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Dewch i Landudno a’r fro i fwynhau traethau a golygfeydd
godidog arfordir gogledd Cymru. A, thra rydych chi yma, beth
am adeiladu castell tywod a bwyta pysgod a sglodion go iawn?
Ond wrth i’r gaeaf ddynesu, peidiwch â mynd yn bell! Mae yna
ddigon o bethau y gallwch chi eu gwneud trwy’r flwyddyn
gan gynnwys ymweld â rhai o ddigwyddiadau gorau Cymru
fel Gwledd Conwy a Ffair Nadolig Llandudno – a fydd yn siwˆ r
o godi’ch hwyl yn ystod y gaeaf. Mae rhywbeth yma at ddant
pawb, beth bynnag eich cyllideb. Mae ein hanes unigryw yn
mynd â chi o Oes Fictoria ar y pier i’r Oesoedd Canol yng
Nghastell Conwy ac yna i’r Oes Efydd yn y mwyngloddiau
copr. Os nad ydi hynny at eich dant beth am fynd i Venue
Cymru i fwynhau perfformiad Opera Cenedlaethol Cymru neu
i chwerthin yng nghwmni digrifwyr gorau Prydain. Fel arall,
beth am i chi fynd i weld beth a welwch chi ar y Gogarth; hafan
bywyd gwyllt ar gwr y dref.
Glaw neu hindda, mi gewch chi groeso cynnes yn Llandudno
bob tro.
2 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
Visit Llandudno and the North Wales Coast and you’ll be treated to
the best of the British seaside: beaches, sea views, sand castles and
proper fish and chips. But when the deck chairs get packed away,
we don’t go into hibernation. There’s plenty to keep you busy all
year round, including some of Wales’ best events – from Gwledd
Conwy Feast in October to Llandudno’s Christmas Fayre – all
guaranteed to warm up the chilly months. We’ve something for all
tastes and pockets, too. Our unique history ranges from the old at
Llandudno’s Victorian pier; the very old at Conwy’s medieval castle
and town walls; to the downright ancient at the Bronze Age copper
mines. Let the Welsh National Opera put a song in your heart, while
Britain’s top stand-up comedians provide the belly laughs at Venue
Cymru. Or explore the wild and woolly Green Flag landscapes of
The Great Orme; a coastal haven for wildlife on the edge of town.
Whether the season calls for flip flops or wellies, Llandudno is
ready with a big Welsh welcome.
Llandudno
4 Great breaks
8 Walk this way
Conwy & Conwy Valley heritage
9 Princes, poems and parapets
Around the bay
14 3 days to get the most from the coast
Natural environment
16 It’s in our nature
Gardens and green spaces
18 It takes time
Activities
20 Coastal adventures
21 The golf coast
23 Walks, wheels and water
24 Outdoor adventures in
Conwy Valley & Snowdonia
Food and drink
25 Add some local flavour
Events
28 What’s on in 2013
Places to visit
32 Attractions & entertainment
A guide to the accommodation
34 Gradings & colour code summary
Find a place to stay
36 A-Z list of accommodation
37 Symbols key
39 From basic to blow the budget
Wales’s holiday areas
61 Brochure request
Find your way
62 Street maps
Closer than you think
66 Travel and county map
Tourist Information Centres
Back cover - contact the people in
the know
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GR E A T B R E A K S I N L L A NDUDNO
Mae Llandudno yn enwog am ei gwyliau glan môr traddodiadol ond a wyddoch chi hefyd fod modd sgïo, teithio mewn cerbyd cebl,
ymweld â mwynglawdd Oes Efydd, crwydro drwy un o orielau celf gyfoes mwyaf blaenllaw Cymru, mynd ar gwch, mynd ar hen fws a
cherdded ar hyd milltiroedd o lwybrau? Beth bynnag y tywydd mae yna beth wmbredd o bethau diddorol a chyffrous i’w gwneud. Boed yn
benwythnos byr neu’n wyliau llawn gyda’ch teulu, cymar neu ffrindiau, mae digon o bethau i’ch cadw’n brysur am wythnos gyfan. Mae’r
rhestr yn faith felly dewch draw am dro - does ryfedd bod cannoedd o bobl yn dychwelyd flwyddyn ar ôl blwyddyn!
With ice cream, donkey rides, Wales’ longest
pier, and not one but two beaches to choose
from, we do classic holidays rather well here
at Bill Bryson’s favourite seaside resort.
But you may be surprised to hear that in Llandudno
you can also ski down a big hill, travel in a cable car, go
underground at the Bronze Age mine, and visit Wales’
leading gallery of contemporary art. You can take a
boat trip out to sea, a tour in a vintage bus, or be your
own guide and explore our geological heritage on foot;
the Great Orme country park has dozens of walks and
trails, each one guaranteed to put a spring in your step.
We’re an all-seasons kind of place, with plenty going on
throughout the year, from a Victorian Extravaganza in
May to the annual Christmas panto.
Short break or a full-on holiday, we’re perfect for families,
couples and groups, with enough attractions, walks
and stunning views to keep even the most energetic
holiday-maker busy for a whole week. Our wide range of
approved accommodation caters for all budgets; so you
can choose to wake up in a cosy guest house, a grand sea
front hotel, or cater for yourself. With so much to do, and
some of Britain’s most spectacular scenery to do it in, it’s
no wonder visitors come back year after year. Come and
see for yourself.
4 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
GR E A T B R E A K S I N L L A NDUDNO
Hop aboard the vintage tramway which
has been charming passengers since 1902.
Painstakingly restored to its former glory,
it’s the only cable-hauled tramway running
on British public roads today and is still
one of our favourite ways to get to the top
of the Great Orme, from where, on a clear
day, you can see as far as the Isle of Man,
Blackpool and the Lake District.
For a quick descent of the Great Orme,
Llandudno Ski Slope and Snowboard
Centre has a PermaSnow ski slope with
spectacular views over Llandudno Bay and
the longest toboggan run in Britain. Open
all year and floodlit on winter evenings,
expert tuition in all kinds of winter sports
is available; children from the age of four
can try skiing and tobogganing, while the
over tens can have a go at snowboarding.
Parents can test their own ski skills, or
watch from the sidelines. Aprés ski food
and drink are served at the Alpine Lodge.
Dating back 4,000 years (that’s 2,000
years before the Roman invasion) and
dug out with just stone and bone tools,
The Great Orme Ancient Mines are the
world’s largest Bronze Age Copper Mines.
Since their discovery, excavation work
has been slowly uncovering tunnels and
surface landscape, and members of the
excavation team are on hand to answer
your questions as you take the self-guided
tour of the tunnels and prehistoric cavern.
Walk around Llandudno town centre
and you might notice the wooden
sculptures of characters from the Alice
in Wonderland stories. Creations of
Carmarthen-based sculptor Simon
Hedger, they form part of The Alice Trail
celebrating the town’s links with author
Lewis Carroll, which is due for completion
in 2014 and will feature more than 40
points of interest throughout the town.
www.wonderland.co.uk
Open all year, Bodafon Farm Park is a
big working farm where you can meet
and feed the animals. Residents include
Highland cattle, fallow deer, pygmy
goats and a Welsh Boar called Boris who
ploughed an entire field with his nose.
Take the farm trail and explore on foot,
or hitch a ride on the tractor and trailer
to make sure you don’t miss anything.
Running alongside North Shore beach
is the elegant Victorian promenade
with its pastel-painted seafront hotels.
You’ll find all the ingredients of a good
old fashioned seaside holiday at Wales’
longest pier: sticks of rock, postcards
and amusement arcades, and nearby,
Professor Codman’s Punch and Judy,
one of Britain’s longest-running shows.
PIER, PROM AND PUNCH
ALICE’S ADVENTURES
FUN ON THE FARM
GOING UP
IN LLANDUDNO
Bring the youngsters, a bucket and spade
and head for the beach. We’ve two to
choose from in Llandudno and both
promise a great day out: award-winning
and fun-packed North Shore, or big and
sandy West Shore; great for kite-flyers
and kite-surfers alike. We’ve many more
beaches along the coast too. Build a sand
castle, paddle in the sea, or, if the weather
won’t cooperate, take a dip in the indoor
pool at Llandudno Swimming Centre.
