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STONY ISLAND AVENUE STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN

City of Chicago

June 2010

STONY ISLAND AVENUE STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN

City of Chicago, Illinois

JUNE 2010

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Alderman Leslie A. Hairston, 5th Ward Alderman Michelle Harris, 8th Ward

CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Janet Attarian, Project Director David Leopold, Project Manager

DESIGN CONSULTANTS
Jacobs Altamanu, Inc. Milhouse Engineering & Construction

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Contents
I. INTRODUCTION.................................................................. 2
Purpose of Master Plan .................................................................... 2 Project Approach ........................................................................... 3 Stony Island Avenue History and Identity .............................................. 4

List of Figures
Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure I-1: Focus Area ........................................................................ 2 II-1: Community Character ........................................................... 7 II-2: Landmarks and New Developments ........................................... 9 II-3: Typical Existing Cross Section in Sub Area 1 ................................ 10 II-4: Existing Land Use - Subareas 1 and 2 ........................................ 11 II-5: Typical Existing Cross Section in Sub Area 2 ............................... 11 II-6: Existing Land Use - Subarea 3 ................................................. 12 II-7: Typical Existing Cross Section in Sub Area 3 ................................ 12 II-8: Urban Design Elements ......................................................... 15 II-9: Vehicular Circulation ........................................................... 17 III-1: Pedestrian Circulation Improvements ....................................... 23 III-2: Greenway Linkages ............................................................ 23 III-3: Bicycle Circulation Improvements ........................................... 25 III-4: Typical Near Term Cross Section - Sub Area 2 .............................. 26 III-5: Separated Bike Lanes with Planters - Long Term Improvement ......... 27 III-6: Bicycle Connections............................................................ 27 III-7: Primary Intersection Improvements ......................................... 28 III-8: Secondary Intersection Improvements ...................................... 29 III-9: Intersection and Gateway Improvements .................................. 29 III-10: E. 79th Street Intersection Phased Improvements ...................... 31 III-11: E. 79th Street Intersection Improvements - Near Term ................. 32 III-12: Typical Cross Section - Sub Area 1.......................................... 33 III-13: E. 79th Street Intersection Improvements - Long Term ................. 34 III-14: Gateways and Community Identifiers ...................................... 35 III-15: Symbolic Outcropping Planters - Community Identifiers ............... 36 III-16: LED Curtain under Skyway Ramps - Community Identifiers ............ 37 III-17: Sight Distance Evaluation for Community Identifiers.................... 38 IV-1: Typical Cross Section - Sub Area 1 ........................................... 45 IV-2: Typical Cross Section - Sub Area 2 ........................................... 46 IV-3: Typical Cross Section - Sub Area 3 ........................................... 47 IV-4: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 79th Street to E. 77th Street .............. 49 IV-5: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 76th Place to E. 74th Street ............... 51 IV-6: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 73rd Place to E. 71st Place ................ 53 IV-7: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 71st Street to E. 69th Street .............. 55 IV-8: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 68th Street to E. Marquette Road ........ 57 IV-9: Implementation Progression .................................................. 58

II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS ............................................. 6
Character of the Corridor ................................................................. 6
Community Context and Cultural Identity .................................................... 6 Architectural Influences .......................................................................... 8 Existing Land Uses ............................................................................... 10 Existing Urban Design Elements................................................................ 13 Circulation ........................................................................................ 16 Opportunities and Constraints ................................................................. 18

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES ........................................... 21
Design Guidelines Development Directives ...........................................21
Near Term and Long Term Improvements..................................................... 21 Sustainability ..................................................................................... 21

Active Means of Transportation .........................................................22
Bicycles ............................................................................................ 24 Intersections ...................................................................................... 28 Gateways .......................................................................................... 29 Streetscape Elements ........................................................................... 39

IV. IMPLEMENTATION ........................................................... 44
Priorities .....................................................................................58

APPENDIX A
Community Input ......................................................................... A-1

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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STONY ISLAND AVENUE STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN

I. INTRODUCTION

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

development and new businesses open up to the street having a welcoming presence to the community. With this mix of uses, the street does not provide continuous engagement for the pedestrian or a continuous pedestrian friendly environment. This Master Plan addresses future improvements to the street that can be implemented through private redevelopment along Stony Island Avenue as well as public infrastructure improvements, within the public right-of-way. The public right-of-way for most streets includes the roadway and sidewalks adjacent to the roadway. Within the sidewalks, street trees, street lights, benches and other amenities can be incorporated to improve the livability and beauty of a street.

Ward 20
E MARQUETTE RD E 67TH ST E 68TH ST E 69TH ST E 70TH ST E 71ST ST
S STONY ISLAND AVE

Ward 5

I.

INTRODUCTION
E 72ND ST
Required Landscape Buffer for Parking Lot Outside of the Roadway Right-Of-Way

PURPOSE OF MASTER PLAN
The Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan has been created to improve the form, function, and safety of a 1.6 mile long section of Stony Island Avenue that extends from Jackson Park (E. Marquette Road) south to E. 79th Street. The transition from the serene green space of Jackson Park at the north to the large-scale regional infrastructure of the ramps to the Chicago Skyway on the south is not a smooth one. The land uses and building forms of this

Ward 5
E 73RD ST E 74TH ST E 75TH ST E 76TH ST
S SO U CH TH C IC AG HIC O AG SK O A YW V E AY

As part of the City of Chicago redevelopment requirements, identified in the City of Chicago Zoning and Landscape Ordinances, when property is redeveloped or if significantly rehabilitated improvements are proposed, improvements are also required in the public right-of-way. In recent years, there has been an influx of new businesses that have brought more activity and energy to the corridor through private redevelopment. The establishment of these businesses has brought quality development practices to the area as well as improvements to the public right-of-way.

Ward 8

E 77TH ST
E 78TH ST

Aerial of Stony Island Avenue Median, Source: Chicago GIS

section of Stony Island Avenue are in flux. Remnants of older businesses and former residences share Stony Island Avenue with big box development such as Jewel-Osco and regionally scaled parking lots like the one that is used by Jackson Park Hospital; there are institutions that exhibit unwelcoming ground floors or are set back from the street behind protective fences while small-scale strip mall

E 79TH ST

Legend
Starbucks, Constructed in 2007

Focus Area

Aerial Photo Source: Chicago GIS

´

Figure I-1: Focus Area

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I. INTRODUCTION
The City of Chicago’s Department of Transportation (CDOT) initiated the Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program to rejuvenate streets and transportation corridors, thereby promoting economic and social development of neighborhood commercial areas. In addition to the goal of revitalizing a neighborhood, the Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program emphasizes improving the environmental quality of the community as well. It is the goal of the Stony Island Avenue Master Plan to provide guidance for establishing streetscape improvements that will expand upon community identity and provide a cohesive streetscape with continuity of design elements. A pleasant streetscape environment entices the development community to consider development along a streetscape such as Stony Island Avenue. A clean and comfortable streetscape experience also encourages pedestrians, bicyclists and motorists to visit locations along the corridor, which in turn allows the community to experience what Stony Island Avenue has to offer. A pedestrian-friendly environment can also aid in generating more social interaction with commercial activities. Improving the streetscape environment and ease of navigation along Stony Island Avenue for all users are the most important physical improvements that can be made. The City of Chicago determined that the Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan was needed to identify a comprehensive program to enhance the aesthetics and user-friendliness of the corridor. The streetscape improvements, as documented within this Master Plan, are focused on enhancing the visual character, functionality of the public space, and safety along Stony Island Avenue while encouraging development in the future. This Master Plan will be used to improve Stony Island Avenue through private development in the community as well as CDOT’s streetscape improvement programs. The documented enhancements within this Master Plan express the community’s vision for the corridor. This vision also serves as guidelines for developer implemented streetscape improvements associated with future private development initiatives along Stony Island Avenue. In addition, the Master Plan provides documentation necessary for the City to initiate public funding for streetscape improvements as well as identifying potential menu items for Ward initiated enhancement projects. Other improvements such as Traffic Signal Modernization or major intersection improvements may be presented for funding consideration by other City or State agencies.

PROJECT APPROACH
“If we can develop and design streets so that they are wonderful, fulfilling places to be – community-building places, attractive for all people – then we will have successfully designed about one-third of the city directly and will have had an immense impact on the rest.“ Alan Jacobs This Streetscape Master Plan is intended to be used by the community, future developers and CDOT in implementing physical design improvements through redevelopment and/ or a phased program of infrastructure improvements. The best attributes of Stony Island Avenue must be enhanced and protected, while also integrating the needs and desires of the community. The development of the Master Plan was achieved through a process that included community input through a series of public meetings, and technical development through CDOT. Public meetings were held in the vicinity of the focus area from July 2009 to June 2010. The Master Plan development process and design elements were presented at the meetings. Community comments were received through questions and answers during the meetings, feedback forms that were distributed during the meetings and discussions during the meetings. Documentation of the comments received from the community input can be found in Appendix A. The following is a summary of the priority needs identified from the community input: Percentage of Respondents 36% 31% 17% 5% 4% 4% 3%

Specific objectives of the Streetscape Master Plan include: • Providing a framework for property owners, developers and CDOT to help prepare attractive, feasible, and functional streetscape and private property improvements that provide continuity in scale and character for Stony Island Avenue; Enhancing the sense of place for Stony Island Avenue while defining individuality for unique areas along the corridor. Preserve and enhance the best attributes of Stony Island Avenue’s existing conditions, architectural character, spatial pattern, and streetscape characteristics; Create a gateway statement into the community that also recognizes that Stony Island Avenue is a gateway to the City; Establishing the scope, range and design criteria for the various elements of the streetscape; Ensuring consistency and quality in design and improvements; Improving the streetscape; environmental quality of the

• • • •

Cyclists Currently Using Portions of Stony Island Avenue

Enhance safety for pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists through incorporating the City’s design standards; and Cohesive phased implementation of Near and Long Term improvements.

Based on the existing conditions within the Stony Island Avenue corridor, pedestrian and bicycle safety will be a priority of this Master Plan. The broken and uneven sidewalks are one safety item to address, however, the safety of pedestrians is most compromised by the number of vehicular lanes and width of pavement that pedestrians have to traverse while crossing Stony Island Avenue. Bicycle traffic on Stony Island Avenue is infrequent as the number of traffic lanes, vehicle volume and speeds presents an inhospitable environment for all but most ardent cyclists. The Master Plan will address improvements that can aid the safety of pedestrians and cyclists, active transportation users, along the corridor.

The recommended improvements are based on a needs evaluation of existing conditions as well as a design analysis with the community. The improvements are focused on aesthetic and functional improvements that can positively influence business and community development.

Need Pedestrian-Bicycle Improvements Streetscape Amenities Attract Development Roadway and Sewer Improvements Improve More of Stony Island Avenue Parking Improvements Recreational Sitting Areas

View Looking North Along Stony Island Avenue

View Looking North Along Stony Island Avenue Between the Ramps for the Skyway

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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STONY ISLAND AVENUE HISTORY AND IDENTITY
Stony Island Avenue is a major north/south thoroughfare through the southern area of Chicago, connecting several south side neighborhoods (e.g. South Shore, Highlands, Woodlawn, Grand Crossing, Avalon Park, Stony Island Park and South Chicago) to the downtown and lakefront via connections to Lake Shore Drive. Stony Island Avenue starts at E. 56th Street at the northern edge of Jackson Park and extends southward beyond Interstate 94 with the ramps for Interstate 90/Chicago Skyway located at the approximate midpoint. This thoroughfare serves as the main commercial corridor for several south side and south lakefront neighborhoods. Historic maps from as early as 1890 show a 200 foot rightof-way that eventually became Stony Island Avenue. The area was annexed to Chicago in 1889 as part of Hyde Park Township. Once a rural landscape on the outskirts of the City, major commercial and residential development began to occur along Stony Island Avenue during and after the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893. Jackson Park was the site of the World’s Columbian Exposition and visitors could take the new “L” to a stop on Stony Island Avenue which served as the western boundary of the park. One of the Exposition sites is now the home of the Museum of Science and Industry, with the University of Chicago located just west of Stony Island Avenue and Jackson Park.

In the 1946 Comprehensive Plan, Stony Island Avenue is shown as a future “Expressway” south of Jackson Park. The wide right-of-way was able to accommodate the current roadway, consisting of a wide landscaped median as well as lanes that ranged in number from a total of 4 to 9, with the maximum number of lanes in one direction being 5. The median experience along Stony Island Avenue defines a corridor gateway into Chicago for drivers and pedestrians alike.

1880 Map, Source: University of Chicago Map Archives

Photographs from the Chicago Transit Authority Archives show that Stony Island’s wide right-of-way once accommodated a commuter rail line down the center of the right-of-way in a wide green space. The removal of the rail lines left the current conditions of a wide median located in the middle of the street.

Historic View Looking South Along Stony Island Avenue with Trolly Utilizing the Center of the Roadway, Source: Chicago on the Move, 2007

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STONY ISLAND AVENUE STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN

II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

Community Context and Cultural Identity
Stony Island Avenue has traditionally served multiple functions and many of those functions are still evident. As a broad avenue it had a functional and regionally symbolic role. It was the southern entryway to the City, a role that it still plays today as the major connector to the Chicago Skyway and to the neighborhoods further to the south. Many of the land uses still address the wider community with institutions such as the Jackson Park Hospital and Clinic and the headquarters of the Nation of Islam and even stores that have become institutions such as the Moo and Oink. Its large-scale also made it a natural link and line of differentiation between the Woodlawn neighborhood to the north, Grand Crossing to the West and South Shore and Jackson Highlands (Heights) to the East. It has served the needs of these adjacent communities with neighborhood stores and entertainment, some of which have survived but many have struggled in the changing times to retain a foothold on Stony Island Avenue.

Murals on the Exterior Wall of New Regal Theater

II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS
CHARACTER OF THE CORRIDOR
Community character is comprised of the perception and experience of those living, working, and passing through the area. It is largely determined by the residents themselves, the built environment and the surrounding natural environment as affected by urban development. Careful urban design can provide direction and guidance for development to enhance community character by creating a greater sense of time, place, and well being. Figure II1, identifies several physical elements that influence the character of the corridor, however it is the sum of several tangible and intangible elements that substantiate the character for Stony Island Avenue.

Today, Stony Island Avenue focus area retains part of its regional role, it is still a major connector and entryway to the city, it is an important center of African-American culture and it also continues its historic role as a center for basic goods and services for the surrounding residential neighborhoods, providing groceries, clothing, automobile services and personal services for nearby residents. Its regional role is growing with recent additions such as large scale retail developments addressing a larger surrounding area. The corridor also functions as an important arterial route, connecting commuters and visitors to Lake Shore Drive and the Chicago Skyway. In that capacity, the Stony Island Avenue corridor is visited by thousands of motorists from outside the area every day. Catering the roadway to accommodate the movement of motorists from outside the area, through to the City, has lead to the current roadway configuration (e.g. multiple travel lanes, wide travel lanes, etc.) that emphasizes the swift movement of motorists through the corridor with little consideration for pedestrians or cyclists (e.g. long pedestrian crossings, narrow sidewalks, etc.). The proposed Master Plan improvements address the importance to provide pedestrian improvements balanced with motorists and bicyclists to create a streetscape experience that accommodates the multiple users.

Recent Development Along Stony Island Avenue at E. 67th Street

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II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS

Skyway entrance ramp

Jackson Park Hospital

Planted medians with healthy, well established vegetation

Moo and Oink grocery

Guaranty Bank and Trust Building

High rise apartments prominent in views

Stony

Island

Ave.
Jackson Park

Regal Cinema

Nation of Islam’s Mosque Maryam

Stony Island Metra station

Green space leading into Jackson Park

Pedestrian Mall at E. 68th St.

