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Hinkley Point C

Development
Consent Order
Application
Environmental
Statement
Doc Ref 4.14
October 2011
Environmental Statement - Annex 2
Construction Method Statement
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CONSTRUCTION METHOD STATEMENT
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Construction Method Statement | October 2011 1
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CONTENTS
1. INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................3
1.1 Purpose...........................................................................................................................3
1.2 Related Documents.........................................................................................................4
2. STRATEGIC CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMME .............................................................5
2.1 Introduction......................................................................................................................5
2.2 HPC Project Construction Programme............................................................................6
3. ENABLING AND PRELIMINARY WORKS....................................................................11
3.1 Introduction....................................................................................................................11
3.2 Enabling Works .............................................................................................................11
3.3 Preliminary Works .........................................................................................................11
4. CONSTRUCTION OF HPC...........................................................................................17
4.1 Introduction....................................................................................................................17
4.2 Land Use.......................................................................................................................17
4.3 Temporary Buildings and Structures .............................................................................19
4.4 Construction Programme and Phasing..........................................................................22
4.5 Construction Activities ...................................................................................................25
4.6 Construction Logistics ...................................................................................................39
5. ROLE OF THE ASSOCIATED DEVELOPMENT SITES ...............................................47
5.1 Introduction....................................................................................................................47
5.2 Individual Sites ..............................................................................................................47
6. CONSTRUCTION OF ASSOCIATED DEVELOPMENTS .............................................61
6.1 Introduction....................................................................................................................61
6.2 Temporary Buildings and Structures .............................................................................61
6.3 Individual Sites ..............................................................................................................61
7. HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENTS .......................................................................................75
8. CONSTRUCTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT.......................................77
8.1 Introduction....................................................................................................................77
8.2 Construction Management ............................................................................................77
8.3 Environmental Management during Construction..........................................................78
9. EMERGENCY ARRANGEMENTS ................................................................................81
9.1 Introduction....................................................................................................................81
9.2 Emergency Requirements.............................................................................................81
9.3 Access to the Sites........................................................................................................81
9.4 Impact on Existing Routes.............................................................................................82
TABLES
Table 4.1: Proposed Areas of Land Use during the Peak Phase of Construction......................19
Table 4.2: Construction Related Buildings and Structures: Height Parameters .........................20
Table 4.3: Approximate Distribution of Workers between Shifts.................................................42
Table 4.4: Shift start/finish times Monday to Friday.................................................................42
Table 4.5: Shift start/finish times Saturday Morning................................................................43
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Table 4.6: Shift start/finish times Alternate working pattern, all days worked..........................43
PLATES
Plate 2.1: Hinkley Point C Developments Key Plan.....................................................................7
Plate 2.2: Indicative Phasing Schedule Hinkley Point C and Off-site Associated Development8
Plate 2.3: Profile of Workforce Numbers Over Time ....................................................................9
Plate 4.1: HPC Accommodation Campus...................................................................................31
Plate 4.2: Workforce Profile........................................................................................................41
Plate 5.1: Bridgwater A Accommodation Campus......................................................................49
Plate 5.2: Bridgwater C Accommodation Campus .....................................................................50
Plate 5.3: Cannington Bypass....................................................................................................53
Plate 5.4: Cannington Park and Ride Facility.............................................................................54
Plate 5.5: Combwich Wharf Refurbishment and Extension and Combwich Freight Laydown
Facility........................................................................................................................55
Plate 5.6: M5, J unction 23 Park and Ride Facility, Freight Management Facility, Consolidation
Facility for Courier Deliveries and Induction Centre...................................................56
Plate 5.7: M5, J unction 24 Park and Ride Facility, Freight Management Facility, Temporary Consolidation
Facility for Postal/Courier Deliveries, and Temporary Induction Centre...................................59
Plate 5.8: Williton Park and Ride Facility....................................................................................60
FIGURES
Figure 4.1: Hinkley Point C Indicative Construction Activities early 2013 Site Layout Plan
Regulation 5(2)(O)
Figure 4.2: Hinkley Point C Indicative Construction Activities 2014 Site Layout Plan Regulation
5(2)(O)
Figure 4.3: Hinkley Point C Indicative Construction Activities 2015 Site Layout Plan Regulation
5(2)(O)
Figure 4.4: Hinkley Point C Indicative Construction Activities 2019 Site Layout Plan Regulation
5(2)(O)
Figure 4.5: Hinkley Point C Indicative Construction Activities 2020 Site Layout Plan Regulation
5(2)(O)
Figure 4.6: Hinkley Point C Indicative Construction Parameters 2019 Site Layout Plan
Regulation 5(2)(O)
Figure 4.7: Hinkley Point C Indicative Construction Activities Sections A-A, B-B, C-C, and D-D
Site Layout Sections Regulation 5(2)(O)
APPENDICES
Appendix A1: Site Preparation Works: Project Description
Appendix A2: Temporary J etty Development: Project Description
Appendix A3: Construction Lighting Strategy

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1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Purpose
1.1.1 This document, together with its appendices, describes the programme and
methodology for constructing Hinkley Point C (HPC), and supports the application to
the IPC for Development Consent as well as providing information for the
Environmental Impact Assessment. The scope of this document is as follows:
1.1.2 Section 2 describes the strategic construction programme for the HPC Project,
including strategic construction assumptions.
1.1.3 Section 3 describes any applications separate to the DCO application for works on-
site prior to the main construction phase, including the enabling and preliminary
works to facilitate the construction of HPC.
1.1.4 Section 4 sets out the detailed programme and key construction phases for the
construction of HPC. A description is provided for the key construction activities
including proposed land used, construction machinery and site facilities.
1.1.5 Section 5 describes the need for and role of each of the associated developments
during the construction of HPC, including the timing of the introduction of the facilities
at these sites.
1.1.6 Section 6 describes the methodology for constructing and decommissioning each of
the associated developments associated with HPC, including the accommodation
campuses, park and rides, freight management facilities, Cannington bypass and
Combwich Wharf.
1.1.7 Section 7 describes the minor highway improvements to be undertaken in support of
the development.
1.1.8 Section 8 describes the construction and environmental management arrangements
that would be employed to ensure comprehensive control of safety and protection of
the environment.
1.1.9 Section 9 describes the emergency arrangements which would apply to the main
construction site during construction.
1.1.10 Appendix A1 describes the site preparation works as submitted in the application for
planning consent.
1.1.11 Appendix A2 describes the temporary jetty as submitted in the application for a
Harbour Empowerment Order.
1.1.12 Appendix A3 is the Construction Lighting Strategy.
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1.2 Related Documents
1.2.1 This document makes reference to, and should be read in conjunction with the
following documents:
Hinkley Point C Development Site Design and Access Statement.
Post Operational Strategy (Appendix to the Planning Statement).
Accommodation Strategy.
Hinkley Point C Development Site Environmental Management and Monitoring
Plans (Environmental Statement, Annex 3).
Off-Site Associated Developments Environmental Management and Monitoring
Plans (Environmental Statement, Annex 4).
Waste Management Implementation Strategy (Environmental Statement,
Annexe 5).
Community Safety Management Plan (Environmental Statement, Annexe 6).
Transport Assessment (Environmental Statement, Annex 7).
Freight Management Strategy (Transport Assessment Appendix 1).
Framework Travel Plan (Transport Assessment Appendix 2).

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2. STRATEGIC CONSTRUCTION
PROGRAMME
2.1 Introduction
2.1.1 This Section presents the strategic construction programme for the full HPC Project,
including the HPC development site and all of the associated developments.
2.1.2 The overall programme for the construction of HPC, including the preliminary works,
is anticipated to take approximately nine years and includes:
the site preparation works;
construction and subsequent operation of the temporary jetty;
construction of the sea wall;
construction of HPC, including the nuclear island, conventional island, the balance
of plant, ancillary buildings and structures, the National Grid 400kV substation and
EDF Energy overhead line transmission infrastructure;
construction of the cooling water infrastructure;
construction of interim storage facilities for spent fuel and intermediate level waste
construction of the on-site accommodation campus;
dismantling and removal of the temporary jetty;
removal of the on-site accommodation campus; and
landscape restoration.
2.1.3 EDF Energy has identified a number of associated developments which are
considered necessary to facilitate the construction, and in some instances, the
operation of HPC and to mitigate potential environmental impacts associated with the
HPC Project. In the absence of the proposed associated developments, the likely
traffic and socio-economic impacts associated with the construction and operation of
HPC would be significantly greater in the local area. The proposed associated
developments include:
Accommodation campuses in Bridgwater.
Park and ride facilities close to J unctions 23 and 24 of the M5 motorway, and at
Cannington and Williton.
Freight management facilities, courier consolidation facilities and an induction
centre close to J unction 23 of the M5 motorway.
Freight management facilities and temporary courier consolidation facilities and
induction centre close to J unction 24 of the M5 motorway.
A bypass around the west of Cannington to minimise the amount of construction
traffic using the local road network within the village.
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Refurbishment of the existing Combwich Wharf facility to accommodate the arrival
of approximately 180 Abnormal Indivisible Loads (AILs) and other construction
related goods, over a period of approximately six years. A freight laydown facility
would also be provided adjacent to Combwich Wharf.
2.1.4 Further details of the associated developments and their construction are provided in
sections 5 and 6.
2.1.5 A number of minor highway improvements are proposed as part of the overall
development and these are described in section 7.
2.1.6 A plan showing the locations of the various elements of the development is provided
as Plate 2.1
2.2 HPC Project Construction Programme
2.2.1 As illustrated in Plate 2.2, the HPC construction programme is anticipated to
commence with the site preparation works in late 2011, followed by the main
construction in early 2013, through the Development Consent Order granted by the
IPC. The overall construction of HPC is anticipated to take approximately nine years,
with the first UK EPR reactor unit operational in 2019, and the second UK EPR
reactor unit operational approximately 18 months later in 2020. However, completion
of the spent fuel store would extend some two years beyond initial operation of
Unit 2.
2.2.2 Some landscaping works to the south of the southern construction area would be
undertaken early in the construction phase to establish final ground levels and
provide early screening of the construction works for the residents to the south of the
development site. In addition, landscape screening would be provided along the
western boundary of the development site.
2.2.3 The final landscape restoration works would commence once the construction phase
is complete and HPC is operational. Initially the temporary working areas would be
cleared, including the on-site accommodation campus, and then the HPC
Development Site would be landscaped which would take up to three years to
complete.
2.2.4 Anticipated key dates for HPC construction are set out below, and are based on
securing prior consent for the site preparation works and construction of the
temporary jetty.
Commence site preparation works late 2011;
Commence construction of the temporary jetty in the second quarter of 2012;
Construction of HPC commences (subject to the grant of Development Consent)
in early 2013;
J etty completion and commissioning in mid 2013;
Completion and commencement of operation of the first UK EPR reactor unit in
2019;
Completion and commencement of operation of the second UK EPR reactor unit
18 months following the first unit;
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Plate 2.1: Hinkley Point C Developments Key Plan

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Plate 2.2: Indicative Phasing Schedule Hinkley Point C and Off-site Associated Development

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Dismantling and removal of the temporary jetty in 2021;
Completion of the spent fuel store in 2022; and
Restoration of the HPC Development Site within two to three years of the second
UK EPR reactor unit becoming operational.
2.2.5 This schedule is based on the assumption that the temporary jetty would be granted
consent and construction would commence mid 2012. The jetty would take
approximately 14 months to construct, which includes a period for delays in the
construction programme as a result of any adverse weather conditions (weather
risk). As such, there is expected to be a period of up to six months between the start
of the main construction works and completion of the jetty construction; during this
period materials would be transported to the site via the road network.
2.2.6 In the event that the jetty works are not consented ahead of DCO, the jetty
construction would be undertaken in parallel with the main construction works.
2.2.7 The construction schedule for the main development and each of the associated
developments is provided in Plate 2.2. Further details of the associated development
construction are provided in Section 6.
2.2.8 This schedule provides the basis on which the profile of workforce numbers over time
is estimated. This is illustrated in Plate 2.3 below.
Plate 2.3: Profile of Workforce Numbers Over Time


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2.2.9 The Accommodation Strategy addresses the capability of existing local
accommodation to house construction workers and defines the need for and size of
accommodation campuses for workers, resulting in an on-site campus at Hinkley for
510 persons and two campuses in Bridgwater for 850 and 150 persons, as described
in Section 5.
2.2.10 The remaining workers would be distributed around the local area and the
geographical distribution is predicted using a gravity model in the Transport
Assessment. This assessment has identified the need for park and ride facilities as
part of an integrated approach to worker transport and indicates the required
capacities for park and ride sites at Williton, Cannington and J unctions 23 and 24 of
the M5, as described in Section 5.
2.2.11 Materials usage profiles are also derived from the construction schedule and are
given in the Freight Management Strategy. In conjunction with the Transport
Assessment this document indicates the need for and scale of freight management
facilities required at J unctions 23 and 24 of the M5 and the freight laydown facility
adjacent to Combwich Wharf as described in Section 5.
2.2.12 The Transport Assessment has indicated the desirability of a number of road
improvements including a new bypass around Cannington and various highway
works. The Cannington bypass would be a significant development in its own right
and is included as one of the associated developments in Section 5. The highway
works are described in Section 7.
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3. ENABLING AND PRELIMINARY WORKS
3.1 Introduction
3.1.1 There are a number of works that are in the process of being undertaken, or are
proposed to be undertaken, before the start of the main HPC construction activities.
The former are termed Enabling Works and the latter Preliminary Works.
3.2 Enabling Works
a) Remediation Project
3.2.1 In J anuary 2011 planning permission was granted by Somerset County Council for
the remediation of land in the north-eastern corner of the site.
3.2.2 In addition to these remediation works, the development includes the creation of
temporary areas of hard-standing for material segregation and stockpiling, plus
temporary offices. It also includes construction of a temporary helipad.
b) Bat Barn Construction
3.2.3 There are a number of derelict barns located within the HPC site which would have to
be demolished when the site is cleared. There are suspected bat roosts located
within these barns and therefore a new bat barn is to be created to re-house them.
c) New Hinkley Point B Car Park
3.2.4 A new car park has been constructed in the north-eastern corner of the HPC site
within existing operational land associated with Hinkley Point B. The new car park is
the subject of a Certificate of Lawful Use or Development from West Somerset
Council.
d) Trenching Works and Testing
3.2.5 There are two temporary trenches that have been excavated within the north-western
part of the HPC site for vibration testing and compression testing.
3.3 Preliminary Works
3.3.1 To facilitate the construction of a new nuclear power station at HPC, EDF Energy
submitted two applications to undertake Preliminary Works at the HPC Development
Site, comprising site preparation works and the construction and operation of a
temporary jetty. These applications were submitted to West Somerset Council
3.3.2 (WSC) and the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) respectively.
3.3.3 The preliminary works are designed to be reversible so that the land could be
returned to its previous use in the event that the Development Consent Order for the
HPC Project is refused. Reinstatement proposals were included in each application
and the impacts associated with any reinstatement works have been assessed.
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3.3.4 On the advice of the Marine Management Organisation, the proposed Harbour
Empowerment Order that would permit the construction and subsequent operation of
the jetty does not include provision for its subsequent removal. If a DCO for the HPC
Project is not granted, EDF would seek all necessary consents to enable the jetty to
be dismantled and removed and the land reinstated.
3.3.5 In case consent is not obtained for the jetty works ahead of the DCO, these works
are also included within the DCO application (as are the site preparation works). The
DCO application also includes for the dismantling and removal of the temporary jetty
at the end of its operational lifespan.
3.3.6 If the jetty works application is not granted ahead of DCO, the HPC Project schedule
would need to be adjusted to take this into account.
3.3.7 There follows a summary of the proposals for the site preparation works and the
temporary jetty. Description documents from these stand-alone applications are
provided in Appendices A1 and A2 respectively. If both the site preparation works
and temporary jetty are consented, their work scopes would be integrated as far as
possible (see Section c below: Integration of Work Programmes for further details).
a) Site Preparation Works
3.3.8 The stand-alone proposals for the site preparation works include:
Site establishment works, including the creation of construction compounds and
associated facilities including welfare facilities and offices, layover facilities, car
parks, and services upgrades including construction of an 11kV substation and
the laying, replacement and/or diversion of services networks across the site;
Erection of construction fencing around the perimeter of the development site, and
site clearance works including the diversion of rights-of-way, demolition of three
existing barns; archaeological mitigation works and the removal of all of the
woodland and the majority of hedgerows within the construction areas;
Earthworks to create the platforms required for the construction of HPC and
commence the deep excavations for the power stations (down to 3m AOD and 6m
AOD centred on units 1 and 2 respectively. It is estimated that approximately 2.3
million m
3
(unbulked) of material would be excavated in total during the site
preparation works and used for construction of the level platforms or stockpiled
on-site for re-use. The proposed stockpile areas and stockpiling methodologies
are determined by the volumes and properties of the materials, requiring the
different types of materials to be stored in separate stockpiles and managed
accordingly. It is anticipated that on average approximately 200,000m
3