Sandy Cove, Kinmel Bay: Seaside
Award (rural) and Green Coast Award
Pensarn/Abergele: Seaside Award
(resort) and Green Coast Award
Llanddulas: Green Coast Award
Old Colwyn: Seaside Award (rural)
and Green Coast Award
Colwyn Bay/Rhos-on-Sea:
Blue Flag and Seaside Award (resort)
Penrhyn Bay: Green Coast Award
Llandudno North Shore:
Seaside Award (resort)
Conwy Morfa: Green Coast Award
Penmaenmawr: Seaside Award (resort)
Llanfairfechan: Seaside Award (resort)
BEACHES
AWARD-WINNING
BEACHES 2012:
GOING UNDERGROUND
GOING DOWN
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A PEAK AT THE PAST
Discover Llandudno’s long and fascinating
history, from the really ancient to the fairly
recent. Llandudno Museum has a regularly
changing programme of temporary
exhibitions and there are many fascinating
artefacts in the permanent collection
too; from a footprint on a Roman tile to
paintings, sculptures, furniture and objet
d’art from around the world.
VINTAGE BUS TOUR
After walking, the best way to see the
Great Orme is from a vintage coach as
it winds its way round the limestone
headland’s four mile toll road. The drive
takes an hour and enjoys spectacular views
out to sea along the way as well as lots
of other great things to look out for, from
colonies of seabirds and free-roaming
Kashmiri goats to the Victorian lighthouse
and medieval Church of St Tudno.
www.alpine-travel.co.uk
A TRIP DOWN MEMORY LANE
Those who remember the 1940s will be
treated to a nostalgic trip down memory
lane at this living history museum; while
the self-guided tour allows younger visitors
to experience the sights and sounds of
1940s Britain, giving an unique glimpse
into what life was like during the Second
World War.
www.homefrontmuseum.co.uk
GR E A T B R E A K S I N L L A NDUDNO
FOR HISTORY BUFFS
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VE NUE CYMRU
With its diverse programme of events, Venue Cymru is among
North Wales’ best places to go for a great night out. There
are performances throughout the year ranging from musicals
and drama to pop gigs and stand-up comedy, with large-scale
productions by the likes of Welsh National Opera and Moscow
City Ballet, and smaller shows by local theatre companies. Here
are a few of this year’s highlights; for full details of what’s on in
2013 visit www.venuecymru.co.uk
22 FEBRUARY Phil Cool – A Comedy Legend
17 MARCH BBC National Orchestra of Wales
– Sibelius, Mozart, Stravinsky
and more
13, 15, 16 MARCH Welsh National Opera –
Puccini’s Madame Butterfly
25-30 MARCH Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap
– Diamond Anniversary Tour
4-6 APRIL The Importance of Being Earnest
16-20 APRIL James and the Giant Peach
7-11 MAY Sleeping Beauty on Ice
19 MAY Micky Flanagan – 2013
12-13 JUNE Bill Bailey – Qualmpeddler
2 AUGUST Jimmy Carr – Gagging Order
14 -15 OCTOBER Jason Manford
MOSTYN
Described by The Guardian as ‘one of the most adventurous
contemporary art venues in the UK’, MOSTYN shows regularly
changing exhibitions of international, contemporary art.
Housed in a Grade II-listed building with impressive Victorian
façade and gold spire, MOSTYN began life as the world’s first
gallery for women artists. It’s still a great place to discover
stimulating art today and, alongside the work displayed across
six gallery spaces, you’ll find a shop selling contemporary craft
by local, national and international makers, and a Café where
you can enjoy locally-baked cakes, fresh coffee and a menu of
exciting dishes cooked to order.
GR E A T B R E A K S I N L L A NDUDNO
FORTHCOMI NG EVE NTS AT MOS TYN
From January 2013: ‘MOSTYN Open 18’
This, the 18th Open exhibition, features work by artists from
home and abroad, with a £10,000 prize, and an additional
£1,000 prize to the artist who receives the most votes from
visitors to the exhibition.
From April 2013: ‘YOU’ (plus solo artist shows)
Bringing together the work of five international artists, this
exhibition includes pieces that require the direct involvement
of the viewer.
From July 2013: ‘Dear Portrait’ (plus solo artist shows)
This exhibition looks at portraiture, and aims to update and
renew its relevance in today’s visual arts.
From October 2013: ‘Women’s Art Society’
(plus solo artist shows)
Part of a series of shows about the building’s heritage, this
exhibition explores the origins of MOSTYN as an exhibition
space for women, previously excluded from local art societies
on the basis of their gender.
To find out more visit: www.mostyn.org
To find out more about all the
other great things to see and do in
Llandudno, grab yourself a copy of
the Essential Pocket Guide (2013
edition available at Easter) or visit
www.visitllandudno.org.uk
Vl5lTLLAN0U0N0
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The Great Orme limestone headland is designated a Special Area of Conservation,
a Site of Special Scientific Interest, a local Nature Reserve, and has just received
a Green Flag Award for the fifth year running. One of the best ways to see it,
and make sure you don’t miss anything, is to take a guided walk. Here, four
walkers – Sian and Roger Dale and Stella and Mike Lehane – join guide
Barry Mortlock on an autumn walk, especially designed for over 50s.
8 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
C ONWY A ND C ONWY V A L L E Y HE R I T A GE
Conwy’s mighty castle and town walls built by
English King Edward I are just part of our story. As
Chester based travel writer David Atkinson discovers
when he visits the major new Princes of Gwynedd
exhibition at Conwy Tourist Information Centre.
Ychydig iawn o bobl sy’n gwybod hanes Tywysogion Gwynedd. Eto, mae’r cyfnod yma yn un tyngedfennol yn hanes ein gwlad. Yng
ngeiriau Helen Bradley, Swyddog Prosiect Twristiaeth Treftadaeth Cyngor Sir Gonwy: “Mae llawer o’r syniadau sydd gennym ni am ein
hanes a’n diwylliant yn deillio’n uniongyrchol o’r cyfnod yma”.
Mae arddangosfa newydd Tywysogion Gwynedd yng Nghanolfan Groeso Conwy (cyferbyn â’r castell) yn eich tywys drwy hanes cythryblus
Gwynedd, Dyffryn Conwy ac Eryri yn oes y Tywysogion. Mae Rheilffordd Dyffryn Conwy yn ffordd gyfleus o deithio os oes arnoch chi
eisiau ymweld â llefydd fel Eglwys Sant Crwst (Llanrwst), Eglwys Sant Mihangel (Betws-y-Coed) a Chastell Dolwyddelan, ac mi gewch chi
olygfeydd godidog ar y ffordd! Bydd gwefan arbennig gyda map rhyngweithiol yn ogystal â llawlyfr newydd ar gael yn y gwanwyn.
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C ONWY A ND C ONWY V A L L E Y HE R I T A GE
Many events from this time shaped Wales
in terms of its landscape, culture and
heritage. Yet the lives and times of the
Princes of Gwynedd, and their struggles
against their neighbours both within and
beyond Wales, remain one of the least
known epochs in the story of Wales.
“The Princes presided over a period of
dynamic change in the history of Wales.
We owe so many of our notions of culture
and history today to this period,” says
Helen Bradley, Heritage Tourism Project
Officer for Conwy County Borough
Council.
Helen is showing me around the new
Princes of Gwynedd exhibition at the
tourist information centre in the centre
of Conwy. The exhibition tells the story
of the Princes using maps, documents
and sound recordings to capture the
spirit of the times. From a child-friendly
animation of historical soundbites
to information about life in medieval
Gwynedd during their reign, the exhibition
acts as a gateway to a series of sites across
Gwynedd, Conwy and the Snowdonia
National Park.
“The Princes were tactical,
strategic players on the
European stage, reforming
their lands and creating
strong political alliances.
They were not downtrodden
victims cowering in the
mountains,” adds Helen.