N
Figure II-1: Community Character

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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Architectural Influences
The turn-of-the-century residential neighborhoods to the east of Stony Island Avenue provide an insight to the original architectural character of the corridor however, a critical mass of historical architecture is no longer present along the streetscape. What can be found is an eclectic palette of architecture that has developed in the focus area with uses that span from residential, commercial, institutional to religious. Many of the buildings along Stony Island Avenue have unique identities with distinct architectural features that make the building stand out along the corridor; however the combination of these unique buildings as one travels along Stony Island Avenue does not define a strong spatial relationship that visually links these architectural elements together within the focus area. The landscape medians provide a spatial relationship for the corridor; however the focus is to the middle of the roadway and not the distinct architectural elements along the corridor. We continually evaluate our environment and react to the condition of all the elements that make up that environment. The character of an area is expressed by the individual elements but it is also expressed by the connection between those elements, the spatial relationship, between them. There are several structures that are dominating visual elements in the community that are scattered amongst the recent development landmarks (see Figure II-2) within the streetscape, and include:

The historic New Regal Theater, located a block east of Stony Island Avenue along E. 79th Street, is a landmark for this neighborhood, and the City of Chicago as a whole. The New Regal, which originally was known as the Avalon, is an example of Middle Eastern, Moorish design and is a long-time center for the performing arts in the city’s African-American community.

The overpass of the Chicago Skyway at the intersection of Stony Island Avenue, E. 79th Street and South Chicago Avenue provides a unique gateway location along Stony Avenue, though the intersection is considered one of the most dangerous in the Chicago region.

The Jackson Park Hospital, located along this stretch of Stony Island Avenue between E. 75th Street and E. 76th Street, is a 326-bed acute, short term comprehensive care facility serving the south side of Chicago since 1913.

Chicago Skyway at the intersection of Stony Island Avenue, 79th Street and Chicago Avenue

Jackson Park Hospital

Historic New Regal Theater

See Page 9 for Legend
AV

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ILR

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. AV

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S. CH IC AG O

S. HARPER AVE.

E. 75TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

E. 76TH ST.

E. 72ND PL.

E. 74TH ST.

E. 73RD ST.

E. 76TH PL.

E. 73RD PL.

E. 75TH PL.

E. 74TH PL.

NO

RF

OL

K

SO

UT

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SB STONY ISLAND AV. RAMP TO EB I-94

CHICAGO SKYWAY
WB I-94 RAMP TO NB STONY ISLAND AV.
E. 78TH ST. E. 77TH ST.
S. STONY ISLAND AV.

JACKSON PARK HOSPITAL

NEW REGAL THEATRE

E. 79TH ST.

MOSQUE MARYAM

S. CORNELL AV.

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II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS
• Mosque Maryam, located between E. 73rd Street and E. 74th Street is the most visually prominent facility along Stony Island Avenue in the focus area. Mosque Maryam has served as the headquarters and National Center for the Nation of Islam since 1972. Adjacent to the mosque is Muhammad University of Islam, an educational institute for boys and girls from preschool through 12th grade. • The famous Moo and Oink grocery store is located south of E. 71st Street. In 1976 the Calumet Meat Company assumed the name and added grocery items to the store. • Guaranty Bank and Trust Building located between E. 67th Street and E. 68th Street at 6760 S. Stony Island Avenue, it is one of the neo-classical neighborhood banks that were half-scale versions of their prestigious downtown counterparts with 30-foot tall Doric columns capped with an impressively detailed entablature. Closed a quarter century ago, the now vacant building occupies a prime corner on the edge of Jackson Park.

Moo and Oink Grocery Store

The recent reconstruction of the METRA rail station visible from Stony Island Avenue along E. 71st Street.

Mosque Maryam

Guaranty Bank and Trust Building

LEGEND
FOCUS AREA LANDMARK RECENT REDEVELOPMENT/CONSTRUCTION
150 300 NORTH

0

600

METRA Stony Island Station

MOO & OINK

METRA STONY ISLAND STATION
E. 71ST ST.

E. MARQUETTE RD.

E. 72ND ST.

GUARANTY BANK AND TRUST BUILDING

E. 70TH ST.

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

E. 72ND PL.
S. STONY ISLAND AV.

E. 71ST PL.
S. CORNELL AV.

E. 69TH PL.

E. 69TH ST. S. STONY ISLAND AV.
S. CORNELL AV.

E. 67TH PL.

E. 68TH ST.

Figure II-2: Landmarks and New Developments

E. 67TH ST.
COR NEL LD R.

JACKSON PARK

E. 66TH PL.

E. 65TH PL.

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E 77TH ST

This corridor is composed of residential, commercial, institutional and civic uses. Commercial development along Stony Island Avenue consists mainly of automobile-oriented uses and shopping plazas that provide a range of goods and services. There are no new developments currently proposed in the focus area. To further evaluate the Stony Island Avenue streetscape, the focus area was divided into three distinct sub-areas (see Figures II-4 and II-6).

Recent improvements by the City that have visually enhanced this area include painting of the structural steel for the Skyway ramps and landscape improvements under the entrance ramp.

S HARPER AVE

S

Sub-Area 1
E 78TH ST E 79TH ST

S STONY ISLAND AVE

SUB-AREA 1 - E. 76TH PLACE TO E. 79TH STREET/SOUTH CHICAGO AVENUE
The character of this sub-area is dominated by the access ramps for the Chicago Skyway which physically encloses the streetscape. The regionally scaled ramps of the Chicago Skyway descend down into Stony Island Avenue dwarfing the pedestrian and the lower-scaled older buildings. The ramps present blank walls and multiple lanes of traffic to the neighborhood. Businesses facing the ramps have suffered over time from the imposition of the ramps and from changes in business trends. The ramps visually and physically block access from the opposite side of the road. Today’s retailers want visibility and ease in access

E 77TH ST

View Looking North Along Stony Island Avenue Just South of Jackson Park Hospital

See Page 11 for Legend

Demonstrating the impact of streetscape design on adjacent land uses, the properties adjacent to the ramps are less visible, and are bounded by open sites to the west and parking lots to the east. The existing land uses in this area consist of approximately 65 % vacant/ undeveloped lots and buildings. The majority of occupied commercial structures in the ramp areas are located around the intersection of Stony Island Avenue, South Chicago Avenue and E. 79th Street.

View Looking North Along Stony Island Avenue Between Recently Painted Skyway Ramps

to their businesses. If drivers can not see a business from the roadway they may not attempt to find the business to patronize. The character of the roadway in this area feels enclosed compared to the open expanse of lanes of pavement, and wide median elsewhere (Sub-Area 2) in the focus area. Harsh concrete walls and bridge ramps define the edges of the streetscape. In addition, the six-legged intersection of Stony Island Avenue, South Chicago Avenue and E. 79th Street is equally imposing to pedestrians and drivers. Pedestrians have to traverse across multiple crosswalks to reach the opposite sides of Stony Island

Figure II-3: Typical Existing Cross Section in Sub Area 1 (E. 79th Street to E. 76th Street) - View Looking North

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E 76TH PL

Existing Land Uses

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Avenue and motorists have to be aware of traffic turning in front of them from multiple directions.

IC

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Cross Section

II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS
E 76TH PL
E 71ST ST

E 74TH PL

E 73RD PL

E 73RD ST

E 72ND PL

E 71ST PL

E 75TH PL

E 75TH ST

S STONY ISLAND AVE

Sub-Area 2
E 71ST ST
S CORNELL AVE
S CORNELL AVE

E 72ND ST

E 70TH ST

E 70TH ST

S CORNELL AV

SUB-AREA 2 - E. 67TH STREET TO E. 76TH PLACE
This sub-area encompasses the greater part of the Stony Island Avenue streetscape. The majority of the recent development is located in this sub-area as well as the existing landmark architectural influences. Approximately 25% of the property in this sub-area is vacant land or vacant structures. The Jackson Park Hospital and Clinic presents blank walls to the street and an entire block of parking serves the Auto Zone south of E. 76th Street. The existing land uses in this area consist of primarily commercial, institutional and religious uses, with residential uses located in the northern portion of the sub-area.

Figure II-4: Existing Land Use - Subareas 1 and 2

LEGEND
EXISTING LAND USE
RESIDENTIAL RETAIL INSTITUTIONAL RELIGIOUS INDUSTRIAL PARKS, GREENSPACE AND RECREATION TRANSPORTATION VACANT LAND SUB-AREA FOCUS AREA

0

150

300

Feet 600

View Looking South Along Stony Island Avenue at E. 71st Place

Figure II-5: Typical Existing Cross Section in Sub Area 2 (E. 76th Street to E. 69th Place) - View Looking North

E 69TH PL

Cross Section

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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E MARQUETTE RD

E 69TH PL

E 68TH ST

E 70TH ST

E 69TH ST

E 67TH PL

E 67TH ST

LEGEND
EXISTING LAND USE
RESIDENTIAL RETAIL INSTITUTIONAL RELIGIOUS INDUSTRIAL PARKS, GREENSPACE AND RECREATION TRANSPORTATION VACANT LAND SUB-AREA FOCUS AREA

Sub-Area 3
S STONY ISLAND AVE

E 66TH PL

Cross Section

CORNELL AVE

E 70TH ST

0

150

300

Feet 600

S CORNELL AVE

SC OR

UETT E E M ARQ

NE L L DR

S CORNELL AVE

SUB-AREA 3 - E. MARQUETTE DRIVE TO E. 67TH STREET
The elegance and natural beauty of Jackson Park enhances the pedestrian and motorist experience in this area. The comparatively narrow five-lane road, park, street trees and the landscaped median make this section stand out as an inviting, positive, comfortable space for pedestrians and motorists. The existing land uses in this area include recreation with Jackson Park on the east and commercial uses occupying the west side. A significant amount of the buildings are occupied in this sub-area. There are residential uses in this sub-area, some of them front South Cornell Drive and a public greenspace buffers them from Stony Island Avenue while others are residences located above store fronts.

Figure II-6: Existing Land Use - Subarea 3

View Looking South Along Stony Island Avenue at E. 69th Street

Figure II-7: Typical Existing Cross Section in Sub Area 3 (E. 69th Place to E. Marquette Road) - View Looking North

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II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS
Existing Urban Design Elements
Walking or driving along Stony Island Avenue one will find numerous urban design elements. These elements are physical improvements such as sidewalks, street furniture (benches, trash receptacles, etc.) bus shelters and street trees. The following identifies the urban design elements within the Master Plan focus area, as well as their condition and functionality along Stony Island Avenue. Figure II-8 identifies the location of the urban design elements in the focus area. developed property. Most curb ramps at the intersections provide some degree of universal accessibility, but require construction of detectable warning tiles and improved grading to be fully ADA compliant. These same tiles are also needed at the curb ramps in the medians for pedestrians crossing the roadway. Some areas along the corridor have parkways that are grass areas between the back of curb and sidewalk. Near active pedestrian areas, such as bus stops, sidewalks need to be expanded into the parkway to eliminate the unsightly look of worn grass and bare soil. Carriage walks or other urban design techniques can also be implemented to reduce the zone of dead plant material that can exist at the back of curb as a result of roadway salt spray in the winter.

STREET TREES
Street trees are installed sporadically along both sides of Stony Island Avenue. The trees are generally installed in two different ways, either in parkways or in open tree pits that have been formed out of the existing concrete sidewalk. With the exception of pits located on the east side of the street between E. 74th Street and E. 75th Street, tree roots are not protected by tree pit grates. Several trees show signs of distress, likely due to inadequate growing conditions and other adverse urban conditions along the corridor.

BUS SHELTERS
CTA bus routes 28 and X28 service the length of the corridor and routes 6 and 15 serve the one-block segment between E. Marquette Road and E. 67th Street. There are 48 stops in the focus area and decorative bus shelters are located at 15 locations. One bus shelter location between E. 67th Street and E. 69th Street on the east side is an older model and needs to be repaired or replaced. The decorative shelters are located throughout Chicago and are manufactured and installed by JCDecaux under contract to the City. They have advertisement panels on one end and a built in bench. The shelters are three sided to allow protection from the elements.

SIDEWALKS
Concrete sidewalks extend along both sides of Stony Island Avenue and in most situations connect with sidewalks along the side streets. The majority of the sidewalks are broken and uneven. In several locations curb cuts occur in the sidewalk but no driveway is present. New sidewalk construction primarily exists adjacent to recently

STREETLIGHTS
Street lights extend along the entire length of Stony Island Avenue. The lights within the focus area consist of cobra head luminaries extending on an arm over the roadway from a galvanized steel pole. These street lights have limited decorative value and are strictly utilitarian. There are also some lights that have been damaged and are in need of repair. Though the majority of the street lights receive electric service from an underground conduit system, there are sporadic sections of street lights on both sides of the street that have an aerial service extending from light to light. Decorative banners are installed on a select amount of light poles. The banners add character to the focus area.

Street Tree in a Parkway Lawn with a Carriage Way Existing Bus Shelter with Built-In Bench

Narrow Sidewalks with Debris

Street Trees in Open Pits without Tree Grates

Broken and Missing Sidewalks Street Lights Along Stony Island Avenue Street Trees with Tree Grates

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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STREET FURNITURE
Aside from the benches included in the decorative bus shelters, additional street furniture such as advertisement benches can be found sporadically along the corridor. Trash receptacles are also placed adjacent to some bus stop locations. There are no other benches or low walls that could provide additional seating.

In addition to the existing traditional street furniture there are two small structures located in the sidewalks along the corridor. One is located at the southwest corner of Stony Island Avenue at E. 71st Street and is likely a noncompliant newsstand. The other is at the northeast corner of Stony Island Avenue at E. 75th Street, and appears to be temporary in nature for an undetermined use. The structures should be removed from the public right-of-way to eliminate the sight visibility concerns for vehicles exiting adjacent driveways as well as the visual nuisance and congestion that the structures cause by blocking portions of the sidewalk for pedestrians.
Existing Structure in Sidewalk at E. 75st Street Mast Arm Assembly Traffic Signals with Street Lights

TRAFFIC SIGNAL ASSEMBLIES
Trash Receptacle in the Sidewalk Along Stony Island Avenue

Existing Structure in Sidewalk at E. 71st Street

Signalized intersections are controlled by installations with side post and mast arm mounted signals. The mast arms and support poles are painted galvanized steel. The paint finish is deteriorated for seven out of eight intersections. The mast arms provide an uncluttered look to the streetscape by having combined street light and traffic signal mountings wherever possible. Traffic signal assemblies at the intersection of Stony Island Avenue and E. 79th Street and South Chicago Avenue were recently upgraded and the fresh paint on the poles is a positive addition to the character of the intersection.

There are pedestrian signals at each signalized intersection. The pedestrian signals are positioned at the outside corners of the intersections with no signals in the refuge area in the medians. The signals provide the graphic symbols for walk (walking person) and don’t walk (hand) with incandescent lamps, to acknowledge pedestrian movement. The majority of the pedestrian signals are mounted on the supports poles for the mast arms and have a painted finish that is weathered and in poor condition. At the intersection of Stony Island Avenue, E. 79th Street, and South Chicago Avenue the pedestrian signals are painted to match the painted mast arm assemblies and include an LED count down clock to inform pedestrian how much time they have left to cross traffic. This installation also includes a pedestrian signal in the pedestrian refuge area.

Advertising Bench Along Stony Island Avenue

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II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS
TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNAGE
There are several types of traffic control signage along Stony Island Avenue that include street name sign blades and regulatory signage (i.e. speed limit sign, stop sign, no parking sign, etc.). A large overhead sign structure directs local and through traffic on southbound Stony Island Avenue as well as indicating access to the ramps for the Chicago Skyway. The overhead signs are more typically found on area expressways rather than major arterials such as Stony Island Avenue and seem out of scale for the corridor.

LANDSCAPED MEDIAN
The landscaped medians provide the most significant positive visual impact for the Stony Island Avenue streetscape. Though improvements to the landscaped medians are not a primary focus for this Master Plan, the existence of the medians can not be overlooked. The wide landscaped medians soften the visual affect of the multiple lanes of pavement of Stony Island Avenue, as well as provide refuge for pedestrians that are crossing Stony Island Avenue.

ROADWAY INFRASTRUCTURE
While the roadway pavement is in generally good condition, there are numerous areas along Stony Island Avenue where the pavement has deteriorated and the ponding of stormwater runoff can be an issue.

