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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
A visit from Kenya
Fledgling HVCHS trip grows
into global tie. PAGE 3
By NORA CARNEVALE
The Sun
or Hopewell Valley residents and sur-
rounding community members wondering
where store-bought vegetables come from,
the Northeast Organic Farming Associa-
tion of New Jersey is offering the Organic
Gardening Series for Food Production.
For experienced gardeners or those
looking to start an organic garden, NOFA-
NJs series provides information, instruc-
tion and the opportunity for participants to ask specif-
ic questions. The series consists of three sessions,
spanning different aspects of organic gardening.
Connie Deetz, programming coordinator for NOFA-
NJ, explains that with important topics such as geneti-
cally modified organism, or GMO, education on the
forefront of the organic farming movement, it is a
great time for people to learn how to experience the
satisfaction of eating something they have grown for
themselves. She described the increasing trend of in-
dividuals asking themselves how their food arrives at
the grocery store and then to their table.
A lot of folks want to know how to grow their own
food in a safe manner for their family and their envi-
ronment. Were not saying everyone needs to practice
total organic methods, but were trying to give them
options, Deetz said.
Deetz explained that attendees at the various series
Farming group
offers organic
gardening series
F
please see CLASSES, page 4
Special to The Sun
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 26MARCH 4, 2014
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Make and taste homemade
maple syrup on March 1
Sugaring time has arrived at
Howell Living History Farm,
where the public can join the fun
of making and tasting homemade
maple syrup (and pancakes) on
Saturday, March 1.
Activities offered continuously
on these dates from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. include syrup making, but-
ter making and purchased whole-
wheat pancakes. Sap gathering
will take place at noon and at 2
p.m. Tree tapping demonstra-
tions will be held at 11 a.m., 1 p.m.
and 3 p.m.
The childrens craft on March 1
will be Maple Twig Lantern
(cost is $4 per craft). Hours for
the program are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Families and individuals may
participate in the craft program
on a walk-in basis; groups (eight
or more) must pre-register.
Howell Farm is maintained
and operated by the Mercer Coun-
ty Park Commission. It is located
on Valley Road, just off Route 29,
two miles south of Lambertville.
GPS directions: 70 Woodens
Lane, Lambertville, NJ 08530.
Parking and admission are free.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tues-
day through Saturday.
For more information, call the
Farm at (609) 737-3299, or visit the
Farm website at www.howell-
farm.org or www.mercercounty-
parks.org.
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FEBRUARY 26MARCH 4, 2014 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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By NORA CARNEVALE
The Sun
What began as a fledgling
Model World Health Organization
trip in 2007 for Hopewell Valley
Central High School students has
become a community-wide effort
culminating in a visit next month
to HVCHS from Kenya Ambassa-
dor to the United States Jean
Kamau. Through the Hopewell-
Keroka Alliance, a partnership
between Hopewell Valley and
Keroka, the effort has blossomed
into a movement that HVCHS
teacher Dr. David Angwenyi
never could have imagined.
In 2007, Angwenyi, whose
home village of Nyanchonori lies
within the greater Keroka area,
and Dr. Lillian Rankel, another
local teacher, led their students
on the initial trip that sparked the
formation of the Hopewell-Kero-
ka Alliance, or the HKA in Febru-
ary 2008 by parents and trip mem-
bers who had seen the poverty en-
dured by the Kerokan people.
Since the first trip of the Glob-
al Connections Kenya Experi-
ence, HVCHS students, staff and
community members have taken
many trips to Kenya as part of an
ongoing program, with another
student trip planned this sum-
mer. Angwenyi explained that
every student that attends these
trips is deeply affected, as it is not
like a typical study abroad trip.
Mandy Lee, a current student
at Georgetown University and
former trip participant, ex-
plained the effect the experience
had on her, saying, Traveling to
Kenya with David Angwenyi, Lil-
lian Rankel and Andy Jackson in
2010 exposed me to Kenya in a
very unique way. We spent time
on safari, stayed in some beauti-
ful lodges and saw Kenya through
tourist eyes. But we also saw
Kenya through the eyes of blind
students in Thika, researchers at
Mpala Reserve and tea farmers in
Nyanchonori. I think we both cel-
ebrated the successes and vibran-
cy of the communities we en-
countered and tried to examine
critically the issues they face. I
learned that service is about
more than just donating money
and supplies, and I have started
seeing myself as a global citizen
with much to learn about and
offer to the world.