The Princes ruled over tribal kingdoms,
surviving Saxon attacks and the
construction of Offa’s Dyke along the
Welsh-English border in the 8th century,
Viking raids in the 9th century and
widespread power struggles and in-
fighting within Wales itself. It was not until
the 13th century that the Princes finally
rose to predominance, first with Llywelyn
Fawr (the Great) and finally his grandson,
Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, who was the first
to be known by the title Prince of Wales.
After his death, the new Welsh values of
nationhood, language and law appeared
threatened forever. Indeed, it wouldn’t
be until the rise of Owain Glyndwr in the
1400s that Welsh pride would be restored.
Helen goes on to show me round the
second room of the exhibition, which is
dedicated to the cultural legacy of the
age of the Princes. Despite our dark image
of the times, this era saw Welsh literature
and art flourish. Indeed, Rhys ap Gruffydd
convened the first ever bardic tournament
in 1176, a precursor to the modern-day
Eisteddfod. The Princes commissioned
bards to write eulogies and praise poems,
which helped to create a mythology
around their image and ancestry.
I T’ S ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS DYNASTI ES I N WELSH
HI STORY. THEI R STORY SPANS A PERI OD OF TUMULT
AND CONFLI CT FROM THE END OF THE ROMAN EMPI RE
TO THE WARS OF I NDEPENDENCE AGAI NST EDWARD I .
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C ONWY A ND C ONWY V A L L E Y HE R I T A GE
One featured poem, recorded in medieval
Welsh, is a praise poem for the Princes
by Gynddelw Brydydd Mawr. It dates
from 1170: “He is a spear striking on the
battlefield, exalted in his praise … His spear
is blood-stained as he dispenses his anger.”
After a brisk walk around the walls, a quick
look into Aberconwy House, the town’s
oldest medieval merchant’s quarters
dating from around 1300, and lunch at
L’s cool little coffee and bookshop, I set
out to trace the princes’ legacy through
the surrounding landscape. I take the
scenic Conwy Valley railway line down to
Llanrwst via Dolgarrog, the line celebrating
its 150th birthday in June this year.
The route passes through an RSPB
wildlife reserve, looking back towards
Conwy Castle and Robert Stephenson’s
engineering-marvel railway bridge, before
heading onwards through a picture-
postcard landscape past Bodnant Garden.
By the time we are approaching North
Llanrwst station, the Gwydyr Forest is
looming into view.
“It’s a very different experience to explore
Conwy by public transport, rather than
driving,” says Larry Davies, Community
Rail Officer for Arriva Trains Wales, which
is working with local bus companies to
connect key locations along the princes’
trail. “You get closer to the scenery, closer
to history this way,” he smiles.
St Grwst’s Church, dedicated to the 6th
century Celtic saint who founded the
church in Llanrwst, clings to the banks
of the River Conwy. Gwydir Chapel, the
stone-built chapel adjacent to the main
church and dating from 1633, houses the
stone sarcophagus of Llywelyn the Great,
who died in 1240 after a reign spanning
four decades.
Llywelyn is regarded as one of the greatest
Welsh princes, a powerful 13th century
ruler who fought hard to unite his realm
and to play a role on the wider stage,
concluding treaties with rulers such as
Phillip Augustus of France in 1212. Upon
his death, his body was buried first in
Conwy and then moved to Maenan
Abbey outside Llanrwst. When Henry
VIII dissolved the monasteries in the
16th century, Llywelyn’s stone coffin
was moved to the church in Llanrwst. His
body was lost but the elaborately carved
sarcophagus survives.
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Elsewhere along the line, other locations
help bring the story of the Princes to life.
For example, St Michael’s Church at Betws-
y-Coed features a 14th century limestone
effigy of Gruffydd ap Dafydd Goch,
while the stunning castle at Dolwyddelan
was first built by Llywelyn Fawr and
subsequently modified by Edward I. Both
sites are open to visitors.
For an overview, a dedicated website with
an interactive map and a new guidebook
to sites associated with the Princes will be
available from Spring 2013 for visitors to
find out more.
Back in Conwy, I finish with a visit to the
World Heritage Site of Conwy Castle, one
of the cornerstones of Edward I’s iron ring
of castles. A series of new artworks inside
the castle ruins symbolise fragments of the
story and add depth to the human story
behind the facts of the history books.
Llywelyn’s Coronet, a crown atop a tower
of shields and swords in the Prison Tower
by the artist Rubin Eynon, symbolises the
burning spirit of the people, while a rusted-
iron sculpture of the head of King Edward I
by Gideon Petersen in the King’s Chamber
is a ghostly presence.
Standing on the defensive parapets of
the castle, I look over the estuary towards
the former castle site at Deganwy, a
stronghold of the Princes, ransacked and
ravaged by generations of invaders. Below
is the busy harbour quayside. “Conwy was
a bustling trading port in the late 13th
century with communities of English,
Welsh and other nationalities,” says Roy
Williams, Head Custodian at Conwy
Castle. “The castle had its own watergate
entrance to allow access for people and
supplies directly from ships.”
Roy and I climb the spiral stairs to the
castle’s chapel, the weight of history
around us, to be greeted with a new
installation of stained glass, Garrison of
Flowers. The three-pane window tells the
story of the bloody fight between the
Princes of Gwynedd and the English crown.
“By presenting the story of
the princes to visitors to the
castle, I’ve learnt that, like
much of history, the story is
not black and white,” adds
Roy Williams. “I hope these
artworks will make people
think again about Welsh
history – and maybe inspire
them to find out more.”
We sit for a moment in contemplation on
a semi-circular pew carved with verses in
Welsh, English and French, the languages
spoken in the new borough of Conwy in
the 1280s after the Edwardian Conquest.
In the fading light of late afternoon, one
particular verse catches my eye.
It reads: “Let the eye pierce the mirror of
the past – history’s shadow, phantom in
the glass.”
C ONWY A ND C ONWY V A L L E Y HE R I T A GE
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C ONWY A ND C ONWY V A L L E Y HE R I T A GE
PRINCES OF GWYNEDD
EXHIBITION AT CONWY TOURIST
INFORMATION CENTRE
Open daily all year round:
10am - 4pm (winter opening)
9am - 5pm (summer opening)
(Further hubs at Caernarfon and
Betws-y-Coed, will be completed by
Easter 2013)
CONWY VALLEY LINE
www.conwyvalleyrailway.co.uk
CONWY TOWN WALLS
Among Europe’s best preserved and
most complete medieval town walls,
Conwy’s have UNESCO World Heritage
status and measure about a kilometre
in length. Explore them anytime, for
free, and get a completely different
look at Conwy’s cobbled streets below.
www.walledtowns.co.uk
www.cadw.wales.gov.uk
ABERCONWY HOUSE
This fascinating museum is housed
in a fourteenth century merchant’s
residence, thought to be the oldest
town house in Wales. Hear the story
of the daily lives of its occupants
through the ages, and a few ghostly
tales as well.
01492 592246
www.nationaltrust.org.uk
CONWY CASTLE
Medieval military architecture at
its finest, Conwy Castle was built
in the thirteenth century as part of
Edward I’s ‘iron ring’ of fortresses
designed to subjugate the Welsh.
These days invaders are welcome
at this UNESCO World Heritage Site.
01492 592358
www.cadw.wales.gov.uk
DOLWYDDELAN CASTLE
Built in the thirteenth century by Prince Llywelyn
‘The Great’, Dolwyddelan Castle was later captured by
Edward I during his conquest of Wales. Conquer the
steep hill and reward yourself with awesome views of
the Lledr Valley and Snowdonia.
01690 750366
www.cadw.wales.gov.uk
CONWY SUSPENSION BRIDGE & TOLL HOUSE
Before Thomas Telford built the Conwy suspension
bridge in 1826, the only way to cross the River Conwy
was by boat. Today the bridge, which is traffic-free,
and its toll house with Victorian-style interior, are
looked after by the National Trust.
01492 573282
www.nationaltrust.org.uk
PLAS MAWR, CONWY
Built in the sixteenth century by a wealthy merchant,
Plas Mawr is probably the finest surviving Elizabethan
town house in Britain. With gatehouse, stepped
gables and lookout tower outside; stunning plaster
decoration and original furnishings inside.