(unbulked) of material would be excavated within the application site per month
throughout the site preparation works, based on the sequencing of works around
the site and the transport of excavated materials. The sequence of the
excavations and stockpiling is generally based on the following events:
removal of topsoil to storage areas;
removal of subsoil and overburden to storage areas, dependent upon their
individual properties;
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creation of screening bunds and landscaped areas, using subsoil, overburden
and topsoil as required;
removal of weathered rock to storage areas or to form platforms; and
removal of fresh rock as required to storage areas or to form platforms.
All the material excavated during the earthworks would remain on-site as part of
the platforms, stockpiles or landscaping.
Culverting of Holford Stream to allow for creation of a construction platform area.
The culvert would be constructed from a point adjacent to the western boundary
of the site, across to the eastern boundary of the site, where it would return water
into the existing open Holford Stream watercourse.
Construction of a surface water drainage system incorporating water management
facilities, outfalling into Bridgwater Bay and Holford Stream ensuring that:
water is discharged at controlled rates (greenfield run-off rates being achieved
for discharges into Holford Stream downstream of the site).
all surface water discharges meet appropriate water quality standards in terms
of suspended sediments and other possible contaminants (e.g. hydrocarbons);
the drainage is designed using the principles of Sustainable Drainage Systems
(SuDS), including re-use wherever possible; and
the design for the drainage strategy is based on a 1 in 30 year storm event
occurring during the construction period.
The surface water drainage system would incorporate modular foul treatment
facilities to serve the construction workforce. These facilities would be installed
during site preparation but would not be used until the HPC works commence.
Dewatering of the working areas around the areas proposed for deeper
excavations during the main construction phase. Water collected from dewatering
would be discharged to the surface water drainage system described above.
Construction of a temporary retaining structure along part of the northern edge of
the main platform to retain the elevated main platform above the natural grade
level (this structure being subsumed by the sea wall within the HPC works).
Development of a network of haulage roads to facilitate the movement of vehicles
and soil and rock materials around the site, including:
a north-south haulage road which would allow for the transfer of excavated
material to the southern part of the site;
a haulage road network in the northern part of the site, which would vary in
location and level to suit the ongoing platform development to eventually tie
into the site compounds as they are developed;
a service road around the perimeter of the site within the security fence to
facilitate the construction of the fence and allow security and maintenance
personnel access to inspect and maintain the fence line; and
a foreshore access road from the site at a gap in the cliff. During the site
preparation works this foreshore access road would be used only for a limited
period to complete the outfall construction works on the foreshore.
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Construction of site access points to the north-east of the site to provide the main
site access during the site preparation works, with a second site access gate to
the south-east of the site to provide access for Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs)
and deliveries to the site. Two roundabouts would be constructed to the north-
east and south-east of the site to serve these access points.
Installation and commissioning of two concrete batching plants; the smaller of
these would be used for concrete for the preliminary works, the other would not be
used for concrete production with the exception of concrete tests until the
Development Consent Order is granted.
b) Temporary Jetty
3.3.9 The stand-alone proposal is for the construction and operation of a temporary jetty
extending off the north-west coast of the construction site including:
Erection of construction fencing around the onshore development site;
Construction of haulage roads, including access to and along the foreshore to
facilitate construction of the works on the foreshore;
Soil stripping and topsoil, subsoil and overburden storage;
Construction of the onshore development platform for the jetty;
Surface water drainage and treatment infrastructure for the platform;
Piling for the jetty bridge and head, using tubular steel piles. The piles would be
inserted using either the drill and drive technique or into pre-drilled sockets
where they would be grouted into place. The onshore and foreshore piles would
be inserted using land-based equipment. The offshore piling would use a jack-up
barge;
Construction of the jetty bridge, incorporating a roadway and conveyors for
aggregates, sand and cement;
Construction of the jetty head, incorporating ship mooring provisions, aggregate
and cement receipt equipment and facilities for jetty workers;
Dredging of a berthing pocket alongside the jetty head to allow ships of up to
5,000 deadweight tonnes (dwt) to berth;
Construction of onshore storage stockpiles for aggregate (both external and
internal within a sand shed) and silos for storage of cement;
Compulsory acquisition of certain land interests required for these works; and
Materials and construction equipment deliveries would be predominantly by sea
for the offshore works and by road for the onshore and foreshore works.
c) Integration of Work Programmes
3.3.10 Whereas the applications for the site preparation works and the temporary jetty are
capable of being implemented independently, if consent were received for both it is
intended that the work scopes would be integrated to the maximum extent practicable
in order to avoid duplication of activities wherever possible.
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3.3.11 The project schedule envisages that the site preparation consent would be received
first and the following activities, which are common to both applications, would be
implemented under the site preparation consent and therefore would not need to be
implemented under the jetty consent:
Erection of construction fencing around the onshore development site;
Soil stripping and storage for topsoil, subsoil and overburden;
Construction of haulage roads, including access to the foreshore (the access
corridor running along the top of the foreshore between here and the jetty site
being undertaken only under and in accordance with the jetty application);
Construction of the onshore development platform for the jetty; and
Surface water drainage/treatment infrastructure serving the development platform.
3.3.12 In this scenario there would be no need to develop the rock extraction area or the
east-west service road between the onshore jetty site and the site entrance, as
described in the jetty application. With the site preparation works consented, the site-
wide cut-and-fill balancing would apply making the rock extraction zone redundant,
and the haul routes would follow different alignments taking account of the terracing
during site preparation. The soil storage areas identified in the jetty application would
also not be needed because the soil strip would occur during site preparation and the
soils would be stored in the areas identified in the southern part of the HPC
development site.
3.3.13 The water management zone included in the jetty application would not be required
as the jetty site would instead be served by the construction drainage installed during
site preparation (i.e. the spine drains discharging to Bridgwater Bay).
3.3.14 No on-site footpaths would need to be stopped up to construct the jetty if the site
preparation works are also consented, because in this scenario all footpaths crossing
the HPC development site would be diverted onto an alternative route running
around the perimeter of the site outside of the construction fence. The coast path
would be closed when the earthworks start and would re-open once the sea wall is
constructed if the DCO is granted. The jetty has been designed to safely
accommodate the coast path running beneath it during the operational phase of the
jetty.
3.3.15 The Site Preparation Works and Temporary J etty descriptions (Appendices A1 and
A2) include the removal and reinstatement activities to be undertaken in the event
that the power station construction does not proceed. In the event that DCO is
granted and the power station is constructed, this reinstatement would not take place
and the DCO restoration works would be undertaken instead.
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4. CONSTRUCTION OF HPC
4.1 Introduction
4.1.1 This section provides a description of land uses and key construction activities at the
HPC development site. The site comprises an area of land to the west of the existing
Hinkley Point A and Hinkley Point B power stations, between the village of Shurton to
the south and the coast to the north.
4.2 Land Use
4.2.1 This section describes the main land usage throughout the construction works.
4.2.2 The overall construction site area is bisected by a track (Green Lane) running east-
west, which has landscape, archaeological and ecological significance. This track
would be retained and protected for most of its length and two crossing points are
provided for construction traffic.
4.2.3 The southern limit for main construction activity has been set as OS grid line
144750mN, to provide a buffer zone between the main construction activity and the
village of Shurton. However, limited works (early landscaping and the construction of
an emergency access road and associated bridge over Bum Brook) would take place
within this buffer zone.
4.2.4 A number of badger setts have been relocated to the west of the construction site.
These badger setts, together with a bat house, earth bunds and water management
zone(s) would be integrated into a landscaped western boundary, which serves to
reduce the visibility of the works from the west.
4.2.5 A temporary jetty would be located in the north-west of the site to facilitate the import
of bulk materials, primarily aggregate, sand and cement for concrete production and
other construction materials.
4.2.6 An on-site accommodation campus would be located in the south-east corner of the
HPC development site.
4.2.7 Construction of the permanent plant and buildings (the Permanent Development)
would mostly take place in the north part of the HPC development site, above Green
Lane. In order to support this construction, temporary contractor facilities and
storage areas would be required to the west and south of the Permanent
Development. These additional areas would include space for:
Topsoil, subsoil and excavated rock storage.
Contractors plant, storage and offices/welfare facilities.
EDF offices and welfare facilities.
Bus and car parking.
Landscaping to mitigate the visual and ecological impact of the construction
activity.
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Environmental management, such as management of surface water.
Access control and security.
Connecting roads and paths.
4.2.8 Access to the construction site for material deliveries by road would be from Wick
Moor Drove via a roundabout into the southern part of the site. This southern access
incorporates a waiting area and search lanes for delivery vehicles. Workers would
mostly be bussed to site and arrive via the northern roundabout and a coach drop-off
and parking area on the site of the southern permanent station car park. Workers
would enter the site via turnstiles and a search hall for security control.
4.2.9 During the site preparation works, the construction areas would be levelled into a
series of platforms and excavation of the main site would start. The total excavation
and ground terracing works would involve the movement and storage of
approximately four million m
3
of material, of which about 2.3 million m
3
would be
moved during the site preparation works. To avoid additional road journeys, all the
material would be retained on site. This would necessitate the culverting of Holford
Stream to provide space for stockpiles and working platforms.
4.2.10 In the south-west corner of the site, north of grid line 144750mN, would be storage
areas for topsoil, re-usable excavated rock, weathered rock and overburden. The
areas for soil storage would be subdivided to segregate the various categories of
material and allow multiple uses of the areas, where practicable. Topsoil storage
requires limited storage height in order to avoid damaging the structure of the soil.
Some of the rock would be suitable for engineered backfilling of the excavations,
although pre-treatment in the form of crushing and grading would be necessary for
some classes of fill. This rock, which is destined for engineered backfill, needs to
remain accessible during storage. Other material, which would not be used for
engineered backfill, would be stored in areas to produce level platforms suitable for
accommodating temporary contractors facilities.
4.2.11 Water management zones would be located in the north, east and west of the site to
control the discharge of water from run-off and dewatering activities into the sea and
local watercourses. An additional water management zone may be required to the
south of the southern construction area, to deal with run-off from the proposed early
landscaped area. The northern water management zones would be removed as the
permanent site drainage systems are implemented.
4.2.12 Areas of the site that are not required for permanent plant and buildings would be
used as temporary contractors areas. Allocations would change over time and the
contractors would be required to install whatever facilities they need for their workers
and construction equipment and materials. Service connections for the contractors
use (electricity, water, drainage) would be made available in close proximity of the
contractors areas.
4.2.13 Although the construction site plans (Figures 4.1 to 4.5) show some key temporary
buildings, the actual provisions and locations would be developed in conjunction with
the relevant contractors. In addition, muster points, welfare and medical facilities
would be provided. The locations of these facilities would need to be validated with
the early contractors and many would be relocated as the work progresses.
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4.2.14 The construction of the National Grid 400kV substation in the south-east corner of the
permanent power station area, along with the diversion of existing overhead lines to
facilitate connections to the National Grid transmission system would be undertaken
by National Grids contractors as a separate activity. A temporary working area
would be provided to the south and east of the substation for the duration of National
Grids construction works.
4.2.15 Construction of the EDF Energy overhead transmission lines and towers on the
permanent power station site would be undertaken by EDF Energys contractors.
4.2.16 The working areas for some of the contractors, such as for the marine works and
substation, would be located wholly or partly within the footprint of the permanent
development site. Within the development site boundary, the layout of the site would
vary over the construction period but, taking this into account, the anticipated
principal uses of the overall land area within the development site at the peak phase
of construction, in 2016, are presented in Table 4.1 below.
Table 4.1: Proposed Areas of Land Use during the Peak Phase of Construction
Land Use Area (ha)
Final permanent power station area 67.5
Construction contractor accommodation, working and storage 28.4
Landscape screening and protected areas/reserves 27.5
Construction site entrance and access roads 20.6
Stockpile of material for re-use 13.3
Topsoil storage 9.7
On-site accommodation campus 3.7
Low-lying land unsuitable for construction use 2.8
Sea wall foreshore construction area 1.7
Total 175.2
4.2.17 The land uses would change throughout the construction phase, reflecting the
different stages of development activity. For example, the area allocated to the civil
works contractor would be reduced and the spare land reallocated to the main
mechanical and electrical contractors as the balance of work on the site changes.
The changing usage of land is illustrated in Figures 4.1 to 4.5.
4.2.18 In addition to the main construction activity, associated developments as outlined in
Sections 5 and 6 would be required. One of the accommodation campuses for up to
510 workers would be located adjacent to the construction site in the south-east
corner of the HPC Development Site. All the other associated development sites
would be located remote from the main construction site.
4.3 Temporary Buildings and Structures
4.3.1 A range of buildings, structures, plant, equipment and uses will be required
temporarily in connection with, and for the duration of, construction works at the HPC
Development Site and the Associated Development sites.
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4.3.2 Whilst the heights of the permanent buildings at the HPC Development Site are
defined in the Hinkley Point C Development Site Design and Access Statement,
the height of the temporary buildings and structures would vary across the site and
would change with time. Figures 4.6 and 4.7 show in plan and cross section the
height limits for various areas of the site.
4.3.3 Figure 4.6 identifies construction zones of the site within which temporary buildings
and structures would be located. Figure 4.7 shows cross-sections through the site
and the height limits for the various temporary buildings and structures. Table 4.2
below shows the heights limits applicable to each of the zones identified on
Figure 4.6.
Table 4.2: Construction Related Buildings and Structures: Height Parameters
Construction Zone Explanation of Parameter Construction
Zone Parameter
(Max. Height)
1

Zone 1: Construction of the
main nuclear island,
conventional island, balance
of plant and ancillary
buildings.
Working envelope for main building
construction requirements. Structures to
include:
temporary buildings, construction warehousing
and storage buildings; and
tower cranes, mobile cranes and other
specialised lifting equipment.
140m AOD
Zone 2: Construction of the
main nuclear island and
conventional island
Exceptional Structures
Working envelope for exceptional structures
that are required for the lifting and installation
of reactor domes and other time limited
activities that require specialised cranes or
lifting equipment that go above the height
parameters set out in Construction Zone 1.
Typically these would include large mobile
cranes for installation of the dome associated
with the two reactor units.
175m AOD
Zone 3: Contractor areas to
the north of green lane.
Working envelope for liner fabrication facilities,
workshops, storage buildings, offices and
mess facilities, concrete batching plants and
associated aggregates stockpiles, covered
stockpiles and cement/pulverised fuel ash
silos.
75m AOD
Zone 4: National Grid
substation area.
Working envelope for substation construction,
transmission tower erection, workshops,
storage buildings, offices and mess facilities.
80m AOD
Zone 5: Contractor areas to
the south of green lane.
Working envelope for workshops, storage
buildings, offices, mess facilities and fixed
cranes.
55m AOD
Zone 5: Contractor areas to
the south of green lane
Exceptional Structures
Working envelope for exceptional structures in
Zone 5, such as mobile cranes.
75m AOD


1
Figures quoted are height above ordnance datum level
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Construction Zone Explanation of Parameter Construction
Zone Parameter
(Max. Height)
1