To date, members of the HKA
have raised more than $100,000 to
provide a variety of aid to the
sprawling, tea-growing area, in-
Expanding global connections
Hopewell Valley Central High Schools fledgling world health
trip has spurred upcoming visit from Kenyan ambassador
please see OPPORTUNITIES, page 7
Email us at news@hopewellsun.com
offered by NOFA-NJ range from
individuals looking to start a sec-
ond career, to community mem-
bers who have always traditional-
ly farmed but now want to transi-
tion to organic methods, to young
people who have an interest in the
integrity of growing their own
vegetables, which she describes
as thrilling.
Since NOFA-NJ is a statewide
organization, there are many
questions concerning soil compo-
sition in varying areas.
It is an issue a lot of people
deal with. We work with folks to
address their different needs.
New Jersey is one of the most di-
verse states in terms of soil quali-
ty and composition. Probably
more than 50 different delin-
eations, Deetz said.
She explained that even in her
own personal garden, in just a
two-acre area there is extreme
variation in soil composition.
However, overcoming the poten-
tial difficulty of soil type is some-
thing more and more families are
excited to do to bring the connec-
tion back to people and their
food.
There is something very spe-
cial about taking a bite out of a
tomato that you grew yourself,
Deetz said.
NOFA-NJ is always trying to
tailor programs to the requests of
communities and individuals by
adding programs that address
specific needs. The organic farm-
ing series is among one of the
most recently added programs.
Deetz explained that one of the
major obstacles in holding this
type of series is the weather.
When the weather is well suited
for gardening, most people are
busy with other commitments, so
they try to schedule them for win-
ter, which presents a challenge
with snowy conditions.
Regardless, prospective or sea-
soned gardeners and farmers can
expect to see more gardening and
agricultural programs on the cal-
endar.
A new program in the works is
entitled Exploring the Small
Farm Dream, Deetz said, which
walks interested parties through
the process of evaluating
whether small-farm living is fea-
sible for their lifestyle, including
financial and planning advice.
The first organic gardening
class was held on Feb. 20. Two fu-
ture sessions are scheduled for
Feb. 27 and March 6, both from 6
to 9 p.m. at the Stony Brook-Mill-
stone Watershed Association lo-
cated at 31 Titus Mill Road in Pen-
nington. Participants may sign
up online at any point, and it is
not mandatory to take all three
classes. Registration information
may be found at www.nofanj.org
or call (908) 371-1111 for more in-
formation.
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 26MARCH 4, 2014
CLASSES
Continued from page 1
A new breast cancer support
group free to the public is open to
newly diagnosed and those re-
ceiving active treatment for
breast cancer. The group will
meet on Thursday, March 6, from
7:30 to 9 p.m. at Hopewell Presby-
terian Church, 80 West Broad St.
Questions, contact Susan at
(609) 954-1639.
Classes coming up
Cancer support
group formed
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 26MARCH 4, 2014
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too.
The Hopewell Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium including
electronically.
Dan McDonough Jr.
CHAIRMAN OF ELAUWIT MEDIA
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
CONTENT EDITOR Kristen Dowd
HOPEWELL EDITOR Nora Carnevale
ART DIRECTOR Stephanie Lippincott
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
PUBLISHER EMERITUS Steve Miller
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
Tim Ronaldson
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Joe Eisele
INTERIMPUBLISHER
According to the Hopewell Township Po-
lice Department, PSE&G is once again urg-
ing customers to be vigilant to a telephone
scam where callers threaten to shut off
electric or gas service if payment is not
made that day.
The scam, which has been reported
across the country, involves payments
using Green Dot MoneyPaks and currently
seems to be targeting customers in Mercer
County. (PSE&G alerted the public to a
similar scam several times in 2013.)
How does the scam work?
Individuals pretending to be PSE&G em-
ployees call customers and demand that
they make payment within hours using a
Green Dot MoneyPak, a type of pre-paid
card. Customers are told to purchase a
Green Dot MoneyPak at a pharmacy or
convenience store, use cash to put money
on to the card and then provide the num-
ber on the card to the person who called
them. Customers are advised that if they
do not immediately call back and provide
the MoneyPak information, their gas/elec-
tric service will be shut off that day. Typi-
cally, after the customer provides that Mon-
eyPak number, the scammer transfers the
funds to a prepaid card and cashes it in at
an ATM.
What should customers know?
Customers should be wary of callers
who demand immediate payment and
threaten service termination. PSE&G does
not accept Green Dot MoneyPak cards.