01492 580167
www.cadw.wales.gov.uk
RHOSONSEA HERITAGE TRAIL
Among the 25 historic sites on The Rhos-on-Sea
Heritage Trail are St Trillo’s Chapel, the smallest
church in Britain; and the remains of Llys Euryn
5th century hill fort. A Heritage Trail leaflet is available
from Rhos-on-Sea Tourist Information Point.
CADW’S CONWY APP
Cadw’s new Conwy app is free to download to your iPhone
or iPad and is designed to help you get the most from your
visit. Uncover Conwy’s jackdaw legend, explore the walled
town by completing challenges and collecting points along
the way, then send a virtual postcard to family and friends.
www.cadw.wales.gov.uk
LOCAL HISTORY DIRECT TO YOUR MOBILE
Look out for HistoryPoints QR barcodes at our heritage
sites – on posts, walls, notice boards or in windows. Scan
the QR barcode with your smart phone to receive an instant
snippet of information about the site. To find out more and
download the app, visit www.HistoryPoints.org
The Princes of Gwynedd project is led by Conwy County Borough Council in partnership with
Gwynedd Council, Snowdonia National Park Authority and the National Trust, as part of Cadw’s
£19m Heritage Tourism Project which is largely funded by the Welsh Government and from EU
Convergence Funds.
13
Mae yna lawer o bethau y gallwch chi eu gwneud yn Llandrillo-yn-Rhos, Bae Colwyn, Towyn a Bae Cinmel. Beth am ddilyn Llwybr Treftadaeth
Llandrillo-yn-Rhos, gwibio ar hyd y llwybr beicio neu fynd allan ar y môr i ddal eich swper? Dewch i gwrdd ag anifeiliaid a chreaduriaid y
Sw Fynydd Gymreig ym Mae Colwyn neu brynu darn gwreiddiol o gelf yn Oriel Gymunedol y Bae. Os nad ydi hynny at eich dant beth am
roi ceiniog neu ddwy ar geffyl yn Nhir Prince, Towyn neu fynd i ffair Knightly yn Nhowyn i wylio sioe hud a chael gwers neu ddwy yn yr
ysgol syrcas.
R HOS - ON- S E A , C OL WY N B A Y , T OWY N & K I NME L B A Y
Set off for no fewer than three hours of historic discovery from the tiny shoreside chapel
of 6th century Saint Trillo, just one of 26 sites on the Rhos-on-Sea Heritage Trail. Pack a
picnic and have lunch on the beach. Grab an ice cream. Write a postcard. Stroll around
the shops. Bring a bike and cycle down the prom, or hop aboard a charter boat for a spot
of sea fishing and catch your supper. Then watch a proper puppet show at the 55-year-
old Harlequin Puppet Theatre, the UK’s very first permanent marionette theatre.
from te coast
T O G E T T H E MO S T
3

D
A
Y
S

A roam around Rhos
14 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
Day 1
RHOS-ON-SEA
Sea Fishing Trips
from Rhos-on-Sea
01492 541733 or
07721 532731
www.incentivefishing.co.uk
Harlequin Puppet Theatre
01492 548166
www.puppets.uk.com
Day 2
COLWYN BAY
Welsh Mountain Zoo
01492 532938
www.welshmountainzoo.org
Bay Gallery
07909 893254
Parc Eirias
01492 577900
www.conwy.gov.uk
Theatr Colwyn
01492 577888
www.theatrcolwyn.co.uk
Day 3
TOWYN & KINMEL BAY
Adventure Paintball,
St George, Abergele
01745 361368
www.adventure-company.co.uk
Tir Prince, Towyn
01745 345123
www.tirprince.co.uk
Knightly’s Funfair, Towyn
01745 351112 or 07836 787789
www.funfair-hire.com
These are just a few
things you can get up
to in Rhos-on-Sea,
Colwyn Bay, Towyn
and Kinmel Bay, to
find out more grab a
copy of the Essential
Pocket Guide (2013
edition available
from Easter) or visit
www.visitllandudno.org.uk
See if you can tell a meerkat from a polecat at the Welsh Mountain
Zoo, the National Zoo of Wales. After meeting the residents, have lunch
on the grassy slopes and catch a show at Sealions Rock. Do a spot of
art appreciation and bag yourself some original artwork at the award-
winning community Bay Gallery. Go shopping at the market – choose
from classic or local farmers’ – and grab a bargain, or the ingredients
for dinner. Take a tour of the town and a trip down memory lane on
the Heritage Trail, or spend the afternoon at Parc Eirias: on the bowling
green, in the park, pool or tennis court. Finish off the day with a movie
or a stage show at Theatr Colwyn, the UK’s oldest operating cinema.
Kick off day 3 with a gentle bike ride and some knockout sea views on
the cycle path from Colwyn Bay. Crank up the pace and battle it out
across 69 acres of open woodland at Adventure Paintball, Abergele.
Take a breather at Pensarn’s quiet beach, and treat yourself to some
candy floss. Then have a flutter and experience the excitement of
American harness racing at Tir Prince Raceway, Towyn. Finish your
tour with some classic seaside fun at Knightly’s Funfair, where you
can watch a magic show, take a lesson at the circus skills school,
have a game of bingo or a round of crazy golf.
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15
Conwy is a great place to get back to nature. Better still,
there’s always something to see and do whatever the
season - from wild flowers in spring to migrating birds
in autumn. Time your visit well and you could be greeted
by the rasping call of Reed warblers or the song of the
Reed bunting.
There are new developments at the Great Orme County Park
and at the RSPB Conwy Nature Reserve this year. But, away
from the main sites, there is also a host of attractions and
back-to-nature experiences at some of the lesser-known
locations managed by Conwy Countryside Service.
We highlight some of the best of Conwy’s natural
attractions by season.
NA T UR A L E NV I R ONME NT
Sir Gonwy ydi’r lle perffaith i ymgolli ym myd natur, beth bynnag y tywydd. Bydd datblygiadau newydd ym Mharc Gwledig y Gogarth a
Gwarchodfa Natur Conwy yn denu ymwelwyr i’r ardal i fwynhau byd natur ar ei orau.
Mae Arsyllfa Natur newydd y warchodfa yn agor yn y gwanwyn ac mae disgwyl i’r gwelliannau i Ganolfan Ymwelwyr y Gogarth fod wedi
eu cwblhau erbyn hynny hefyd. Bydd y Maes, man ymgynnull yn y warchodfa, yn agor yn barod ar gyfer yr hydref a’r adar mudo.
Mae yna hefyd ddigon o bethau y gallwch chi eu gwneud yn rhai o safleoedd llai adnabyddus Gwasanaeth Cefn Gwlad Conwy. Er enghraifft,
llwybr cerdded newydd yng Ngwarchodfa Natur Coed Pwllycrochan ym Mae Colwyn sy’n eich tywys trwy’r coed collddail.
It’s in our nature
©Andy Hay, rspb-images.com
©
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©Eleanor Bentall, rspb-images.com
©Andy Hay, rspb-images.com
16 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
NA T UR A L E NV I R ONME NT
RSPB CONWY NATURE RESERVE
Among the UK’s most popular
RSPB reserves with plenty to
see throughout the year, from
shorebirds returning in the autumn,
to dragonflies in summer; plus an
exciting timetable of events which
includes a New Year’s Day Walk and
International Mud Day in June.
01492 584091
www.rspb.org.uk
GREAT ORME COUNTRY
PARK VISITOR CENTRE
Discover the Great Orme’s history,
geology and wildlife, and take a
sneaky peak at the seabird colonies
using the ‘seabird camera’. A range
of leaflets produced by Conwy’s
Countryside Service is available at
the Centre.
01492 874151
www.conwy.gov.uk/greatorme
PENSYCHNANT CONSERVATION
CENTRE AND NATURE RESERVE
The woodland and heathland of
this nature reserve at the top of
Conwy’s Sychnant Pass is home
to diverse species of wildlife and
is a perfect starting point for a
walk to the Carneddau mountains.
The Centre itself works with
naturalists and wildlife organisations
and hosts regular events.
