Reno-Tahoe International Airport
15. RAdIO AdvERTISINg

1st Place: Minneapolis St. Paul International Airport 2nd Place: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport 3rd Place: Bradley International Airport
16. Tv AdvERTISINg

1st Place: Minneapolis St. Paul International Airport 2nd Place: Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority 3rd Place: Chicago Airport System
19. wEb SITES

The William E. Downes, Jr., Memorial Award, first presented in 1978, is ACI-NA’s most prestigious award. The 2006 winner of the award is Jim DeLong. In his career, DeLong was the aviation director in five cities: Wichita, Houston, Philadelphia, Denver and Louisville. In each city, DeLong was in charge of major construction projects. In Denver, he built and opened the new airport. DeLong served as chairman of ACI-NA in 1996. The award honors the memory and leadership of Downes, who was the Chicago aviation commissioner from 1959 to 1975. Most of the extensive development of O’Hare International Airport took place while he was commissioner.

1st Place: McGhee Tyson Airport (Knoxville) 2nd Place: LA/Ontario International Airport 3rd Place: Bradley International Airport

1st Place: Portland International Airport 2nd Place (tie): Tulsa International Airport 2nd Place (tie): Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport 3rd Place: McGhee Tyson Airport (Knoxville)

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awa r d w i n n e r s
environmental Achievement Awards
The annual ACI-NA Environmental Achievement Awards acknowledge the hard work and achievements of ACI-NA members by promoting awareness more broadly within the airport community, the general public and regulators of the many notable and innovative efforts being undertaken by environmental professionals at airports. In 2007, ACI-NA received 16 entries across three award categories: Environmental Management (9); Mitigation (3); and Outreach, Education, and Community Involvement (6). Three airports won awards and the judges made one special award.
ENvIRONMENTAL MANAgEMENT AwARd CATEgORy: MITIgATION AwARd CATEgORy:

dane County Regional Airport: Runway 14/32 Safety Area and Associated Improvements To bring Runway 14/32’s safety area into compliance with FAA design standards, the Dane County Regional Airport relocated 2.4 miles of active rail line, 0.8 miles of a county highway, over one mile of creek, and the airport perimeter road and fence. The project resulted in 36 acres of direct wetland fill and 35 acres of secondary impact, necessitating 53 acres of wetland mitigation credit. In conjunction with 10 federal, state, and local agencies, the airport developed an on-site mitigation plan that included measures to address adverse historical impacts to water resources. The airport restored both the hydrology of the Cherokee Fen, including buffer plantings and sediment removal, and the Starkweather Creek. The mitigation measures of the project will result in a net overall enhancement to local water resources.

San Francisco International Airport: Environmental Sustainability Program The San Francisco International Airport plays a key role in meeting the city’s commitment to attaining environmental sustainability. Significant measures have been undertaken to reduce emissions, save energy, improve water quality, preserve natural resources, and minimize waste at the airport. Components of the Environmental Sustainability Program, as documented in an Environmental Sustainability Report, include a pilot program with Virgin Atlantic to tow departing aircraft part-way to the runway, 400 Hz power and pre-conditioned air at many gates, conversion of airport shuttles to bio-diesel fuel, installation of solar panels, and a solid waste minimization and recycling program.

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putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

SPECIAL AwARd

Louis Armstrong New orleans International Airport: Runway 10-28 Rehabilitation, Levee Lift, Flood Gate, and Canal Enclosure Having been in service for almost 30 years without a major rehabilitation, rehabilitating Runway 10-28 became a priority for the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport in late 2003. Because Runway 10-28 is the longer of the Airport’s only two runways, minimizing construction time was critical. The project was completed successfully through use of monetary incentives for early completion, innovative and environmentally-friendly construction techniques, and inclusion of regional flood protection construction works. Completion of the rehabilitation coincided almost to the hour of Hurricane Katrina making landfall near New Orleans. With daily operations soaring from an average of 700 to as many as 3,800, completion of the rehabilitated runway proved critical to emergency operations following the Hurricane’s devastating effects.

OUTREACH/EdUCATION/COMMUNITy INvOLvEMENT:

Portland International Airport: Environmental Outreach and Communications Program To further its environmental policy and objectives, the Port of Portland established an Environmental Outreach and Communication Program. The program informs stakeholders about the port’s aviation environmental programs and integrates stakeholder input to those programs through use of Community Integration Guidelines developed specifically for the program. The program, which includes a dedicated environmental outreach manager, enhances relationship building between the airport and the community, allowing more effective implementation of the airport’s proactive environmental projects.