Zone 6: On-site
accommodation campus
Working envelope for the onsite
accommodation campus.
32m AOD
Zone 6: On-site
accommodation campus
Exceptional Structures
Working envelope for exceptional structures in
Zone 6, such as mobile cranes.
55m AOD
4.3.4 Exceptional structures comprise very large cranes and similar equipment which
would be used for relatively short periods during the construction works for specific
activities, such as lifting in the reactor building liner dome roof, and would then be
removed.
4.3.5 Other buildings and structures include temporary buildings which would be used by
the contractors for fabrication, storage, offices and welfare, as well as long-term
cranes such as tower cranes. The height parameters for buildings and structures
also apply to any extensions to existing temporary buildings and structures.
4.3.6 Zone 1 is the main power station area of together with the area immediately to the
west which would be used by the main construction and erection contractors. Zone 2
is within Zone 1 and includes the main nuclear island, conventional island buildings
and the areas immediately to the south and west where liner fabrication may be
undertaken. Zone 2 is where very large mobile cranes would be used for installation
of the liner roof, polar crane and main exhaust stack.
4.3.7 Zone 3 includes the area to the west of Zone 1 where aggregates, sand and cement
brought in by the jetty would be stored and construction/erection contractors would
site their storage and prefabrication facilities. Zone 3 also includes the area south of
Zone 1 where the platform level is +20m AOD and various ancillary power station
buildings would be constructed. It also includes an area for the main nuclear steam
supply systems contractor would be based.
4.3.8 Zone 4 is the area of the National Grid substation at +14m AOD and includes the
temporary works area for the National Grid contractors.
4.3.9 Zone 5 is the area where the main mechanical and electrical installation contractors
would be based. During the early construction works, this area may also be used by
the main civil works contractor for laydown and storage.
4.3.10 Zone 6 includes the southern site entrance, the on-site campus and an area for
offices and laydown/storage. Maximum heights within this area would be limited in
order to minimise the visual impact on the village of Shurton.
4.3.11 Soil and rock stockpiles will be within the heights shown for these areas on
Figure 4.6
4.3.12 Construction lighting will be provided in accordance with the Construction Lighting
Strategy as described in section 4.5 and attached as Appendix A3.
4.3.13 Internal site roads will be provided in the general locations shown on Figures 4.1 to
4.5 and as described in section 4.5
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4.3.14 The HPC Development Site would be enclosed by construction hoardings, security
fencing and perimeter enclosure, initially in the form and locations required for site
preparation. These would be re-aligned from time to time within the confines of the
HPC Development Site to take account of the construction needs at that time.
4.3.15 The above approach is considered to provide sufficient detail within the DCO to
enable the temporary construction-related development to be erected without the
need for prior approvals from the Local Panning Authority or Commission.
4.4 Construction Programme and Phasing
4.4.1 This Section sets out the construction programme and the key phases within this
programme. Following the site enabling and preliminary works, as described in
Section 3 above, the principal phases of the main construction are:
excavation for building foundations;
construction of permanent buildings and marine structures;
installation of mechanical and electrical equipment;
commissioning; and
site clearance and landscaping.
However it should be noted that these phases would overlap and construction of the
second reactor unit would generally follow the first unit by 18 months. Temporary
construction infrastructure would be required to support each phase.
4.4.2 Figures 4.1 to 4.5 are indicative phasing plans for the full construction phase from
site preparation through to completion of HPC and land restoration. The series of
plans identifies the construction activities at key phases in the construction
programme; however it should be noted that these are subject to refinement of the
detailed construction sequencing. It should also be noted that within the main
construction site areas there would be activities and uses that would remain
undefined, including minor temporary facilities and structures.
4.4.3 Figures 4.1 to 4.5 and the associated descriptions are based on the enabling and
preliminary works described in Section 3 having been commenced on schedule
ahead of DCO consent. In the event that any of the necessary permissions are not
received prior to DCO consent, the respective works would be integrated into the
main power station construction schedule as appropriate.
4.4.4 In early 2013, shortly after DCO is granted, the site would be generally as shown in
Figure 4.1. A number of construction activities would have been completed or be
underway as follows:
The site perimeter fence would have been erected.
The temporary jetty would be under construction, utilising a temporary beach
access road.
Holford Stream would have been culverted, the north and south access
roundabouts and initial haulage roads have been built and the material stockpiles
are in use.
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The landscaping along the western site boundary would be substantially
complete.
A temporary earth retaining structure would have been built at the low-lying land
near to the cliff line to enable a level platform to be established behind.
A permanent station car park would have been constructed and others would be
under construction.
The main platform areas would have been established in the northern part of the
site and excavation of the areas for the main plant buildings would have started.
Contractors working areas would have been established in the northern part of
the site and be under construction in the southern part.
Interim security arrangements for personnel and materials deliveries are in place.
Water management zones would have been established for the management of
drainage and the principal network of construction drains would be in place with
an outfall to the sea shore.
Landscaping of the area south of grid line 144750mN is in progress.
4.4.5 Figure 4.2 shows the indicative layout of the construction site at the start of nuclear
island construction in 2014, where:
The temporary jetty has been completed and is in use.
The sea wall in front of the permanent power station site has been constructed.
The permanent station car parks have been built. The south car park is in use for
park and ride buses for the workers and part of the south-east car park has been
allocated to the National Grid 400kV substation contractor as a working area.
All the principal contractors working areas have been established.
The construction of the National Grid 400kV substation has commenced.
Security access controls have been established for materials deliveries via the
southern access roundabout and for workers arriving by bus to the south car park.
Site offices have been built near to the southern access roundabout. The on-site
accommodation campus area has been levelled and accommodation blocks and
facilities are in the final stages of construction.
The Public Information Centre and some permanent offices and ancillary buildings
are under construction.
Many of the tower cranes have been erected on the main power station area.
Excavations for Unit 1 have been completed and the foundations prepared for
start of construction of the nuclear island.
Construction of the marine works has started, ready to bore the tunnels for the
cooling water.
Landscaping of the area to the south of the main construction area is substantially
complete, and the construction of the emergency access road together with its
bridge over Bum Brook is under way.
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4.4.6 Figure 4.3 shows the indicative layout of the construction site in 2015, where:
The excavations for Unit 2 are complete and ready to start construction of Unit 2
nuclear island.
The offshore cooling water works are partly complete, including tunnels, access
shafts and intake structures, with the discharge structures remaining to be
installed.
The buildings for Unit 1 and most of the shared (Unit 1 and 2) buildings are under
construction and the excavations are being back-filled.
A number of temporary buildings are complete or under construction in the
contractors working areas.
The installation of mechanical and electrical equipment is under way.
The Public Information Centre, Simulator Building/Training Centre, permanent site
offices and the Outage Access Control Building are complete. Temporary access
to the Public Information Centre is established via the south-east permanent
station car park.
The on-site accommodation campus is complete.
The National Grid substation is under construction.
4.4.7 Figure 4.4 shows the indicative layout of the construction site in 2019 when Unit 1 is
in operation, where:
Unit 1 is complete and is fenced off from the rest of the construction site.
The ancillary buildings for both units are complete.
The National Grid substation is complete and National Grids transmission system
connections have been diverted to connect the substation.
Unit 2 buildings are substantially complete and mechanical and electrical
equipment installation is nearing completion.
The interim storage buildings for intermediate level waste and spent fuel are
under construction.
4.4.8 Figure 4.5 shows the indicative layout of the construction site in 2020 when Unit 2
commences operation where:
both units of the power station are complete and fenced off from the rest of the
construction site;
construction of the Intermediate Level Waste Interim Storage Building is complete,
although work continues on construction of the Interim Spent Fuel Store; and
some of the contractors temporary facilities are being dismantled and removed.
4.4.9 After the start-up of Unit 2, the following activities would be undertaken:
the temporary jetty would be dismantled and removed;
the on-site accommodation campus would be closed, the buildings dismantled
and removed and the area cleared;
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the contractors areas would be cleared and temporary services removed;
temporary re-routing of the emergency access road would be established to allow
the final landscaping to be undertaken in the southern construction area;
the internal fit-out of the Interim Spent Fuel Store would be completed; and
final landscaping and planting would be undertaken, incorporating the final
alignment of the emergency access road and the visitor access road to the south
car park.
4.5 Construction Activities
4.5.1 The construction would be undertaken by a number of contractors. The number of
contract packages would be limited, which would maximise consistency in the
management and control of site activities. Construction activities would be controlled
by the use of construction method statements which would be prepared by the
contractor and approved by EDF Energy prior to use.
a) Contractor Mobilisation
4.5.2 Following the grant of the DCO, the main civil works would complete mobilisation and
the marine works and ancillary buildings contractors would mobilise. This would be
followed progressively by the mobilisation of the other site contractors. Mobilisation
would include:
induction training for site workers, including security and immigration checks,
training in safety awareness and site arrangements, and signing up to the
workers code of conduct prior to the issue of a site pass;
preparation and approval of construction environmental management plans;
preparation and approval of method statements for the work to be undertaken
covering safety, environmental, quality and regulatory aspects;
installation of the contractors site compound facilities; and
installation and testing of key temporary plant, such as tower cranes.
b) Construction of Contractor Compound Areas
4.5.3 The contractors compound areas would be prepared as level platforms by the site
preparation works contractor. Surface water drainage would be via the construction
drainage systems installed during the site preparation works. Service connections for
water, electricity, sewage and telecommunications would be provided in close
proximity to each compound.
4.5.4 Each contractor would provide fencing and lighting for their own compound. They
would install facilities for office and welfare use for their workforce, together with
workshops and storage facilities as necessary, connecting these to the adjacent
services connection points.
c) Site Access
4.5.5 The HPC development site would be arranged as a secure construction site with
controls on the people and materials entering and leaving the site. New roundabouts
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would be constructed at the southern and northern site access points during the site
preparation works.
4.5.6 Most of the materials required for the production of concrete (sand, aggregate,
cement and cement substitutes) would be transported to site by sea and would be
offloaded at the temporary jetty. The jetty could also be used for the import of other
bulk materials to the site, where this is practicable.
4.5.7 Other construction materials would be delivered by road and would enter the site via
the southern roundabout. As detailed in the Freight Management Strategy, all road
deliveries would be managed using a computerised delivery management system
which controls the timing of deliveries. Vehicles arriving via the motorway networks
would be required to check-in at one of the freight management facilities at J 23 or
J 24 and would be despatched to site in accordance with a strict timetable. Delivery
vehicles would be subject to search in line with the security policy before entry and
when leaving the site. Deliveries would normally be made to the respective site
contractors compound and the delivery vehicle would then leave the site.
4.5.8 Abnormal Indivisible Loads (AILs) which are subject to road transport restrictions,
including major equipment items such as the reactor pressure vessel, would be
delivered by sea to Combwich Wharf and would then be transported to site by road.
These deliveries would bypass the southern site entrance and would be transported
directly to the point of installation via the northern roundabout. All such deliveries
would be subject to special controls to minimise the impact on other road users.
4.5.9 Waste and other materials despatched from site would also be subject to controls in
accordance with the Waste Management Implementation Strategy. Where
practicable, sea transport would be used, but most transport would be by road. The
delivery management system would be used to manage the timing of freight vehicles,
including empty vehicles, leaving the site to ensure compliance with the transport
plan for waste and materials movements.
4.5.10 In accordance with the Framework Travel Plan, nearly all personnel working at the
construction site would travel to and from site by bus. Buses would collect workers
from off-site campuses, park and ride sites and other identified locations and take
them via the northern roundabout to the site personnel entrance adjacent to the
south permanent station car park. This car park would be dedicated to buses for the
duration of the construction period, although the access route would vary according
to the stage of construction works. Workers would enter the site through turnstiles
adjacent to the bus drop-off point and would be subject to security controls and
searches in line with the security policy. Buses to take workers home would wait
within the designated car park and would leave as soon as they are full.
4.5.11 When fuel is delivered to site for Unit 1, the bus access via the northern roundabout
would be closed and the worker buses would enter the site via the southern
roundabout before travelling north to the south car park and personnel entrance.
4.5.12 Very limited car parking would be available during the construction period. This
would be provided outside the construction site fence and no private cars would be
allowed within the construction site. 200 car parking spaces would be provided for
EDF Energy and construction contractors. EDF Energy and its contractors would
each be allocated a small number of parking spaces sufficient to enable them to fulfil
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their responsibilities for health and safety and worker welfare. In addition, there
would be 100 car parking spaces allocated for visitors, including VIP visitors to the
site, disabled visitors to the Public Information Centre (PIC) and coach parking for
other PIC visitors. Provision for pedal cyclists would be made at the construction
site, but motorcyclists would be required to use the park and ride sites.
4.5.13 Workers resident in the on-site accommodation campus would be able to enter the
site via dedicated turnstiles adjacent to the campus. All other persons who do not
walk or cycle to site and are not entitled to the use of one of the limited car park
spaces would be required to use the bus service to the site, via the park and ride
sites if necessary.
d) Internal Haulage Roads
4.5.14 During the site preparation works, a number of haulage roads would be developed on
site to facilitate the movement of vehicles carrying excavation and construction
materials around the site. These haulage roads are indicated on Figures 4.1 to 4.5
and would vary in location and level according to the construction needs. Where
practicable, the haulage roads are aligned with the routes for the permanent roads.
4.5.15 In addition, a temporary service road would be constructed around the perimeter of
the site within the security fence, to allow security and maintenance personnel
access to inspect and maintain the fence line.
4.5.16 The haulage roads would be constructed in accordance with the current relevant
British Standards and the Highways Agency Design Manual as required for heavy
vehicle usage and estimated traffic volumes. These haulage roads would be
surfaced with tarmac or compacted granular material as appropriate, and the surface
water drainage would be tied into the construction drainage systems to be installed
during the site preparation works.
4.5.17 Lighting would be provided along the haulage roads in line with the Construction
Lighting Strategy in Appendix A3.
e) Civil Works
i. Introduction
4.5.18 The civil works would pick up from the site preparation works, completing the deep
excavations before starting the building construction.
ii. Platform Development and Deep Excavation
4.5.19 Most of the platform development and ground terracing would have been undertaken
during the site preparation works. However, as the deep excavations are
undertaken, additional platforms and access routes would be required to facilitate
access. The deep excavations would involve mainly fresh rock, although some
weathered rock would be encountered. Where practicable, mechanical excavation
would be used. However, blasting may be required and this would be strictly
controlled, with appropriate warning given to nearby residents. The excavated
material would be transported by dump truck to the designated stockpiles in the south
of the site, where it would be stored in accordance with the Soil Management Plan
and the Materials Management Plan contained within Annex 3 to the ES.
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4.5.20 The deep excavations would require dewatering. Dewatering wells would be drilled
outside the perimeter of the excavations and water would be pumped out to lower the
water table locally and enable the excavation to be carried out in dry conditions.
Pumping rates would be adjusted to minimise the drawdown of groundwater levels
outside the excavation.
4.5.21 Excavations for Unit 2 would continue after the excavations for Unit 1 are complete
and construction of the Unit 1 buildings is underway. Excavations for the interim
spent fuel store would take place during the latter stages of Unit 1 construction, once
the marine works are substantially complete and the area can be released.
4.5.22 Material from the excavations would be taken to the material storage areas where it
would be placed and levelled to produce a temporary working platform to the east
and levelled storage areas to the west.
4.5.23 Backfilling of the excavations as the buildings are constructed would be managed in
accordance with the engineering performance required. Different material standards
are applied depending on the location of the backfill. Where practicable, excavated
material would be used for backfill and this would require careful quality control in the
segregation of materials going to the stockpiles. To achieve the particle size
standards required for backfill, rock crushing plant would be used. Where excavated
material is insufficient or unsuitable for backfill, appropriate granular fill material
would be imported.
f) Construction of the Sea Wall
4.5.24 The sea wall would be constructed to provide erosion protection for the HPC power
station platform. It is located approximately along the line of the existing cliffs in front
of the permanent power station site and would incorporate return sections at each
end of the wall to prevent erosion from the side. A 30m wide corridor from the cliff
line in the upper foreshore area would be required to construct the sea wall.
4.5.25 The West Somerset Coast Path would have been closed for the preliminary works
and a new path would be constructed immediately landward of the completed wall,
connecting to the existing coastal path. An access ramp down to the foreshore would
be provided at the western end of the wall for inspection and maintenance. Access
steps would be provided at intervals along the length of the wall to allow safe access
and egress from the foreshore level.
4.5.26 The construction methodology for the sea wall would be the responsibility of the
chosen contractor, but a likely construction sequence is indicated below.
4.5.27 The construction drainage outfall would be temporarily extended as necessary to
allow the sea wall construction to proceed safely.
4.5.28 The existing cliff line would be trimmed as necessary to provide space for the wall
construction. Rock armour would be delivered by sea and temporarily placed
seaward of the works to provide protection during construction. A haulage road
would be built parallel to the cliff to provide access and the foundations of the wall
would be excavated.
4.5.29 The excavated rockhead would be prepared and any cracks grouted and the base
concrete would be poured into prepared formwork.
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4.5.30 The area for the rock armour would be excavated, covered with geotextile and the
rock armour placed in position.
4.5.31 The main wall section would be cast within prepared formwork, prior to installation of
the drainage works behind the wall and partial backfilling behind the wall. The
construction drainage outfall would be integrated into the main wall.
4.5.32 The top section of the wall would likely be formed of pre-cast units which would be
installed on top of the main wall section before completion of backfill.
4.5.33 Access ramps and steps would be cast in parallel with the main wall construction and
the footpath would be created following completion of backfill behind the wall.
4.5.34 The return walls would be formed by interlocking cast-in-situ concrete piles,
extending down into the underlying rock with a concrete capping beam and
reinforced concrete cladding on the passive side. Pedestrian access ramps would be
formed to carry the footpath over the return walls and link into the existing sections of
the West Somerset Coast Path.
4.5.35 Once the construction drainage system has been decommissioned, the associated
outfall structure would be removed and the sea wall would be made good.
g) HPC Accommodation Campus
4.5.36 The proposed on-site accommodation campus would provide accommodation for up
to 510 workers in accordance with the Accommodation Strategy,
4.5.37 The facilities as illustrated in Plate 4.1, would comprise:
accommodation blocks;
amenity buildings;
access roads, car parking, cycle facilities and footpaths;
external sports pitches (accessible to the public) and associated welfare facilities;
security office;
access to the main construction site by turnstiles; and
drainage, landscaping and ecological features.
4.5.38 The on-site accommodation campus, whilst adjacent to the main construction site,
would be treated as a separate construction site with limited interaction with the main
site construction activities during the construction of the campus.
Preparatory Works
4.5.39 Prior to the construction works a number of preparatory activities would be
undertaken, including:
site clearance, including vegetation removal;
levelling of the platform for the construction of the campus;
construction of a landscaped earth bund to the south of the campus; and
installation of fencing around the area for the campus.
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4.5.40 Construction access is proposed via a temporary section of road connected to the
southern roundabout on the C182; this access would be retained throughout the
duration of the main HPC construction works when the on-site accommodation
campus is operational.
4.5.41 Temporary site offices, welfare accommodation, storage and site parking areas
would be provided within the site.
Construction Works
4.5.42 The construction works would commence with the preparation of the platform and
required excavations for the on-site accommodation campus and associated
facilities. Concrete works would then by undertaken to build the foundations.
4.5.43 In parallel, the construction of the internal roads and parking areas would be
undertaken. Initially these areas would be constructed up to base course and sub-
base level respectively. The final layers for the roads and parking areas would be
completed as one of the last works before occupation.
4.5.44 The section of road providing access to the site would be completed under
supervision of the highway authority. The permanent entrance into the site, off the
C182, would be constructed.
4.5.45 The surface water drainage, as well as foul and surface water connections, would be
installed at the same time as the roads, parking areas and building foundations.
4.5.46 It is envisaged that the buildings on-site could be partially or wholly of prefabricated
and/or modular construction on concrete foundations. The building elements, if a
modular construction is used, would be delivered to the site on flat-bed vehicles, then
lifted into position by mobile cranes and connected together. Where on-site steel
framed construction is to be utilised, this would be assembled and fitted out with the
internal mechanical and electrical services installed. The utility connections would
then be made.
4.5.47 Two all weather five a side sports pitches would be constructed to the north of the
buildings and the internal landscaping would be implemented.
4.5.48 Security fencing, with associated lighting and CCTV, would be erected around the
perimeter of the site.
Operation and Decommissioning
4.5.49 The campus would be operated and decommissioned in accordance with the
Accommodation Strategy.
4.5.50 The buildings and associated infrastructure would be removed in accordance with a
demolition plan, which would maximise the potential for re-use of building, modules
and materials.
4.5.51 Once the campus is removed, the area would be landscaped in accordance with the
approved landscape plan.

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Plate 4.1: HPC Accommodation Campus