01492 592595
www.pensychnant.co.uk
NATURE RESERVES
Conwy Countryside Service
manages a number of nature
reserves with diverse habitats –
from woodland to sand dunes
– including the wild landscapes
of Conwy Mountain; Bodlondeb
Woods with its many species
of birds and butterflies; and
Dolwyddelan picnic site where
volunteers created award-winning
flower beds.
www.conwy.gov.uk/countryside
SPRING
The new Jubilee Nature Observatory at
RSPB Conwy opens this spring. The straw-
bale-built structure overlooks one of the
two lagoons and up the Conwy Valley to
Snowdonia. Use it to spot birds such as
Water rail (similar to moorhens) hidden in
the reeds, plus spring butterflies, egrets and
Grey heron.
“I love walking round the reserve on a spring
day,” says Julian Hughes, Reserve Manager.
“With birds arriving from Africa, wild flowers
and insects emerging, there’s something new
every day.”
Improvements to the Great Orme Country
Park Visitor Centre will also be complete
for spring with a new weather station and
a digital information point. The Great Orme
boasts some 400 species of wild flowers
in spring with rock roses one of the most
prevalent on its limestone grassland. You can
also spot seabirds on the cliffs and Kashmir
goat kids running wild. Look out for the
wild flower interpretation chart, one of the
centre’s latest publications.
SUMMER
A new viewpoint from RSPB Conwy’s Ganol
Trail, looking across to Conwy Castle, will
open for summer to spot oystercatchers
and curlews on the islands in the lagoons.
You will also see native wild flowers, such
as Bird’s foot trefoil, a food source for the
Common blue butterfly. The Great Orme
heathland, meanwhile, will be in full bloom
with heather and gorse showering purple
and yellow flowers across the landscape.
A perfect walking spot for May or June is
the Mynydd Marian Local Nature Reserve,
a small limestone ridge on the edge of
the village of Llysfaen, located between
Colwyn Bay and Abergele. The limestone
grassland site boasts stunning coastal views
and a rich patchwork of summer flora and
fauna, including rare species such as Hoary
rockrose, Spring cinquefoil and the Silver-
studded blue butterfly.
AUTUMN
New developments to the nature reserve
with the next stage of the Conwy
Connections project at RSPB Conwy will
be complete for autumn. The centrepiece
of this will be Y Maes (the village square),
which will offer a newly landscaped central
outdoor meeting place. It will also provide
an elevated view across the reserve to the
Conwy Valley. Look across the treetops at
eye level with the Goldfinches at play.
“The mix of habitats brings people closer
to nature,” says Julian Hughes. “The reserve
is alive at this time of year with autumn
colours, fungus, frogs and birdlife on the
move.”
Also alive in early autumn is the circular
walk through the Penmaenmawr uplands,
exploring ancient historical sites from the
Jubilee Path to the Druid’s Circle, whilst
walking through a carpet of mixed pinks and
purples with splashes of yellow from heather,
gorse and bilberry.
WINTER
Enjoy a winter walk at the Pwllycrochan
Woods Local Nature Reserve, a deciduous
woodland above Colwyn Bay, where
improvements to the woodland path
and new themed information boards are
available for walkers amongst the native
and exotic trees. Listen out for buzzards,
nuthatch, great spotted woodpecker and
tawny owls while out rambling the five
circular woodland trails.
“With sweet chestnut, sessile oak and
sycamore, it’s a brilliant place to trudge
through the thick carpet of leaves in the
autumn,” says Countryside Warden Lesley
Lawson.
Finally, the four walks around Llanfairfechan
are also ideal for winter wildlife. Route one
through the Glan y Môr Elias Local Nature
Reserve is graced with wigeons grazing the
saltmarsh and wading birds on the adjoining
Traeth Lafan mudflats.
17
Mae yna hefyd ddigon o bethau i’w gwneud yn ein gerddi a’n meysydd gwyrdd. O agor gardd y gaeaf ym Modnant am y tro cyntaf i weld
Llandudno’n ffrwydro’n felyn pan fydd 50,000 o gennin Pedr yn blodeuo yn y gwanwyn. Mae’r ardal hefyd wedi ennill sawl gwobr. Mae
yma naw baner werdd yn chwifio yn ein parciau a’n gerddi ac mae Bae Colwyn wedi ennill cystadleuaeth Cymru yn ei Blodau i Drefi Mawr
am yr unfed mlynedd ar ddeg yn olynol! Felly, dewch i weld be’ sy’n tyfu yn y sir eleni.
GA R DE NS A ND GR E E N S P A C E S
18 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
The Green Flag Award Scheme is a
national standard of excellence for parks
and green spaces. To qualify, a green
space must be a welcoming place which
involves the community. The award
takes into consideration such things as
sustainability, conservation and heritage,
and recognises the hard work of dedicated
parks staff and community groups. This
year we are proudly flying no fewer
than nine prestigious Green Flags; from
ornamental flowerbeds, paths and seating
at Queen’s Gardens, Colwyn Bay, a relaxed
environment in an otherwise busy area of
the town; to Cae Derw, Llandudno Junction
which has a sensory garden, sculptures, a
play area and a place to walk the dog.
So far more than 50,000 daffodil bulbs have been planted at Llandudno’s parks,
gardens and green bits in a bid to secure the title of Daffodil Capital of Wales.
Throughout 2012, school, youth and children’s groups, the Council’s parks
department and local businesses gathered for mass bulb-planting and fund-raising
events, competitions and activities, with a ‘daffometer’ gauging planting progress.
The first year’s planting goal was met (and bettered) last November, and all the
hard work is due to pay off this year. Visit Llandudno in late winter / early spring
to be among the first to see the explosions of bright yellow when thousands upon
thousands of daffodils burst into bloom throughout the town.
www.daffodilcapitalofwales.co.uk
Wales in Bloom is a national campaign designed to embrace the beauty of
Wales. Prizes are awarded annually for the best looking towns and take into
consideration environmentally friendly practices and community involvement as
well as horticultural achievement. In 2012 Colwyn Bay took home 1st prize, the
Gold Award in the Large Town category for a whopping 11th year running. Visit
and see what’s growing this year.
walesinbloom.org.uk
GA R DE NS A ND GR E E N S P A C E S
Our Green Flags are flying at:
Wynn Garden, Old Colwyn
Queens Garden, Colwyn Bay
Bodlondeb Park, Conwy
Happy Valley, Llandudno
Great Orme Country Park, Llandudno
Pentre Mawr Park, Abergele
Cae Derw, Llandudno Junction
Llanrhos Lawn Cemetery, Llandudno
Bryn Euryn Allotments and Local Nature
Reserve, Rhos-on-Sea
www.conwy.gov.uk
19
P’un ai a ydych chi’n anturiwr o fri sy’n hoffi gwthio’ch corff, a’ch calon, i’r eithaf neu’n hoffi ymlacio a chwarae golff gyda thyˆ’r clwb gerllaw
i chi gael llymaid, mae rhywbeth at ddant pawb yn Llandudno a Sir Gonwy. O antur ar dir sych i antur ar y môr - beth am roi cynnig ar
rywbeth newydd? Beth am fynd ar siglen pum sedd fwyaf Ewrop yn Treetops Adventure neu, os ydych chi’n ddigon dewr, beth am feicio
ar hyd llwybr 28km y Marin yng Nghoed Gwydir? Yng Nghonwy mae gan ddringo, sgïo, syrffio barcud a cherdded un peth yn gyffredin -
golygfeydd godidog o bob cyfeiriad.
A C T I V I T I E S
Whether you’re a fully fledged outdoor type who likes nothing better
than a no-holds-barred adrenaline thrill, or prefer to spend your
spare time on the golf course with a club house close at hand, there’s
something to please everyone in Llandudno and Conwy County.
We’ve adventures on dry land and on the water; Colwyn Bay’s eagerly
awaited Watersports Centre is coming soon, but in the meantime why
not try something new? Whether it’s climbing, skiing, kitesurfing or just
good old fashioned walking, they all have one thing in common here:
amazing scenery in every direction.