Interstate Signage and Sign Support on Stony Island Avenue is out of Scale

Storm Drainage Issues within the Roadway Along Stony Island Avenue

View Down Center of the Median Along Stony Island Avenue

Easy to Read Street Name Signs Along Stony Island Avenue

LEGEND
FOCUS AREA STREET TREES IN PLANTERS OR GRATES STREET TREES IN PARKWAY SCREENED PARKING WITH ORNAMENTAL FENCE CHAIN LINK FENCE BUS STOP BUS STOP WITH SHELTER BUILDING/STRUCTURE IN SIDEWALK

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Figure II-8: Urban Design Elements

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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Circulation
VEHICULAR CIRCULATION
Stony Island Avenue was originally design to function as a major north/south arterial urban street that would connect southeast and far south neighborhoods, south suburban communities, and communities in northwest Indiana, to the Chicago lakefront and downtown. The later addition of the Chicago Skyway (I-90) and associated ramps reinforced this function, especially for communities in northwest Indiana. The opening of the Dan Ryan Expressway (I90/94) in the early 1960’s reduced the importance of Stony Island Avenue to regional travel, especially for many south suburban communities. At the local level, Stony Island Avenue still serves as a major arterial on the Chicago street grid system. It has more through lanes than adjacent parallel arterial streets like Cottage Grove Avenue, Jeffrey Boulevard, and South Shore Drive (US 41). It provides an efficient connection between major cross streets such as E. Marquette Road, E. 71st Street, and E. 79th Street. It also provides easy access to two commuter rail stations along E.71st Street. The typical travel lane width is twelve (12) feet wide. Parking lanes extend along both sides of Stony Island Avenue for the entire length except for two areas: E. 69th Street to E. 67th Street northbound and 76th Place to 79th Street southbound, see Figure II-9. There are no rush hour restrictions on parking, however parking along the street is minimally utilized.

All side streets that are not signalized have access to the lanes of traffic across the median area. The wide landscaped medians enable a vehicle entering Stony Island

along that section of the corridor. The number of through lanes and width of pavement may contend that Stony Island Avenue was originally designed to accommodate a higher volume of vehicular traffic then what currently exists. A detailed traffic analysis is recommended to confirm the design volume, verify the level of service provided for existing and projected traffic, and validate any concept that includes reducing the number of through lanes. Inclusive of the overall traffic circulation, there are seven signalized intersections from the south to the north end of the focus area. The signalized intersection of Stony Island Avenue with E. 79th Street and South Chicago Avenue had the highest number of crashes of any intersection in Chicago and Northeastern Illinois as reported in the December 2008 draft document by the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, “Analysis of High Crash Locations that Contain Intersections, Years 2005-2006”. Recent traffic signal modernization included installation of Red Light Running Cameras. This enforcement mechanism has demonstrated a recent reduction of crash frequency. However the physical configuration of the intersection was unchanged and remains a challenging intersection for drivers and pedestrians to navigate. Red Light Running Cameras were also installed along the corridor at E. 76th Street and E. 67th Street.

PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION
Sidewalks and crosswalks are located at every intersection and allow full access for pedestrians in all directions, including pedestrian landings located at the end of each median. Sidewalks also extend from the side streets to Stony Island Avenue creating a pedestrian network for this area of the community. However, the majority of the sidewalks throughout the focus area are in poor condition.

Vehicles in Median Area at an Unsignalized Intersection

Avenue from a side street, at an unsignalized intersection, to be sheltered from oncoming traffic. Therefore a vehicle only has to cross one direction of traffic at a time. The most recent traffic counts are provided by the Illinois Department of Transportation through on-line resources (http://www.gettingaroundillinois.com/default.aspx). This information indicates the Average Daily Traffic (ADT) along Stony Island Avenue varies from a low of 38,100 vehicles for the segment just south of E. Marquette Road, to a high of 57,500 for the segment south of E. 67th Street. Traffic counts from south of the Skyway ramps to I-94 ramps south of E. 95th Street indicate about 55,000 vehicles travel

Pedestrian in Crosswalk at E. 72nd Street

Currently some pedestrian trips are generated by the local businesses and services along Stony Island Avenue, but a primary source of pedestrian activity is access to transit. Providing safe routes to transit is a priority by moving pedestrians along and across Stony Island Avenue, across associated cross streets, to the numerous bus stops along the corridor, and to the METRA Station at E. 71st Street.

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II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ANALYSIS
In recent history, there have been several pedestrian accidents along Stony Island Avenue. One fatality was reported in 2005 at the intersection of Stony Island Avenue and E. 79th Street. The pedestrian was crossing the north leg of the intersection going eastbound and was struck by a northbound vehicle.

BICYCLE CIRCULATION
Bike lanes/routes are found crossing the focus area at the northern and southern terminus on E. Marquette Road and South Chicago Avenue respectively, as well mid-way along the corridor at E. 76th Street. In addition, a new off street multi-use path is being constructed along the north side of E. Marquette Road, east of Stony Island Avenue. No existing bike facilities or routes are identified along Stony Island Avenue, however bike lanes are programmed along Stony Island Avenue north of E. Marquette Road.

TRANSIT CIRCULATION
The community is also served by METRA Electric Line with a station located at Stony Island Avenue and E. 71st Street, which was recently reconstructed. CTA bus routes 6, 15, 28, and 28X have several stops along the focus area. There are a total of 48 bus stops along the corridor and 15 of those bus stops have bus shelters.

Existing Bus Stop with Bus Shelter Along Stony Island Avenue

FOCUS AREA

Medians Provide a Safe Haven for Pedestrians Crossing Stony Island Avenue

SIGNALIZED INTERSECTION DRIVEWAY OVERSIZED DRIVEWAY SHARED TRAVEL/PARKING LANE THRU TRAFFIC LANES

Cyclist Crossing Stony Island Avenue

EXISTING/PROGRAMMED BICYCLE ROUTE/LANE PEDESTRIAN SIGNAL PEDESTRIAN SIGNAL WITH COUNTDOWN BUS STOP

There were five reported crashes involving bicycles in the corridor from 2005 through 2007. Two occurred in 2005, one in 2006, and two in 2007. The locations varied and details were only available for two of the five crashes. One involved a motorist failing to yield to a cyclist while exiting a commercial driveway just north of E. 72nd Street. The other involved a northbound driver striking a cyclist from behind north of E. 79th Street. Both crashes were hit and run collisions.

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Figure II-9: Vehicular Circulation

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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Opportunities and Constraints
The landscape enhancements of the median by the City and the application of the City’s Landscape Ordinance on new developments along the Stony Island Avenue have had considerable positive influence on the character of the focus area. However there is more that can be done to create an improved and welcoming environment within the public right-of-way. Improvements to the corridor should be representative of the surrounding community while stimulating public pride and economic confidence.

ADDRESSING THE SCALE OF THE AVENUE
We can mediate the regional scale of the Stony Island Avenue by breaking its overall length into recognizable and walkable segments: a regional role as a gateway into the city near the Skyway ramps, a transitional boulevard section, and an arrival into Jackson Park as a transformation of the regional scale into a local more community friendly event. We can mark these segments with community identifiers and use these gateways to express the transitions in scale, ownership and identity.

LOCAL VERSUS REGIONAL
Stony Island Avenue’s role as a regional connector, city gateway and regional retail corridor has shaped the corridor in reaction to regional rather than local factors. The width of the avenue has always been orientated towards mass movement, speed and the service of the population in general, and it is therefore not as welcoming to local and in particular pedestrian uses. This scale can be intimidating for pedestrians, particularly with closed building facades or large building setbacks with substantial parking lots, and can result in an exposed or unsafe feeling for pedestrians. The older and more pedestrian friendly uses within the project area, such as the Guaranty Bank or the Regal Theater, have diminished over time and the new uses such as large-scale retail stores create a multiplicity of design motifs, site treatments and setbacks that create a visual and spatial chaos. The majority of Stony Island Avenue could be considered a regional interloper overlaid on the local, smaller-scaled, personalized environment of the adjacent communities. Our first goal therefore is to address the regional scale of the roadway, to make it more pedestrian and community friendly while accepting its regional role and still encouraging the potential of new forms of development.

Landscaped Medians Along Stony Island Avenue

ENHANCE THE VISUAL QUALITY OF THE AVENUE
Through the application of the Chicago Streetscape Guidelines, pedestrians and motorists traveling through Stony Island Avenue will experience a corridor with a renewed sense of place through the coordination and enhancement of streetscape design elements. The elements to be incorporated into the Streetscape Master Plan may include new ADA compliant sidewalks and crosswalks, decorative street lights – roadway and pedestrian, street trees, benches, trash receptacles and community identifiers. In addition, an extension of select urban design elements should be considered along corridors that reach into the neighborhoods to provide for safe pedestrian access to and from Stony Island Avenue. Stony Island Avenue is an important corridor that moves people from the adjoining neighborhoods to transit facilities along Stony Island Avenue. These connections should be maintained and enhanced. The Pedestrian Mall along E. 68th Street is one such example of a community pedestrian connection that provides an enhanced value to the surrounding community.

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STONY ISLAND AVENUE STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
of accessibility and ecological design are integrated into infrastructure design, allowing for a sustainable environment in which large populations can efficiently share resources and reduce their impact on the environment. Accessibility is defined through fundamentals of “Complete Streets” policies. Complete Streets are designed and maintained to enable safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and public transportation users of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along and across a complete street. The second element of the Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program is designing streetscapes that improve the environment through concepts such as: • • • • • • • • • Urban Heat Island Reduction Local and Recycled Materials Construction Waste Community Education Stormwater Management Water Efficiency Alternative Transportation Beauty and Community Energy Efficiency
After Green Alley Conversion, Source: CDOT Before

Moving traffic efficiently through the corridor by recommending a coordinated traffic signal system and connection of that signal system to the City’s traffic management center to minimize emissions.

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
DESIGN GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT DIRECTIVES
Near Term and Long Term Improvements
In developing design guidelines for Stony Island Avenue it was evident that there were several improvements that must occur and that can be implemented with ease, while there were some exciting ultimate visions that will take much more time to implement along the corridor. Improvements that can be accomplished without major modifications to the existing infrastructure are referred to as Near Term Improvements. More visionary improvements that require additional resources to implement are identified as Long Term Improvements. As the individual guidelines are discussed in the Master Plan, their association with Near Term and Long Term Improvements are identified.

An example of Chicago’s environmental sustainable streets practices is the Green Alley program. Permeable pavers, asphalt and concrete are used in lieu of traditional concrete or asphalt paving. The permeable pavements allow storm water to infiltrate in the ground instead of entering the burdened combined sewer system, thereby helping to prevent sewer overflow into local waterways. Permeable pavements do not withstand the wear and tear of heavy traffic, like that found on most city streets, including Stony Island Avenue. However on busy streets, permeable pavements could be incorporated in sidewalk areas, in bike lanes, in the buffer areas between bike and parking lanes, or even in parking lanes. Near term improvements to Stony Island Avenue that enhance sustainability in this Master Plan include: • • • • • Providing accessibility for pedestrians and cyclists throughout the focus area; Designing intersections for pedestrians; Rehabilitating sidewalks; Installing bicycle lanes; Increasing the number of trees along Stony Island Avenue to provide shade and reduce urban heat island effect; Installing permeable pavers along sidewalks to allow for stormwater infiltration; and

Many of the Complete Streets improvements oriented towards bicycle and pedestrian improvements also minimize emissions by encouraging non-motorized modes of transportation which reduces the demand for fossil fuels and resultant greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, these improvements allow for increased density and development around transit facilities, further increasing the shared resources common for urban areas. Long term sustainability related improvements could include water quality initiatives implemented in a reconstructed median. These could include incorporating a bioswale in the median, construction of infiltration trenches, rain gardens and possibly bioretention cells. Electrical consumption could be reduced by using high efficiency lighting when the new street light are installed, and the use of high efficiency (Light Emitting Diode-LED) signals when traffic signal installations are modernized.

Sustainability
In its effort to become the “Greatest City in America,” the City of Chicago has become a national leader in sustainable infrastructure design. Through the Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program, the fundamental elements

GREEN CONSTRUCTION
Sustainability can also be addressed during construction by recycling demolition materials and construction waste within or outside the project instead of sending demolition items to a landfill. Construction materials produced with recycled materials may also be used, in addition to sourcing locally made materials.

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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ACTIVE MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION
Pedestrians and bicycles are the two primarily means of active transportation along Stony Island Avenue. Improvements evaluated for the Master Plan include enhancing the existing facilities and introducing new improvements that will improve safety, aesthetics and amenities for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Crosswalks
Enhancing crosswalks to make them more visible to pedestrians and motorists improves the safety of pedestrians. Crosswalks can be enhanced with decorative pavement such as stamped colored asphalt or pavement stenciling.

Minimize Disruptions within the Sidewalk
Eliminating or minimizing obstacles within the walking area of the sidewalk will improve pedestrian safety. • Driveway/Access Management Improvements – Several driveways along Stony Island Avenue are wider than the City standards (some drives extend the full width of the property). Driveway widths should be reduced to meet the City standards and/ or their permitted width. Properties with multiple driveways should be evaluated to determine if some of the driveways could be consolidated. There also are some driveways located too close to an intersection (per the City Standards) that should be relocated or removed with future improvements. Remove all elements that are not approved streetscape elements. There are two small sheds that are located in the sidewalks that partially obstruct pedestrian access that should be removed.

Pedestrian
Currently the primary pedestrian generators are associated with the CTA bus stops dotted along Stony Island Avenue and the METRA commuter rail station on E. 71st. Street. There are also some destinations scattered along Stony Island Avenue that attract pedestrians such as the Moo & Oink, Maryam Mosque and Jackson Park, see Figure III1. Recommended elements to be incorporated in future enhancements that improve pedestrian activity include:
Curb Extension - Source: CDOT

Crosswalk with Stamped Colored Asphalt - Source: CDOT

NEAR TERM IMPROVEMENTS Sidewalk Infrastructure
The sidewalk pavement shall be a smooth walking surface. Curb ramps shall be constructed at all intersections to meet the American Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. Sidewalk widths shall be maximized with the preferred minimum sidewalk width no less then 10 feet (10’).

Curb Extensions on Side Streets (Curb Bump outs)
A curb extension extends the sidewalk beyond the existing curbline, which then reduces the length of the crosswalk that a person must walk to cross the street. A shorter crosswalk minimizes the conflicts between pedestrians and motorists. Curb extensions are recommended along several one-way side streets approaching Stony Island Avenue for Near Term improvements. The curb extension can be paved or include an optional planter. Curb extensions could also be considered as a viable option for Long Term improvements along Stony Island Avenue.

Pedestrian Signal Improvements
Though all signalized intersections have pedestrian signals the existing pedestrian signals should be updated with countdown clocks. In addition, pedestrian actuated buttons should be added at the pedestrian landings within landscape medians and unique crossing locations so that a pedestrian can activate a crosswalk light once they arrive in the middle of the road. Installation of High-intensity Activated crossWalK signals HAWK or rapid flash beacons at high volume unsignalized intersections can also be considered.

Curb Extension with Flush Planter - Source: CDOT

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III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
curb extension further along the block face which would result in a wider sidewalk. The locations for widening long sections of sidewalks with curb extensions would be locations where on street parking is under-utilized. Such an example would be the west side of Stony Island Avenue between E. 75th St. and E. 76th St. The expansive parking lot in the front of the Jewel-Osco stores is used by their patrons. Individuals do not park on the street and walk to either store. Therefore this could be a location that the sidewalk could be widened, beyond a typical curb extension, and the loss of on-street parking would minimally affect the community. The additional sidewalk width may also allow for landscape parkways to be installed in some areas where the appropriate maintenance can be provided. However the choice to implement curb extensions along Stony Island Avenue is controlled by the long term consideration of providing dedicated bike lanes along Stony Island Avenue that are buffered from the travel lanes (See Bicycles, Long Term Improvements). Since the landscape buffered bike lane concept would place the bike lane along the existing curb, extensions of those curbs would disrupt the continuity of the proposed bike lanes. The Near Term bike lane configuration, where the bike lanes are between the through travel lane and the parking lane, would allow curb extensions to be provided without interrupting the bike lane. It may also be possible to improve traffic flow along Stony Island Avenue with the construction of curb extensions since the time allocated to the pedestrian phase of the traffic signals could be shorten to account for the decreased crossing distance and be reallocated for use by bicyclists or motorist.

Community Pedestrian Connectivity
In addition to the improvements to sidewalks along Stony Island Avenue to improve pedestrian movement, pedestrian connections to the surrounding neighborhoods should be improved. Primary linkages should consider connections

from community schools, parks and green space to and from Stony Island Avenue, see Figure III-2. The existing E. 68th Street pedestrian mall is an example of connectivity into the community from Stony Island Avenue.