PSE&G offers a variety of payments op-
tions and would never require a customer
to use one specific type of payment. When
PSE&G makes an outbound phone call to
customers, customer-specific information
is shared with the customer. That informa-
tion includes the account name, address,
number and current balance. If customers
do not receive this correct information,
they likely are not speaking with a PSE&G
representative. Any customer who has
doubts about the legitimacy of a call from
PSE&G especially one in which payment
is requested should call PSE&G directly
at 1-800-436-PSEG (7734). PSE&G customers
scheduled for disconnection due to nonpay-
ment receive written notice on their bill at
least 10 days in advance. Customers who
are struggling to pay their bill are encour-
aged to call PSE&G at 1-800-357-2262 to dis-
cuss payment options and visit
pseg.com/help to learn about programs
that can help.
D
ear Mother Nature: We re-
spectfully request that you
stop dumping loads of snow
upon us. Yes, we realize that we were
hoping for a snow day or two at the be-
ginning of the season. And yes, we re-
alize we were praying for colder tem-
peratures during last summers heat
wave. But this is a little nuts, dont you
think?
Seriously, Mother Nature, look what
you have done to us:
You broke a 130-year-old record
this year when you dumped more than
six inches of snow on us in four sepa-
rate storms in one season.
You have crippled traffic, causing
major motor vehicle accidents and de-
laying planes in and out of airports
for days on end.
You have caused local schools to
delay their openings, close early and
close for the full day so many times
that this school year may end only
days before the next one begins.
You have caused us to run out of
salt. Yep, its all gone. And were hav-
ing trouble getting more. Who would
have thought that a shipping law
would stand in our way of making our
roads safer?
Mother Nature, oh powerful one,
wielder of our wintery fate, please
have mercy on us. We beg you to get us
through these last few weeks of winter
unscathed.
We ask you to forgive our similar
pleas for an end to summertime heat.
We were misguided in our thoughts
then, and we hope to not be as mis-
guided next time around.
We promise that well put every-
thing in perspective when we wish for
warmer weather, colder weather,
dryer weather or wetter weather.
And we promise, oh how we prom-
ise, to enjoy every day of sunshine you
give us this spring before youre sure
to reign down your fury with swelter-
ing temperatures this summer. At
least well have the sea and our pools
to cool us down.
in our opinion
Our plea to Mother Nature...
...Be kind to us the rest of this winter
Your thoughts
Are you sick of winter, or do you yearn for
more snow ahead? What are your plans
for the spring ahead? Share these
thoughts, and any others, through a letter
to the editor.
Police, PSE&G warn of ongoing telephone scam
Narcotics Anonymous
of New Jersey
(800) 992-0401
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cluding funding the materials
and labor to build a tea-buying
center to spare villagers a two-
mile trip with baskets of harvest-
ed tea atop their heads, complet-
ing a new health-care center and
giving the community 5,000 mos-
quito nets.
In December, Angwenyi and
several HVCHS students attended
a symposium in Washington,
D.C., at which they spoke of their
efforts with the HKA in front of
many Kenyan officials. The stu-
dents had an opportunity to meet
with Kamau, a Kenyan ambassa-
dor who was very impressed and
accepted the groups offer to visit
Hopewell Township, an idea that
is coming to fruition next month.
The Global Connections Educa-
tional Diplomacy Ambassador
Program will celebrate the glob-
al bridges of understanding that
students and community mem-
bers have helped to forge over the
years. The event will also honor
the 2014 Hopewell Valley CHS
Kenya Student Ambassador. Thir-
ty-five students from different
classes will have the opportunity
to ask Kamau questions on a vari-
ety of topics as just one of the
programs planned for the two-day
visit to the high school as well as
Bear Tavern Elementary School
from March 21 to 23.
The future looks very bright,
and we are thinking of expanding
opportunities to surrounding
area schools to go to Kenya and
bring awareness to their own
communities. We are exploring
the option of engaging local busi-
nesses and other resources to
help students who cannot afford
to go, Angwenyi said.
Angwenyi also explained that
he and the College of Health Edu-
cation and Human Development
at Clemson University have been
working on a formal proposal to
provide college credit to HVCHS
students through the program as
Clemson has an established pro-
gram of leadership and coopera-
tion with Kenya.
Email us at news@hopewellsun.com
OPPORTUNITIES
Continued from page 3
Opportunities to travel to Kenya may
be expanded to include other schools
ENGAGED?
Did you or someone you
know recently get engaged,
maybe even married? Tell
everyone the good news! Send
us your announcement and we
will print it, free of charge.