20 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
A C T I V I T I E S
To book your next big golf adventure, call 0845 450 5885
or visit: www.golfcoastnorthwales.com
Penmaenmawr Maesdu Abergele Conwy
Planning a golf break on the North Wales coast
can be tricky. Do you choose parkland, links, or a
bit of both? Golfer-friendly hotel or self-catering?
Mountain, castle or sea view?
With 9 challenging holes at Penmaenmawr, USGA standard greens at
Abergele, championship courses at North Wales and Maesdu, Llandudno
and Wales’ only Open Qualifying course at Conwy; you’ve quite a choice
to make. We find decisions like these are best left for the 19th hole.
North Wales
Golf Coast
North Wales
10% discount
for groups of
12 or m
ore
21
A C T I V I T I E S
WAL K S, WHE E L S AND WAT E R
T H E WA L E S C O A S T P A T H
Officially opened in May 2012, the Wales Coast Path is a long
distance walking route which follows the entire coast of Wales,
from Chester to Chepstow. The route clocks up a grand total of
870 miles, but the section of the path which runs through Conwy
stretches a more manageable 34.5 miles from Kinmel Bay to
Llanfairfechan. It can be divided into three shorter bite-sized chunks
for a perfect day’s walking: Kinmel Bay to Rhos-on-Sea which takes
in Persarn Beach Site of Special Scientific Interest and Llanddulas
beach’s interesting array of wildlife; Rhos-on-Sea to Conwy which
takes in the summit of the Great Orme, RSPB Conwy nature reserve
and finishes at Conwy Castle; and Conwy to Llanfairfechan where
you can choose from a lowland and a more challenging rural upland
route, where the extra leg work is rewarded with stunning sea views.
www.walescoastpath.gov.uk
1 0 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y O F
C O N WY WA L K I N G WE E K
3 1 0 J U L Y
Strictly speaking Conwy Walking Week should
be renamed; we’ve so much going on this year
we needed an extra day. Have your walking
boots at the ready for no fewer than 8 days
of exploring Conwy county, from coast to
mountain. With walks of all levels from easy to
challenging, for adults and families alike, all led
by local professionals. This year Conwy Walking
Week turns 10; join us to celebrate.
www.conwy.gov.uk
C O N WY C Y C L E R O U T E
If you prefer your bike rides with a sea view, try the Conwy
Cycle Route, part of North Wales Coast Route (National
Route 5) from Anglesey to Chester. For a shorter ride you
can cycle along the mainly traffic-free sea-fronts between
Llanfairfechan and Kinmel Bay which include the ‘Conwy
Estuary Trail’ and a link to the RSPB Reserve at Conwy. Much
of the route is perfect for walkers, wheelchairs and pushchairs
too, and is a great way to enjoy our coast, leaving just tracks
behind you rather than a carbon footprint.
www.conwy.gov.uk
I N D O O R A N D O U T D O O R L E I S U R E C E N T R E S
Let’s face it, sometimes the weather gets the better of even the most intrepid
adventurer. In times of inclement weather, however, we have many great indoor leisure
facilities so you can still set the pulse racing. But you don’t have to wait for a rainy day
to enjoy our leisure centres; they’re open all year round, whatever the weather is doing
outside. Swim a few lengths at Llandudno Swimming Centre, hire a squash court or have
a go on a climbing wall at Llandudno Junction Leisure Centre; or challenge your friends
to a match at Craig y Don’s purpose build tennis centre.
www.conwy.gov.uk/leisure
23
A C T I V I T I E S
24 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
Mae Neil Sowerby yn mynychu dosbarth pobi bara gyda’r pobydd organig o fri Alex Gooch yng Nghanolfan Fwyd Bodnant. Mae’r Ganolfan
Fwyd newydd, a gostiodd £6.5 miliwn i’w chwblhau, wedi ei sefydlu ar hen fferm ger yr afon Conwy sy’n dyddio’n ôl i’r ddeunawfed ganrif.
Mae Neil yn edrych ymlaen at ddegfed pen-blwydd Gwledd Conwy lle bydd cynhyrchwyr lleol yn cael eu gwobrwyo. Ymysg y stondinwyr
bydd cwmnïau hufen ia Fortes a Parisella, selsig Ieuan Edwards o Gonwy, cynnyrch Blas ar Fwyd ac olew rêp Blodyn Aur.
Mae Canolfan Bodnant hefyd yn gartref i Ganolfan Wenyna Cymru – adnodd hanfodol gyda bod y wenynen fêl yn prinhau. Mae croeso i
chi weld cychod arddangos a thrin y gwenyn hyd yn oed. Oes, mae yna fwrlwm mawr am ein diwylliant bwyd, fel mae Neil yn ei ddarganfod!
F OOD A ND DR I NK
Neil Sowerby makes a lot of dough, discovers
why there’s a buzz about bees and savours
a precious Diamond pie on a food safari
around Conwy
“YOUR baps are better than mine” is not
a phrase I use lightly. Any kind of course
brings out my competitive edge. But this
time, in a rather superior breadmaking
tutorial, I was suffering from a helping of
self-knowledge. Unlike the attentive lass to
my right I had failed to master the hand-
never-leaving-the-surface nudge that gives
dough the correct tensile shape. Oh and
perhaps I’d overfloured the worktop.
Out of my oven came some delightfully
savoury potato baps, to be enhanced by a
garlic/organic olive oil glaze, but mine had
spread slightly into flab – a bit like their
baker, in fact.
It’s not going to help my personal tensile
shape that I carted home two Bodnant
Welsh Food bags packed with a glorious
Perl Las cheese and garlic bread, a chunky
spelt loaf, rocket oil coated focaccia
and wicked cinnamon twists – all from
one productive day under Alex Gooch.
Fermentation was never such fun!
Still just 31, Alex is symptomatic of the
culinary revolution raging in Wales. In
2010 he won ‘Best Producer’ at Radio 4’s
Food and Farming Awards. Down in
Hay-on-Wye this yeastmeister works
through the night at his organic bakery
to supply top restaurants, delis and
farmer’s markets. His spelts, sourdoughs
and ryes are hot properties.
25
‘legendry’
It’s mirrored 10 miles south in Llanrwst
at Blas ar Fwyd, a restaurant/cafe/
wine operation run by the intensely
knowledgeable Deiniol ap Dafydd. His
coleslaw is legendary, but it was his Celtic
Pork in Cider (Porc Celtaidd mewn Seidr)
that triumphed in The Great Taste Awards
and Wales’s True Taste.
Winning prizes is becoming a habit for
local food producers. Edwards Butchers
of Conwy scooped five 2012 Great Taste
Awards and capped it with a top Diamond
Award for their Pork and Black Pudding Pie
with Free Range Eggs at butchers’ Oscars
the Smithfield Awards.
“I can vouc for its
scrumptiousnes.”
Purchasing the last pie left, one lunchtime,
in their bustling High Street shop, I scoffed
it on the quayside, fighting off a gull who
fancied a piece of the pie action.
Local ice cream scoops lots of awards, too.
Take friendly rivals Fortes of Llandudno
and Conwy-based Parisella’s, Fortes
scooped five 2012 Great Taste Awards
and two from True Taste – Raspberry
Sorbet (gold) and Classic Vanilla Ice Cream
(bronze). Parisella’s earned two True Taste
silvers for their Walnut and Maple Ice
Cream and Passion Fruit Sorbet. Go for
that last one. Tangy!
F OOD A ND DR I NK
Both firms were founded by Italian
immigrants. Young Domenico Parisella
initially came down from Scotland to work
for Fortes in 1943. Ten years later he was
running his own shop and selling from a
motorised tricycle.
The Fortes’s ice cream parlour in Mostyn
Street, Llandudno, all red-leather
banquettes and gleaming fittings, harks
back to those times. It was here in the
basement that current owner David Forte’s
grandfather Onorio used to churn ice
cream using recipes from the old country.
Parisella’s relaunched in 2006, opening an
artisan ice cream factory. “We use Welsh
whole milk, double cream and finest Italian
flavours to create a rich, smooth gelato
style ice cream,” says Tony. “Gelato has
very little air added, making it extremely
dense and creamy.’’