HAWK Crosswalk Signal- Source: Ada County Highway District

Countdown Signal, Source: CDOT

LEGEND
PEDESTRIAN GENERATORS PROPOSED CURB EXTENSION (LONG TERM ALTERNATE) PEDESTRIAN SIGNAL BUS STOP BUS STOP WITH SHELTER SIGNALIZED INTERSECTION ONE-WAY STREET DIRECTION
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LONG TERM IMPROVEMENTS Curb Extensions on Stony Island Avenue (Curb Bump outs)
The advantages of implementing curb extensions along Stony Island Avenue include allocation of additional space for sidewalks or landscaped parkways, shadowing of onstreet parking and creating shorter crossing distances for pedestrians at crosswalks. Curb extensions are implemented at street corners, however Stony Island Avenue has a unique opportunity in select locations to “extend” the

Figure III-2: Greenway Linkages

METRA STONY ISLAND STATION MOO & OINK
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Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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Figure III-1: Pedestrian Circulation Improvements

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Bicycles
There are several existing and proposed bicycle facilities that cross Stony Island Avenue. The Stony Island Avenue provides an opportunity to expand on the existing bicycle network by providing a north-south link to these bicycle facilities, see Figure III-6.

NEAR TERM IMPROVEMENTS Dedicated Bicycle Lane
With minor adjustments to the current vehicular travel lanes, 6’ directional bike lanes can be constructed for northbound and southbound travel. The bike lanes would typically be buffered from the travel lane with a 3’ painted buffer area and would be located adjacent to the current parking lane (on-street parking lanes, 7’ wide, would remain where they currently exist).
Northbound Stony Island Avenue in Front of Mosque Maryam

Simulation of Near Term Bicycle Improvements - 3’ Bike Lane Buffer, 6’ Bike Lane and 7’ Parking Lane Bike Lane with Buffer - Source: NYCDOT

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III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
Bicycle Lane Safety Features
Though Stony Island Avenue is a logical location for a north-south bicycle corridor, the volume of motorized traffic along Stony Island Avenue, and the number of travel lanes necessitates implementing safety elements along the corridor to enhance the safety factor for cyclists. • In addition a bike landing, large paved landing located behind the landing for curb ramps could be considered in the northeast corner of the same intersection to provide a transition to the bike trails that extend through Jackson Park.

Bicycle Lane Delineation
Painted or physical barriers can enhance safety for bicyclists. Painted buffer lanes, flexible bollards, curbed medians are some methods that can be used to define bike lanes.

Intersections
There are several elements that can be considered to enhance safety at intersections for bicyclists. • Bicycle lane markings can be extended through intersections to increase road users awareness of potential conflict points such as through movements for bicycles and right turns for motorists. A safe way to aid the bicyclist’s ability to cross multiple lanes is to construct a bike box at an intersection that will aid with the preferred bicycle movement. In the situation presented at the northern end of the project on E. 66th Street, for a northbound cyclist, the cyclist is directed along Cornell Road to E. 66th Street. To proceed northbound on Stony Island Avenue it is recommended that bicycle traffic cross over to the west on E. 66th Street to head north on Stony Island Avenue. The bicycle box in this location adds to the visibility of the cyclists movement.
Bike Box - Source: City of Portland Separated Bike Lane with On-Street Parking - Source: NYCDOT

PROPOSED BICYCLE FACILITIES
PROPOSED BIKE LANES PROPOSED BIKE ROUTE PROPOSED OFF STREET TRAIL

LEGEND

EXISTING BICYCLE FACILITIES
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Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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E. 69TH ST. S. STONY ISLAND AV.
S. CORNELL AV.

E. 67TH PL.

E. 68TH ST.

E. 67TH ST. JACKSON PARK
BIKE BOX

E. 66TH PL.

E. 65TH PL.

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NEL

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BIKE LANDING

TO LAKEFRONT TRAIL

S. CORNELL AV.

Figure III-3: Bicycle Circulation Improvements

25

Driveway Delineation
There are numerous driveways along Stony Island Avenue that can cause potential conflict areas between bicycles and motorists. Pavement changes can occur across the bike lanes at driveways as a visual cue to the bicyclist to be aware of vehicles crossing their path.

Bicycle Lane Delineation, Source: San Francisco Bicycle Coalition

Typical Cross Section in Sub Area 2 (E. 76th Street to E. 69th Place) - Existing Condition View Looking North

Proposed Cross Section in Sub Area 2 (E. 76th Street to E. 69th Place) - Near Term View Looking North Figure III-4: Typical Near Term Cross Section - Sub Area 2

26

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
LONG TERM IMPROVEMENTS
Stony Island Avenue could be a regional attraction for cyclists by enhancing the bicycle facilities to include a bike lane along the curb which is separated from the travel lanes with a 15’ wide landscape planter, see Figure III-5. Where a parking lane would occur it would be between the bike lane and travel lane instead of against the curb. The parking lane would be separated from the bike lane with a painted 5’ buffer, that could incorporate flexible bollards. In addition, separate bicycle signals would be installed and programmed into the signal timing. Implementation of separated bike lanes will require evaluation of several functions of the roadway including: traffic patterns, travel lanes, maintenance, snow removal for the travel lanes and the bike lanes, as well as cost. The separated bike lanes could be constructed by maintaining the current pavement width and eliminating a lane of traffic or by widening the roadway pavement to maintain the current traffic lanes with the construction of the separated bike lanes. A traffic study would have to be performed to fully evaluate the pros and cons of each of these options. Construction of the Near Term bicycle improvements identified in the Master Plan would not preclude implementing separated bike lanes. Driveway removal off of Stony Island Avenue would increase the safety for cyclists by eliminating some conflict areas for cyclists and vehicles at driveways that would be removed. If existing or future parking lots can be accessed from side streets or alleys then driveways currently on Stony Island Avenue could be considered for removal. Bike signals are recommended for traffic signal modernization for all the signalized intersections along the corridor. To facilitate bike left turns at intersections from separated bike lanes, a bike left-turn lane with in-street bike detection could be considered, for left turning bikes to operate prior to the side street phase being called.
7400 RESIDENTIAL 7336 SUBWAY NORTHWEST INSURANCE COIN LAUNDRY BEAUTY SUPPLY HAROLD'S FRIED WINGS #1 CHOP SUEY DOLLARMARKET PLUS A+ CELLULAR WONDERBREAD

BUS STOP

E. 74TH ST.
T

E. 73RD PL.

7320 DUNMORE'S AUTO SALES

BUS STOP

15' WIDE LANDSCAPE PLANTER

10' PARKING LANE

5' BIKE BUFFER WITH DECORATIVE PAVEMENT 5' BIKE BUFFER WITH DECORATIVE PAVEMENT 10' PARKING LANE 15' WIDE LANDSCAPE PLANTER 10' BICYCLE LANE

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401 ERPRISE T-A-CAR

7351 MOSQUE MARYAM

Figure III-5: Separated Bike Lanes with Planters - Long Term Improvement

Community Bicycle Connectivity
With Stony Island Avenue identified as a north-south bike connector in the Master Plan it complements the existing bicycle network that serves the local community and regional bikeway facilities.

Simulation of Long Term Bicycle Improvements - Bike Lane Separated from Travel Lanes with Planter

Figure III-6: Bicycle Connections

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

27

SPATIAL RELATIONSHIP OF THE CORRIDOR
As one proceeds along Stony Island Avenue there are very few elements that visually entice an individual to move along the street, or that link the individual blocks or unique architecture to each other. The landscape medians are a positive consistent element along Stony Island Avenue that do visually lead someone along the corridor, however more is needed to enhance the spatial relationship of the corridor due to its width and current limited streetscape enhancements. Incorporating enhancements consistently along the corridor will create a sense of place and reinforce the experience provided from the constant rhythm created by the medians.

PRIMARY INTERSECTIONS (SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS)
• Enhanced crosswalks across Stony Island Avenue and side streets ◊ Widen from 6’ to 10’ ◊ Decorative crosswalk pavement • • • ADA curb ramp upgrades Upgrade pedestrian signals with countdown clock Replace standard luminaires and davit arms on combined traffic signal and street light poles with Gateway 2000 street luminaires. Refurbish existing signal support poles and mast arm assemblies. Encourage traffic signal modernization (TSM) in the future as part of other City improvements. New concrete sidewalks Driveway consolidation for driveways to close to intersections, if possible Curb extensions on side streets with optional flush planter Evaluate pedestrian actuation in medians as a Long Term improvement. The installation of the actuators in the medians would require CDOT approval Evaluate providing bike lane only signals at the major intersections such as E. 79th Street and E. 71st Street

PEDESTRIAN LINK TO RETAIL PARKING LOT FROM STREET
7530 JEWEL OSCO

5' WIDE PERMEABLE PAVER STRIP 1' WIDE CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY

7448 BP

REMOVE EXISTING CURB CUT
7444 POPEYE

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E. 75TH ST.

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Intersections
There are 19 intersections along Stony Island Avenue in the 1.6 mile project area, see Figure III-9. Differentiating some improvements between intersections will help to define a progression along the corridor. A differentiation can easily be made between Primary intersections and Secondary intersections. Primary intersections are signalized intersections and secondary are non-signalized intersections. Elements included in each intersection type include the following:

• • •

ENHANCED CROSSWALKS PEDESTRIAN SIGNAL

ADA CURB RAMP UPGRADES

S. STONY ISLAND AV.

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7505 NEW VISION DETOX PROGRAM

1543 FAMILY HEALTH CENTER

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CURB EXTENSION WITH OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER TO RECEIVE CROSSWALK

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7437 KFC LONG JOHN SILVER'S

Figure III-7: Primary Intersection Improvements

See Page 29 for Legend
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III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
SECONDARY INTERSECTIONS (UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS)
• Enhanced crosswalks across side streets
E. 75TH PL.

◊ Widen from 6’ to 10’ ◊ Decorative crosswalk pavement on side streets only • • • • • • Maintain existing painted crosswalks across Stony Island Avenue ADA curb ramp upgrades HAWK or rapid flash beacons at high volume unsignalized intersections, such as E. 74th Street New concrete sidewalks Curb extensions on select one-way side streets Diagonal parking could be considered on side streets with one-way traffic to increase available on street parking Driveway consolidation if possible

POTENTIAL DIAGONAL PARKING

INSTALL CURB EXTENSIONS WITH OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER ON SIDE STREETS ENHANCED CROSSWALK

Gateways
Gateways to the Stony Island Avenue focus area are easily defined on the north at E. 67th Street, where Jackson Park begins, and on the south at the E. 79th Street/S. Chicago Avenue intersection. The existing physical attributes of both these intersections makes a unique statement as one enters and exits them along the corridor. Both intersections create a unique backdrop for community identity improvements. Gateway improvements at E. 67th Street must respect the historical significance of Jackson Park and Frederick Law Olmsted’s design philosophy. Community identity elements or landscape improvements should not be incorporated within Jackson Park. In addition, to the demarcation of north and south gateways along Stony Island Avenue, there are two other gateways identified along the corridor. E. 71st Street is a noteworthy east-west corridor, that extends from the South Shore Country Club and South Shore community along the lake on the east, past Stony Island Avenue and further west through the City. A Master Plan for E.71st Street has been developed by the City, and is currently being implemented. The intersection of Stony Island Avenue and E. 71st Street is a significant gateway for both corridors. Gateway improvements at E. 71st Street need to address proposed improvements identified in the 71st Street Master Plan while incorporating community identity elements for Stony Island Avenue. A fourth gateway location along Stony Island Avenue is identified by the change in scale from Stony Island Avenue to the ramps rising up to the Chicago Skyway. Placement of a gateway at E. 76th Street acknowledges the unique change in scale along the corridor.

ADA CURB RAMP UPGRADES

MAINTAIN EXISTING PAINTED CROSSWALKS

S. STONY ISLAND AV.

LEGEND
PRIMARY INTERSECTION
7531 JACKSON PARK HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER

SECONDARY INTERSECTION COMMUNITY GATEWAY BUS STOP

Figure III-8: Secondary Intersection Improvements
0

BUS STOP WITH SHELTER SIGNALIZED INTERSECTION
150 300 600 NORTH

METRA ELECTRIC DISTRICT STONY ISLAND STATION
E. MARQUETTE RD.

E. 71ST ST.

E. 72ND ST.

E. 70TH ST.

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

E. 72ND PL.
S. STONY ISLAND AV.

E. 71ST PL.
S. CORNELL AV.

E. 69TH PL.

E. 69TH ST. S. STONY ISLAND AV.
S. CORNELL AV.

E. 67TH PL.

E. 68TH ST.

Figure III-9: Intersection and Gateway Improvements

E. 67TH ST. JACKSON PARK
COR NEL LD R.

E. 66TH PL.

29

E. 65TH PL.

The preferred location for gateway improvements along Stony Island Avenue north of E. 79th Street is in the existing landscape medians because of the available space. Care must be given that placement of improvements in the median must not interfere with sight distance for vehicles. Sight distance analysis defines a clear zone that allows a motorist to see oncoming traffic, unobstructed, to be able to safely maneuver through an intersection. It is typically performed for intersections where there is no signal control. Sight distance must be evaluated for each gateway median location based on the existing 45 mph speed limit.

outside “local” lanes. This configuration may encourage hasty starts and erratic lane selection as anxious drivers departing from the congested conditions under the narrow viaduct enter more free flowing traffic conditions.

Future improvements to the E. 79th Street intersection should minimize the pedestrian, bicyclist and vehicular conflict areas by reducing the amount of lanes necessary to efficiently carry vehicular traffic through the intersection. Any improvements can only be implemented after a thorough traffic study evaluates the intersection. The Master Plan identifies a progression of improvements to the intersection. The improvements make minimal impact on vehicular accessibility while significantly enhancing pedestrian and cyclists’ facilities. The Near Term improvements that modify the roadway are located primarily along the east side of the northbound lanes and can be implemented with minor adjustments to accessing

existing businesses. The Long Term roadway improvements are focused on the southbound lanes and would primarily be implemented through redevelopment of the contiguous property. Figure III-10 illustrates the evolution of improvements for the E. 79th Street intersection from existing conditions to Long Term.

E. 79TH STREET INTERSECTION
The E. 79th Street/South Chicago Avenue and Stony Island Avenue intersection has one of the highest crash totals in the City. The six leg configuration with both local and express lanes, Skyway ramps and long intersection crossings all contribute to the safety problems at the intersection. Proposed improvements to the intersection are included in the Stony Island Avenue Master Plan because the E. 79th Street/South Chicago Avenue and Stony Island Avenue intersection is a gateway to the community; and as a gateway, this intersection is uninviting because the functional movement through the intersection is challenging for motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists. There is a perceived confusion at the intersection due to the multiple approaches and the intersection is complicated with the visual clutter of the Skyway infrastructure towering above, the Skyway ramps landing and ascending within the outer limits of the intersection and the constriction caused by the narrow railroad viaduct over the south leg. Stony Island Avenue lanes north of this intersection add another layer of confusion to the movements. North and south bound traffic have two sets of lanes approaching, continuing through, and departing from the intersection. Lanes for each direction are located between the Skyway ramps as well as on either side of the ramps; which means as southbound traffic along Stony Island Avenue approaches the intersection it can be on the “local” lanes (west of the Skyway ramps) that allow for right turns and through movement or on the lanes between the ramps that allow for left turns and through traffic. The same configuration exists for northbound traffic. The railroad viaduct across the south leg adds another level of confusion. The number of through lanes changes from two in each direction under the viaduct to three for southbound traffic and four for northbound traffic. Just south of the intersection drivers in the inside set of southbound lanes are confronted by drivers merging from the outside “local” through lane. Just north of the intersection, northbound drivers are presented with two inside through lanes and two

View looking east of Skyway Ramps over the Intersection of Stony Island Avenue, E. 79th Street and S. Chicago Avenue

SOUTHBOUND FRONTAGE ROAD

A specific concern to be addressed by the Master Plan is to improve the safety of the intersection. The safety can be addressed by simplifying the lanes and turning movements for motorists and bicycles while minimizing the length of crosswalks for pedestrians. Bus stops are located on the near side and far side of the intersection which is an indication that the intersection is difficult to traverse for pedestrians. The current length of several crosswalks are too long for a pedestrian to cross from one side to the other without stopping at medians, especially across the northern leg of the intersection. A pedestrian traveling along S. Chicago Avenue would cross thirteen (13) lanes of traffic to continue walking along the north side of S. Chicago Avenue. The intersection is supported with countdown pedestrian signals; however it is not enough to make the intersection comfortable for pedestrians.