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h) Construction of Buildings and Infrastructure
i. Nuclear Island
4.5.52 The nuclear island buildings are constructed of reinforced concrete. The concrete
would be mixed on site using a batching plant and would use sand, aggregate and
cement imported via the temporary jetty. In some cases, cement substitutes, such as
pulverised fuel ash would be used to secure specific concrete properties. The
reinforcement would be with steel reinforcing bars, fabricated into cages appropriate
to the building geometry and strength requirements. Some reinforcement would be
prefabricated into assemblies which can be lifted into place. Such pre-fabrication
would normally take place close to the workface to minimise handling issues. Where
plant or equipment has subsequently to be attached to the concrete structure,
embedded attachment plates are provided and fixed to the reinforcement cage in
such a way that they are able to transmit the loads of the attached equipment into the
concrete.
4.5.53 Temporary formwork either of steel and/or wood would be used to create a mould
around the reinforcement, into which the concrete is pumped. A small number of key
concrete pours would need to be completed as a continuous activity spanning
several shifts. Local residents would be given prior warning of these activities which
would involve 24-hour working.
4.5.54 The reactor building incorporates a steel liner which forms the inner shell of the
building. Sections of the liner would be pre-fabricated on-site inside a purpose-built
temporary building and then transported to the reactor building where they would be
craned into position before being welded to the other liner sections.
4.5.55 The reactor building is pre-stressed using steel tendons to improve its strength.
During construction, tendon ducts are incorporated within the concrete walls of the
building and the tendons are then threaded through the ducts and tensioned in a
controlled manner before being anchored. The tendon ducts are then filled with
grout.
4.5.56 As the buildings are constructed, the surrounding excavations are backfilled until a
level is reached just below the final ground level. The final surfacing would be
undertaken at the end of construction as part of the on-site landscaping.
ii. Conventional Island
4.5.57 The conventional island contains a combination of reinforced concrete and steel-
framed buildings. The concrete buildings would be constructed using similar
methods to the nuclear island buildings. The steel-framed buildings would be erected
using pre-fabricated steel sections lifted into place using mobile cranes. Secondary
steel sections would be attached to the main frame to allow cladding to be attached
to make the building weather-tight. Most of the steel sections would be fabricated off-
site and bolted or welded together in-situ, although some pre-fabrication may be
carried out on-site.
iii. Cooling Water Infrastructure
4.5.58 The cooling water system draws water from the Bridgwater Bay and passes it
through the turbine condensers and plant coolers before returning it to the bay. The
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water intake structures are positioned approximately 3.3 km offshore and the outfall
approximately 1.8 km offshore. The intake and outfall are connected to the power
station cooling water pumphouse by tunnels which are lined with concrete and the
connections from the cooling water pumphouse to the turbine condensers are by
means of buried composite steel/concrete pipes.
4.5.59 The cooling water tunnels would be bored from deep onshore excavations using
tunnel boring machines. The tunnels would be lined with pre-cast concrete sections
as they are bored. The excavated material would be transported back to the tunnel
entrance where any bentonite used in the tunnel boring process is recovered for re-
use before the rock is transported to the appropriate stockpile for use in the final land
re-profiling and landscaping. Tunnelling is likely to take place as a continuous activity
for several days and nights at a time. Whilst excavated material would be
transported to the stockpile during the day and night, distribution and grading of the
material would be restricted to the daytime in order to keep night-time noise levels
within acceptable limits.
4.5.60 Connections to the intake and outfall structures are made via lined vertical shafts
which are bored from the seabed down to the tunnels. The shafts would be bored
using wet drilling techniques, and would be undertaken from a jack-up rig. The intake
and outfall structures would be prefabricated and floated into position over the
connecting shafts before being lowered into position.
4.5.61 The fish return tunnel for the Fish Recovery and Return (FRR) system would be
tunnelled under the foreshore using a directional drilling technique.
iv. Ancillary Buildings
4.5.62 The proposed ancillary buildings would be predominantly steel-framed although
some reinforced concrete is used. Construction activities for the ancillary buildings
would generally be similar to the conventional island buildings.
v. Construction of the National Grid 400kV Substation
4.5.63 Construction of the National Grid substation would be a separate activity, undertaken
by National Grid and its contractors. In addition to the substation, National Grid
would divert some of the existing overhead lines in the vicinity of the site to serve the
new substation. They would also provide a new overhead line connection to the
existing Hinkley Point B 400kV substation.
4.5.64 The substation compound includes a building which would house the gas insulated
switchgear, an amenity building, workshop buildings and a diesel generator building.
In addition, there would be three single phase series inductor tanks, which would be
brought by sea to Combwich Wharf and then by road to site.
vi. Construction of the Emergency Access Road and the Bridge Over Bum
Brook
4.5.65 The emergency access road provides an access route to the site for emergency
vehicles, which is independent of the main site access. It would run from a junction
with the road running through Shurton to the power station outage access gate, via
the road connecting Wick Moor Drove to the southern power station car park.
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4.5.66 The emergency access road would not normally be used and there would be a
locked gate at the junction in Shurton. The road would be single-track with passing
places and incorporate a bridge over Bum Brook. The bridge would be single lane
and designed to keep the road above the maximum flood level of Bum Brook whilst
minimising the restriction to floodwater flows. It would also incorporate a footway to
provide pedestrian access to the landscaped areas at the south of the site.
4.5.67 The emergency access road junction in Shurton would be designed to incorporate
provision for adequate visibility splays and turning circles for emergency service
vehicles. This would necessitate the removal of a length of existing hedge in order to
achieve acceptable sight lines. New hedges would be planted as part of the
landscaping scheme and a pedestrian gate would be provided alongside the locked
vehicle gate to facilitate pedestrian access.
4.5.68 Construction of the road to the south of the bridge and the southern part of the bridge
would be undertaken using access from Shurton, as access from the north would be
limited by the existing bridge capacity. Construction access for the northern part of
the bridge and the remainder of the access road would be from the north.
4.5.69 The detailed design of the bridge would take account of the flood risk assessment
findings. It would probably incorporate pre-cast concrete sections and may require
piling for the foundations. It is envisaged that the piling would utilise cast-in-situ piles
using pre-drilled holes to minimise noise and disturbance.
4.5.70 The southern part of the emergency access road, including the junction in Shurton
and the bridge over Bum Brook, would be constructed shortly after the DCO is
granted as part of the early landscaping of the area south of grid line 144750mN.
The northern part of the road would initially be temporary and connect to the
construction road network, although it would only be used as an alternative access
for emergency vehicles. Once construction of HPC is complete and the
accommodation campus buildings have been removed, a revised temporary route
would be established through the site of the campus so that the final landscaping can
be implemented and the final road alignment can be established across the
landscaped area.
vii. Landscaping of the Southern Area
4.5.71 The land south of grid line 144750mN would not be used as part of the main
construction site, although it would accommodate the emergency access road and its
bridge over Bum Brook. The final landscaping proposals for this area involve raising
the ground levels in the northern part of the area and new planting.
4.5.72 Planting along the southern part of this area would provide early screening of the
main construction works. The areas that would not be remodelled as part of the final
landscaping have been planted ahead of the start of the preliminary works, to provide
initial screening.
4.5.73 In order to bring forward the final planting and increase the height of the screening of
the construction works from the south, it is proposed to undertake the final re-
modelling and landscaping of most of the area south of grid line 144750mN
immediately following grant of DCO. This work is expected to take up to six months
and would involve bringing material from the main site and stockpiles to increase the
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height of the land. Construction of the southern part of the emergency access road
and the bridge over Bum Brook would take place at the same time. Final
landscaping and planting of this area would have time to develop and mature during
the construction works.
viii. Utilities Infrastructure
4.5.74 During the site preparation works phase, new networks of utilities would be installed
which would provide for the main construction works and there would be a
subsequent transition to the utilities for the operating power station.
Electrical Infrastructure
4.5.75 Electrical power would be provided for the construction works by means of a
dedicated supply from the existing Hinkley Point Power Station Complex with a new
temporary distribution network serving the whole of the construction site. Extensive
sub-metering would be installed to monitor construction electricity usage.
4.5.76 Once the new National Grid 400kV substation is complete and connected to the
national grid high voltage electricity transmission system, supplies for the
energisation of the permanent power station plant would be made available, prior to
the main electricity generator connections being made. All the permanent buildings
on the site would ultimately be fed directly from the operating HPC power station.
The temporary electrical systems would be decommissioned as the construction area
is cleared and the supply from the existing power stations would be terminated.
4.5.77 HPC would be connected to the national grid high voltage electricity transmission via,
two double circuit overhead lines which currently connect the existing Hinkley Point A
and B power stations. These circuits would be diverted to the new National Grid
400kV substation and in addition, a new double circuit overhead line would also be
built to connect to the existing National Grid Hinkley Point B 400kV substation. The
transmission system connection works would be undertaken by National Grid under a
separate application for development consent by National Grid to the IPC (or its
successor).
Lighting
4.5.78 Lighting of the main construction area and access and haulage roads on the
construction site would be provided by EDF Energy or its contractors. The lighting
design would comply with the Construction Lighting Strategy. The principal
measures of this strategy are:
designing to correct light levels;
locating luminaires away from sensitive receptors;
using shields and baffles to limit light spill;
reducing height of columns;
using controls to avoid unnecessary illumination;
using full cut-off luminaires to prevent upward light;
directing light downwards to illuminate the task;
considering the choice of luminaires to achieve aims; and
using light source appropriate for use and environmental considerations.
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4.5.79 Lighting of the contractors compounds would be the responsibility of the individual
contractors, but EDF Energy would require such lighting to comply with the
Construction Lighting Strategy and achieve the objectives indicated above.
Water Supplies
4.5.80 A new water supply main is planned to serve the HPC site and this would be installed
by the local water company. The new main would enter the site from the east near to
the northern roundabout and would be installed underground. This supply would
serve both the construction works and the permanent power station via temporary
and permanent distribution networks with metering to monitor usage. The temporary
network would be decommissioned as the construction site is cleared at the end of
the construction works.
Drainage Systems
4.5.81 A temporary construction drainage system would be constructed as part of the site
preparation works. This drainage system would handle surface water run-off from
the construction areas, groundwater pumped from the dewatering wells, sewage
effluent which would have received tertiary treatment, water pumped from the cooling
water tunnelling works and flushing water discharged during early commissioning
works. These discharges would be directed via water management zones to the
appropriate discharge point.
4.5.82 The construction drainage system would be divided into three areas corresponding to
the current drainage zones. The northern area drainage would be directed to the
foreshore of Bridgwater Bay, via a discharge outfall located to ensure the potential
impact on the intertidal environment is minimised. The southern construction area
would be drained to Holford Stream, as at present. As Holford Stream would be
culverted for most of its length within the construction site, there would be two
discharge points via water management zones at the western and eastern edges of
the site. The area to the south of Grid line 144750mN, which is the approximate
alignment of the existing watershed, would be drained to Bum Brook. The need for
engineered drainage of this area would be assessed as part of the earthworks design
process and, if appropriate, a water management zone would be established to
control the flow into Bum Brook.
4.5.83 The construction drainage systems would be designed to cater for rainfall
corresponding to that expected from a one in 30 years event in accordance with best
practice guidance, but would be assessed for its capability to cope with more extreme
rainfall.
4.5.84 Dewatering systems would be required for the deep excavations needed during the
power station construction. These would incorporate dewatering wells sufficient to
keep the excavations dry under all normal circumstances and would discharge the
water into the construction drainage system. The nature of the underlying geology
indicates that groundwater flows would be limited and predictable. However,
monitoring would be carried out to measure the water quantities and quality, such
that appropriate controls can be implemented as necessary.
4.5.85 There would be a number of permanent drainage systems for the power station. The
systems would be segregated in accordance with best practice and would
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incorporate oil separation and treatment facilities as required. Parts of the temporary
construction drainage system would be incorporated into the permanent drainage
systems and this transition would take place during the later stages of construction.
Remaining parts of the temporary drainage system within the permanent
development would be removed or isolated and left in place.
4.5.86 The construction drainage systems located outside the permanent power station
footprint would be removed as part of the construction area clearance. However the
Holford Stream culvert would be retained as part of the permanent landscaping.
4.5.87 The permanent drainage systems would be designed to cater for rainfall levels
expected to occur at a frequency of once in 100 years. In addition, the systems
would be designed to cope with extreme rainfall which is only expected to occur once
in 10,000 years, without allowing flood-water build-up on-site which could threaten to
flood safety-related buildings.
4.5.88 The permanent drainage systems would include a groundwater drainage system,
designed to maintain groundwater levels no higher than about six metres below the
station ground level, in order to limit the flotation forces on deep buildings. This
drainage system would discharge into the station cooling water system.
Sewage
4.5.89 A new sewage collection network would be installed for the construction site and this
would take the sewage to a number of modular sewage treatment plants and the
treated water would be discharged into the site drainage systems. The temporary
plants would provide tertiary treatment to ensure acceptable discharge quality.
4.5.90 A new permanent sewage treatment plant would be built as part of the permanent
power station and this would service the permanent works, discharging treated
effluent into the station cooling water discharge to the Bridgwater Bay.
ix. Site Offices and Welfare Facilities
4.5.91 The site offices, canteens and other infrastructure would be subject to continuous
change as the workforce numbers change, the nature of the work evolves from civil
construction, through mechanical and electrical installation, to commissioning and
operation, and as contractors arrive and depart from the site.
4.5.92 EDF Energy would exercise overall control of the temporary infrastructure within the
construction areas and would allocate temporary compounds for contractors, within
which they would have a degree of flexibility in how they occupy the space.
4.5.93 A large pre-fabrication building is planned for construction of the reactor building steel
liners. This would be within the construction envelope indicated in Figures 4.6 and
4.7, but the exact size and location would be the subject of further discussions with
the main civil works contractor when they are appointed.
4.5.94 A dual purpose building is located in the south-west corner of the permanent
development site. This building would be used by the nuclear steam supply system
contractor as a warehouse and fabrication facility during the construction works and
would then become the outage workshop and store for the ongoing station operation.
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x. Mechanical and Electrical Works
4.5.95 The mechanical and electrical plant installation phase would commence when the
civil structures are sufficiently advanced to enable access. This would be in
approximately 2014. There would be a limited number of mechanical and electrical
contractors and they would install equipment manufactured by others, as well as
equipment supplied under their own contracts.
4.5.96 The majority of the mechanical and electrical activity would take place within the
power station buildings in the north of the site. However, some of the contractors
compounds would be located in the southern part of the site. A significant proportion
of the piping and ventilation ductwork would be pre-fabricated before installation,
either at the manufacturers works or on-site.
4.5.97 Most of the mechanical and electrical equipment would be delivered by road,
although some items, such as small bore pipework, cable, and items manufactured
abroad, may be suitable for sea delivery. Suppliers would be encouraged to use sea
transport where practicable.
4.5.98 Approximately 180 mechanical and electrical plant items, such as the reactor
pressure vessels, would be very large and/or heavy and would require special
transport to site. These are classified as Abnormal Indivisible Loads (AILs) and
would be shipped to Combwich Wharf by sea and then taken to site by road using
special trailers. These items would be taken straight to their final location and
installed using special lifting and handling equipment.
4.6 Construction Logistics
4.6.1 This Section outlines the management of the flow of people and materials within the
HPC development site.
a) Freight and Materials
i. Materials Quantities
4.6.2 HPC and the on-site associated development construction works would require
around 5.1 million tonnes of material to be brought onto the development site, of
which at least 2.3 million tonnes is expected to be transported by sea via the
temporary jetty. The remaining 2.8 million tonnes would be transported by road. A
detailed schedule of material quantities is provided within the Freight Management
Strategy.
ii. Materials Delivery and Storage
4.6.3 Material arriving via the temporary jetty would be mainly sand, aggregate and cement
but the jetty is also designed to handle other more general construction materials.
The sand and aggregate would be offloaded into a hopper at the jetty head, from
which a conveyor system would transport it to stockpiles in the north-west corner of
the site. The cement would be pumped ashore, using a pipeline along the jetty, into
silos. These materials would be transported by truck or conveyor to the concrete
batching plants where the concrete is mixed and pumped or trucked to the point of
use.
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4.6.4 Other bulk materials arriving at the jetty would be offloaded by mobile crane and
transported by truck to the appropriate storage areas.
4.6.5 Most materials arriving by road would enter the site via the south entrance where
security checks would be carried out before the materials are trucked to the
appropriate storage areas.
4.6.6 Road deliveries would be controlled via a delivery management system as described
in the Freight Management Strategy, in order to limit the impact on the road
network.
4.6.7 Materials would be stored in the contractors compounds until required for installation.
4.6.8 Abnormal Indivisible Loads (AILs), which have been brought by sea to Combwich
Wharf, would be transported to site by road and would enter the site via the northern
roundabout. Prior to being required at site, these loads would be stored at the
Combwich freight laydown facility. The loads would then be taken direct to the point
of installation and would not be stored in the contractors compounds.
iii. Pre-fabrication
4.6.9 Materials delivered to site may be pre-fabricated into larger assemblies before
installation. Examples of likely pre-fabrication are the reactor building steel liner and
reinforcing bars for the reactor building structures.
4.6.10 Pre-fabrication of the reactor building steel liner would take place in a large
temporary building where welding can be carried out in a controlled environment.
The pre-fabricated sections would be transported using large trailers along a heavy
load route to the point where they can be lifted into place with a large jib crane.
4.6.11 Reinforcing bar cages could also be pre-assembled, the largest cages being
assembled close to the point of use, where they can be lifted directly into position by
crane. Smaller pre-assemblies could be fabricated further away and brought to the
crane by truck.
4.6.12 Other materials may be pre-fabricated within the contractors compound before being
taken to the point of installation.
iv. Materials Handling
4.6.13 Unloading and loading of trucks within the contractors compounds would normally be
undertaken using forklift trucks and mobile cranes as appropriate.
4.6.14 Within the HPC Development Site, a number of tower cranes and large mobile
cranes would be used to install equipment and handle scaffolding, reinforcing bar
pre-fabrications, temporary formwork etc. Large jib cranes would be used to install
the large pre-fabricated steel reactor building liner sections, including the liner roof,
as well as the crane beams and crab for the reactor building crane.
4.6.15 Specialised lifting equipment would be used for the installation of the AILs. Such
equipment could include specialised jacks, lifting frames and winches.
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v. Security
4.6.16 All vehicles entering and leaving the site would be subject to security checks in line
with the security plan.
b) Construction Workforce
i. Workforce Numbers
4.6.17 Workforce numbers have been estimated based on the workforce deployed to date at
Flamanville 3, the first EDF EPR to be constructed, and the total estimated man-
hours required to complete it. Experience of construction of multiple-unit plants in
France has then been factored in to convert the single-unit Flamanville workforce
numbers into the workforce numbers required for the twin-unit power station at HPC.
The approximate profile of workforce numbers is given in Plate 4.2
Plate 4.2: Workforce Profile

4.6.18 The peak workforce required at HPC is estimated to be around 5,600, with civil
worker numbers comprising much of the early workforce, being gradually replaced by
mechanical and electrical trades as the construction progresses. With the changing
nature of work, the total number of individual workers expected to be employed over
the lifetime of the construction of HPC is likely to be significantly higher, with a likely
range of 20,000 to 25,000 people.
ii. Workforce Transport
4.6.19 The large majority of workers would be transported to the site by bus and would enter
the site via the northern roundabout. A shuttle bus service would operate around the
construction site to transport workers between the southern contractors areas and
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the main construction site in the north. Designated walkways would be provided to
reduce potential conflict between pedestrian and vehicular traffic on the site.
iii. Working Hours
4.6.20 The working patterns of particular groups of workers would be determined by the
needs of the construction phase. Security staff would work shifts to cover the full 24-
hour period with higher numbers on duty at times of workforce shift changeover and
peak material deliveries. Similarly, catering and cleaning staff would not necessarily
work the same shift patterns as other staff. Most office workers would work a normal
day shift.
4.6.21 In addition, there will be other activities which require continuity of working, such as
tunnelling and large concrete pours, where the working pattern may differ from those
described below. It is anticipated that this will involve a small proportion of the
workforce.
4.6.22 The majority of the workforce would work a double day shift with a small night shift.
The workforce deployed on non-critical buildings would likely work a single day shift
and office workers would work a normal day pattern. The likely numbers of workers
for each of the shifts at the time of peak workforce numbers on site are given in
Table 4.3 below:
Table 4.3: Approximate Distribution of Workers between Shifts
Shift Number of Workers
Double Day Shift First shift 1,480
Double Day Shift Second shift 1,440
Night shift 380
Single Day Shift 1,460
Office personnel 840
Total 5,600
4.6.23 The start times for each shift would vary within a range chosen to minimise
congestion and noise during the travel to and from work. The start and finish times
for the various shifts from Monday to Friday is shown in Table 4.4 below:
Table 4.4: Shift start/finish times Monday to Friday
Shift Start Time Finish Time
Double Day Shift First shift From 06:00 to 07:30 From 14:00 to 16:00 or
after 17:30
Double Day Shift Second shift From 13:30 to 15:00 From 22:00 to 24:00
Night shift From 20:30 to 22:00 From 06:00 to 08:00
Single Day Shift From 07:00 to 08:30 From 16:30 to 18:30
Office personnel From 07:30 to 09:00 From 17:30 to 19:00
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4.6.24 For weekend working, two work patterns would be used. The first involves a single
Saturday morning shift with no shift on a Sunday. The Saturday morning shift times
are shown in Table 4.5 below:
Table 4.5: Shift start/finish times Saturday Morning
Shift Start Time Finish Time
Saturday Morning Shift From 06:00 to 08:00 From 13:00 to 15:00
4.6.25 The second weekend working pattern operates on a four-week cycle comprising 12
working days (Monday to Sunday plus Monday to Friday) followed by a two-day non-
working weekend (Saturday and Sunday) followed by 11 working days (Monday to
Sunday plus Monday to Thursday) followed by a three-day non-working weekend
(Friday to Sunday). For this working pattern, the shift working times would be as
Table 4.6 below for all working days, including working weekends.
Table 4.6: Shift start/finish times Alternate working pattern, all days worked
Shift Start Time Finish Time
Double Day Shift First shift From 06:00 to 07:30 From 14:00 to 16:00 or
after 17:30
Double Day Shift Second shift From 13:30 to 15:00 From 22:00 to 24:00
Night shift From 20:30 to 22:00 From 06:00 to 08:00
Single Day Shift From 07:00 to 08:30 From 16:30 to 18:30
4.6.26 Whichever weekend working pattern is followed, there would also be a limited
number of people (less than 300) working on the non-working days carrying out
maintenance and other activities similar to the night shift.
4.6.27 The night shift would generally be a maintenance and logistics support shift involving
relatively quiet activities such as:
pre-placement of materials for the subsequent shifts;
repositioning of scaffolding;
essential plant maintenance and repair;
dewatering operations;
refuelling;
unloading activities at the jetty; and
radiography of welds.
4.6.28 In addition, where continuity of work is essential, the night shift could include:
Fixing of concrete formwork and reinforcing bars.
Welding of the reactor containment liner.
Continuation of large concrete pours (in excess of 18 hours).
Tunnelling activities, including removal of excavated material to the northern part
of the stockpile area south of Green Lane. Noisier activities, including the
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spreading and grading of such excavated material would be restricted to the
daytime.
4.6.29 The majority of night-time working would take place in the northern part of the site.
c) Site Access and Security
4.6.30 Workers would access the site via turnstiles operated by their identity passes. They
would be subject to searches in accordance with the site security plan as they enter
and leave the site. The main personnel access is in the northern part of the site
where the buses set down and pick up. Additional access turnstiles would be
provided at the south entrance for freight vehicle drivers and workers staying at the
on-site campus.
d) Site Offices and Welfare Facilities
4.6.31 EDF Energy would provide office space and welfare facilities for its own staff and for
contractors who do not require their own site compounds. EDF Energy would also
provide canteens, first aid and welfare facilities in the main construction area to the
north of the HPC Development Site for use by all workers, in order to reduce walking
time to and from breaks etc. It is currently envisaged that there would be two
canteens and multiple welfare and first aid buildings within the main construction
area. The welfare and first aid facilities would be relocated as necessary as the work
proceeds.
4.6.32 In addition to the EDF Energy facilities, each construction contractor would be
required to provide office, changing and welfare facilities for their own staff within
their allocated compounds. The contractors would also incorporate pre-fabrication
facilities, workshops and storage facilities, as necessary for their work, within their
compounds.
4.6.33 The medical centre would provide a 24-hour service. In addition to the treatment of
minor injuries and ailments, the medical centre would provide preventative health
care. In the event of any serious injuries, the on-site medical team would provide first
aid and the local emergency services would be called to take any casualties to
hospital.
4.6.34 Drug and alcohol testing would be carried out in accordance with the site policies on
workers entering the site. Smoking would not be permitted on-site except within
clearly designated smoking areas.
4.6.35 The on-site campus would be separated from the main construction site by a security
fence. The campus would provide accommodation and recreation facilities and
would operate independently of the main construction site.
e) Construction Waste and Contaminated Materials
4.6.36 Any contaminated material discovered during excavation would be removed and/or
remediated.
4.6.37 There would be a policy of waste reduction which would include reducing packaging
material, consistent with the need for protection of sensitive items; re-use of items
and recycling of remaining materials. This would be facilitated by the appointment of
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a site waste management contractor, who would receive the construction waste from
the various construction and erection contractors and take the accumulated waste to
appropriate sorting and recycling facilities. Further details on the management of
waste arising from the HPC Project are provided in the Waste Management
Implementation Strategy.
f) Landscaping
4.6.38 The final hard landscaping of the built development would utilise materials brought
onto the site for this purpose. Depending on the quantities involved and the
originating location, the jetty may be used to import these materials
4.6.39 The landscaping of the temporary working areas would utilise the materials
excavated during the site preparation and excavation works. This material would be
relocated using dump trucks and graders to form the final topography and topsoil
would be taken from storage to cover the area.
4.6.40 It is anticipated that the re-profiling would take place in phases. The north-western
and south-eastern areas of the site of the site would be built up using material from
the stockpiles before surfacing with topsoil and seeding with meadow grass. The
main stockpile areas would then be re-graded to achieve the desired profile, covered
in topsoil and seeded with meadow grass. The perimeter areas would be
relandscaped either as part of the second phase, or as a separate third phase.
Trees and hedges would be planted whilst the grassed areas are monitored for
achievement of the desired land quality. Once the required quality is achieved, the
relevant land areas, as indicated on the final landscaping plan, would be returned to
agricultural use.
4.6.41 Whilst the initial phases of the landscaping are being carried out, the emergency
access road would be temporarily diverted around the southern and eastern
perimeter of the site. The final route of this road and the visitor access road from the
southern roundabout to the south car park would be prepared as part of the
landscaping work and the roads would then be built on their final alignments.
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5. ROLE OF THE ASSOCIATED
DEVELOPMENT SITES
5.1 Introduction
5.1.1 This Section describes the need for and role of each of the associated development
sites during the construction of HPC, including the timing of the introduction of the
associated development sites and any changes in their extent or function over time.
5.1.2 The associated developments are proposed in order to achieve the following
objectives:
to provide accommodation for the non-home based workforce (in addition to
accommodation that has been identified as available within the local community
and surrounding area);
to manage the flow of personnel and freight (including goods delivered to
Combwich Wharf) to HPC;
to provide freight management facilities to regulate the flow of HGVs through
Bridgwater and Cannington, particularly at peak times; and
to provide a bypass around Cannington to lessen the impact of vehicle
movements through the centre of the village.
5.1.3 The accommodation campuses would be provided in accordance with the
Accommodation Strategy. The operation of the accommodation campus sites
would support the Accommodation Strategy.
5.1.4 The park and ride sites would be provided and operated in accordance with the
Framework Travel Plan.
5.1.5 The freight management facilities, the refurbishment of Combwich Wharf and the
Combwich freight laydown facility would be provided and operated in accordance
with the Freight Management Strategy.
5.2 Individual Sites
a) Bridgwater A Accommodation Campus
5.2.1 The proposed Bridgwater A accommodation campus, would be sized to
accommodate 850 bed spaces in accordance with the Accommodation Strategy.
5.2.2 The facilities as illustrated in Plate 5.1, would comprise:
an accommodation campus with 25 accommodation buildings; three football
pitches (one full size and two 5-a-side pitches) and associated changing facilities;
543 car parking spaces and bus, motorcycle and bicycle parking spaces; an
amenity building providing amongst other things administration, canteen, laundry,
gymnasium and recreational facilities; and internal access roads;
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access off the A39 (Bath Road), changes to the road markings along the A39
(Bath Road) and the stopping up of Fredrick Road;
a new drainage rhyne;
landscaping within the site, including tree planting around the perimeter of the
site; and
other ancillary development, including signage, fencing, lighting, CCTV and
utilities.
5.2.3 The site currently comprises a disused cellophane factory, which is currently part
demolished, and a sports and social club including sports pitches and a bowling
green.
5.2.4 Construction of the accommodation campus (of which preparatory works are the first
component) is proposed to commence in 2013. It is expected that construction would
take approximately 27 months. It is proposed that preparatory works would run
concurrently with the main construction works. Similarly, it is proposed that a first
phase of the campus would be occupied whilst the construction of the second phase
continues.
5.2.5 Operation of the Bridgwater A accommodation campus is scheduled to finish in 2021.
b) Bridgwater C Accommodation Campus
5.2.6 The proposed Bridgwater C accommodation campus would be sized to
accommodate 150 workers, in accordance with the Accommodation Strategy.
5.2.7 The facilities, as illustrated in Plate 5.2, would comprise
an accommodation campus with four accommodation buildings; an all weather 5-
a-side football pitch; 66 car parking spaces, and motorcycle and bicycle spaces; a
temporary canteen building for a period of approximately six months until the
facilities at Bridgwater A accommodation campus become operational; and
internal access roads;
alterations to the existing gyratory on the A39 (Bath Road), including provision of
two bus shelters and changes to the road markings;
access road off College Way;
landscaping within the site, including tree planting along College Way; and
other ancillary development, including signage, fencing, lighting, CCTV and
utilities.
5.2.8 The site is currently used as a training pitch and parking by Bridgwater and Albion
Rugby Football Club.
5.2.9 Construction of the accommodation campus (of which preparatory works are the first
component) is proposed to commence in 2013. It is anticipated to take
approximately 12 months, and would be completed in one phase. It would be
constructed around the same time as the Bridgwater A accommodation campus.