It’s significant that another culinary hot
property, the new Bodnant Welsh Food
can lure him north on his Sundays off
to run their breadmaking classes. The
reciprocal enthusiasm of my eight fellow
baking apprentices is as palpable as the
live dough pliant to our fingertips. “Making
bread at home allows you to control what
you put in. Use the finest ingredients and
you will see the difference,” Alex tells us.
“...their Shelves
reflec the wealth
of fantasic produce
in the Conwy and
Llandudno area.”
That quality concern could well be the
mantra of the £6.5m food complex
conceived by the owners of the Bodnant
Estate on their old home farm and
opened by Prince Charles in July 2012.
Spectacularly overlooking the River
Conwy, the restored 18th century Furnace
Farm houses a farm shop, tea-room, on-
site bakery, butchery, dairy, restaurant,
cookery school and a beekeeping centre.
It’s a showcase for Welsh produce. “Here
we measure in food feet, not food miles,”
they say. Hence their shelves reflect the
wealth of fantastic produce in the Conwy
and Llandudno area.
26 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
F OOD A ND DR I NK
‘popysed dizle cake’
Another serial award-winner for the
sweet-toothed is Siwgr a Sbeis (Sugar
and Spice) in Llanrwst whose Bara Brith,
cakes and quiches are widely available.
Recommended – their lemon and
poppyseed drizzle cake.
All these products and many more come
together in that great celebration of North
Welsh food, the Gwledd Conwy Feast. It
has been the catalyst for the food tourism
that makes a hugely attractive destination
even more attractive.
This year the Feast celebrates its 10th
anniversary. Organiser Jane Hughes
promises lots of “special surprises”.
Her enthusiasm is undimmed: “People
are as enthusiastic as ever about small
producers,” she says. “Buying food is like
buying art – there’s a difference between
buying an original painting and a mass-
produced print. With small scale, quality
production you know there are going to
be no chemicals in the preparation or
packaging. It’s just going to be better.”
‘fodie heaven’
The Feast even takes place in October for
a special reason. That’s when the famous
Conwy estuary mussels are at their best.
Wash them down with beer from one of
the three local breweries – Great Orme,
Conwy and Nant – and it’s foodie heaven.
Perhaps accompany it with a salad
dressed in the buttery, nutty Blodyn Aur
rapeseed oil cold-pressed on a farm near
Llanfihangel Glyn Myfyr. The oil’s name
means Golden Flower and it contains half
the saturated fat of olive oil and 11 times
more Omega 3.
Honey’s another great healthy option –
the Feast’s originator was Peter McFadden,
who produces award-winning heather
honey from the hills above town. But
these are difficult times for bees. In the
UK, honeybee numbers have halved over
the past 25 years. The disappearance
of wild flower meadows and in 2012 a
wet summer that stopped honeybees
collecting nectar contributed to the crisis.
Hence the importance of the National
Beekeeping Centre of Wales – another
key element back at Bodnant Welsh Food
where nearby Bodnant Garden provide
wonderful source material for honeybees.
Visitors are able to visit demonstration
hives, watch the keepers at work and
handle the bees. You can even rent a hive.
For the less hands-on there is a bee cam
and a chance to buy hive produce.
Yes, there’s a real buzz about food
culture in these parts.
27
What’ s On
in 2013
Spring, summer, autumn and
winter, there’s always a feast
of fun wherever you go in this
part of North Wales. We’ve got
concerts and competitions,
festivals and fairs, races and
rallies. So come and join the
celebrations! This is just a taste
of what’s going on in 2013;
for more details of events in
Conwy County check out
visitllandudno.org.uk
and to find out about events
in North Wales as a whole,
please visit
eventsnorthwales.co.uk/events
RAI SE THE GAME
Some of the best young rugby talent
in the northern hemisphere will be on
display at Eirias, Colwyn Bay this year
when Wales take on Ireland and England
in the Under 20 Six Nations. Wales are
on a high after finishing third at last
year’s Junior World Championship and
becoming the first team to beat New
Zealand at Under 20 level. They will be
keen to build on that form, starting with
the clash against Ireland in February,
while the Championship ends with a
crunch match against old rivals England
in March.
1 February
WALES V I RELAND
15 March
WALES V ENGLAND
To book your tickets for the games:
WRU: wru.co.uk/ tickets
Venue Cymru: venuecymru.co.uk
01492 872000
Colwyn Leisure Centre: 01492 577900
1940’s Festival, Colwyn Bay
Three Castles Welsh Classic Trial
and Heritage Tour
Access all Eirias 2012
Llandudno Victorian Extravaganza
28 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
1 March
ST. DAVI D’ S DAY
PARADE, COLWYN BAY
The first modern day St David’s
Day parade in Wales, with
a street parade led by local
schoolchildren ending with
a St David’s Day concert at
St Paul’s Church.
t: 01492 577600
26 March
CONWY SEED FAI R
One of Conwy’s 700 year old
Charter Fairs, with stalls selling
plants, seeds, crafts, home
produce and more, plus Conwy
Farmers’ Market on the Quay.
t: 01492 650851
conwybeekeepers.org.uk
31 March
EASTER EGG HUNT
Hop along to Conwy Castle
this Easter Sunday and
participate in an Easter Egg
Hunt. Receive a free Easter egg
for taking part. Egg-citing stuff!
cadw.wales.gov.uk
14 April
LLANDUDNO 1 0
This 10Km road race starts and
finishes on the promenade in
Llandudno and includes a run
around the scenic Great Orme.
20 & 21 April
CONWY J ESTER’ S
WEEKEND
Join our jesters for a weekend
of medieval mayhem and
guaranteed fun for the whole
family, with the thoroughly
authentic backdrop of Conwy’s
castle and town walls.
t: 07703 105177
conwytownevents.co.uk
20 & 21 April
1 940’ S FESTI VAL,
COLWYN BAY
Following last year’s success,
this year once again
experience the sights, sounds
and tastes of Britain during
WWII, from ration book
cookery to vintage clothes
and vehicles.
t: 01492 577600
colwynbayheritage.org.uk
1- 4 May
GLAMORGAN V
LANCASHI RE
Kick off the British summer
at the ever-popular festival
week, when Glamorgan –
who this year celebrate
their 125th anniversary –
take on Lancashire in their
championship encounter at
Colwyn Bay Cricket Club,
Rhos-on-Sea.
t: 01492 544103
colwynbaycricketclub.co.uk
4- 6 May
LLANDUDNO
VI CTORI AN
EXTRAVAGANZA
Among Llandudno’s favourite
events with marching bands,
street entertainers, jugglers,
fire eaters, vintage fairground
vehicles and many other
attractions, all with a
Victorian flavour.
t: 07828 108999
4- 6 May
LLANDUDNO
TRANSPORT FESTI VAL
The largest transport festival
in Wales, this event features
vintage vehicles of all kinds;
from cars, motorbikes and
buses to farm and military
vehicles.
llantransfest.co.uk
5 May
WELSH DRAGONS
( GLAMORGAN) V
YORKSHI RE
A great day out and the
perfect start to the Clydesdale
Bank 40 season, with the visit
of Yorkshire Carnegie and the
Welsh Dragons to Colwyn
Bay’s ground in Rhos-on-Sea.
t: 01492 544103
colwynbaycricketclub.co.uk
11 & 12 May
CONWY PI RATE
WEEKEND
Grab your shipmates and join
the fun and games at Conwy
Pirate Weekend, where you
can roll a barrel, join a tug of
war, place a bid in the slave
auction, sing a sea shanty and
more besides.
conwypirates.co.uk
18 & 19 May
BAY OF COLWYN
PROMENADE DAY,
COLWYN BAY
Timed to coincide with the
opening of Porth Eirias, this
event has been extended to
a whole weekend, with a new
location on the promenade
closer to town.
t: 01492 575948
5- 8 June
THREE CASTLES
WELSH CLASSI C TRAI L
AND HERI TAGE TOUR,
BASED AT LLANDUDNO
See 125 classic cars – from
vintage Bentleys to 70s sports
cars – cover around 450 miles
in three days of competitive
rallying across the region’s
most beautiful locations.