WEDNESDAY FEB. 26
Story time: Ages 2 to 5 years. 10:30
a.m. to 11:15 a.m. at the Hopewell
Branch Library. These story times
introduce children to the best
age-appropriate stories in chil-
drens literature. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities
are part of the program. The con-
tent of each story time centers
on a different theme. An age-
appropriate craft follows story
time.
Movies for Adults: 1:30 p.m. to 4
p.m. at the Hopewell Branch
Library. Captain Phillips: Tom
Hanks stars in this true story
based on the book A Captain's
Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy
SEALS, and Dangerous Days at
Sea. Rated PG-13. No registration
needed.
English Language Conversations: 1
p.m. at the Pennington Public
Library. Bambi Hegedus will lead
a relaxed and informal English
conversation session. Emphasis
will be on learning practical
phrases and will be determined
by the needs of participants. Par-
ticipants should have some
knowledge of English.
THURSDAY FEB. 27
Toddler Rock: Ages 2 to 3 years. 10
a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at the Hopewell
Branch Library. Join us for
singing, dancing and rhymes.
Through structured group activi-
ties, we play with musical instru-
ments, puppets, parachutes and
more! There is an emphasis on
interaction with the music and
the rhymes through singing,
actions and props to build pre-lit-
eracy skills. Adult supervision
required. No registration needed.
Story time: Ages 2 to 5 years. 11
a.m. to 11:45 a.m. at the Hopewell
Branch Library. These story times
introduce children to the best
age-appropriate stories in chil-
drens literature. Action rhymes,
songs, and felt board activities
are part of the program. The con-
tent of each story time centers
on a different theme. An age-
appropriate craft follows story
time.
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
FRIDAY FEB. 28
Fun and Games: All ages. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. at the Hopewell Branch
Library. Stop by the library for
fun and games. Make a craft, play
board games, listen to music and
enjoy some snacks. Feel free to
bring your favorite board game(s)
and your friends.
Story time with Miss Cindy: Ages 2
to 5. 10:30 a.m. at the Pennington
Public Library. Enjoy books,
music and a craft. No registration
required.
SUNDAY MARCH 2
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship Service at 10
a.m. Adult education from 9 to
9:45 a.m. Childrens Sunday
school is held at about 10:15 a.m.,
as the children leave the sanctu-
ary with the teachers early in the
worship experience. Look for us
at www.HopewellMethodist.org
then come and visit at 20 Black-
well Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY MARCH 3
Tai Chi: 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the
Hopewell Branch Library. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration necessary.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
TUESDAY MARCH 4
Gentle stretching and meditation:
12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Hopewell Branch Library. Moms,
come take a break from your per-
petual giving and focus on your-
self in this whole-body wellness
class designed to loosen tight
muscles through gentle stretch-
ing and relax your mind and nour-
ish your spirit through guided
meditation. Please bring a yoga
mat. No registration required.
Hopewell Township Agricultural
Advisory Committee meeting:
7:30 p.m. at the Township Build-
ing first Tuesday of the month.
Public is invited. For information
contact: Lucia Huebner at 466-
0277 or lucia@doorposter.com;
or John Hart at 737-2008 or
ihart89@aol.com.
Story time with Miss Cindy: Ages 2
to 5. 10:30 a.m. at the Pennington
Public Library. Enjoy books,
music and a craft. No registra-
tion.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 FEBRUARY 26MARCH 4, 2014
Opera great Maria Callas is
presented in all her temperamen-
tal glory when The Pennington
Players present Master Class at
Mercer County Community Col-
leges Kelsey Theatre Saturday,
March 1 at 8 p.m.; and Sunday,
March 2 at 2 p.m. Kelsey Theatre
is located on the colleges West
Windsor Campus, 1200 Old Tren-
ton Road. A reception with the
cast and crew follows the opening
night performance on Feb. 21.
Inspired by a series of master
classes the singer conducted to-
ward the end of her career, this
Tony Award-winning play by Ter-
rence McNally captures Callas as
she challenges the next genera-
tion of singers to reach for the
heights she herself has achieved.
This somewhat fictionalized ac-
count of La Divina, as she be-
came known, gives Callas a
chance to meditate on the rela-
tionship between art and life and
to wonder when the pursuit of
one's art becomes self-destructive.
Some of her revelations are
deeply personal, including her re-
lationship with Aristotle Onassis.
Portrayed in all her imperfect
glory, Callas is at times wickedly
funny, unrelentingly critical and
highly emotional.