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Plate 5.1: Bridgwater A Accommodation Campus

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Plate 5.2: Bridgwater C Accommodation Campus

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5.2.10 The Bridgwater C accommodation campus would utilise amenity facilities on the
Bridgwater A accommodation campus when these become available. Until then,
temporary amenity facilities would be provided at the Bridgwater C site.
c) Cannington Bypass
5.2.11 The proposed Cannington bypass would link the existing A39 southern bypass to the
C182 (Rodway) (see Plate 5.3).
5.2.12 The proposed development site is currently predominantly agricultural land.
5.2.13 Construction of the bypass (of which preparatory works would be the first component)
is proposed to commence in 2013 and take about 21 months.
5.2.14 The Cannington bypass is planned to remain in operation after completion of the
construction of HPC.
d) Cannington Park and Ride Facility
5.2.15 The Cannington park and ride facility would be provided to enable site workers and
visitors (including visitors to the Public Information Centre) to park their cars,
motorcycles or bicycles and travel to site by bus in accordance with the Framework
Travel Plan.
5.2.16 The proposed park and ride facility at Cannington would comprise an area for the
parking of vehicles, a bus waiting area, some ancillary structures, including bus
shelters, and amenity/welfare/security buildings as illustrated in Plate 5.4.
5.2.17 The site is currently used for agricultural purposes, located directly off the A39.
5.2.18 Construction of the park and ride facility (of which preparatory works would be the
first component) is proposed to commence in 2013. It is expected that these works
would take approximately 11 months to complete.
5.2.19 Operation of the Cannington park and ride facility is scheduled to finish around the
end of 2021.
e) Combwich Wharf and Freight Laydown Facility
i. Combwich Wharf
5.2.20 The refurbished and extended Combwich Wharf would receive sea-borne deliveries
of Abnormal Indivisible Loads (AILs) and other freight in accordance with the Freight
Management Strategy and is illustrated in Plate 5.5.
5.2.21 The proposed wharf refurbishment and extension would also provide for new berthing
and lifting facilities. A new access road would be constructed from Combwich Wharf
to the freight laydown facility. This road would cater for HGVs delivering general
construction goods from Combwich Wharf to the freight laydown facility.
5.2.22 Works at Combwich Wharf (of which preparatory works are the first component) are
proposed to commence in 2013. It is expected that these works would take about 14
months to complete.
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5.2.23 The Combwich Wharf facility is planned to remain in operation throughout the
operation and decommissioning of HPC.
ii. Combwich Freight Laydown Facility
5.2.24 The Combwich freight laydown facility would be used for the temporary storage of
AILs destined for the main HPC Development Site and secure storage of construction
related materials. Deliveries by sea to Combwich are constrained by the tides and
subject to weather-related delays. Offloading is also constrained by tidal conditions
and the working hours of the wharf. Shipments would therefore be scheduled ahead
of need to minimise the risk of late delivery. In addition, the site requirement for
abnormal indivisible loads (AILs) that are delivered through Combwich exceed the
wharfs capacity at certain times, requiring deliveries to be scheduled earlier still, to
avoid delaying work on site. Bulk materials deliveries are likely to contain sufficient
material for several weeks usage on site. As a result, there is a need to store sea-
borne goods in the vicinity of Combwich Wharf to act as a buffer between planned
delivery dates and site needs. The freight laydown facility is illustrated in Plate 5.5.
5.2.25 Construction (of which preparatory works are the first component) is proposed to
commence in 2014, and would take approximately 12 months to complete.
5.2.26 The operation of the Combwich freight laydown facility is scheduled to finish in 2021.
f) M5 Junction 23 Park and Ride Facility, Freight Management Facility,
Consolidation Facility for Courier Deliveries and Induction Centre
5.2.27 The M5 J unction 23 park and ride facility would be provided to enable site workers to
park their vehicles and travel to site by bus in accordance with the Framework
Travel Plan. The freight management facility would be provided to manage freight
traffic in accordance with the Freight Management Strategy. This site would also
incorporate a consolidation facility for post and courier deliveries and an induction
centre for worker induction prior to starting work on the main construction site.
5.2.28 The proposed development at the J unction 23 site is illustrated in Plate 5.6 and
would comprise:
a park and ride facility, including an area for parking of cars, a bus waiting area
and some ancillary structures including bus shelters and a security/welfare
buildings;
a freight management facility, including an area for the parking of HGVs and other
vehicles, , and some ancillary structures, including an administration/amenity and
security building;
a consolidation facility for courier deliveries; and
a worker induction centre with 120 associated parking spaces.
5.2.29 The site is currently a combination of grazing fields and low-lying pastureland.
5.2.30 Construction of these facilities (of which preparatory works would be the first
component) is proposed to commence in 2013. It is expected that these works would
take approximately 17 months to complete, with the facilities being progressively
brought into use, prior to final completion.
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Plate 5.3: Cannington Bypass


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Plate 5.4: Cannington Park and Ride Facility


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Plate 5.5: Combwich Wharf Refurbishment and Extension and Combwich Freight Laydown Facility

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Plate 5.6: M5, J unction 23 Park and Ride Facility, Freight Management Facility, Consolidation Facility for Courier Deliveries and Induction Centre

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5.2.31 The operation of the J 23 facility is scheduled to finish in 2020.
g) M5 Junction 24 Park and Ride Facility, Freight Management Facility,
Temporary Consolidation Facility for Postal/Courier Deliveries, and
Temporary Induction Centre
5.2.32 The proposals for the J unction 24 facilities provide for the initial construction period,
before the J unction 23 facilities could be completed. The facility would then be
reduced in scope to support the remainder of the construction period.
5.2.33 The proposed development at the J unction 24 site is illustrated in Plate 5.7 and
would comprise:
a park and ride facility, including parking within an existing warehouse and
externally for 1,300 vehicles, a bus waiting area and some ancillary structures
including bus shelters and amenity/security/welfare areas;
a freight management facility, including an area for the parking of 140 HGVs and
some ancillary structures, including administration/amenity and security
areas/buildings;
a temporary consolidation facility for courier deliveries; and
a temporary worker induction centre with 75 associated parking spaces.
5.2.34 These facilities would be constructed in 2013, taking about 6 months with facilities
being introduced in phases, and would remain in place until the facility at J unction 23
is fully operational in 2014. At this point, the J unction 24 facility would be modified as
follows:
the park and ride capacity would be reduced to take account of the opening of
J unction 23 park and ride;
the freight management facility parking would be reduced to 55 HGVs;
the consolidation facility for postal/courier deliveries would be removed; and
the temporary worker induction centre would be removed.
5.2.35 The operation of the J 24 facility is scheduled to finish in 2022.
h) Williton Park and Ride Facility
5.2.36 The Williton park and ride facility would be provided to enable site workers to park
their cars, motorcycles or bicycles and travel to site by bus in accordance with the
Framework Travel Plan.
5.2.37 The proposed park and ride facility at Williton would comprise an area for the parking
of vehicles, a bus waiting area, some ancillary structures, including bus shelters, and
an amenity/welfare/security building as illustrated in Plate 5.8.
5.2.38 The site is currently used as a lorry park facility with a building used for storage,
maintenance and light industrial uses, located directly off the B3190.
5.2.39 The alterations to the facility required to enable EDF Energy to use the site as a park
and ride facility (of which preparatory works would be the first component) would
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commence in 2013. It is expected that these works would take approximately nine
months to complete.
5.2.40 Operation of the Williton park and ride facility is scheduled to finish in 2020.


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Plate 5.7: M5, J unction 24 Park and Ride Facility, Freight Management Facility, Temporary Consolidation Facility for Postal/Courier Deliveries, and Temporary Induction Centre

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Plate 5.8: Williton Park and Ride Facility