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SLIP RAMP

E. 79TH ST.

79TH ST. GRILL

View Looking North Along Stony Island Avenue Between the Skyway Ramps

EXISTING CONDITION

30

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES

MODIFY SOUTHBOUND FRONTAGE ROAD TO ONE LANE AND ADD BIKE LANE

CONVERT SOUTHBOUND FRONTAGE ROAD INTO GREEN SPACE AND PEDESTRIAN AREA

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DECORATIVE PAVEMENT IN MEDIAN UNDER SKYWAY RAMP

EXTEND SIDEWALK AND SHORTEN CROSSWALK AREAS

. Y ISLAND AV TO NB STON P M A R 4 9 IWB
7900 FELLOWSHIP HALL DR. CONNER 1600 FIFTH THIRD BANK

ND ONY ISLA TO NB ST P M A R 4 B I-9
7900 FELLOWSHIP HALL DR. CONNER

AV.

1600 FIFTH THIRD BANK

ELIMINATE SLIP RAMP

79TH ST. GRILL

NARROW FRONTAGE ROAD TO ONE LANE, ADD BIKE LANE AND WIDEN EXISTING SIDEWALK

79TH ST. GRILL

NEAR TERM IMPROVEMENTS

LONG TERM IMPROVEMENTS
Figure III-10: E. 79th Street Intersection Phased Improvements

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Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

E. 79TH ST.

31

NEAR TERM
Improvements that should be consider for Near Term improvements to the E. 79th Street intersection include: 1. A frontage road along the east side of Stony Island Avenue is proposed to replace the function of the northbound local lanes. The frontage road should accommodate a bike lane and a curbside parking lane. The entrance to this frontage road would be from Stony Island Avenue, under the Skyway exit ramp, north of E. 79th Street. The local road leg at the intersection proper would be eliminated to discourage through traffic from using the frontage road and provide additional space for pedestrians, bicyclists, and streetscape amenities. While a bus/ bikeway would be desirable along this segment of

the frontage road, it will need to be open to general traffic to serve adjacent land uses, and provide access to E. 77th and E. 78th Streets. The typical section of the frontage road would consist of a 8’ parking lane, a 6’ bike lane, and a 11’ through lane. 2. At the north end of the frontage road the twin entrance/exit driveways to the Jackson Park Hospital parking lot should be reconfigured. The entrance could remain as is but the exit should be relocated to the northeast corner of the lot to exit on to E. 76th Street. The alley just east of Stony Island Avenue could be used as the exit driveway. In addition a shared right turn/bike lane should be provided at the south leg of the E. 76th Street intersection.

3. On the west side of Stony Island Avenue, a phased implementation is proposed for the southbound local lanes. For the Near Term the proposal is to restripe the pavement to provide a standard width inside through lane and convert the wide outside travel/parking lane to a curbside parking lane with an adjacent bike lane. At the approach to the S. Chicago Avenue intersection, the existing right turn lane would be maintained, the bike lane would cross over the inside lane and end at S. Chicago Avenue, the outside right turn lane would allow for through traffic only for CTA busses. 4. The signal phases used for the E. 79th Street/S. Chicago Avenue intersection for the northbound and southbound lanes should allow for through traffic to move before left turns from Stony Island Avenue, if an acceptable level of service can be provided. By

allowing the through lanes to move first the pedestrian will receive a walk light when the through lanes move, instead of a delayed walk light after the left turn lanes have moved. 5. Traffic signal modernization plans should consider clearance times for bicyclists, not just motorists. It is likely additional clearance time will be needed, given the distance a cyclist needs to travel to cross this complex intersection. Bike signals are to be recommended for traffic signal modernization at this intersection for the Near Term improvements.

ADD "SHARROW" BICYCLE PAVEMENT MARKING ALONG E. 77TH STREET AND S. HARPER AVENUE.

CONVERT 2-LANE FRONTAGE ROAD TO SINGLE LANE WITH BIKE LANE ADJACENT TO TRAFFIC LANE. SOUTHBOUND: TRANSITION OUTSIDE LANE AS EXIT ONLY TO E. 77TH ST./S. HARPER AVE. BIKE LANE TRANSITIONS FROM OUTSIDE OF PARKING LANE TO BUFFERED AT CURBSIDE. BUFFER ISLANDS TO BE PAINTED OR CURBED.

AV .

S. CH IC AG O

S. HARPER AVE.
CONVERT SOUTHBOUND FRONTAGE ROAD TO 12' TRAVEL LANE WITH CURSIDE PARKING AND BIKE LANE. TRANSITION BIKE LANE TO INSIDE LANE BEFORE INTERSECTION WHILE ELIMINATING PARKING

E. 77TH ST.
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E. 76TH PL.

E. 75TH PL.

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ELIMINATE SLIP RAMP CONFIGURATION TO REPLACE ISLAND WITH COHESIVE PEDESTRIAN ORIENTED CORNER.

ELIMINATE DIRECT ENTRANCE TO FRONTAGE ROAD. RECONFIGURE BANK DRIVEWAYS. PROVIDE SLIP RAMP ENTRANCE TO FRONTAGE ROAD.

NARROW NORTHBOUND FRONTAGE ROAD. CONVERT TO SINGLE LANE WITH BIKE LANE AND ON-STREET PARKING.

ONE - HALF BLOCK TRIAL CONVERSION IN BOTH DIRECTIONS TO BUFFERED BIKE LANE WITH PARKING.

E. 79TH ST.

PAVEMENT MARKING CHANGES IN BOTH DIRECTIONS TO INCLUDE PAINTED BUFFER, BIKE LANE, PARKING LANE AND THROUGH LANES.

RELOCATE FRONTAGE ROAD OUTSIDE CURB TO IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN EXPERIENCE AND FURTHER SEPARATE LAND USES FROM VEHICLE TRAVEL WAY. RELOCATE BUS STOP 1 2 BLOCK NORTH. PROVIDE PEDESTRIAN/BIKE PATH CONNECTION BETWEEN E. 79TH ST. AND FRONTAGE ROAD.

TRANSITIONS FROM OUTSIDE OF PARKING LANE TO BUFFERED AT CURB SIDE. ISLANDS TO BE PAINTED OR CURBED

S. CORNELL AV.

Figure III-11: E. 79th Street Intersection Improvements - Near Term

32

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES

Typical Cross Section in Sub Area 1 (E. 79th Street to E. 76th Street) - Existing Condition View Looking North

Proposed Cross Section in Sub Area 1 (E. 79th Street to E. 76th Street) - Near Term View Looking North Figure III-12: Typical Cross Section - Sub Area 1

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

33

LONG TERM
Implementation of the ultimate Long Term improvement is based upon the timing of future redevelopment of the parcels at the northwest corner of Stony Island Avenue and South Chicago Avenue. 1. Assuming redevelopment will occur in the mid to long term the southbound frontage road is proposed to be eliminated and replaced with a meandering pedestrian path. The area adjacent to the path could be developed as a linear park which could be designed to include a farmer’s market or sculpture garden. 2. The meandering design of the path is intended to discourage use by bicyclists. Southbound bicyclist would be accommodated on a proposed on street bike route along E. 77th Street and through the redeveloped area along S. Harper Avenue.

3. It is assumed that a traffic signal would be installed on S. Chicago Avenue at or near S. Harper Avenue when the parcels are redeveloped. This new signalized intersection should be designed to accommodate southbound bicyclist as they would be turning onto the bike lanes along South Chicago Avenue.

Existing Southbound Frontage Road
GO S K YW AY

Simulation of transforming the Southbound Frontage Road to a Greenspace with a Pedestrian Trail

S. BLACKSTONE AV.

S. BLACKSTONE AVE.
POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT AREA STREET NETWORK COULD CHANGE BASED UPON DEVELOPMENT PLAN. ADD "SHARROW" BICYCLE PAVEMENT MARKING ALONG E. 77TH STREET

NEW TRAFFIC SIGNAL AT S. HARPER AVE. OR S. BLACKSTONE AVE. OR ALIGNED WITH OPPOSITE SIDE DRIVEWAY.

S. CH IC AG O

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IMPROVE S. HARPER AVE. OR S. BLACKSTONE AVE. AS CONNECTION BETWEEN SOUTHBOUND STONY ISLAND AVE. AND S. CHICAGO AVE.

S. HARPER AVE.

AS AN OPTION, PROVIDE TURNING ROADWAY AND CORNER ISLAND ONLY IF REQUIRED FOR SAFE INTERSECTION OPERATION.

EITHER RELOCATE BUS STOP TO E. 76TH ST. OR ALTER BUS ROUTE THROUGH REDEVELOPED AREA.

E. 77TH ST.

E. 76TH ST.

FRONTAGE ROAD CONVERTED TO GREENSPACE WITH PEDESTRIAN PATH.

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Figure III-13: E. 79th Street Intersection Improvements - Long Term

34

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
Community Identifiers
Every community has its own distinct traditions, values, and norms that help make up its collective identity. The more inclusive and stronger that identity becomes the more local citizens will be encourage to take pride in, and to take part in that community. Therefore, as part of the streetscape master plan, proposals have been made for “Community identifiers” to assist in enhancing the visual identity of the community. Stony Island Avenue already has a strong identity. The Skyway and its ramps and the Stony Island Avenue’s expansive width introduce a memorable regional scale into the surrounding city fabric. The challenge in accentuating this identity is to design enhancements that could represent the community and address the roadways extensive width, while acknowledging the dramatic change in scale from the towering ramps of the Skyway to the intimate park setting of historic Jackson Park. Figure III-14 illustrates the preferred locations for community identifiers. The community identifiers therefore have to address a hierarchy of scales. After considerable examination two themes emerged for the study of the Avenue and its immediate environment. One was inspired by nature and the history of the area and the second evolved as a response to man-made structures that influence the function and identity of the corridor. Chicago. The original Stony Island was a rocky outcropping that stretched for over a mile between Stony Island Avenue (1600 east) and Kingston Avenue (2500 east), from E. 91st Street to E. 94th Street. It began as a coral reef on the floor of a great inland sea that was covered with subsequent layers of limestone. It survived the abrasions of the glacial age to stand 20 to 25 feet above the surrounding plain. It appeared to early settlers as an island because it stood out in contrast to the surrounding undulating prairie. Two quarries later reduced its size and the remainder was razed to make way for development. outcroppings should be located adjacent to the Skyway ramps and at the community gateway intersections, with smaller outcroppings elsewhere on the corridor. These features will be planted to complement the existing landscape medians and to add color at the most highly visible locations. They will be sited to minimize disruption to the existing mature plant material and to preserve safe sight-lines for both motorists and pedestrians.

Limestone rock formation at Stony Island - Source “The 1902 Chicago Folio, U.S. Geological Survey, Geologic Atlas of the United States, Number 81.

NATURAL REPRESENTATION
The Master Plan commemorates and celebrates this distinguished history by representing it in symbolic form. The existing wide median islands provide a unique canvas for large-scale planters that would be reminiscent of the original rock outcroppings. Care must be taken to interpret this original form for contemporary urban conditions. They should represent quarried stone walls projecting upwards from the ground, balancing both the natural and mademade and vary in scale, reflecting the hierarchy of scales expressed on the Avenue, see Figure III-15. The larger urban

View of quarry at Stony Island - Source “The 1902 Chicago Folio, U.S. Geological Survey, Geologic Atlas of the United States, Number 81.

LEGEND
REGIONAL GATEWAY COMMUNITY GATEWAY

HISTORY OF STONY ISLAND
All communities change over time but this area has an enduring historical importance. Within the name Stony Island there is a reference to an extraordinary ancient geologic history as well as the early history of settlement in
O SK YW AY
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Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

EAST END AV.

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MOSQUE MARYAM
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S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

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Figure III-14: Gateways and Community Identifiers

35

Existing Conditions - View Looking Southwest from the Northeast Corner (Jackson Park Hospital) of the E. 76th Street Intersection

Existing Conditions - View Looking North toward E. 71st Street Intersection from Northbound Lanes

Simulation of Large Uprising Stone Planter in Median with Additional Streetscape Elements

Simulation of Small Uprising Stone Planters Located in the Medians on Both Sides of E. 71st Street.

Figure III-15: Symbolic Outcropping Planters - Community Identifiers

36

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
Challenges to enhancing the E. 71st Street intersection include the large metal railroad control cabinets located in the middle of the intersection. Relocation of the cabinets out of the intersection is unforeseen in the near or long term future. By improving the hard surface that encompasses the controllers, the railroad gates and the tracks to a clean and consistent pavement the aesthetic of this area would be improved. In addition, adding a new coat of paint on the controller boxes, that is a consistent color will also improve the appearance. As proposed in the E. 71st Street Master Plan, planters could also be considered to be installed along the east-west curbs of the median.

RECOGNITION AND MEDIATION OF REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE
In contrast to the history of natural features, the structures of the Skyway and railroad represent a larger context in which to view Stony Island Avenue. They are visual reminders of our connection to a national system of transportation and act as entryways to the city of Chicago as well as the neighborhoods. Their impressive scale however, can overshadow more local activities. Therefore it is necessary to find a balance between the regional and local scales. The Chicago Skyway ramps extend over the E. 79th Street/S. Chicago Avenue/Stony Island Avenue intersection and swoop down into Stony Island Avenue. This intersection is visually cluttered with multiple lane approaches and dissected by the supporting structure of the ramps overhead. The recommended treatment for the structure and this intersection seeks to reduce confusion, increase safety and make the environment more pedestrian friendly while using the Skyway structure as a supportive backdrop. The pedestrian experience and safety will be enhanced by providing colored crosswalks, enlarged pedestrian islands and enhanced lighting. Designated bike lanes will reduce the impact and scale of the frontage roads. In addition, the visual impact of the Skyway structure will be mediated by adding colored columns and lights giving it a more cheerful countenance. A transparent LED curtain, hanging independently between the structural supports, will provide a canvas that could be lit with different colors and patterns, see Figure III-16. These transparent screens will not only add interest but also reduce visual clutter while allowing sufficient sight lines for safety. They will allow a clearer visual distinction between the travel lanes that extend through the Skyway ramps and the frontage roads. The planting along the median on Stony Island Avenue will extend further into the intersection from the north and stone pavers will add interest under the ramps.

Existing Conditions - View Looking North at the E. 79st Street Intersection at the Support Infrastructure for the Chicago Skyway Ramps

Intersection of Stony Island Avenue and E. 71st Street and Railroad Utility Cabinets in Center median

Northeast Corner of the Intersection of Stony Island Avenue and Cornell Drive, with lawn damage from pedestrian traffic

Additional improvements should be considered at the E. 67th Street intersection to complement the urban outcropping and correct an existing concern at this intersection. The southern end of the median that separates Stony Island Avenue and Cornell Drive is trampled by pedestrian traffic. Paths have been worn in the existing lawn, that have left dirt trails. This particular location is the very southwest corner of Jackson Park and sensitivity to the design philosophy of Jackson Park is of utmost importance. Enhancing this point with acceptable paving improvements that supported the pedestrian movements would enhance an important location in Jackson Park, and eliminate it’s current negative appearance.

Simulation of an LED Curtain Supported under the Skyway Ramps. The LED Curtain Helps to Minimize the Visual Clutter of Viewing through to Multiple Travel Lanes under the Ramps.

Figure III-16: LED Curtain under Skyway Ramps - Community Identifiers

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

37

Streetscape Elements
The introduction of street trees, decorative street lights, and other streetscape elements in a logical rhythm along both sides of the corridor along with the sitting of the Community Identifiers will provide an overall continuity for the corridor, joining its disparate elements into a coordinated whole.

SIGHT DISTANCE CLEAR ZONE
As additional amenities such as community identity enhancements are incorporated into the landscape median, it is necessary that the placement of those improvements do not interfere with the ability for motorists, bicyclists and pedestrian to see oncoming traffic around the median. Sight visibility is important at every intersection. Intersections that have no signal control have an added concern since there is no protection for movement to cross the road. An intersection sight distance evaluation was conducted to determine the areas in the center median along Stony Island Avenue where landscaping and community identifier enhancements can be placed without blocking sight lines for motorists. The intersection sight distance is the length of roadway required for a vehicle to accelerate from a stop condition and complete a full turn without forcing major roadway travel speeds to decrease by more than 30%.