Leading the cast as Maria
Callas is Laurie Hardy of Hamil-
ton. Featured as students in the
master class are soprano Jenne
Carey, of Princeton, as Sophie De-
Palma; soprano Eileen Cooper, of
Hamilton, as Sharon Graham;
and tenor Timothy Walton, of
Plainsboro, as Anthony Can-
dolino. These three classically
trained opera singers will all sing
arias: Carey will perform Belli-
nis Ah Non Credea; Cooper will
perform Verdis Vieni taffretta;
and Walton will perform Pucci-
nis Recondita Armonia. An-
drew Monath of New Hope, Pa.,
plays the on-stage accompanist
Manny Weinstock.
Sally Page of Princeton pro-
duces the show. Stage Manager
Tara Gruber Etter of Hamilton
will also appear on stage as the
stagehand.
Tickets are $18 for adults, $16
for seniors, and $14 for students
and children. Tickets are avail-
able online at www.kelseythe-
atre.net or by calling the Kelsey
Theatre Box Office at 609-570-3333.
Kelsey Theatre is wheelchair ac-
cessible, with free parking avail-
able next to the theater.
FEBRUARY 26MARCH 4, 2014 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
The historic First Baptist
Church of Pennington recently
announced the installation of
Rev. Malik K. McKinley, Sr. as sen-
ior pastor on March 16.
Originally from Bloomfield,
Conn, McKinley attended More-
house College in Atlanta, Ga.,
where he served as a chapel assis-
tant in the Martin Luther King,
Jr., International Chapel. Over
the past decade, McKinley has
worked in the public non-profit
educational arena where he has
earned academic graduate de-
grees in teaching and learning
from the University of Georgia as
well as an MBA with a focus on
project management from Kenne-
saw State University.
Over the years McKinley has
used these degrees in conjunction
with his call to ministry to fortify
the body of Christ.
In his new role, McKinley
plans to bring this expertise and
leadership to the First Baptist
Church as it enters its 112th year
in the community.
McKinley currently resides in
Mercer County with his wife, Dr.
Tabitha Bellamy-McKinley along
with three children.
On Sunday, March 16, at 5 p.m.,
McKinley will be formally ap-
pointed senior pastor at a special
installation service conducted by
the Middlesex Central Baptist As-
sociation and hosted by the Pen-
nington United Methodist
Church, 60 S. Main St., Penning-
ton.
The service is open to the pub-
lic; for more information contact
the church office at (609) 303-0219.
Rev. McKinley joins First Baptist Church
Opera singer to present Master Class
Visit us on the Web at www.hopewellsun.com
Concrete Masonry
Ocean City New Jerseys #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
Very well kept 1st floor condo.
This 3 bedroom 2 bath condo
is located on a great block only
steps from the beach. Property
features, g/h, c/a, new carpets,
fresh paint, gas fireplace, sound
proofing in between floors,
track lighting, flat screen TV's,
10' ceilings, enclosed garage,
storage, outside shower, and
is being offered furnished with
a great rental history!
$499,900
4920 ASBURY AVE
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
FEBRUARY 26-MARCH 4, 2014 PAGE 10
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 4 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
Dog Boarding
In A Loving Home
NOT A KENNEL!
Call Steven:
856-356-2775
www.
OUR HOME
DOG BOARDING.com
Your Dog
Spring cIean-ups, muIching, seeding, pIanting,
patios, waIkways, waIIs, grading, drainage,
backhoe service, compIete tree services,
thatching & core aeration, Iot cIearing,
snow removaI, Fences & Lawn Care, firewood
FULL TREE SERVICE
Stump Removal,
Grinding, Trimming
Fully Insured Free estimates
Over 10 years experience
609.737.0171
www.lopezaparicio.com Credit Cards Accepted
Furniture For SaIe
ANTAL HANDYMAN
609-737-7401
Painting &
Wall Papering
Professionally
1-800-281-2573 1-800-281-2573
Business Landscaping
CLASSIFIED FEBRUARY 26-MARCH 4, 2014 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
If youre reading your
competitors ad?
Whos making money
YOU OR THEM?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Dont delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245
Considering a home
in South Florida?
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Kliot of Pulse International Realty is
the broker for buyers who want a
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for that coastal home!
Rena Kliot, Broker | Owner
Pulse International Realty - Miami
305.428.2268
rena@pulseinternationalrealty.com
www.pulseinternationalrealty.com
$1,000 BFF
Any new complete roofing or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Expires 3/31/14.
30 Years Experience Family Owned & Operated
High Quality Products Senior Citizen Discount
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Pet Care Tax Services
30 Years Experience Family Owned and Operated High Quality Products Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics Professional Installation
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/14.
$1,000 BFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/14.
10 BFF
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/14.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/14.
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job
UP TO