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c a P i ta l n e e d s
Airports eye $87 Billion in New Projects to Meet Travelers’ Needs
If the local airport is the new Main Street or central business district in this post-industrial era as The Wall Street Journal observed, then there needs to be a lot of building over the next five years to meet the customers’ demands. Just to keep pace with the FAA’s forecast of air traffic growth – both passenger and cargo, the U.S. airports expect to spend $87.4 billion on capital developments through 2011 – that’s $17.5 billion per year. But to keep pace, the airports need more money. One answer to the funding gap is more dollars from passenger facility charges (PFC). To document the need for more PFC dollars, ACI-NA surveyed its member airports and reported in May that in just two years the airport construction tab has grown 22.2 percent. While additional projects contributed to part of the growth, the survey determined that inflation in the construction industry has been driving up the costs of work underway as well as the price estimates for projects in the planning stage. More than 100 member airports participated in the survey. Citing this inflation in the construction industry, ACI-NA has been urging Congress to raise the ceiling on PFCs to $7.50. The House has responded to the report by proposing a new $7 ceiling on PFCs. With more than 1 billion passengers expected to be traveling through the U.S. airports by 2015, airports need to start moving dirt now. The Airport Capital Development Costs study found that if these improvements are not made, travelers will encounter overcrowding at some of the nation’s most congested passenger airports, longer flight delays, longer waits for an open gate at destination airports, and a system underequipped and ill-prepared to respond to new capacity, safety and security requirements. On just the airside of airport operations, there are 858 construction projects in progress or planned for large, medium and small hub airports. The study found that a consistent source of funding is needed, especially when it takes on average 10 years to building a new runway and three years to construct a new terminal.

Guide directs a passenger to the correct gate at Denver International Airport.

ToTAl CosTs oF AIRPoRT IMPRoVeMeNTs By PRojeCT TyPe—2007 - 2011 |
sTATIsTICAl MeAsURe
airport type Large Hub Medium Hub Small Hub Nonhub Commercial Reliever gA total Percent safety $1,067 778 307 689 69 83 195 3,189 3.7% security $3,089 946 305 50 11 61 208 4,670 5.3% airfield reconstruction $3,487 2,028 798 1073 211 696 2,008 10,299 11.8% airfield standards $594 179 148 1709 412 1,832 5,329 10,202 11.7% environmental $2,162 698 398 146 23 90 101 3,619 4.1% airfield capacity $10,194 2,276 1,782 287 20 355 426 15,341 17.6%

MIllIoNs oF CURReNT yeAR dollARs

$19,479 5,842 745 634 35 32 149 26,917 30.8%

$6,113 3,424 1,534 119 38 95 146 11,469 13.1%

$0 963 315 0 0 0 0 1,277 1.5%

$282 0 0 27 6 19 46 380 0.4%

$46,466 17,134 6,331 4,735 825 3,263 8,608 87,362 100.0%

53.2% 19.6% 7.2% 5.4% 0.9% 3.7% 9.9% 100.0% -

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putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

SOURCES: ACI-NA SURVEY AND FAA NPIAS.

terminal

access

new airport

other

total

Percent

2007 leadershiP
Board of directors
EXECUTIvE COMMITTEE dIRECTORS

Charles t. “Skip” Miller Louisville Regional Airport Authority

Chairman Fredrick (Rick) J. Piccolo Sarasota Manatee Airport Authority

James E. Bennett Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority thella F. Bowens San Diego County Regional Airport Authority Bruce Carter Metropolitan Airport Authority of Rock Island County Nancy J. Clawson UBS Securities LLC Associates Representative Benjamin R. deCosta Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport thomas E. Greer Monterey Peninsula Airport District

Reginald K. Milley Edmonton Regional Airport Authority

First Vice Chairman Randall H. Walker McCarran International Airport

Stephen J. Mitchell Tampa International Airport Commissioners Representative Raul L. Regalado Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority

Second Vice Chairman John d. Clark, III Jacksonville Aviation Authority

Barry Rempel Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.

Secretary-treasurer G. Hardy Acree Sacramento County Airport System

Lester W. Robinson Wayne County Airport Authority

Immediate Past Chairman: Steven J. Grossman Oakland International Airport

Sylvia Y. Stewart Jackson Municipal Airport Authority Immediate Past Chair, Commissioners Representative William R. Vanecek Buffalo Niagara International Airport

Bradley S. Livingston Dane County Regional Airport

William F. Marrison Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority

James C. Cherry Aeroports de Montreal Canadian Airports Council Representative: Ex-Officio Member
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2007 leadershiP

ACI-NA Associates Board of directors – 2007
EXECUTIvE COMMITTEE dIRECTORS

Chairman Joseph W. Waller Vice President, Business Development HMSHost Corporation Vice Chair Susan Kurland Senior Vice President First Albany Capital Immediate Past Chair Nancy J. Clawson Managing Director UBS Securities LLC ACI-NA Board of directors Liaison Steven J. Grossman Director of Aviation Oakland International Airport Port of Oakland

donald G. Andrews Vice President - Aviation Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Inc. Steven t. Baldwin Vice President The Louis Berger Group Joseph didomizio Chief Operating Officer Hudson Group Shauna Forsythe President Alliance Airport Advertising Robert A. Hazel Managing Partner Eclat Consulting, Inc.