Clear zones have been defined that provide sufficient sight lines along the corridor. It is within these sight lines that the median plus any enhancements, including plant material, must be less than 3.5 feet in height – the height at which vehicles can recognize other vehicles. Figure III-17 illustrates a typical clear zone for an unsignalized intersection.

Public Art
Stony Island Avenue is unusually suited for the outdoor display of public art. The scale of the medians, the cultural heritage of the surrounding communities and the fact that Stony Island Avenue is an important entryway to the City, all suggest it as a location for the display of large-scale public art. The creation of an integrated linear gallery would require a comprehensive framework for incorporating art in the urban environment which is beyond the scope of this plan, but mention of this concept is incorporated here as a reminder of the Avenue’s potential as a significant cultural and artistic asset to the communities along its length and to the City itself.

Uprising Stone Planters Could be a “Stage” for the Presentation of Public Art Sculptures

CLEAR ZONE
14.4'

14.4'

E. 72ND PL.

E. 72ND ST.

7222 BURGER KING 7208 PROGRESSIVE FUNERAL PARLOR 1539 APARTMENTS

7158 MOO AND OINK

490'

CLEAR ZONE

490'

S. STONY ISLAND AV.

7241 7243

7239 APARTMENTS

7237

7233

7211 QUALITY HAND CAR WASH

Images Could be Incorporated into the LED Curtain During Events in the Community

7145 CITY CLEANERS

7141 APARTMENTS

Figure III-17: Sight Distance Evaluation for Community Identifiers

38

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
Streetscape Elements
The streetscape elements are what add detail and enhance the character of a streetscape. The details of certain elements may only be perceived by pedestrians, however the combined rhythm of the placement of the streetscape elements, along the corridor, is apparent by everyone that travels along the corridor. This section identifies the streetscape elements to be incorporated into Stony Island Avenue. lights can be assumed to be 100’ to 150’ on center, with the actual spacing to be determined in the detail design of the streetscape. The street lights would be installed on both sides of the travel lanes opposite each other. For Stony Island Avenue the opposite side of the travel lanes would actually be along the median for northbound and southbound traffic. Along the roadway section between the Skyway ramps, where the median narrows, a double mast arm street light assembly would be recommended to provided adequate lighting.

STREET LIGHTS
There are two types of street lights that would be introduced to Stony Island Avenue. One is a decorative roadway street light that provides the lighting that creates a safe roadway for motorists and bicycles, and safe sidewalks for pedestrians. The Chicago Gateway 2000 light fixture is a decorative roadway street light that the City of Chicago has identified in the City of Chicago Street Light Master Plan as the street light to be used when upgrading street lights for streetscape projects. The Chicago Gateway 2000 street lights are high mast lights that provide lighting for the roadway as well as sidewalk areas. The street light poles have a decorative 34’ support pole and decorative mast arm with a tear drop luminaire. The finish for the street light is black to complement other streetscape elements. The spacing for the Chicago Gateway 2000
Standard Streetscape Bench - Source: CDOT

Chicago Gateway 2000 and Single Acorn Street Lights - Source: CDOT

The Chicago Single Acorn street light is the second type of street light that provides ambiance in accentuating the pedestrian scale of the streetscape. The height of the Chicago Single Acorn is approximately 16’ and has a decorative support pole. The lower height of the Chicago Single Acorn allows the decorative Acorn luminaire to provide additional light for sidewalk areas; these lights are not used to supplement lighting for the roadway. A single Chicago Single Acorn light would be spaced between the Chicago Gateway 2000 lights along the sidewalks on the east and west side of Stony Island Avenue and not between the Chicago Gateway 2000 lights in the median. However, it is recommended a Single Acorn light is placed at each sidewalk in the median at crosswalks to enhance the pedestrian scale in the middle of the roadway.

Chicago Gateway 2000 Street Light with Double Mast Arm, Source: CDOT

STREET FURNITURE
Street furniture can increase the function and aesthetics of pedestrian areas. Along Stony Island Avenue the scale of the roadway does not lend itself to a random placement of benches and other street furniture to develop public seating areas where pedestrians would stop and sit and enjoy the day watching traffic and people. Stony Island Avenue is however very populated with bus stops. There are approximately 48 bus stops along Stony Island Avenue and immediately along the side streets. The bus shelters have a built-in bench but bus shelters are not located at each stop. Benches and trash receptacles should be located at each bus stop. The City of Chicago Streetscape Guidelines identifies a preferred palette of street furniture.
Standard Streetscape Trash Receptacle - Source: CDOT

Chicago Gateway 2000 and Single Acorn Street Lights Source: CDOT

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

39

LANDSCAPE ENHANCEMENTS
The introduction of landscape enhancements, such as street trees, planters and parkway lawns, in a streetscape aids to the sustainability of the streetscape by minimizing the “urban heat island effect”. Adding vegetation to an urban area helps clean and cool the air. The shade from trees lowers the temperature under their canopy along the streets, which in turn helps to provide a more pleasant environment for pedestrians.

grate there is no additional landscape areas, such as lawn or planters that require maintenance. A concern for the use of tree grates is that the tree root exposure to rain and air is limited to the 5’x5’ grate. To increase the exposure of the tree’s root system as it matures, permeable pavers are proposed to be installed between tree grates. Permeable pavers are pavers that allow for absorption of rain water through the pavement surface into the subgrade. The absorption of the rainwater adds air and water to the street tree root system while removing a portion of rain water from the existing storm sewer that is over capacity. The permeable pavers should be dark rich pigments that add color to the streetscape. Additional improvements that can aid in the future health of the street trees is to include structural soils with the reconstruction of the sidewalks around the street trees, under the permeable pavers as well as the concrete sidewalk. Structural soils are engineered to accommodate compaction requirements for paved surfaces while allowing tree root penetration under the pavement.

Private Streetscape Landscape Improvements
As redevelopment or site improvements occur through the actions of private developers/land owners there are landscape improvements that are identified in the Chicago Landscape Ordinance that will further enhance the Stony Island Streetscape. The Chicago Landscape Ordinance requires that all parking lots located against the public right-of-way provide a landscape buffer to soften the look of the parking field from the street. Some properties such as Starbucks, at the E. 71st Street intersection have installed a landscape buffer when the site was redeveloped. The intent of the Landscape Ordinance is to also have existing non-conforming sites to retrofit the landscape improvements on their site. The original schedule for the retrofits within the City of Chicago was to be completed in 2008.

Crosswalks
The Master Plan identifies decorative crosswalks for side streets as well as at signalized (primary) intersections. The City of Chicago primarily uses colored, stamped asphalt to highlight crosswalks within streetscape projects as an approved standard. Alternate materials may be acceptable based upon testing by the City such as decorative thermoplastic pavement markings.

Street Trees
The medians are well planted with trees, shrubs and lawn which enhance the sustainability and aesthetics of the corridor, however the street trees that seem to sporadically dot the sidewalks of Stony Island Avenue do not have the same affect. Street trees should be spaced approximately 25’ on center for the entire length of the corridor.

HARDSCAPE Sidewalks
The walking surface for pedestrians must be smooth and free of obstructions. Scored concrete sidewalks provide a clean ground plane for a streetscape that do not visually conflict with ADA requirements for curb ramps at corners. Interest can be added to the sidewalk with the introduction of a varied scoring pattern that reflects the placement of streetscape elements such as tree grates and street light poles. In addition, decorative paving materials could be incorporated to add more interest to the sidewalk. The permeable pavers proposed between street tree grates not only aid in the heath of the trees and sustainability of the streetscape it also accents the sidewalk with a wide paverband adjacent to the 1’ carriage way and curb.
Colored, Stamped Asphalt, approved City Standard for Decorative Crosswalks

Curb Extension Planters
An optional landscape enhancement to be introduced to Stony Island Avenue is a planter in the proposed curb extensions. Curbed planters could be constructed in curb extensions if a maintenance agreement is developed with the community to maintain the proposed plant material. Curbed planters offer an opportunity not to just plant street trees but they allow a location that shrubs, perennials, and annuals can color the community. Irrigation is installed in planters by the City to aid in sustaining the plant material.

Street Tree in Tree Pit with Tree Grate - Source: CDOT

Currently the street trees along Stony Island Avenue are installed using methods ranging from parkway lawn areas to tree grates. Parkway lawns soften the visual affect of the immense pavement spanning across Stony Island Avenue. Where parkways with street trees are currently being maintained in good condition, the parkways should be maintained and a carriage walk added to protect the parkway adjacent to the curb. For areas without maintained parkway lawns, the harsh urban conditions and the potential limited maintenance define a tree pit with tree grate as the preferred type of street tree installation. The tree pit opening would be 5’ x 5’ fitted with cast or ductile iron tree grate that has an ADA acceptable walking surface. With the use of a tree

Thermoplastic Crosswalk Application, Source: Integrated Paving Concepts

Curb Extension with Planter - Source: CDOT

Permeable Pavers Between Tree Grates with Carriage Way - Source: CDOT

40

III. CORRIDOR DESIGN GUIDELINES
Driveways
The numerous driveways along Stony Island Avenue affect pedestrian safety. Consolidation or elimination of driveways will minimize pedestrian/vehicular and cyclist conflicts. Sidewalks should continue through driveways providing a pedestrian surface and not change the pavement to a vehicular surface such as asphalt. The numerous driveways also affect the rhythm of the placement of streetscape elements. The placement of the streetscape elements must be responsive to the movement of traffic in a out of the driveways, by providing adequate clearance from the driveway.

Environmental Graphics
Banners currently are installed along Stony Island Avenue on the existing light poles. Maintaining a banner program for the corridor will enhance the community identity. Providing a program that installs banners on Gateway 2000 street lights at the gateway locations and additional key areas along the corridor will maximize the visibility of the banners while not visually cluttering the corridor with banners on every street light pole.

WELCOMING PEDESTRIAN STREETSCAPE
With the future development of streetscape improvements along Stony Island the presence of the development to pedestrians on the street must be considered. Recent developments along Stony Island Avenue have installed and maintained streetscape landscape buffers that are required in the City of Chicago Zoning and Landscape Ordinance, but at the detriment to a welcoming presence along Stony Island Avenue. Front doors to establishments should have a welcoming presence and accessibility from the street. Several developments actually inhibit easy access from Stony Island Avenue by pedestrians, and by doing so present an uninviting streetscape presence.

SIGNAGE
There are several types of signage along Stony Island Avenue ranging from traffic control to environmental graphics such as banners located on street lights.

Traffic Control Signage
Future improvements along Stony Island Avenue will require traffic control signage to direct the flow of traffic per the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), additional considerations for traffic control signage include: • Adequate signage to alert motorists and cyclists to the bicycle facilities and movements along the corridor Placement of signage for ease of visibility by the motorists Installation of sign supports that complement the aesthetics of the streetscape Street name sign blades that are readable to motorists traveling along the corridor I-90 Route shield horizontal pavement markings on Stony Island Avenue to delineate lane for southbound I-90
Chicago Gateway 2000 with Banner - Source: CDOT

Sidewalk Presence of Business Minimized by Fencing

• • • •

Uninviting Pedestrian Access to Business

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

41

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STONY ISLAND AVENUE STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN

IV. IMPLEMENTATION

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

The extent of the proposed improvements for pedestrians and cyclists can be easier understood with cross sections that illustrate the scale of Stony Island Avenue and the relationship of pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles within the proposed improvements. Figures IV-1 thru IV-3 represent typical cross sections for each of the three subareas In development of the Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan, the specific design elements, where applicable, have been identified as Near and/or Long Term improvements. The Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan Near Term improvements are identified on the block-by-block Master Plan, Figures IV-4 thru IV-8.

IV. IMPLEMENTATION
As identified in the Master Plan, Stony Island Avenue presents some unique issues due to its size and function that control streetscape options that are implementable for the roadway. Therefore as the Master Plan evaluates implementation of streetscape enhancements for Stony Island Avenue, Near Term improvements focus on recommendations maintaining the existing curb alignment and sidewalk areas. Modifications to the location of the curb to widen the sidewalks for streetscape improvements and reduce the amount of roadway pavement are perceived as the Long Term improvements. Modifications to the roadway pavement width or reduction in traffic lanes will require a significant traffic analysis of the corridor to fully understand the implications of such improvements. Phasing for many of the proposed streetscape improvements along the corridor will primarily be defined by redevelopment interests and activities. However, improvements such as decorative street lights can not reasonably be installed with development on a parcel by parcel basis, unless the proposed property incorporates a block or several blocks. Typical streetscape element improvements associated with redevelopment can address sidewalk pavement, street trees, driveway improvements as well as provide for the required landscape buffers that would be located on private property as required by the Chicago’s Landscape Ordinance.

44

IV. IMPLEMENTATION

RELOCATE CURB TO PERMIT A MINIMUM 10' SI

OFF-STREET PARKING, AS NECESSARY OF OFF-STREET PARKING DUE TO WID

7753 VACANT

7744 VACANT

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

8' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

CROSS SECTION

LED CURTAIN, COMMUNITY IDENTIFER ENHANCEMENT

GATEWAY 2000 STREET WITH DUAL MAST ARMS

Typical Cross Section in Sub Area 1 (E. 79th Street to E. 76th Street) - Existing Condition View Looking North

8' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE

7739 PRAYER MISSION
STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP. STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

E. 78TH ST.

NORTH

Plan View: Location of Cross Section

Proposed Cross Section in Sub Area 1 (E. 79th Street to E. 76th Street) - Near Term View Looking North Figure IV-1: Typical Cross Section - Sub Area 1

45

E. 74TH ST.

46

E. 74TH PL.
NORTH

RECONSTRUCT DRIVEWAY TO MEET CITY OFFSET FROM INTERSECTION REQUIREMENTS, TYP.

7418 CAR-X

7416

7410 ROSECO AUTO BUILDERS

7400 RESIDENTIAL

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

Typical Cross Section in Sub Area 2 (E. 76th Street to E. 69th Place) - Existing Condition View Looking North

CROSS SECTION

UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

7' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE/3'BIKE LANE BUFFER

BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP.

T

7401 MIDAS AUTO SERVICE

7401 VACANT/OFFICE

7401 ENTERPRISE RENT-A-CAR
EXIS

Plan View: Location of Cross Section

Proposed Cross Section in Sub Area 2 (E. 76th Street to E. 69th Place) - Near Term View Looking North Figure IV-2: Typical Cross Section - Sub Area 2

IV. IMPLEMENTATION

6714

E. 67TH PL.
8' CURB ION, TYP GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP. LANE

PIZZA HUT

SEE THRU YALE CURRENCY CHINEESE SUBWAY INSURANCE EXCHANGE KITCHEN
MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP. TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP.

E. 67TH ST.

T

6' BIKE LANE/3' -8' BIKE BUFFER

MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN, TYP. STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

REPLACE STANDARD LUMINARIES AND DAVIT ARMS WITH GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHTS, TYPICAL ON ALL COMBINED STREET LIGHT TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLES

Typical Cross Section in Sub Area 3 (E. 69th Place to E. Marquette Road) - Existing Condition View Looking North

CROSS SECTION

6' BICYCLE ONLY RIGHT TURN LANE UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

BIKE BOX

COR
NORTH

T

Plan View: Location of Cross Section

Proposed Cross Section in Sub Area 3 (E. 69th Place to E. Marquette Road) - Near Term View Looking North Figure IV-3: Typical Cross Section - Sub Area 3

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

47

R.

R.

CH IC AG O

HE

1550 WHITE CASTLE

UT

7825 TACO BELL

7818 APPAREL AND TEXTILES

RN

AV .

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

SO

NO

SO UT H

RF

OL

UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

7800 THRIFT STORE

K

94 I-94 AV. RAMP TO EB I SB STONY ISLAND AV
STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP. DECORATIVE STONE PAVEMENT TO REPLACE EXISTING PLANT MATERIAL LED CURTAIN, COMMUNITY IDENTIFER ENHANCEMENT

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT WITH DUAL MAST ARMS, TYP.

V. NY ISLAND A O T S B N O T I-94 RAMP WB I
7900 FELLOWSHIP HALL DR. CONNER 1600 FIFTH THIRD BANK

7' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE

7825
STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

7867 VOCATIONAL CENTER - VACANT
5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

E. 79TH ST.

79TH ST. GRILL

48

IV. IMPLEMENTATION
Sub-Area 1
AV .

Sub-Area 2
S. HARPER AV.