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6. CONSTRUCTION OF ASSOCIATED
DEVELOPMENTS
6.1 Introduction
6.1.1 This Section describes the methodology for constructing and decommissioning
each of the associated developments associated with HPC, including the
accommodation campuses, park and rides, freight management centres,
Cannington bypass and Combwich Wharf.
6.2 Temporary Buildings and Structures
6.2.1 A range of buildings, structures, plant, equipment, uses, construction
hoardings and means of enclosure would be required temporarily in
connection with, and for the duration of, construction works for the associated
development. These would be located within the boundaries of the respective
associated development sites. Following cessation of construction works, all
temporary structures and uses would be removed.
6.3 Individual Sites
a) Construction of Bridgwater A Accommodation Campus
i. Preparatory Works
6.3.1 Preparatory works would run concurrently with the main construction works. It
is proposed to establish a temporary construction site access off the A39 (Bath
Road) on the south-eastern boundary of the site, via the existing entrance into
the sports club. It is proposed to retain this entrance for the duration of the
construction works. A separate temporary access is proposed at the south-
eastern end of the site, using the existing factory entrance, to facilitate the
demolition and remediation phase.
6.3.2 The site would be secured with suitable temporary fencing at the perimeter of
the work area.
6.3.3 Demolition of the existing buildings would be required and this would be
undertaken on a phased basis from south to north across the site. Similarly
the remediation works would also be undertaken on a phased basis, following
demolition of the relevant part of the site. It is anticipated that these works
would be completed within 27 months.
6.3.4 Some ecological works, including clearance of vegetation, may be required
prior to the commencement of the main construction works.
ii. Construction
6.3.5 The first phase would comprise delivery of the first accommodation buildings,
an amenity building, bus terminus, parking areas, security fencing (as
appropriate) and associated roads for that part of the development, within the
parcel of land in the southern part of the site. It is anticipated that this would
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take approximately 16 months from completion of the remediation works of that
land parcel.
6.3.6 The second phase would comprise the sports changing rooms, a full-size
grass football pitch and two all-weather 5-a-side pitches, the remaining
accommodation buildings, associated access and parking areas. It is
anticipated that this would take approximately 27 months from completion of
the remediation works of that land parcel. Drainage, landscaping and other
associated developments would be delivered as part of each phase.
6.3.7 At a mutually agreed point in the programme, and under the supervision of the
highway authority, the permanent connection to the A39 (Bath Road) would be
made. It is anticipated that these highway works could take approximately six
months to complete. This entrance would be used by occupants of the
campus accommodation as the main access point.
6.3.8 It is envisaged that the accommodation buildings could be of prefabricated
modular construction on concrete foundations which would be supported by
piles, where required by the ground conditions. The building elements would
be delivered to the site, then lifted into position by mobile cranes and
connected together.
6.3.9 The amenity building and sports changing rooms would be constructed using
modular or traditional construction techniques followed by fit-out and the
internal mechanical and electrical services installation. Some of the smaller
buildings, such as security booths and bus shelters, could be delivered fully
prefabricated.
6.3.10 Foul and surface water connections would be made to the local public
sewerage networks, subject to gaining approval from the relevant authorities
and service providers. The surface water drainage runs would be installed at
the same time as the roads, parking areas and building foundations.
6.3.11 It is currently envisaged that the internal roads and parking areas for buses
would be designed and constructed using traditional methods. The on-site car
parking areas would be formed using a permeable material arrangement.
Initially both these areas would be constructed to sub-base level with the final
layers being installed towards the end of this construction phase.
6.3.12 Security fencing would be erected around the perimeter of the site, with
external lighting and CCTV security cameras installed throughout the facility.
iii. Operation and Decommissioning
6.3.13 The campus would be operated in accordance with the Accommodation
Strategy. EDF Energy use of the facility is anticipated to finish in 2021.
6.3.14 The ultimate end state of the facility will be determined in accordance with the
Post Operational Strategy. Any removal of buildings and infrastructure would
be in accordance with a demolition plan, which would maximise the potential
for re-use of building, modules and materials.
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b) Construction of Bridgwater C Accommodation Campus
i. Preparatory Works
6.3.15 Preparatory works are expected to overlap with the construction phase.
6.3.16 Vehicle and pedestrian construction access would be provided on the northern
boundary of the site for the duration of the construction works, to reduce any
disruption to road users to the south, i.e. Bridgwater College.
6.3.17 The site overlies a former landfill site. Some ground remediation may be
required and these works would be completed at this stage, with any
associated stripping of vegetation.
6.3.18 Any required ecological mitigation would be carried out prior to the start of any
works.
6.3.19 The site would be secured with suitable temporary fencing at the boundary of
the works area.
6.3.20 The construction site office, welfare accommodation, storage and site parking
areas would be located in the north-western section of the site.
ii. Construction
6.3.21 Construction works are anticipated to last for approximately 12 months (which
overlaps in part with the preparatory phase), and would commence with the
piling for the building foundations. Where this piling produces contaminated
arisings from the former landfill site they would be removed from the site and
taken to a licensed facility for disposal. On completion of the piling works, the
excavation and concrete works for the building foundations would be
undertaken.
6.3.22 In parallel, the construction of the internal roads and parking areas would
commence. Initially these areas would be constructed up to base course and
sub-base level respectively. The final layers for the roads and parking areas
would be completed towards the end of the construction programme. The
surface water drainage infrastructure would be installed at the same time as
the roads, parking areas and building foundations.
6.3.23 The principal building type would be the accommodation buildings. These
buildings would be designed to be permanent structures albeit the type of
structure is still to be finalised. These buildings would be constructed using
modular construction techniques, using steel, timber or structural insulated
panels with timber frames. The buildings have been designed to allow
modification during EDF Energy use.
6.3.24 After completion of the building foundations, the frame and envelope would be
constructed. The building would then be fitted-out and the mechanical and
electrical services installed. The utility connections would be made to the local
public networks, subject to gaining approval from the relevant local authorities
and service providers.
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6.3.25 The section of internal road providing access to the site would be completed to
adoptable standards; and, under the supervision of the highway authority, the
connection to College Way would be made.
6.3.26 Security fencing would be erected around the perimeter of the site, with
external lighting and CCTV cameras installed throughout the facility.
6.3.27 The primary landscaping works would be undertaken during the appropriate
season, where possible. The final landscaping works would be completed at
the end of the construction works following removal of the construction site
office and other temporary facilities.
6.3.28 The accommodation buildings would be opened in one phase approximately
12 months after the start of construction.
iii. Operation and Decommissioning
6.3.29 The campus would be operated in accordance with the Accommodation
Strategy.
6.3.30 The ultimate end state of the facility will be determined in accordance with the
Post Operational Strategy. However, it is anticipated that once the need for
the campus has ceased in accordance with the Accommodation Strategy, it is
anticipated that, subject to the necessary permissions, the campus would be
retained for use in connection with Bridgwater College.
c) Construction of Cannington Bypass
i. Preparatory Works
Ecological and Archaeological Mitigation
6.3.31 Ecological mitigation would be required, including habitat creation and
protected species relocation, some of which would require temporary localised
fencing. Temporary and permanent crossing arrangements would be made for
the protected species.
6.3.32 The principal archaeological features identified on the site would be subject to
set piece excavation and preservation by record.
Site Establishment
6.3.33 In conjunction with the ecological mitigation works, the site would be secured
with suitable temporary fencing at the boundary of the work areas.
6.3.34 Site clearance would progress along the length of the sections of the proposed
development, removing vegetation and stripping the topsoil where relevant.
The topsoil would be stored on site and would be available for use in the
landscape works.
6.3.35 Temporary access arrangements would be put in place during the construction
phase to reduce any impacts on those using land in the vicinity of the
construction area, including Brymore School, Withiel Farm and adjoining fields.
Access to the existing properties and any rights of way would be maintained,
using diversions to rights of way where necessary, during the construction
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phase. Temporary crossing points would also be provided, where necessary,
to maintain access routes for people, animals and vehicles.
6.3.36 It is envisaged that two site compounds would be established. The southern
site compound would support the construction of the southern and central
sections of the proposed development, to be located adjacent to the A39
roundabout. The site compound supporting the construction of the northern
section of the proposed development would be located adjacent to the site of
the new roundabout linking to the C182 (Rodway) and could also support
construction of the central section of the proposed development.
6.3.37 Both site compounds would include: a construction site office, welfare
accommodation, security, materials storage areas and site parking; albeit the
southern site compound would be the principal compound. The temporary site
accommodation would likely be of prefabricated, modular construction and
delivered to site on flat bed road vehicles.
6.3.38 Temporary site utilities comprising power, water, drainage and
telecommunications would be provided as required.
ii. Construction Works
Earthworks
6.3.39 The earthworks have been optimised to minimise the amount of surplus spoil
requiring disposal off-site. It is estimated that approximately 65,000m3 would
be cut and approximately 30,000m3 would be used as fill, giving a surplus of
approximately 35,000m3 . In addition, approximately18,000m3 of topsoil
would be stripped, of which approximately 9,000m3 would be retained on site
for landscape works. All these figures are unbulked.
Construction of Carriageway and Associated Infrastructure
6.3.40 Initially the proposed carriageway would be constructed up to base course
level, with the final wearing course layer being added towards the end of the
construction phase for each section of the proposed route. After the final
wearing course layers are laid, the proposed lighting columns, road markings
and signage would be erected.
6.3.41 At this stage, any necessary utility diversions or works to existing carriageways
would be carried out. This would include the provision of electricity supplies to
feed the proposed lighting and road crossings.
6.3.42 The surface water drainage would be installed at the same time as the
carriageway is constructed, to enable the necessary connections to the
balancing ponds at the northern and southern ends of the proposed
development to be made.
Construction of Permanent Road Connections and Accesses
6.3.43 The construction work to connect the carriageway to the existing A39
roundabout would result in some minor disruption to the existing road network,
although it is not anticipated that the roundabout would be taken out of use or
that roads would be closed. This would be carried out in consultation with the
Highway Authority and any other relevant stakeholders.
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6.3.44 The southern section of the proposed development would be opened once
construction of that section was complete. Redundant highway would then be
stopped up and the signalised crossing commissioned, allowing the diversion
of all vehicles south to the roundabout, until the northern and central sections
are completed.
6.3.45 The construction of the new roundabout in the northern section of the
proposed development would be a significant change to the operation of the
road. Therefore as much of the works as possible would be carried out within
the construction site before multiple phasing would re-route traffic to complete
the roundabout. This work would last a few months with temporary traffic
lights, reconfigurations and lane narrowing being necessary to complete the
construction, to ensure that full closure of the C182 (Rodway) at this location is
not required.
6.3.46 On completion of the northern section of the proposed development, to a
standard agreed with the Highway Authority, and following connection of the
new C182 (Rodway) roundabout, the northern section of the proposed
development would be opened to divert all traffic (predominantly quarry
vehicles) north-eastwards to the roundabout until the central section was
complete. Redundant highway would then be stopped up.
6.3.47 On completion of the central section of the proposed development, the
connections to the northern and southern sections would be opened and traffic
would travel the full length of the proposed route. Any remaining redundant
highway would then be stopped up and landscaped.
iii. Operation
6.3.48 The completed bypass would be offered for adoption by the Highway Authority
as part of the county road network.
d) Construction of Cannington Park and Ride Facility
i. Preparatory Works
6.3.49 Preparatory works are expected to last for approximately one month. Site
access for plant and vehicles would be provided using the existing access
point off the A39, which is currently used as a livestock crossing intersection.
Plant and vehicles would not be allowed to make right hand turns into the site
from the A39, and would therefore be required to follow the A39 west to the
roundabout, carry out a u-turn via the roundabout, and then make a left hand
turn off the slip road into the site.
6.3.50 Vegetation clearance would be required to ensure visibility in accordance with
highway legislation and to enable construction to commence. This work would
take into account any ecological constraints, including the presence of
protected species.
6.3.51 Working areas within the site would be secured with hoarding or Heras
fencing.
6.3.52 A temporary construction compound comprising a site management and
security office, materials and storage areas, site parking and internal site
access routes would be provided within the site boundary.
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ii. Construction
6.3.53 It is anticipated that the main construction works would take approximately 11
months to complete. Earthworks and excavation would be undertaken, with
any spoil arising retained on-site to deliver the earth bunds.
6.3.54 Once any required excavation works have been completed, the laying of
materials to construct the parking area and internal circulation routes, and the
installation of first fix utilities and drainage pipe work, would be undertaken.
The internal circulation routes and vehicle parking areas would be constructed
using traditional methods. Initially these areas would be constructed to base
course level, with the final layer being added towards the end of the
programme of works.
6.3.55 A second fix of utilities would include the installation of lighting, CCTV, water
supply, power and data cables. The installation and fit out of the amenity
building would be undertaken along with the installation of appropriate barrier
control systems, signage, bus shelters and the final layer of surfacing to the
bus circulation routes and parking areas.
6.3.56 The construction of the permanent access to the facility would require local
widening of the A39 and is likely to require local width restrictions for a period.
The junction providing access into the site would be delivered to adoptable
standards and under the supervision of the highway authority.
6.3.57 Any landscaping would be undertaken as early as possible during the most
appropriate season.
6.3.58 Security fencing would be installed around the perimeter of the facility,
replacing the temporary fencing which enclosed the working areas.
iii. Operation and Decommissioning
6.3.59 The site would be operated in accordance with the Framework Travel Plan.
6.3.60 The ultimate end state of the facility will be determined in accordance with the
Post Operational Strategy. However, it is anticipated that once the need for
the facility has ceased, the buildings and associated infrastructure would be
removed in accordance with a demolition plan, which would maximise the
potential for re-use of building, modules and materials.
6.3.61 When the site has been cleared, the area would be landscaped in accordance
with an approved landscape plan.
e) Combwich Wharf and Freight Laydown Facility
Refurbishment of Combwich Wharf
i. Preparatory Works
6.3.62 A site compound would be established comprising offices, welfare facility,
storage, parking areas and temporary site utilities. Temporary fencing would
be erected around the site perimeter, with a suitable site access point
established at the western edge of the site. Temporary construction signage
would be erected at this stage.
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6.3.63 The site environmental control measures, such as bunds and settlement tanks,
would be introduced.
6.3.64 Bulk excavation would reduce the general ground level. Any suitable material
arising would be stockpiled for future use, whereas unsuitable material would
be removed from site.
6.3.65 Demolition work would start on the existing dolphin berthing structures using
cutting technologies to reduce nuisance. The existing supporting piles would
be cut back or removed depending on their position in relation to the proposed
redevelopment. The demolition of the finger pier would follow. Care would be
taken to maintain the stability of the pier structure during excavation of the pier
fill material. The sheet piling to the perimeter of the pier would then be cut
back or removed.
6.3.66 The demolition arisings would be sorted and then removed off-site for
appropriate disposal or recycling.
ii. Construction
6.3.67 The access road would be constructed between the freight laydown facility and
the wharf.
6.3.68 The construction of the goods wharf would commence with the installation of
the rear anchor wall and then proceed to the installation of the main sheet pile
wall and its associated temporary propping.
6.3.69 The pier would then be backfilled with suitable material. If suitable, some of
the demolition arisings may be used. The tie-rods between the main wall and
the anchor wall would then be inserted. At this stage the upper levels of the
quay are laid in place and finished.
6.3.70 The construction of the abnormal load quay would start with the excavation for
the landward anchor beams. This would be followed by the installation of the
landward bearing piles using continuous flight auger cast-in-situ reinforced
concrete piles.
6.3.71 The ground beams would be installed over the piles, followed by the concrete
deck and finishes layers for the quay.
6.3.72 Dredging operations would be undertaken to prepare the berth bed.
6.3.73 Any necessary modifications to the permanent utilities would be carried out.
6.3.74 Quay furniture would be installed comprising guardrails, fencing, gates,
ladders, navigation lighting and beacons.
6.3.75 The site compound, associated facilities and fencing would then be removed
and the necessary works to road finishes and landscaping completed.
iii. Operation
6.3.76 The site would be operated in accordance with the Freight Management
Strategy.
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6.3.77 The facility at Combwich Wharf would be retained to allow import and export of
AILs in support of the operation and decommissioning of the Hinkley Point
power stations and associated National Grid substations.
Construction of Combwich Freight Laydown Facility
iv. Preparatory Works
6.3.78 A site access point would be introduced at the northern edge of the site.
6.3.79 Where appropriate and necessary the work area would be secured with
suitable types of temporary fencing.
6.3.80 A site compound would be established comprising offices, welfare facility,
storage, parking areas and temporary site utilities. The site traffic and
pedestrian routes would be laid out. Temporary construction signage would be
erected.
6.3.81 Site environmental control measures, such as bunds and settlement tanks and
a temporary wheel wash, would be introduced where required.
v. Construction
6.3.82 Construction would commence with the installation of the culverts and access
bridges over the drainage ditches. The topsoil would then be stripped. Where
possible this would be retained for future use in the landscaping works. Any
excavation required would then be undertaken to create the balancing pond,
surface water storage and the utility networks. The importation and
compaction of the capping, sub-base and permeable material for the storage
areas would be carried out.
6.3.83 The utility pipework, ductwork and cabling would be installed and connected to
the existing utility supplies.
6.3.84 Piling for the load-bearing areas would be carried out.
6.3.85 The sub-base and surfacing layers would be installed for the flexible pavement
areas.
6.3.86 Modifications to the permanent access would be undertaken, under the
supervision of the highway authority, at the junction of the access road with the
C182.
6.3.87 The foundations for the welfare, administration and security buildings would be
undertaken. The buildings would be then brought to site, erected and fitted
out.
6.3.88 The permanent fencing would be erected, together with lighting, access control
barriers, CCTV and signage. The landscaping works would be carried out and
completed after the removal of the temporary site facilities.
vi. Operation and Decommissioning
6.3.89 The site would be operated in accordance with the Freight Management
Strategy.
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6.3.90 The ultimate end state of the facility will be determined in accordance with the
Post Operational Strategy. However, it is anticipated that once the need for
the facility has ceased, the buildings and associated infrastructure would be
removed in accordance with a demolition plan, which would maximise the
potential for re-use of buildings, modules and materials.
6.3.91 When the site has been cleared, the area would be landscaped in accordance
with an approved landscape plan.
f) Construction of M5 Junction 23 Facilities
i. Preparatory Works
6.3.92 Preparatory works are expected to last for approximately five months.
Temporary vehicular access to the site would be established via the A38 and
the access road to the Bridgwater Business Park. Temporary security and
welfare facilities would be set up on-site.
6.3.93 Before any construction works commence, ecological mitigation by means of
habitat creation and protected species relocation would be required, including
the installation of temporary localised fencing to prevent harm to protected
species. Some vegetation clearance would be required.
6.3.94 Where appropriate and necessary for the works, the working areas would be
secured with suitable temporary fencing.
6.3.95 The site compound, including parking, site office, security, storage and welfare
units would be set up near the entrance of Bridgwater Business Park before
site clearance begins. This work would include the removal of vegetation and
stripping of topsoil.
ii. Construction
6.3.96 It is anticipated that the main construction works would take approximately 12
months to complete. Earthworks and excavation would be undertaken along
with rerouting of the existing drainage channels. Apart from a small amount of
existing fly-tipping material which would be disposed of to a suitable licensed
facility, all spoil would be retained on-site for reuse.
6.3.97 The proposed platform level would be approximately 1m above prevailing
ground level. Excess soil would be stored in defined areas to the north-west of
the site for use during its potential reinstatement following EDF Energys
cessation of use. The detention pond required to capture surface water would
be excavated and prepared around this time.
6.3.98 The existing flood defences would be locally enhanced to remove any low
points.
6.3.99 Excavations would also progress in areas where foundations are required, and
along the line of the internal road system. These internal roads, together with
the parking areas, would be constructed up to base level in accordance with
the final scheme layout.
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6.3.100 Utilities, such as power and water, would be brought onto site and
incorporated into the scheme as the internal roads progress, as would any
underground drainage.
6.3.101 The section of internal road providing access to the site and Bridgwater
Business Park would be completed to adoptable standards. In consultation
with the highway authority, the connection to Dunball roundabout would be
made.
6.3.102 During the construction of the permanent access to the development, there
would be a requirement for road width restrictions and temporary localised
diversions in the vicinity of the Bridgwater Business Park entrance and the
Dunball roundabout. These works would be planned and timed to cause the
minimum of disruption to road users.
6.3.103 Installation of the buildings would be undertaken. The smaller buildings on this
site may be modular, with the induction centre of modular or traditional
construction. Fit-out and installation of mechanical and electrical services
would follow.
6.3.104 The parking areas and internal circulation roads would be finished off with the
final surfaces and line marking.
6.3.105 Ancillary structures and lightweight buildings, such as bus shelters and security
booths, would also be installed at this time.
6.3.106 Any landscaping would be undertaken during the most appropriate season,
where possible; and would take into account any ecological constraints.
6.3.107 Security fencing would be erected around the perimeter of the vehicle parking
areas and consolidation facility for postal/courier deliveries, replacing the
temporary fencing which initially enclosed the working areas.
6.3.108 The installation of barriers, CCTV cameras, signage and external lighting
would complete the works.
iii. Operation and Decommissioning
6.3.109 The site would be operated in accordance with the Framework Travel Plan
and the Freight Management Strategy.
6.3.110 The ultimate end state of the facility will be determined in accordance with the
Post Operational Strategy. However, it is anticipated that once the need for
the facility has ceased, the necessary buildings and associated infrastructure
would be removed in accordance with a demolition plan, which would
maximise the potential for re-use of building, modules and materials.
g) Construction of M5 Junction 24 Facilities
6.3.111 It is anticipated that the main construction works would take approximately six
months to complete.
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ii. Preparatory Works
6.3.112 A temporary site compound area would be established comprising construction
office, welfare accommodation, security, materials storage areas and site
parking.
6.3.113 The site compound would connect into the existing utilities.
6.3.114 The existing access gate and associated security building would be used for
site access during the construction period.
iii. Construction Works
Modification Works within Existing Warehouse
6.3.115 A modular car park deck and associated ramps would be erected within the
existing warehouse.
6.3.116 The car park modules and ramp sections would be delivered to site and
erected by means of mobile cranes within the building.
6.3.117 The ventilation system within the warehouse would be modified and enhanced
to provide vehicle fume and smoke extraction capability.
6.3.118 The envelope of the existing warehouse would be modified as necessary to
accommodate access to the car park vehicle ramps and the incorporation of
the ventilation plant.
6.3.119 The amenity/welfare/administration and security facilities for the park and ride
and freight management facilities would be constructed within the warehouse,
partly by remodelling the existing office areas and partly by the construction of
new accommodation areas.
6.3.120 Surface markings would be applied to delineate internal roads, parking areas,
footpaths and pedestrian crossing points.
6.3.121 The intention would be to use the existing primary utilities arrangements with
local modification to suit connection to the new facilities.
Temporary Consolidation Facility for Postal/Courier Deliveries
6.3.122 The temporary consolidation facility for postal/courier deliveries building would
generally be of prefabricated and/or modular construction in whole or part,
founded on concrete foundations. The building elements would be delivered to
the site then lifted into position by mobile cranes and connected together.
Temporary Induction Centre
6.3.123 The temporary induction centre would be constructed within the existing tray
wash and vehicle maintenance building and the facility would generally be of
prefabricated and/or modular construction in whole or part, founded on the
floor of the original building.
6.3.124 The assembled building shells would then be fitted out and the internal
mechanical and electrical services installed.
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Other Structures
6.3.125 Some of the smaller buildings such as security booths and bus shelters could
be delivered fully prefabricated.
6.3.126 The existing perimeter fence would be replaced with a 2m high fence.
6.3.127 Two metre high fencing would be erected around the perimeter of the primary
HGV holding area, temporary consolidation facility for postal/courier deliveries
and induction centre.
6.3.128 Manned security control posts would be installed at the access points to the
freight parking area and the induction centre.
6.3.129 The existing access gates would be modified to reflect the change in
operational use.
Lighting, CCTV Systems and Signage
6.3.130 Generally, the existing external lighting would be retained and locally
enhanced to reflect the change in operational use.
6.3.131 New CCTV security cameras and signage would be installed throughout the
facility.
iv. Operation and Decommissioning
6.3.132 The site would be operated in accordance with the Framework Travel Plan
and the Freight Management Strategy.
6.3.133 The ultimate end state of the facility will be determined in accordance with the
Post Operational Strategy. However, it is anticipated that once the need for
the facility has ceased, the site would be returned to a condition suitable for
storage/distribution purposes.
h) Construction of Williton Park and ride Facility
i. Preparatory Works
6.3.134 Preparatory works are expected to last for approximately one month. Site
access for plant and vehicles would be provided via the existing access point
to the site.
6.3.135 Some vegetation clearance would be required and this work would take into
account any ecological constraints, including the presence of protected
species.
6.3.136 Working areas within the site would be secured with hoarding or Heras
fencing.
6.3.137 A temporary construction compound comprising a site management and
security office, materials and storage areas, site parking and internal site
access routes would be provided within the site boundary. Temporary site
utilities would be established at the earliest opportunity.
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ii. Construction
6.3.138 It is anticipated that the main construction works would take approximately
nine months to complete. Earthworks and excavation would be undertaken,
with any spoil retained on-site where possible.
6.3.139 Once any required excavation works have been completed, the laying of
materials to construct the parking area and internal circulation routes, and
installation of first fix utilities and drainage pipe work would be undertaken.
The internal circulation routes and vehicle parking areas would be constructed
using traditional methods. Initially these areas would be constructed to base
course level, with the final layer being added towards the end of the
programme of works.
6.3.140 A second fix of utilities would include the installation of lighting, CCTV, water
supply, power and data cables. The installation and fit out of the amenity
building would be undertaken along with the installation of appropriate barrier
control systems, signage, bus shelters and the final layer of surfacing to the
bus circulation routes and parking areas.
6.3.141 Any landscaping would be delivered during the appropriate season, where
possible.
6.3.142 Security fencing would be installed around the perimeter, replacing the
temporary fencing which enclosed the working area.
iii. Operation and Decommissioning
6.3.143 The site would be operated in accordance with the Framework Travel Plan.
6.3.144 The ultimate end state of the facility will be determined in accordance with the
Post Operational Strategy. However, it is anticipated that once the need for
the facility has ceased, the buildings and associated infrastructure would be
removed in accordance with a demolition plan, which would maximise the
potential for re-use of building, modules and materials.
6.3.145 The hardstanding and drainage infrastructure together with the existing
landscaping would be retained.
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7. HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENTS
7.1.1 Apart from the Cannington bypass described in Sections 5 and 6, a number of
minor highway improvements are proposed to improve safety and road
capacity to accommodate the construction traffic. These improvements are
listed below and the locations are indicated on Plate 2.1.
7.1.2 The implementation of most these improvements would be carried out during
the period from 2013 to 2015. However, some schemes are included within
the Section 106 agreement for the preliminary works and would commence in
2012. The specific timings would be determined in conjunction with the
relevant authorities to minimise the cumulative impact of the road works and
avoid times of peak usage, where practicable.
7.1.3 The specific proposed road improvements are:
A39 New Road/B3339 Sandford Hill Roundabout the construction of a
roundabout at this existing priority junction which would improve safety and
reduce vehicle speeds.
The works would comprise: the phased construction of the new
roundabout; the reprofiling of the approach roads; the introduction of
lighting; the application of new road markings; the erection of new
signage.
M5 junction 23 Roundabout introducing signals at the motorway
roundabout, together with improvements to the southbound off-slip road
(i.e. from the Bristol direction) and minor improvements to the lane
markings at Dunball roundabout;
The works would comprise : localised widening of the southbound off
slip; the introduction of traffic signalisation; application of anti-skid road
coatings on the approach carriageways; the installation of signal control
loops within the highway; introduction of lighting; the erection of new
signage.
A38 Bristol Road/The Drove J unction the widening of the highway to
improve the operation of this junction and reduce queuing;
The works would comprise: the localised widening of the carriageway to
increase the capacity of the junction for right turning traffic thereby
facilitating an improved flow for southbound traffic.
A39 Broadway/A38 Taunton Road J unction modifications to the signal
arrangements and lane allocations to improve the operation of the junction,
reduce queuing and improve pedestrian and cycle crossing facilities;
The works would comprise: resurfacing of the junction; revised lane
allocations and road markings; replacement of the existing traffic islands
and associated street furniture; new and modified traffic signals; new
signage as required.
A38 Bristol Road/Wylds Road J unction further improvements to assist
right-turning and through traffic movements;
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The works would comprise: localised carriageway widening and
surfacing; revised road markings; new signage as required.
Wylds Road/The Drove J unction further widening of the highway to
improve the operation of this junction and reduce queuing;
The works would comprise the widening of the carriageway; resurfacing
of the junction; revised lane allocations and markings; new and modified
traffic islands; new and modified traffic signals; new signage as required.
Washford Cross Roundabout introduction of a new roundabout to address
safety concerns and cater for traffic to the park and ride site;
The works would comprise: the phased construction of the new
roundabout; the reprofiling of the approach roads; the introduction of
lighting; the application of new road markings; the erection of new
signage.
Cannington Traffic Calming Measures provision of traffic calming in the
form of road markings, speed limit changes and speed reduction measures;
The works would comprise: introduction of vehicle activated speed
warning signs; two new pedestrian crossings with associated road
markings, surface coatings and signage; widening and realignment of
footpaths; introduction of waiting restrictions; introduction of 20mph
speed limit zone; introduction of vehicle priority restrictions.
C182 Farringdon Hill Lane, Horse Crossing install a formal crossing for
horse riders;
The works comprise: clearance of existing vegetation to accommodate
horse crossing and improve visibility of on-coming traffic; the
construction of a horse holding area to the north of the crossing; the
installation of push button activated equestrian crossing warning signs.
Claylands Corner J unction improvements to increase visibility for vehicles
using Adams Lane and reduce vehicle speeds.
The works would comprise minor widening and realignment of the
carriageway; resurfacing of carriageway; application of new road
markings and signage.
Huntworth Roundabout Minor carriageway widening to reduce queuing at
the junction and improve pedestrian crossing facilities
The works would comprise widening of the carriageway at the eastern
arm of the roundabout; local modifications to footpaths and crossing
points; resurfacing of carriageway; application of new road markings and
signage as required.
7.1.4 In all of the above Highway Improvement projects, the works would be planned
to maintain access routes and to minimise disruption.