deborah t. Meehan President & COO SH&E, Inc. david Naleway Vice President Parsons Michael R. Pack Vice President & Marketing Manager HDR Engineering Inc. Mark A. Perryman President Landrum & Brown, Inc. Ronald L. Steinert Principal Gensler

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putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

Canadian Airports Council directors
EXECUTIvE COMMITTEE dIRECTORS

Chairman James C. Cherry Montreal Vice Chair Barry Rempel Winnipeg Secretary-treasurer Garth F. Atkinson Calgary Immediate Past Chairman Reg Milley Edmonton Chairman, Council of Chairs Cliff Campbell Charlottetown Chairman, Small Airports Steve Baker London, ON

Pascal Bélanger Québec

Paul Benoit Ottawa

Larry Berg Vancouver

dr. Lloyd McCoomb, Phd Toronto

Richard Paquette Victoria

William F. Restall Saskatoon

Rob Robichaud Moncton

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2007 leadershiP
ACI-NA Committee Chairs
bUSINESS INfORMATION TECHNOLOgIES COMMITTEE U.S. gOvERNMENT AffAIRS COMMITTEE SMALL AIRPORTS COMMITTEE

John Newsome Greater Orlando Aviation Authority
COMMISSIONERS COMMITTEE

Mark Reis Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
LEgAL AffAIRS COMMITTEE

david N. Edwards, Jr. Asheville Regional Airport Authority
OPERATIONS ANd TECHNICAL AffAIRS COMMITTEE

Stephen J. Mitchell Tampa International Airport
ECONOMIC AffAIRS COMMITTEE

Louisa H. Goldstein Maryland Aviation Administration
MARKETINg ANd COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE

daniel J. Molloy Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
U.S. INTERNATIONAL AIR SERvICE PROgRAM

Lori M. Ballard Wayne County Airport Authority
ENvIRONMENTAL AffAIRS COMMITTEE

John Korenic Vancouver International Airport Authority
PUbLIC SAfETy ANd SECURITy COMMITTEE

Genaro J. Pena Houston Airport System

Stewart dallzell Massachusetts Port Authority
fACILITATION wORKINg gROUP

Mark B. Baldy Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority

Ana Sotorrio Miami International Airport

CANAdIAN AIRPoRTs CoUNCIl (CAC)
James Facette President and CEO Fred Jones Vice President, Operations & Legal Affairs daniel-Robert Gooch Director of Communications Melanie Levac Director, Small Airports

32

putting passengers first – 2007 year in review

ACI-NA headquarters staff
EXECUTIvE LEAdERSHIP

Miranda Horan, Research Analyst Sam McCrimmon, Intern – Technical Affairs
SECURITy ANd ECONOMIC AffAIRS

AdMINISTRATION ANd HUMAN RESOURCES

Gregory Principato, President and CEO Patricia Hahn, General Counsel and Executive Director, ACI-NA Legal Center Brett McAllister, Senior Vice President, Operations/Chief Financial Officer Arlene Mcdermott, Executive Assistant to the President and Liaison to the Board
gOvERNMENT AffAIRS

Nancy Zimini, Vice President, Administration and Human Resources Michelle Leslie, Senior Manager, Membership Operations Joseph Weidlich, Database Administrator and Chief Historian Shawon Briscoe, Manager, Accounts and Registration tijuana Newman, Manager, Office Services Frank Eubanks, Office Services Specialist Michelle Andriano, Receptionist

Charles Chambers, Jr., Senior Vice President, Security and Economic Affairs Lydia Kellogg, Senior Manager, Public Safety and Security Mary Lincer, Administrative Assistant, Security and Economic Affairs
INTERNATIONAL AffAIRS

deborah McElroy, Senior Vice President, Government Affairs Scott Weaver, Senior Director, Government Affairs Paul Eubanks, Manager, Government Affairs
LEgAL AffAIRS

diane Peterson, Senior Vice President, International Affairs
MEETINgS ANd MEMbER SERvICES

Patricia Hahn, General Counsel and Executive Director, ACI-NA Legal Center James Briggs, Jr., Assistant General Counsel
CENTER fOR POLICy ANd REgULATORy AffAIRS

Amy Peters, Vice President, Conference Development and Member Services Christopher Rochette, Director, Conferences Jeffrey Becker, Manager, Conferences
COMMUNICATIONS ANd MARKETINg

Richard Marchi, Senior Advisor Liying Gu, Director, Economic Affairs and Research Jessica Steinhilber, Director, Environmental Affairs A.J. Muldoon, Manager, Policy Analyst

Eileen denne, Senior Vice President, Communications and Marketing thomas J. Smith, Director, Communications Will Huthnance, Senior Manager, Web Development Megan Miller, Manager, Communications

1775 K Street, NW, Suite 500 Washington, DC 20006 voice (202) 293-8500 fax (202) 331-1362 www.aci-na.org