Sub-Area 3
E. MARQUETTE RD.

N

S..

RA ILRO AD

Y ON NTH AN A

. AV

S.

CH IC AG O

S. HARPER AVE.

E. 71ST ST.

E. 72ND ST.

E. 75TH ST.

E. 70TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

E. 76TH ST.

E. 72ND PL.

E. 74TH ST.

E. 71ST PL.

E. 73RD ST.

E. 76TH PL.

E. 69TH PL.

E. 73RD PL.

E. 75TH PL.

E. 74TH PL.

SO UT HER

E. 69TH ST.

E. 67TH PL.

E. 68TH ST.

E. 67TH ST.

E. 65TH ST.

E. 66TH PL.

E. 65TH PL.

NO

RF

OLK

EB I-94 SB STONY ISLAND AV. RAMP TO E
S. STONY ISLAND AV. S. STONY ISLAND AV.

WB I-94 RAMP TO NB STONY ISLAND AV.

S. STONY ISLAND AV.

CORN
CORN ELL DR.

ELL

E. 78TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

DR.

RELOCATE CURB TO PERMIT A MINIMUM 10' SIDEWALK TO BE CONSTRUCTED

OFF-STREET PARKING, AS NECESSARY, TO SUPPORT LOSS OF OFF-STREET PARKING DUE TO WIDENING OF SIDEWALK

E. 79TH ST.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

E. 77TH ST.

7753 VACANT

7744 VACANT

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

7700 ELLISON AUTO PARTS

BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

T

8' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

CROSS SECTION

LED CURTAIN, COMMUNITY IDENTIFER ENHANCEMENT

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT WITH DUAL MAST ARMS, TYP.

8' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE

7739 PRAYER MISSION
STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP. STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

7530 COMPLETE AUTO AIR CONDITIONING - VACANT
5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

E. 78TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

LEGEND
STREET TREES 5'X 5' TREE GRATE 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND
0 30 60 120 NORTH
T

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE BENCH WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE BUS SHELTER WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE DETECTABLE WARNING TILE

DRIVEWAY OVERSIZED DRIVEWAY EXISTING BUILDING EXISTING PROPERTY

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT

T

Figure IV-4: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 79th Street to E. 77th Street

49

E. 76TH ST.

E. 76TH PL.

OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP. 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE 7532 CARRIAGE WAY, TYP. WALGREEN'S

E. 75TH PL.

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP. GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

7608 AUTOZONE

MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

T

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

90

EB

TO

8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP

UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP. GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP. REPLACE STANDARD LUMINARIES AND DAVIT ARMS WITH GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHTS, TYPICAL ON ALL COMBINED STREET LIGHT TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLES

S. STONY ISLAND AV.
BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP.

7' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE/3'BIKE LANE BUFFER

T

HOSPITAL PARKING

RELOCATE EXISTING DRIVE. EXIT ONLY TO E 76TH STREET

MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP. MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

7531 JACKSON PARK HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER

50

IV. IMPLEMENTATION
Sub-Area 1
AV .

Sub-Area 2
S. HARPER AV.

Sub-Area 3
E. MARQUETTE RD.

N

S.

RA

Y ON TH AN

. AV

ILRO

AD

S.

CH IC AG O

S. HARPER AVE.

E. 71ST ST.

E. 72ND ST.

E. 75TH ST.

E. 70TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

E. 76TH ST.

E. 72ND PL.

E. 74TH ST.

E. 71ST PL.

E. 73RD ST.

E. 76TH PL.

E. 69TH PL.

E. 73RD PL.

E. 75TH PL.

E. 74TH PL.

UT

HER

E. 69TH ST.

E. 67TH PL.

E. 68TH ST.

E. 67TH ST.

E. 65TH ST.

SO

E. 66TH PL.

E. 65TH PL.

NO

RF

OLK

EB I-94 SB STONY ISLAND AV. RAMP TO E
S. STONY ISLAND AV. S. STONY ISLAND AV.

WB I-94 RAMP TO NB STONY ISLAND AV.

S. STONY ISLAND AV.

CORN
CORN ELL DR.

ELL

E. 78TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

DR.

E. 79TH ST.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

E. 75TH ST.

7530 JEWEL OSCO
PEDESTRIAN LINK TO RETAIL PARKING LOT FROM STREET MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

SUBWAY NOR HAROLD'S F

E. 74TH ST.

E. 74TH PL.

7448 BP
REMOVE EXISTING DRIVEWAY IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO INTERSECTION AND BUS STOP OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP 7444 POPEYE'S

T

RECONSTRUCT DRIVEWAY TO MEET CITY OFFSET FROM INTERSECTION REQUIREMENTS, TYP.

7418 CAR-X

7416

T

7410 ROSECO AUTO BUILDERS

7400 RESIDENTIAL

OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP
T

T

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP. BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP

8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

CROSS SECTION

REPLACE STANDARD LUMINARIES AND DAVIT ARMS WITH GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHTS, TYPICAL ON ALL COMBINED STREET LIGHT TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLES

UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

STONY ISLAND AVE
TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP. 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP. 7' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE/3'BIKE LANE BUFFER

BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP.

T

T

7505 NEW VISION DETOX PROGRAM

1543 FAMILY HEALTH CENTER

T

8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP

T

7437 KFC LONG JOHN SILVER'S
CURB EXTENSION FOR BUS STOP

7401 MIDAS AUTO SERVICE

7401 VACANT/OFFICE

7401 ENTERPRISE RENT-A-CAR

MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

MOSQ

LEGEND
STREET TREES 5'X 5' TREE GRATE 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND
0 30 60 120 NORTH
T

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE BENCH WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE BUS SHELTER WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE DETECTABLE WARNING TILE

DRIVEWAY OVERSIZED DRIVEWAY EXISTING BUILDING EXISTING PROPERTY

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT

T

Figure IV-5: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 76th Place to E. 74th Street

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

51

7336 NORTHWEST INSURANCE COIN LAUNDRY BEAUTY SUPPLY D'S FRIED WINGS #1 CHOP SUEY DOLLARMARKET PLUS A+ CELLULAR WONDERBREAD

E. 72ND PL.

E. 73RD ST.

E. 73RD PL.

7320 DUNMORE'S AUTO SALES 7300 NATIONAL CITY BANK

OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

T

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

REPLACE STANDARD LUMINARIES AND DAVIT ARMS WITH GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHTS, TYPICAL ON ALL COMBINED STREET LIGHT TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLES SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

7' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE/3'BIKE LANE BUFFER

T

7351 OSQUE MARYAM

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP. MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

1619 HODES PARK

7251 MIDAS

TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP.7243

7241

7239 APARTMENTS

7237

7233

MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

52

IV. IMPLEMENTATION
Sub-Area 1
AV .

Sub-Area 2
S. HARPER AV.

Sub-Area 3
E. MARQUETTE RD.

N

S.

RA ILRO AD

Y ON TH AN

. AV

S.

CH IC AG O

S. HARPER AVE.

E. 71ST ST.

E. 72ND ST.

E. 75TH ST.

E. 70TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

E. 76TH ST.

E. 72ND PL.

E. 74TH ST.

E. 71ST PL.

E. 73RD ST.

E. 76TH PL.

E. 69TH PL.

E. 73RD PL.

E. 75TH PL.

E. 74TH PL.

SO UT HER

E. 69TH ST.

E. 67TH PL.

E. 68TH ST.

E. 67TH ST.

E. 65TH ST.

E. 66TH PL.

E. 65TH PL.

NO

RF

OLK

EB I-94 SB STONY ISLAND AV. RAMP TO E
S. STONY ISLAND AV. S. STONY ISLAND AV.

WB I-94 RAMP TO NB STONY ISLAND AV.

S. STONY ISLAND AV.

CORN
CORN ELL DR.

ELL

E. 78TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

DR.

E. 79TH ST.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

E. 72ND ST.

7222 BURGER KING 7208 PROGRESSIVE FUNERAL PARLOR 1539 APARTMENTS

OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP 8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP DEFINE DRIVEWAYS

7102 CHURCH'S CHICKEN

E. 71ST PL.

E. 72ND PL.
3

7158 MOO AND OINK

MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

T

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND, TYP

1' CONCRETE BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP. AT BUS STOPS, TYP

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP. GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

S. STONY ISLAND AV.
BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP

7' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE/3'BIKE LANE BUFFER 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

T

7211 QUALITY HAND CAR WASH

MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

7145 CITY CLEANERS

7141 APARTMENTS

7131 BANK OF AMERICA

7113 STARBU

LEGEND
STREET TREES 5'X 5' TREE GRATE 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND
30 60 NORTH
T

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE BENCH WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE BUS SHELTER WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE DETECTABLE WARNING TILE

DRIVEWAY OVERSIZED DRIVEWAY EXISTING BUILDING EXISTING PROPERTY

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT

0

120

T

Figure IV-6: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 73rd Place to E. 71st Place

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

53

TOWER 7050

E. 71ST ST.
STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

FUTURE E. 71ST STREET STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

E. 70TH ST.

7000 PIT STOP 500 7038 DA EPIPHANY 7042 SALON CUTTIN VACANT AND SPA IMAGE 7040
REDUCE DRIVEWAY WIDTH

VACANT

TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP.

6950 VACANT

7032 VACANT

7030 VACANT

7022 VACANT

7018 VACANT

T

T

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND, TYP

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

REPLACE STANDARD LUMINARIES AND DAVIT ARMS WITH GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHTS, TYPICAL ON ALL COMBINED STREET LIGHT TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLES UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

IMPROVE AESTHETICS OF CENTER MEDIAN WITH IMPROVED PAVEMENT

TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP.

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND, TYP

7' PARKING LANE/6' BIKE LANE/3'BIKE LANE BUFFER

BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP

T

T

T

7011 VACANT 7113 STARBUCKS
MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

7001 MARATHON

COMMUNITY GARDEN
MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

V

FUTURE E. 71ST STREET STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS

7037 CHILDREN DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE 7007 MARATHON

54

IV. IMPLEMENTATION
Sub-Area 1
AV .

Sub-Area 2
S. HARPER AV.

Sub-Area 3
E. MARQUETTE RD.

N

S.

RA

Y ON TH AN

. AV

ILRO

AD

S.

CH IC AG O

S. HARPER AVE.

E. 71ST ST.

E. 72ND ST.

E. 75TH ST.

E. 70TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

E. 76TH ST.

E. 72ND PL.

E. 74TH ST.

E. 71ST PL.

E. 73RD ST.

E. 76TH PL.

E. 69TH PL.

E. 73RD PL.

E. 75TH PL.

E. 74TH PL.

UT

HER

E. 69TH ST.

E. 67TH PL.

E. 68TH ST.

E. 67TH ST.

E. 65TH ST.

SO

E. 66TH PL.

E. 65TH PL.

NO

RF

OLK

EB I-94 SB STONY ISLAND AV. RAMP TO E
S. STONY ISLAND AV. S. STONY ISLAND AV.

WB I-94 RAMP TO NB STONY ISLAND AV.

S. STONY ISLAND AV.

CORN
CORN ELL DR.

ELL

E. 78TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

DR.

E. 79TH ST.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

E. 69TH PL.

6942

OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

E. 69TH ST.

KING RICHARD'S TIRE & HUB CAP SHOP

RED'S

D ANGELO MS MINNIE'S PAWNERS AND JEWLERS SEAFOOD

1524

1523

FASION N STYLE HIP HOP FASION

EGYPTIAN HAIR NEW ERA AMUSMENT DESIGN

OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP 8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP

6840 VACANT

COSMO MART 6822 VACANT

JTJ F

8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT
T

TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP.

EXTEND PAINTED CROSSWALKS ACROSS SOUTHBOUND LANES OF STONY ISLAND AVENUE SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP. STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

REPLACE STANDARD LUMINARIES AND DAVIT ARMS WITH GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHTS, TYPICAL ON ALL COMBINED STREET LIGHT TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLES

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP. GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP. SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP. BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP

S. STONY ISLAND AV.
6' BIKE LANE

6945 VACANT

T

MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP

6921 BROOKS HEAD START CENTER

8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP

LEGEND
STREET TREES 5'X 5' TREE GRATE 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND
0 30 60 120 NORTH
T

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE BENCH WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE BUS SHELTER WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE DETECTABLE WARNING TILE

DRIVEWAY OVERSIZED DRIVEWAY EXISTING BUILDING EXISTING PROPERTY

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT

T

Figure IV-7: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 71st Street to E. 69th Street

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

55

1519 APARTMENT 6800 JTJ FISH CRICKET STONY LAUNDRY BARBER UNIFORMS ON WHEELS 6714

E. 67TH PL.

PIZZA HUT

SEE THRU YALE CURRENCY CHINEESE SUBWAY INSURANCE EXCHANGE KITCHEN
MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP. TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP.

E. 68TH ST.

E. 67TH ST.

OPTIONAL FLUSH PLANTER WITH RAILING, TYP

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP. 6740

VACANT

MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

T

T

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP. 8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

8' CURB EXTENSION, TYP GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

6' BIKE LANE/3' -8' BIKE BUFFER

MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN, TYP. STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP. SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP. 6' BIKE LANE 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP. 6' BIKE LANE
T

REPLACE STANDARD LUMINARIES AND DAVIT ARMS WITH GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHTS, TYPICAL ON ALL COMBINED STREET LIGHT TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLES

CROSS SECTION

6' BICYCLE ONLY RIGHT TURN LANE UPRISING STONE PLANTER, COMMUNITY IDENTIFIER ENHANCEMENT

BIKE BOX REQUEST INSTALLATION OF NEW BUS SHELTER WIDEN SIDEWALK TO CONSTRUCT A MINIMUM 10' SIDEWALK MAINTAIN EXISTING CURB LINE

COR

NEL

1620
T

56

IV. IMPLEMENTATION
Sub-Area 1
AV .

Sub-Area 2
S. HARPER AV.

Sub-Area 3
E. MARQUETTE RD.

N

S.

RA ILRO AD

Y ON TH AN

. AV

S.

CH IC AG O

S. HARPER AVE.

E. 71ST ST.

E. 72ND ST.

E. 75TH ST.

E. 70TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

E. 76TH ST.

E. 72ND PL.

E. 74TH ST.

E. 71ST PL.

E. 73RD ST.

E. 76TH PL.

E. 69TH PL.

E. 73RD PL.

E. 75TH PL.

E. 74TH PL.

SO UT HER

E. 69TH ST.

E. 67TH PL.

E. 68TH ST.

E. 67TH ST.

E. 65TH ST.

E. 66TH PL.

E. 65TH PL.

NO

RF

OLK

EB I-94 SB STONY ISLAND AV. RAMP TO E
S. STONY ISLAND AV. S. STONY ISLAND AV.

WB I-94 RAMP TO NB STONY ISLAND AV.

S. STONY ISLAND AV.

CORN
CORN ELL DR.

ELL

E. 78TH ST.

E. 77TH ST.

DR.

E. 79TH ST.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

S. CORNELL AV.

E. MARQUETTE RD.

6558 MCDONALDS

E. 66TH PL.

6650 CHASE BANK
STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

1550 APARTMENTS

6600 BP

MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN, TYP. TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOP WITH SHELTER, TYP.

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE, TYP.

5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND WITH 1' CONCRETE CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

STREET TREE IN 5' X 5' TREE PIT WITH DECORATIVE GRATE, TYP

STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK, TYP.

REPLACE STANDARD LUMINARIES AND DAVIT ARMS WITH GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHTS, TYPICAL ON ALL COMBINED STREET LIGHT TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLES

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT, TYP.

T

T

IMPROVE AREA TO SUPPORT PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC 6' BICYCLE ONLY RIGHT TURN LANE

JACKSON PARK
IMPROVE PATH BETWEEN E. 67TH STREET AND MARQUETTE DRIVE TO PROVIDE 5' LANE, 2' PAVED SHOULDER AND 3' GRAVEL SHOULDER

BENCH AND TRASH RECEPTACLE AT BUS STOPS, TYP

COR

NELL

DR.

MAINTAIN EXISTING PARKWAY LAWN AND CONSTRUCT 1' CARRIAGE WAY, TYP.