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8. CONSTRUCTION AND
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
8.1 Introduction
8.1.1 This section describes the management procedures to be implemented to
control construction activities; management of construction waste generated
from each of the sites; and describes the suite of Environmental Management
Plans, which would be used to manage, monitor and report environmental
effects during the construction period.
8.2 Construction Management
8.2.1 The management of construction would be controlled by a suite of policies and
procedures which embody best practice and secure compliance with the
relevant provisions of the Site Licence, Security Plan, Environmental consents
and relevant legislation, including the Construction Design and Management
Regulations 2007. Commitments and conditions associated with the
Development Consent Order would also be addressed in the policies and
procedures.
8.2.2 The procedures would cover all aspects of construction management from
opening of the site through to final commissioning and handover of the power
station to the operations team. They would set down roles, responsibilities,
activities and records required to achieve and demonstrate compliance.
8.2.3 Contractors would be required to comply with the EDF Energy site policies and
procedures, either directly or through compatible company arrangements.
These arrangements would include requirements for nuclear and industrial
safety, environmental stewardship, minimising adverse impacts, sustainability
and security. The arrangements would embody good neighbour principles
and would include such aspects as:
providing wheel washing facilities and keeping these clean and in good
order;
providing adequate clean toilet and messing facilities for all site staff;
managing food waste and removing it frequently;
maintaining all working areas in a clean and tidy condition;
minimising the potential for wind-blown debris through the provision of
adequate enclosed containers;
prohibiting open fires;
taking all necessary measures to minimise the risk of fire;
removing temporary plant, vehicles and buildings when no longer required;
providing adequate security to protect the public and prevent unauthorised
access to the site;
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maintaining perimeter fences and hoardings with a regular inspection,
repair and repainting regime;
locating and directing site security cameras so that they do not intrude on
residential property;
maintaining existing and newly planted hedges and tree screens around the
perimeter of the site; and
controlling the design and usage of construction site lighting to minimise off-
site visibility.
8.2.4 Recognised accreditation schemes would be pursued where applicable,
including BREEAM for relevant ancillary buildings on the main site and
accommodation, amenity and induction centre buildings in the associated
developments. CEEQUAL accreditation would be pursued for the relevant
associated development sites. Contractors would be required to comply with
considerate contractor principles.
8.3 Environmental Management during Construction
8.3.1 This Section describes the framework of management plans and the
procedures in place to manage the potential impacts on nearby communities
and the environment.
8.3.2 A suite of Environmental Management Plans (EMPs) would be implemented to
ensure that best working practices and required environmental mitigation
measures are implemented. The EMPs for a particular site comprise:
Environmental Management and Monitoring Plan (EMMP) which provides
the overall framework of environmental requirements.
Subject-Specific Management Plans (SSMPs) which provide more detail on
the specific subject, where appropriate.
Construction Environmental Management Plans (CEMPs) which show how
the contractor(s) would comply with the EMMP and any SSMPs.
8.3.3 The EMPs are informed through legislative requirements as well as general
requirements and compliance with current standards, construction and
operational experience, and the Environmental Impact Assessment process,
providing for mitigation measures identified in the Environmental Statement
that accompanies the application and that are not secured by other means.
They establish the framework of arrangements required to manage
environmental impacts, mitigate disturbance to the public and to safeguard the
environment during the full life-time of the Project, including the enabling
works, preliminary works, the main construction phase, site restoration and
operation of HPC. The provisions of the EMPs would be incorporated into the
contract(s) for the construction of the Project.
8.3.4 The EMPs would be live documents, providing a methodology by which any
significant changes to the baseline environment can be measured and
managed. To ensure that the EMPs are current at all times, the EMPs would
evolve as the Project develops and the baseline conditions are altered.
Further details of the specific types of EMP are given below.
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a) Environmental Management and Monitoring Plan (EMMP)
8.3.5 The EMMP provides the framework for the overall administration and control of
environmental management and monitoring during each phase of the
construction work. Each of the proposed development sites (HPC and the
associated developments) has a site-specific EMMP explicit to the baseline
environmental conditions; the proposed development and associated activities;
and the potential environmental impacts that require mitigating through
appropriate controls. The complete EMMPs are contained in the
Environmental Statement Annexes 3 and 4. The EMMP identifies and
communicates the environmental requirements placed on it (by regulators and
stakeholders etc.). This document is provided to contractors as part of the
tender process. It is designed as a tool to control, record and audit
environmental management activities throughout the work activities.
8.3.6 The EMMP would be a live document providing the framework to:
Manage predicted effects upon or changes to the baseline environmental
conditions resulting from the construction and operation of HPC and each
of the associated developments, and ensure the proposed works do not
exceed the stipulated environmental quality standards and/or objectives for
the Project including
minimise disturbance to neighbours
meet relevant environmental regulations and guidance on best working
practices,
deliver committed mitigation, and
comply with specific Project requirements from statutory bodies such as
the Environment Agency (EA).
Monitor and document compliance with these requirements.
Aid the identification of any unanticipated effects of the Project and, through
analysis of monitoring and/or inspection, results (a) indicate where
additional mitigation is desirable and (b) ensure that additional mitigation is
implemented as necessary and subject to further monitoring and
surveillance as required.
8.3.7 The EMMPs for the main site and the associated development sites are
supported by SSMPs, which provide a framework for managing potential
specific environmental impacts. The SSMPs would include contributions from
contractors regarding working methods, where appropriate.
b) Subject-Specific Management Plans (SSMP)
8.3.8 Produced by EDF Energy in response to specific planning and legislative
requirements, the SSMPs describe the specific manner in which work should
be undertaken to ensure requirements set out in the EMMP would be met.
Where appropriate, these plans include environmental limits. Identified
SSMPs include:
Air Quality Management Plan
Land Contamination Management Plan
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
80 Construction Method Statement | October 2011
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Water Management Plan
Noise and Vibration Management Plan
Soil Management Plan
Materials Management Plan
Ecology Management and Monitoring Plan
Environmental Incident Control Plan
8.3.9 Copies of the SSMPs are included as Appendices to the respective EMMP
c) Construction Environmental Management Plan (CEMP)
8.3.10 The CEMPs would be produced by the contractors in response to the EDF
Energys EMMP and SSMP requirements.
8.3.11 The CEMPs would provide the specific details of practical day-to-day working
controls to be implemented by the relevant contractor(s). They would include
details on standards, control measures and monitoring procedures as set out
in EDF Energys SSMPs.
8.3.12 The document may also include, or refer out to, method statements and risk
assessments from sub-contractors.
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Construction Method Statement | October 2011 81
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
9. EMERGENCY ARRANGEMENTS
9.1 Introduction
9.1.1 The construction and operation of nuclear power stations and associated
facilities are subject to comprehensive arrangements and controls which are
aimed at minimising the possibility of adverse incidents. Nevertheless, as part
of the strategy of defence in depth, emergency arrangements would be put in
place to deal with such incidents.
9.2 Emergency Requirements
a) Construction Activities
9.2.1 All construction activities would be managed in accordance with construction
method statements (in accordance with the Construction Design and
Management Regulations 2007) and construction environmental management
plans. In most cases, normal good practice, coupled with on-site incident
management, fire, rescue and medical facilities would be sufficient to deal with
potential incidents. More significant incidents would draw on the local fire and
rescue and medical response capability as appropriate, in accordance with
pre-defined arrangements. Further detail is contained in the Overview of the
Outline Contingency Response Arrangements and Strategic Relationship
Protocols which is Appendix 2 to the Community Safety Management
Plan.
9.2.2 In some cases, the construction method statements may identify particular
risks, where the on-site and local facilities might not be sufficient to deal with
potential incidents. In these cases, additional facilities would be secured,
either as temporary on-site facilities or through special arrangements with the
local emergency services.
b) Operational Activities
9.2.3 As the main operational site would be a licensed nuclear site, emergency
arrangements would be required for compliance with the site licence conditions
from the start of construction. The proximity of the Hinkley Point A and B
power stations will influence the specific arrangements during the initial
construction of HPC. However, the requirements arising from the existing
power stations would be similar to those required for the HPC operational
power station, allowing a consistent set of arrangements to be implemented.
9.2.4 The emergency arrangements for HPC would be described in an Emergency
Plan which would be developed in conjunction with key stakeholders and
communicated to the general public in accordance with the Radiation
(Emergency Preparedness and Public Information) Regulations 2001.
9.3 Access to the Sites
9.3.1 The HGV access routes to the HPC development site are identified in the
Freight Management Strategy. In addition, following grant of DCO, an
emergency access road would be constructed from the centre of Shurton
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
82 Construction Method Statement | October 2011
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
village to the main construction site. This route would be reserved for
emergency access only.
9.3.2 The helipad provided for the existing power stations at Hinkley would be
relocated during the construction of HPC and would be available as an
emergency access point to the site.
9.4 Impact on Existing Routes
9.4.1 The impact of construction traffic on the existing routes is described in the
Transport Assessment.
9.4.2 A traffic incident management plan would be developed in conjunction with key
stakeholders to identify arrangements to mitigate the impacts of incidents on
any of the identified road access routes.
HOLFORDSTREAM
CULVERT
EXISTING SCREEN
PLANTING
CONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGE OVER
BUM BROOK ANDEMERGENCY
ACCESS ROADONGOING
ROCK
STOCKPILE
144750mN - SOUTHERN LIMIT OF
MAIN CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY
EXISTING LANDSCAPE
FEATURES RETAINED
SOUTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
WMZ
NORTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
CAR PARK
CAR PARK
UNIT 1 EXCAVATION ONGOING
UNIT 2 EXCAVATION ONGOING
BENHOLE LANE
C182 WICK
MOOR DROVE
HINKLEY POINT A
POWER STATION
HINKLEY POINT B
POWER STATION
+32m
+26m
+23m
+23m +18m
+18m
+18m
+14m
+14m
+14m
+20m
+20m
+14m
+33m
+11m
+20m +20m
+20m
+14m
BRIDGWATER BAY
M
H
W
WMZ
+20m
+25m +28m
+25m
+25m
+31m
+33m +25m
GREEN LANE
SOIL STORAGE
STOCKPILE AND
SEEDING
+20m
PLATFORM
FILLING
+23m
+20m
+20m PLATFORM LEVELLING
IN PROGRESS
WMZ
EARLY LANDSCAPE
WORKS IN PROGRESS
+22m
+24m +20m
+24m
+14m
+6m
+6m
UNIT 2
+20m
TEMPORARY
RETAINING
STRUCTURE
BEACH
ACCESS
ROAD
CAR PARK
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
PLATFORM
COMPLETE
PLATFORM
COMPLETE
PLATFORM
COMPLETE
+20m
AREA FOR COOLING WATER TUNNELS,
FISH RECOVERY ANDRETURN TUNNEL,
ANDASSOCIATEDINFRASTRUCTURE
TEMPORARY
J ETTY UNDER
CONSTRUCTION
+14m
H
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
+21m
+30m
+21m
TEMPORARY BUND
ANDPLANTING
SUBSTANTIALLY
COMPLETE
+24m
+23m
+25m
+22m
+34m
+24m
+23m +23m
+18m
C Copyright 2011 EDF Energy plc. No part of this drawing is to be reproduced without prior permission of EDF Energy
DRAWING TITLE
PROJ ECT DRAWING REFERENCE NO.
DOCUMENT
DRAWING SECURITY CLASSIFICATION
PROTECTIVE MARKING REQUIRED
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
HINKLEY POINT C
DATE SCALE
SCALE BAR
REVISION
KEY
HINKLEY POINT C DEVELOPMENT
SITE BOUNDARY
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
BUILDINGS COMPLETE
EXISTING LANDFEATURES RETAINED
CONTRACTORS WORKING AREA
TOPSOIL STORAGE ANDROCK
WATER MANAGEMENT ZONE - WMZ
TEMPORARY / PERMANENT CAR PARK
EMERGENCY ACCESS ROAD
SINGLE CONSTRUCTION PHASE
SECURITY FENCE
PERMANENT ANDKEY TEMPORARY
LANDSCAPE WORKS / RESTORATION
TEMPORARY HAUL ROADWITHIN
DEVELOPMENT BOUNDARY
MAIN SITE EXCAVATION PLATFORM
EXISTING SCREEN PLANTING
LANDSCAPE WORKS ANDPLANTING
FORMATION IN PROGRESS
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
145000
146000
145000
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
146000
0
STOCKPILE
BUILDINGS ANDSTRUCTURES UNDER
LEVELS
metres
100 200 300 400 500
FIGURE 4.1 1:10,000 @ A3 Sep 2011 01
HINKLEY POINT C
INDICATIVE CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES
EARLY 2013
SITE LAYOUT PLAN
Regulation 5(2)(o)
DENOTES FINISHEDSURFACE LEVEL IN
METRES ANDRELATIVE TO ORDNANCE
DATUM NEWLYN
14m
CULVERTEDWATERCOURSE
TEMPORARY J ETTY SEAWARD
CONSTRUCTION
HARBOUR LIMITS
REVISION DATE DRAWN CHECKED
REASONS FOR REVISION/
COMMENTS
APPROVED
CONSTRUCTION METHODSTATEMENT
SEPT 2011 NNB SG 01 NNB FOR IPC SUBMISSION NNB
BRIDGE OVER
BUM BROOK
EMERGENCY
ACCESS ROAD
LANDSCAPE WORKS
ANDPLANTING
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
144750mN - SOUTHERN LIMIT OF
MAIN CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY
EXISTING LANDSCAPE
FEATURES RETAINED
SOUTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
WMZ
NORTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
NATIONAL GRID400kV
SUBSTATION PLATFORM
CAR PARK
CAR PARK
UNIT 1 EXCAVATION COMPLETE
UNIT 2 EXCAVATION ONGOING
BENHOLE LANE
C182 WICK
MOOR DROVE
HINKLEY POINT A
POWER STATION
HINKLEY POINT B
POWER STATION
+22m
+22m +18m
+25m
+20m
+24m
+20m
+20m
+33m
+11m
BRIDGWATER BAY
M
H
W
ON-SITE
ACCOMMODATION
CAMPUS
+20m
+25m
+25m
+28m
+25m
+25m
+25m
+31m
+33m +25m
GREEN LANE
+20m
SCREEN PLANTING
TEMPORARY BUND
ANDPLANTING
+21m
+30m
+21m
+24m
+23m
+25m
+22m
+34m
+24m
+19m +20m
+19m
+18m
+20m
TEMPORARY
J ETTY
UNIT 1 &2 OFFSHORE
COOLING WATER INTAKE
&OUTFALL TUNNELS
ACCESS TO
FORESHORE
SEA WALL
UNIT 1 &2 OFFSHORE
FISH RECOVERY AND
RETURN TUNNEL
+14m
+14m
+14m
+20m +20m
+20m
+14m
+14m
+6m
-22m
+6m
+14m
+14m
+14m
HOLFORDSTREAM
CULVERT
WMZ
SOIL STORAGE
STOCKPILE AND
SEEDING
+22m
ROCK
STOCKPILE
+32m
+26m
+23m
+23m
+23m +23m
C Copyright 2011 EDF Energy plc. No part of this drawing is to be reproduced without prior permission of EDF Energy
DRAWING TITLE
PROJ ECT DRAWING REFERENCE NO.
DOCUMENT
DRAWING SECURITY CLASSIFICATION
PROTECTIVE MARKING REQUIRED
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
HINKLEY POINT C
DATE SCALE
SCALE BAR
REVISION
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
145000
146000
145000
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
146000
0
metres
100 200 300 400 500
FIGURE 4.2 1:10,000 @ A3 Sep 2011 01
HINKLEY POINT C
INDICATIVE CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES 2014
SITE LAYOUT PLAN
Regulation 5(2)(o)
HINKLEY POINT C DEVELOPMENT
SITE BOUNDARY
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
BUILDINGS COMPLETE
KEY TEMPORARY BUILDINGS &
EXISTING LANDFEATURES RETAINED
CONTRACTORS WORKING AREA
TOPSOIL STORAGE ANDROCK
WATER MANAGEMENT ZONE - WMZ
TEMPORARY / PERMANENT CAR PARK
EMERGENCY ACCESS ROAD
SINGLE CONSTRUCTION PHASE
SECURITY FENCE
PERMANENT ANDKEY TEMPORARY
BUILDINGS &STRUCTURES UNDER
LANDSCAPE WORKS / RESTORATION
TEMPORARY HAUL ROADWITHIN
DEVELOPMENT BOUNDARY
DENOTES FINISHEDSURFACE LEVEL IN
METRES ANDRELATIVE TO ORDNANCE
DATUM NEWLYN
14m
MAIN SITE EXCAVATION PLATFORM
CULVERTEDWATERCOURSE
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
SUB-SURFACE BUILDINGS COMPLETE
STRUCTURES COMPLETE (TEMPORARY
J ETTY &ON-SITE ACCOMMODATION
SCREEN PLANTING
KEY
STOCKPILE
LEVELS
CONSTRUCTION
CAMPUS)
TEMPORARY J ETTY SEAWARD
HARBOUR LIMITS
REVISION DATE DRAWN CHECKED
REASONS FOR REVISION/
COMMENTS
APPROVED
CONSTRUCTION METHODSTATEMENT
SEPT 2011 NNB SG 01 NNB FOR IPC SUBMISSION NNB
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
144750mN - SOUTHERN LIMIT OF
MAIN CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY
EXISTING LANDSCAPE
FEATURES RETAINED
SOUTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
WMZ
NORTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
CAR PARK
CAR PARK
UNIT 1 BACKFILL COMPLETE
UNIT 2 EXCAVATION COMPLETE
BENHOLE LANE
C182 WICK
MOOR DROVE
HINKLEY POINT A
POWER STATION
HINKLEY POINT B
POWER STATION
+22m
+22m
+20m
+24m
+33m
BRIDGWATER BAY
M
H
W
+31m
+33m +25m
GREEN LANE
+25m
+20m
+25m
+25m
+25m
+25m
+18m
+20m
+20m
+20m
ON-SITE
ACCOMMODATION
CAMPUS
BRIDGE OVER
BUM BROOK
EMERGENCY
ACCESS ROAD
SCREEN PLANTING
+19m +20m
+19m
+18m
+20m
CONSTRUCTION DRAINAGE
DISCHARGE OUTFALL
H
NATIONAL GRID400kV
SUBSTATION PLATFORM
+11m
HOLFORDSTREAM
CULVERT
WMZ
SOIL STORAGE
STOCKPILE AND
SEEDING
LANDSCAPE WORKS
ANDPLANTING
+22m
TEMPORARY BUND
ANDPLANTING
+21m
+30m
+21m
+24m
+23m
+25m
+22m
+34m
+24m
ROCK
STOCKPILE
+32m
+26m
+23m
+23m
+23m +23m
C Copyright 2011 EDF Energy plc. No part of this drawing is to be reproduced without prior permission of EDF Energy
DRAWING TITLE
PROJ ECT DRAWING REFERENCE NO.
DOCUMENT
DRAWING SECURITY CLASSIFICATION
PROTECTIVE MARKING REQUIRED
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
HINKLEY POINT C
DATE SCALE
SCALE BAR
REVISION
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
145000
146000
145000
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
146000
0
metres
100 200 300 400 500
FIGURE 4.3 1:10,000 @ A3 Sep 2011 01
HINKLEY POINT C
INDICATIVE CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES 2015
SITE LAYOUT PLAN
Regulation 5(2)(o)
HINKLEY POINT C DEVELOPMENT
SITE BOUNDARY
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
BUILDINGS COMPLETE
KEY TEMPORARY BUILDINGS &
EXISTING LANDFEATURES RETAINED
CONTRACTORS WORKING AREA
TOPSOIL STORAGE ANDROCK
WATER MANAGEMENT ZONE - WMZ
TEMPORARY / PERMANENT CAR PARK
EMERGENCY ACCESS ROAD
SINGLE CONSTRUCTION PHASE
SECURITY FENCE
PERMANENT ANDKEY TEMPORARY
BUILDINGS &STRUCTURES UNDER
LANDSCAPE WORKS / RESTORATION
TEMPORARY HAUL ROADWITHIN
DEVELOPMENT BOUNDARY
DENOTES FINISHEDSURFACE LEVEL IN
METRES ANDRELATIVE TO ORDNANCE
DATUM NEWLYN
14m
MAIN SITE EXCAVATION PLATFORM
CULVERTEDWATERCOURSE
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
SUB-SURFACE BUILDINGS COMPLETE
STRUCTURES COMPLETE (TEMPORARY
J ETTY &ON-SITE ACCOMMODATION
SCREEN PLANTING
KEY
STOCKPILE
LEVELS
CONSTRUCTION
CAMPUS)
MAIN SITE EXCAVATION BACKFILL
TEMPORARY HARBOUR J ETTY LIMITS
REVISION DATE DRAWN CHECKED
REASONS FOR REVISION/
COMMENTS
APPROVED
CONSTRUCTION METHODSTATEMENT
SEPT 2011 NNB SG 01 NNB FOR IPC SUBMISSION NNB
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
144750mN - SOUTHERN LIMIT OF
MAIN CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY
EXISTING LANDSCAPE
FEATURES RETAINED
SOUTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
WMZ
NORTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
CAR PARK
CAR PARK
UNIT 1 OPERATIONAL
UNIT 2 BACKFILL COMPLETE
BENHOLE LANE
C182 WICK
MOOR DROVE
HINKLEY POINT A
POWER STATION
HINKLEY POINT B
POWER STATION
+22m
+22m
+14m
+14m
+14m
+20m
+20m
+24m
+14m
+14m
+33m
+14m
BRIDGWATER BAY
M
H
W
+20m
EXISTING NATIONAL
GRIDTRANSMISSION
LINES/TOWERS TO
REMAIN
+31m
+33m +25m
GREEN LANE
+20m
+25m
+25m
+25m
+25m
+25m
+18m
+14m
THE OVERHEADLINES ANDTOWER (PYLON)
POSITIONS ILLUSTRATEDARE INDICATIVE ONLY
ANDARE ONE OF TWO OPTIONS PRESENTLY BEING
DEVELOPEDBY NATIONAL GRID. THESE OVERHEAD
LINES ANDPYLONS WILL BE SUBJ ECT TO A
SEPARATE DCO APPLICATION BY NATIONAL GRID
ANDWILL BE REFINEDFOLLOWING PUBLIC
CONSULTATION, FURTHER ENVIRONMENTAL
STUDIES ANDDETAILEDOVERHEADLINE DESIGN
+20m
+20m
ON-SITE
ACCOMMODATION
CAMPUS
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
+20m
BRIDGE OVER
BUM BROOK
EMERGENCY
ACCESS ROAD
SCREEN PLANTING
+19m +20m
+19m
+18m
+20m
+14m +14m
H
+11m
HOLFORDSTREAM
CULVERT
WMZ
SOIL STORAGE
STOCKPILE AND
SEEDING
LANDSCAPE WORKS
ANDPLANTING
NATIONAL GRID
400kV SUBSTATION
+22m
TEMPORARY BUND
ANDPLANTING
+21m
+30m
+21m
+24m
+23m
+25m
+22m
+34m
+24m
ROCK
STOCKPILE
+32m
+26m
+23m
+23m
+23m +23m
C Copyright 2011 EDF Energy plc. No part of this drawing is to be reproduced without prior permission of EDF Energy
DRAWING TITLE
PROJ ECT DRAWING REFERENCE NO.
DOCUMENT
DRAWING SECURITY CLASSIFICATION
PROTECTIVE MARKING REQUIRED
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
HINKLEY POINT C
DATE SCALE
SCALE BAR
REVISION
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
145000
146000
145000
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
146000
0
metres
100 200 300 400 500
FIGURE 4.4 1:10,000 @ A3 Sep 2011 01
HINKLEY POINT C
INDICATIVE CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES 2019
SITE LAYOUT PLAN
Regulation 5(2)(o)
HINKLEY POINT C DEVELOPMENT
SITE BOUNDARY
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
BUILDINGS COMPLETE
KEY TEMPORARY BUILDINGS &
EXISTING LANDFEATURES RETAINED
CONTRACTORS WORKING AREA
TOPSOIL STORAGE ANDROCK
WATER MANAGEMENT ZONE - WMZ
TEMPORARY / PERMANENT CAR PARK
EMERGENCY ACCESS ROAD
SINGLE CONSTRUCTION PHASE
SECURITY FENCE
PERMANENT ANDKEY TEMPORARY
BUILDINGS &STRUCTURES UNDER
LANDSCAPE WORKS / RESTORATION
TEMPORARY HAUL ROADWITHIN
DEVELOPMENT BOUNDARY
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
SUB-SURFACE BUILDINGS COMPLETE
STRUCTURES COMPLETE (TEMPORARY
J ETTY &ON-SITE ACCOMMODATION
SCREEN PLANTING
KEY
STOCKPILE
LEVELS
CONSTRUCTION
CAMPUS)
MAIN SITE EXCAVATION BACKFILL
SURFACE TREATMENT COMPLETE
PERMANENT OPERATIONAL
SECURITY FENCE
OVERHEADTRANSMISSION
DENOTES FINISHEDSURFACE LEVEL IN
METRES ANDRELATIVE TO ORDNANCE
DATUM NEWLYN
14m
NATIONAL GRIDTRANSMISSION
LINES/TOWERS (REFER TO NOTE ON
CULVERTEDWATERCOURSE
LINES/TOWERS
PLAN)
TEMPORARY J ETTY SEAWARD
HARBOUR LIMITS
REVISION DATE DRAWN CHECKED
REASONS FOR REVISION/
COMMENTS
APPROVED
CONSTRUCTION METHODSTATEMENT
SEPT 2011 NNB SG 01 NNB FOR IPC SUBMISSION NNB
BRIDGWATER BAY
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
144750mN - SOUTHERN LIMIT OF
MAIN CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY
EXISTING LANDSCAPE
FEATURES RETAINED
SOUTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
WMZ
NORTHERN SITE
ACCESS ROUNDABOUT
CONTRACTORS
WORKING AREA
CAR PARK
CAR PARK
UNIT 1 &2 OPERATIONAL
BENHOLE LANE
C182 WICK
MOOR DROVE
HINKLEY POINT A
POWER STATION
HINKLEY POINT B
POWER STATION
+22m
+22m
+14m
+14m
+20m
+20m
+24m
+14m
+14m
+20m
+33m
+14m
+24m
+20m
+20m
+20m
THE OVERHEADLINES ANDTOWER (PYLON)
POSITIONS ILLUSTRATEDARE INDICATIVE ONLY
ANDARE ONE OF TWO OPTIONS PRESENTLY BEING
DEVELOPEDBY NATIONAL GRID. THESE OVERHEAD
LINES ANDPYLONS WILL BE SUBJ ECT TO A
SEPARATE DCO APPLICATION BY NATIONAL GRID
ANDWILL BE REFINEDFOLLOWING PUBLIC
CONSULTATION, FURTHER ENVIRONMENTAL
STUDIES ANDDETAILEDOVERHEADLINE DESIGN
TEMPORARY
J ETTY
REMAINING KEY SITE ACTIVITIES
REMOVAL OF THE REMAINING TEMPORARY BUILDINGS
CONSTRUCTION OF A TEMPORARY EMERGENCY SITE ACCESS ROAD
DEVELOPMENT SITE
CONSTRUCTION OF THE PERMANENT SITE EMERGENCY ACCESS ROAD
LANDSCAPE RESTORATION
REMOVAL OF THE ON-SITE CAMPUS
DISMANTLING ANDREMOVAL OF THE TEMPORARY J ETTY
DIVERSION TO ALLOWLANDSCAPE RESTORATION OF THE SOUTHERN
COMPLETION OF REMAINING PERMANENT BUILDINGS
M
H
W
EXISTING NATIONAL
GRIDTRANSMISSION
LINES/TOWERS TO
REMAIN
UNIT 1 &2 OFFSHORE
COOLING WATER INTAKE
&OUTFALL TUNNELS
ACCESS TO
FORESHORE
+31m
+33m +25m
GREEN LANE
+19m
+25m
+20m
+25m
+25m
+25m
+25m
+20m
+19m
+18m
+14m
+18m
+20m
+20m
ON-SITE
ACCOMMODATION
CAMPUS
+20m
+14m
BRIDGE OVER
BUM BROOK
EMERGENCY
ACCESS ROAD
SEA WALL
UNIT 1 &2 OFFSHORE
FISH RECOVERY AND
RETURN TUNNEL
SCREEN PLANTING
+14m
+14m
H
+11m
HOLFORDSTREAM
CULVERT
WMZ
SOIL STORAGE
STOCKPILE AND
SEEDING
LANDSCAPE WORKS
ANDPLANTING
NATIONAL GRID
400kV SUBSTATION
+22m
TEMPORARY BUND
ANDPLANTING
+21m
+30m
+21m
+24m
+23m
+25m
+22m
+34m
+24m
ROCK
STOCKPILE
+32m
+26m
+23m
+23m
+23m +23m
C Copyright 2011 EDF Energy plc. No part of this drawing is to be reproduced without prior permission of EDF Energy
DRAWING TITLE
PROJ ECT DRAWING REFERENCE NO.
DOCUMENT
DRAWING SECURITY CLASSIFICATION
PROTECTIVE MARKING REQUIRED
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
HINKLEY POINT C
DATE SCALE
SCALE BAR
REVISION
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
145000
146000
145000
3
1
9
0
0
0
3
2
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
3
2
2
0
0
0
146000
0
metres
100 200 300 400 500
FIGURE 4.5 1:10,000 @ A3 Sep 2011 01
HINKLEY POINT C
INDICATIVE CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES 2020
SITE LAYOUT PLAN
Regulation 5(2)(o)
HINKLEY POINT C DEVELOPMENT
SITE BOUNDARY
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
BUILDINGS COMPLETE
KEY TEMPORARY BUILDINGS &
EXISTING LANDFEATURES RETAINED
CONTRACTORS WORKING AREA
TOPSOIL STORAGE ANDROCK
WATER MANAGEMENT ZONE - WMZ
TEMPORARY / PERMANENT CAR PARK
EMERGENCY ACCESS ROAD
SINGLE CONSTRUCTION PHASE
SECURITY FENCE
PERMANENT ANDKEY TEMPORARY
BUILDINGS &STRUCTURES UNDER
LANDSCAPE WORKS / RESTORATION
TEMPORARY HAUL ROADWITHIN
DEVELOPMENT BOUNDARY
PERMANENT DEVELOPMENT
SUB-SURFACE BUILDINGS COMPLETE
STRUCTURES COMPLETE (TEMPORARY
J ETTY &ON-SITE ACCOMMODATION
SCREEN PLANTING
STOCKPILE
LEVELS
CONSTRUCTION
CAMPUS)
SURFACE TREATMENT COMPLETE
PERMANENT OPERATIONAL
SECURITY FENCE
OVERHEADTRANSMISSION
DENOTES FINISHEDSURFACE LEVEL IN
METRES ANDRELATIVE TO ORDNANCE
DATUM NEWLYN
14m
NATIONAL GRIDTRANSMISSION
LINES/TOWERS (REFER TO NOTE ON
CULVERTEDWATERCOURSE
LINES/TOWERS
PLAN)
KEY
TEMPORARY J ETTY SEAWARD
HARBOUR LIMITS
REVISION DATE DRAWN CHECKED
REASONS FOR REVISION/
COMMENTS
APPROVED
CONSTRUCTION METHODSTATEMENT
SEPT 2011 NNB SG 01 NNB FOR IPC SUBMISSION NNB
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APPENDIX A1: SITE PREPARATION
WORKS: PROJ ECT DESCRIPTION