t: 020 8255 4860
three-castles.co.uk
23 & 23 June
FESTI VAL OF DANCE
Get your dancing shoes on
for a whole weekend of toe
tapping dance, from Bollywood
and Morris dancing to street
dancing and more.
conwytownevents.co.uk
25- 27 June
WELSH OPEN SENI ORS’
CHAMPI ONSHI P
See veteran players do battle
at this open contest set in
Abergele Golf Club’s 18 hole
seaview parkland course.
abergelegolfclub.co.uk
29 June
LLANDUDNO SEA
TRI ATHLON
Voted 2010 Race of the Year
in the 220 Triathlon Awards,
this standard sprint triathlon
incorporates a sea swim and
a challenging cycle section
around the Great Orme.
t: 0161 9286795
xtramileevents.com
Llandudno Sea Triathlon
5
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A
B
S
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Conwy Pirate Weekend
St. David’s Day Parade, Colwyn Bay
29
3- 10 July
CONWY WALKI NG
WEEK
Join the 10th year celebrations
with eight days of walks
around Conwy County, from
coast to mountain. Walks of all
levels, for adults and families,
all led by local professionals.
t: 01492 575290
conwy.gov.uk/walkingweek
4- 7 July
NORTH WALES
BLUEGRASS FESTI VAL
This, the 25th North Wales
Bluegrass Festival, will see the
cream of British bluegrass join
bands from all over the world
for this four day music event.
Pitch a tent and stay for the
whole festival.
t: 01492 580454
northwalesbluegrass.co.uk
20 & 21 July
CONWY LI VI NG
HI STORY WEEKEND
See early medieval history
come to life at the Norman
camp on the quayside, with
re-enactors going about their
daily lives, cooking on open
fires and settling scores by
the sword.
t: 07703 105177
conwytownevents.co.uk
21- 27 July
CONWY CLASSI CAL
MUSI C FESTI VAL
Choral evensong, male voice
choir and early music vocal
performances are among
the highlights of this annual
festival which is centred
around historic St Mary’s
Church in the heart of Conwy
town.
t: 01492 592166
conwyclassicalmusic.co.uk
21- 28 July
CONWY RI VER
FESTI VAL
This well-established annual
festival celebrates the historic
town of Conwy and her
majestic river estuary with
a full week of water-based
activities and land-based
entertainment for the
whole family.
t: 01492 596253
conwyriverfestival.org
24- 28 July
NORTH WALES
BOATSHOW, DEGANWY
QUAYS MARI NA
Running alongside Conwy
River Festival, the Boatshow
offers plenty of exciting
entertainment, whether you
love to get on the water
yourself, or prefer to watch
the action from the shore.
t: 0845 123 5438
northwalesboatshow.com
25 July
FESTI VAL OF HERI TAGE
ARTS AND CRAFTS
Come and visit the Festival of
British Archaeology: an annual
extravaganza of hands-on
historical workshops and
demonstrations at
Plas Mawr, Conwy.
cadw.wales.gov.uk
27- 28 July
ACCESS ALL EI RI AS,
EI RI AS, COLWYN BAY
Following last year’s success,
this two-day concert event
is once again set to feature
top performances by some
of the country’s biggest
artists playing to a huge
excited crowd.
t: 01492 872000
accessalleirias.com
28 July -
2 August
COLWYN BOWLI NG
FESTI VAL
One of the UK’s largest bowling
festivals with seven major
tournaments across Conwy
County, and a prize
in excess of £5,000.
t: 01492 575563
colwynbowlingfestival.co.uk
3 August
THE EI RI AS
TRI ATHLON, COLWYN
BAY
This sea-based middle
distance triathlon includes a
1900m swim from Porth Eirias
Watersports Centre, an 83km
cycle and ends with a running
lap of honour in front of Eirias
grandstand.
t: 0161 9286795
xtramileevents.com
10 August
EGLWYSBACH SHOW
A great day out for all the
family with classes for cattle,
sheep, light and heavy
horses, plus horticulture and
photographic classes, vintage
tractors, a fairground and an
art exhibition.
t: 01492 650529
eglwysbachshow.co.uk
17 August
SI OE WLEDI G
LLANRWST
A rural one day event with
classes for all agricultural
animals from Welsh Black
cattle to sheepdogs, plus
local produce, crafts, vintage
vehicles and a gymkhana.
t: 01492 650847 after 6pm
sioe-llanrwst-show.com
30 & 31 August
AS YOU LI KE I T
This summer The Lord
Chamberlain’s Men return
to Conwy Castle with their
all male production of
Shakespeare’s mysterious
and romantic comedy:
As You Like It.
cadw.wales.gov.uk
e
d
Conwy River Festival
Pixie Lott at Access all Eirias 2012
The Lord Chamberlain’s Men: As You Like It
30 WWW. VI S I T L L ANDUDNO. OR G. UK
31 August
GOLDWI NG LI GHT
PARADE
Join the crowds on Llandudno
Promenade to admire the
static display of GoldWing
motorcycles. Then cheer,
as around 100 brightly lit
bikes parade through the
town before returning to the
promenade for the spectacular
evening display
goldwings.org.uk
13 September
CONWY HONEY FAI R
Showcasing the work of
Conwy’s busy bees for over
700 years, this fair is still the
best place to pick up a jar or
two of delicious local honey,
honey-based soap, candles
and more.
t: 01492 650851
conwybeekeepers.org.uk
1- 3 October
LGU SENI ORS’ HOME
I NTERNATI ONAL
MATCHES
The Ladies’ Golf Union is now
in its 120th year, and this
season the Seniors’ Home
International comes
to Maesdu Llandudno.
maesdugolfclub.co.uk
6 October
SNOWMAN TRI ATHLON,
CAPEL CURI G
Choose from ‘Full Snowman’
(750m swim, 69km cycle, 9km
mountain run) or ‘Snowman
Sprint’ (400m swim, 31km
cycle, 5km mountain run). One
of the UK’s toughest triathlons,
now in its 2nd year.
t: 07500 927037
snowmantri.com
19 October
CAMBRI AN RALLY,
LLANDUDNO
Regarded as one of the UK’s
best rallies and now in its 58th
year, see 150 crews gather for
a day of fierce competition in
the forests of Clocaenog and
Penmachno.
cambrianrally.co.uk
26 & 27
October
GWLEDD CONWY
FEAST
Celebrating its 10th year,
the Feast has over 150 food
and drink stalls, cookery
demonstrations, local ale
marquee, and stunning Blinc
digital arts projections at
locations throughout the
walled town.
t: 01492 593874
conwyfeast.co.uk
8- 10 November
NORTH WALES CHORAL
FESTI VAL, VENUE
CYMRU, LLANDUDNO
Each year choirs from across
the UK and Europe come to
this, one of Wales’ largest
choral competitions, to hear
everything from Gospel and
Male Voice to Barbershop and
A Cappella.
t: 01492 575943
northwaleschoralfestival.com
14- 17
November
WALES RALLY GB
Returning to Wales for a 14th
consecutive year, this rally is
the British round of the FIA
World Rally Championship,
it kicks off from Llandudno
seafront.
walesrallygb.com
21- 24
November
LLANDUDNO
CHRI STMAS FAYRE
A great way to kick off the
festive season, this, Wales’
largest Christmas fayre,
has scores of craft, gift
and produce stalls selling
everything you need for a
merry little Christmas.
t: 01492 574504
llandudnochristmasfayre.co.uk
30 November -
1 December
NADOLI G BETWS-Y-
COED CHRI STMAS
Events for the whole family,
including a candlelit lantern
procession, seasonal music,
fireworks, Santa Dash, late
opening of independent shops
and galleries. Plus a visit from
the man himself.
betws-y-coed-christmas.co.uk
7 December
MEDI EVAL CHRI STMAS
AND TORCHLI T PARADE
A day of medieval fun
including street entertainers,
minstrels, hobby horse jousting
and a torch lit parade in the
evening.
conwytownevents.co.uk
Please note: This list was compiled during November 2012 and details may have changed, so please check dates and times if you plan to attend an event.
North Wales Choral Festival, Llandudno Blinc digital projection, Gwledd Conwy Feast 2012
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Medieval Parade, Conwy
Goldwing Light Parade
31

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