PROGRAMMED OFF-STREET TRAIL IMPROVEMENTS, BY CHICAGO PARK DISTIRCT

BIKE LANDING
T

LEGEND
STREET TREES 5'X 5' TREE GRATE 5' PERMEABLE PAVERBAND STAMPED ASPHALT CROSSWALK
0 30 60 120 NORTH
T T

SINGLE ACORN PEDESTRIAN POLE BENCH WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE BUS SHELTER WITH TRASH RECEPTACLE DETECTABLE WARNING TILE

DRIVEWAY OVERSIZED DRIVEWAY EXISTING BUILDING EXISTING PROPERTY

GATEWAY 2000 STREET LIGHT

Figure IV-8: Streetscape Master Plan - E. 68th Street to E. Marquette Road

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

57

Near Term

Mid Term

Long Term

Ultimate

Parcel Redevelopment by Property Owner

City of Chicago

Parcel Redevelopment by Property Owner • Develop off street parking to benefit adjacent property owners

City of Chicago

Parcel Redevelopment by Property • Establish signature developments on the south end of Stony Island avenue project area;

City of Chicago

City of Chicago

PRIORITIES
The Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan documents enhancements that will be implemented as redevelopment occurs along the corridor as well as improvements that the City can implement. It is impractical to believe that all the proposed improvements could occur at one time. As identified throughout the Master Plan Near Term and Long Term improvements are noted for several design elements. Some improvements can be implemented on a parcel by parcel or a block by block basis, while others must be implemented on a corridor scale. In addition to Near and Long Term improvements there can also be mid term improvements that aid the transition into the Long Term vision for the corridor. Figure IV-9 illustrates the progression and involvement by the community as well as the City to see the Master Plan elements come to fruition. The recommendations have been listed based on low to high implementation cost.
• Sidewalk pavement improvements • Driveway consolidation, relocation or elimination • Install streetscape landscape buffers as required by the City of Chicago Zoning and Landscape Ordinance • Street tree installation w/ permeable paver band • Improve sidewalk pavement at corners for ADA compliance • Curb extensions on side streets • Prepare a Traffic Study for the Avenue to evaluate the viability of long term improvements • Street tree installation w/ permeable paver band • Restripe roadway pavement for bike lane and buffer along on-street parking • Implement construction of community identity elements at the community gateway locations • Install decorative street lights • Traffic signal modernization • Construct bike lane with planter northbound on Stony between th th 76 & 77 Streets as a test implementation of the long term concept for bike lanes • Modify traffic signals to provide bike only phase • Install permeable pavers in parking lanes between curb extensions • Improve E. 79 Street/S. Chicago Avenue intersection based upon findings from Traffic Study • Construct bike lanes separated by planters from the parking and travel lanes
th

• As an option to bike lanes with planters, construct curb extensions along Stony Island • Reconstruct travel lanes and provide bio swales in median

Figure IV-9: Implementation Progression

58

STONY ISLAND AVENUE STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN

APPENDIX A

COMMUNITY INPUT

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

This page is intentionally left blank.

APPENDIX A

CDOTStonyIslandAvenueStreetscapeMasterPlan CommunityMeeting PublicMeeting07/28/09

CDOTStonyIslandAvenueStreetscapeMasterPlan CommunityMeeting PublicMeeting08/03/09

SummaryofResidents'Comments RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION
1.WhatSymbolizes StonyIslandand surrounding community?

SummaryofResidents'Comments RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION
1.WhatSymbolizes StonyIslandand surrounding community?

RESIDENTRESPONSE
• Majorthoroughfareandretail/commercialcorridor • Emptylotsrundown,flowersinthemiddle, minimallyusedstores,skywayrising • Blight,desolation,food/retaildesertasidefrom Jewel,Staples,etc.75thto76th • Empty/dilapidatedbuildingsareeyesoresand underutilizedresources • Nopedestriansafety? • Confusingpatterns • Poormaintenance,cleanup. • Neglectofinfrastructure(e.g.sidewalks,lighting) • Lackofthrivingbusinesses,retailoutlets,comparedto otherareas • • • • • • • • • • • Puttheparkingbehindthebuildings Biglotsbetweenthestreetandstores(e.g.Jewel)areugly Antiquelamps Lovelylandscape MoreRetailOutlets Increaseamenities GouptoE.56thStreet Includebikelanes SouthShorelakefrontnaturetheme Notasimportantasretailoutlets Amenitiesforcommunity

(morethen1)

RESIDENTRESPONSE
• MajorthoroughfareandarteryconnectingLakeShoreDriveto BishopFordwithmanyneighborhoodsalongtheroute • Majorretail/commercialcorridor • Emptylotsrundown,flowersinthemiddle,minimallyused stores,skywayrising • Blight,desolation,food/retaildesertasidefromJewel,Staples, etc.75thto76th • Widestreetthatcouldbedevelopedintoabeautifulshopping areawithproperlandscape • JacksonPark • GoingtoIndiana • Areathatresidentwouldliketobeabletoshop • Specializedcommunity Fastboulevard • Potential • Empty/dilapidatedbuildingsareeyesoresandunderutilized resources • Nopedestriansafety? • Confusingpatterns • Poormaintenance,cleanup. • Neglectofinfrastructure(e.g.sidewalks,lighting) • Lackofthrivingbusinesses,retailoutlets,comparedtoother areas • Peopleloiteringandstandingaroundliquorstoresandvacant properties • Trashwithinatwoblockradiusofmostofthebusinesses • Underdevelopmentandvacantlots • Mediancanbeenhancedbyfollowing: Betterlandscaping Planters Statues Fountain

(morethen1)

3 3

2.Whatisnegative aboutStonyIsland Avenuethatyou wouldliketosee change?

3.Whatwouldyou liketoseehappen alongStonyIsland Avenuetoimprovethe

2.Whatisnegative aboutStonyIsland Avenuethatyou wouldliketosee change?

2 2

2

4.Whatimages, colors,orthemes wouldyouliketosee inacommunity identifier?

2

2

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

A-1

RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION
2.Whatisnegative aboutStonyIsland Avenuethatyou wouldliketosee change?(CONT.) • • • • • • • • •

RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION
4.Whatimages, colors,orthemes wouldyouliketosee inacommunity identifier? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

RESIDENTRESPONSE
Parkwaysareneglected Notbikefriendly Toomanyfastfoodrestaurants ToomanyCurrencyExchanges Needparkwayalongsidesidewalk Sidewalksarenowwhereparkwayshouldbe Greatdealofcrime 79thStreetandStonyIslandintersection Roadintegrity,potholes Signageat71standStonyIsland

(morethen1)

RESIDENTRESPONSE
GouptoE.56thStreet AnythingbutHollywood/Disney SouthShorelakefrontnaturetheme Notasimportantasretailoutlets Amenitiesforcommunity Flowers Moretrendyareas Moreretailstoresaround78thandStonyonbothsides Makestonyvisuallyappealingfordriving Pleasantcolors(2) Historicalfeel Bannersonlightpoleswithcommunityname Keyfactsaboutpeoplefromthecommunity Brightlights Friendlylook Trafficwarning Green,don'twastemoneyonanythingelse.

(morethen1)

3.Whatwouldyou • Puttheparkingbehindthebuildings,Bigparkinglotsbetween liketoseehappen thestreetandstores(e.g.Jewel)areugly • Antiquelamps alongStonyIsland Avenuetoimprovethe • Lovelylandscapeincludingflowersandgreeneryinmedianand area? alongsidewalk(2) • MoreRetailOutlets • Reducevacantlots • Increaseamenities • Businessesthatsupplybasicgoodsandservicestomeetneeds ofresidents • Updatestoresfrom76thStreettotheNorth • Sitdownrestaurants • Improvedbusstops • Enhancedmedianwithlandscaping • Overpassesifdonenicely • Roundabouton79thStreet • Historicallightposts • Includebikelanesandasmanybikelanesaspossible(2) • Improvesignage • ExtendStreetscapeplanallthewaytoBrettHarteSchoolat56th Street(2) • AttracthighendbusinesseslikeWholeFoods,Trader Joes,Target • Addplantersandtrees • Makerighthandlanenexttocurb,parkwayforped.safety • Timedlighting/signalingforpedestrianstocross • DevelopuniformrulesreferencetoStreetscapeassets • Streetcleaners,mechanicalandhuman • Improvelight

2

A-2

APPENDIX A

CDOTStonyIslandAvenueStreetscapeMasterPlan CommunityMeeting PublicMeeting09/22/09

RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION RESPONSE QUANTITY
2.Whatwouldyou liketoseehappen alongStonyIsland Avenuetoimprovethe area? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

RESIDENTRESPONSE
Cleanstreetdaily Brighterpaintunderbridge,viaduct SignsayingwelcometoSouthshore Modernizedlook Fixflooding,ierodoutstreetsewertopreventbackingupinto apartment Narrowdownstreet Turnrighthandlanenexttocurbintoparkwayforpedestrian safety Timedlighting/signalingforpedestrianstocross DevelopauniformsetofrulesinreferencetoStreetscapeassets Streetcleaners,mechanicalandhuman Improvelight Benchestosit Bettermergingprocessonroad,atSkywayandtoeastat76th Street Shuttleservicetolakeandincorporatewatertaxis Noparkingmeters Bikeracks Morebusinesses,entertainment;onesuggestionforTargetat 76thStreet Improvedtrafficlights Install"Noleftturnsigns"onintersections Landscapingandbeautification ImprovedStreetlighting Repairsidewalk Parkimprovements Waterfountain Countdownsignal Improvesigns Smoothstreetpavementandimprovedcurve MakeStonyIslandpedestrianfriendly MakeStonyIslandDriverfriendly Sidewalklighting TimeTrafficsignaltoadjusttotrafficvolumechange

(morethen1)

SummaryofResidents'Comments

QUESTION

RESIDENTRESPONSE

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2

• Trafficcongestionevenwithhavingmanylanes.Remedy:direct outoftowntravelersaround(west)ofStonyIslandorwith 1.Whatisnegative • Trafficlightdesignispoor,particularly67th,79th,71stat aboutStonyIsland Railroad.Remedy1:Secondcountingtrafficlight.Remedy2: thatyouwouldliketo Trafficsignsat71standStonyIsland,"RailroadCrossing"and seechange? • "NoLeftTurn"signsarenotvisible • Underdevelopedlotsshouldhaveappealingstores,officesand apartments:Remedy:Pedestrianfriendlybusinesses:Sitdown restaurant,boutique,café • Pedestriansafety • Nostatueorsculptureinparkway • Needatleastonebikelane • • • • • • • • • LackofStreetlightingonsidewalks.Remedy:Dropdownlight. DifficultybeingabletoturnoffofStonyonto66thPlace LackofbridgetogofromonesideofStonytoanother 79thStreetintersectiondifficulttocross Unwelcoming,sterilelook Innerdrivetoaccommodateslantparking Keepcenterbeautifulwithtreesandflowers Improvelighting Developmentwithoffices,apartment,restaurant Sittingrecreationalareawithinparkway,ieatJacksonPark Hospitalarea Bridgecrossing Streetsidedevelopment,waterfountain,artisticstructure, studentpaintedmural Widersidewalk Moregreeneryandlandscaping Morebannersonstreetpole Turnsignal,especially67thStreet Saferstreetfordriver Saferstreetforpedestriantocross Bikepath

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3.Whatdoyou wanttosee completedfirstalong StonyIsland? 2 6 2

2.Whatwouldyou liketoseehappen alongStonyIsland Avenuetoimprovethe area? • •

• • • • • • • •

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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• Improvelookofskyway,makeitmorefunctionalofanentrance • Moreaccessibleparkingforcars

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION
4.Whatareafew specificelementsyou wouldliketosee includedinagateway? • • • • • • • • • • • •

RESIDENTRESPONSE
Signornoticeenforcingnotrucktraffic Bettertrafficcontrollights Lighting Somethingtoslowdowntraffic Trafficcircleat79thintersection Sign Waterfountain Water/Streams Music,Community ServiceLane Nicesculpture,providehistoriclook Beautifullandscape Artrelativetothecommunity(ReferencemadetoBronzeville's • gateway) • SimilartoBronzevillegatewayatMcCormickplace

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CDOTStonyIslandAvenueStreetscapeMasterPlan CommunityMeeting PublicMeeting10/27/09

SummaryofResidents'Comments
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RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION RESIDENTRESPONSE
• Dreary • NumberofAccidents • Trafficsignalneedsimprovement • 79thStreet,StonyIslandandSouthChicagocrossingstreet • Fasttraffic,disobedienceoftrafficlaws,illegalturns. • Trafficlightsnotcoordinated • Vacantland/Buildings.Theyneedtobecomealive • Largeamountsoftrash • Notenoughgreen • Notenoughlighting • Deterioration,includingbuildings • Poortrafficflowinareas • BikelaneusingideaofparkingawayfromCurb • MoretreesonthewestsideofStonyIslandfrom66thto87th Street • Shortenthelanestomakeitsafertowalkontodrive • Widersidewalk • Moveparkingareastoimprovevisualsightline • Morepedestrianandbikingfriendly.Putintrafficcalming measures • Benches • Garbagecans • Signs • Attractive,Closedincoveratallbusstopswithheatduring wintermonths • Streetpolesidentifying5thWardwithnoticeablesignsthatglow atnight,lights • Havebusinesseskeepfrontcleaner • Pedestriancountdownlight • New,brighterlights • Treesandgrass,moreattractivemedian • Handicapaccessibility
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2 1.Whatisnegative aboutStonyIsland thatyouwouldliketo seechange? 2

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2.Whatwouldyou liketoseehappen alongStonyIsland Avenuetoimprovethe area?

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APPENDIX A

RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION
2.Whatwouldyou liketoseehappen alongStonyIsland Avenuetoimprovethe area? • • • • • •

CDOTStonyIslandAvenueStreetscapeMasterPlan CommunityMeeting PublicMeeting06/10/10

RESIDENTRESPONSE
Emergencyphonelinktopolice Landscape BetterTrafficcontrol Redevelopment Improvetrafficflow Morepedestrianfriendly 79thStreetIntersection,Eastboundleftturn Morelighting Improvedlandscaping Medianmorethanjustgrass Bikelanewithparkingmovedout All5thWardpolespaintedthesamecolor Cleanandbeautifyareas HaveMetratrackskeptclean Countdownlights Lightingunderskywayandbridgeway ADAimprovements Sidewalkimprovements Improvedtrafficflow.Removebottleneck Attractivelandscaping Largestonesfrompresentation Treesandgreenery Outdoorart Structures

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SummaryofResidents'Comments RESPONSE QUANTITY QUESTION
1.Whatisnegative aboutStonyIsland thatyouwouldliketo seechange?

RESIDENTRESPONSE
• PedestrianCrossingDifficulty • Landscaping • Speeding • • • • • • • • • • • • • Bumpoutcorner(curbextension) Planter Bettercrossingofstreetbypedestrians Countdownsignalsforpedestrians MakeStonyIslandaplacetovisitandsupportbusiness,notjust athoroughfare Curbextension Safebikelane(longtermdesignwithplanterbuffer) BlackPaintedlightposts Communitymarkeridentifierplacedatlandmarks,(notin median).LandmarksincludeJacksonParkHospitalandMosque Newsidewalk Betterpaintedandvisiblecrosswalk Beautifyalongsharedborderof5thand8thWards,particularly 75thto78thStreet

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• 3.Whatdoyouwant • toseecompletedfirst • alongStonyIsland? • • • • • • • • • • • 4.Whatareafew • specificelementsyou • wouldlliketosee • includedinagateway? • Whatwouldyounot liketosee?

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2.Whatwouldyou liketoseehappen alongStonyIsland Avenuetoimprovethe area?

• Bumpouts • Payboxes

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• HistoricCommunityhighlights 3.Whatdoyouwant • CurbExtension toseecompletedfirst • Morelandscaping alongStonyIsland? • BlackPaintedlightposts • Curbextension Beautifyalongsharedborderof5thand8thWards,particularly • 75thto78thStreet • Landscapingalongsidewalk75thto78thStreet • • • • •

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4.Whatareafew specificelementsyou wouldlliketosee includedinagateway?

Stony Island Avenue Streetscape Master Plan June 2010

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Altamanu
Richard M. Daley, Mayor

Inc.