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Construction Method Statement Appendix A1 | October 2011 1
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CONTENTS
APPENDIX A1: SITE PREPARATION WORKS...........................................................................3
A1.1 Introduction......................................................................................................................3
A1.2 Summary of Works..........................................................................................................3
A1.3 Detailed Description of Works .........................................................................................7
A1.4 Site Preparation Works Resource Requirements..........................................................23
A1.5 Removal and Reinstatement.........................................................................................26

TABLES
Table A1.1: Indicative Numbers of Personnel ............................................................................25


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2 Construction Method Statement Appendix A1 | October 2011
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Construction Method Statement Appendix A1 | October 2011 3
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APPENDIX A1: SITE PREPARATION WORKS
A1.1 Introduction
A1.1.1 This Annex describes the proposed activities and programme for the site preparation
works. In summary, the proposed development involves the following activities:
site clearance (including fencing, vegetation removal, demolition of existing
structures and the creation of alternative footpaths);
earthworks (including soil stripping and storage, site levelling, creation of
landscape bunds and spoil screening/storage for re-use on-site);
provision of earth retaining structures;
commencement of deep excavations;
provision and relocation of drainage infrastructure (including culverts, outfalls and
balancing ponds);
the provision and operation of plant and machinery (including concrete batching);
site establishment works (including construction compounds and associated
(including layover) facilities, car parks, haulage roads, site access points and
roundabouts, and laying, replacement and/or diversion of apparatus); and
other associated works.
A1.1.2 In the event that Hinkley Point C is not consented all structures would be removed
and the site reinstated.
A1.1.3 Figure 4.1 within the Construction Method Statement (CMS), illustrates the layout
at the end of site preparation.
A1.2 Summary of Works
A1.2.1 The main purpose of the site preparation works is to clear the application site and
undertake the earthworks necessary to create the development platforms for the
subsequent construction of Hinkley Point C power station. This would allow the
construction work to be performed from safe level platforms and enable access
around the site using suitably designed ramps between the different elevations. In
addition, works would commence on the deeper excavations for building foundations.
A1.2.2 The site preparation works would also involve substantial drainage works. These
works would include culverting Holford Stream, which runs through the centre of the
site, and the construction of a network of spine drains for the collection of surface
water and groundwater arising during the site preparation works and the subsequent
construction phase of Hinkley Point C. In the northern half of the site the spine
drains would outfall into Bridgwater Bay and the spine drains in the southern half of
the site would outfall into existing watercourses located downstream and to the east
of the application site.
A1.2.3 In addition to the earthworks and site drainage, there are a number of supplementary
packages of work that would be undertaken during site preparation, comprising:
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demolition of existing barns;
erection of boundary and construction fencing;
construction of a temporary retaining structure along a low-point in the cliff fronting
the application site (to enable land raising of the site during platform
development);
construction of new site access points, roundabouts and internal haulage roads;
erection and commissioning of two concrete batching plants, one of which would
be used to supply concrete for on-site uses during site preparation;
installation of services infrastructure, including a temporary 11kV substation, 25-
30 local switchrooms, power supplies, raw water, telecoms and sewage treatment
plant; and
mobilisation of the civil works contractor (i.e. the contractor that would undertake
the civils work upon grant of the DCO for the Hinkley Point C Project).
A1.2.4 These main and supplementary works are described in further detail below.
a) Platform Development and Commencement of Ground Terracing
A1.2.5 Due to the existing undulating topography, the ground levels of the proposed site
need to be modified to create a series of level platforms. The proposed nuclear
power station would be developed on the Built Development Areas East and West to
the north of Green Lane. Within the areas to be occupied by the new reactor units
(Units 1 and 2) and some of the ancillary buildings, the existing topography is to be
reshaped by a cut and fill operation to create the main development platform at 14m
AOD. This platform level has been defined in response to a number of engineering
and safety case requirements (that is, mainly to remove any risk of inundation of the
nuclear reactors in the event of extreme storm surges, under conservative climate
change scenarios, and the need to optimise the operation of the cooling water
circuit).
A1.2.6 The levels of the surrounding areas have been determined by the need to balance
the cut and fill operations within the site, minimise vehicle movements, maintain level
platforms across the site, and minimise the changes in levels and heights between
the platforms by using natural slopes between platforms rather than concrete and
gabion walls, where possible. The new nuclear power station would require the
creation of deep foundations, constructed as part of Hinkley Point C, to
accommodate the two UK EPR reactor units and large deep structures such as the
forebay and pumping stations associated with the cooling water circuit. These deep
foundations and structures would necessitate the excavation of large quantities of
subsoil and rock. Although it is unlikely to be necessary during the site preparation
works, blasting of the bedrock may be required during commencement of the deeper
excavations in unweathered rock at the two EPR unit sites. It is anticipated that the
excavated rock would be processed on-site and re-used within the development as
structural fill, and some of the less suitable rock and subsoil material would be used
as general fill. Work on these deeper excavations would only be initiated in the site
preparation works, with ground levels centred on EPR Unit 1 and Unit 2 being
excavated to a maximum depth of 3mAOD and 6mAOD, respectively.
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A1.2.7 The overall volume of material to be excavated during the site preparation works is
approximately 2.3 million cubic metres (unbulked), compared with a total of 4.5
million cubic metres (unbulked) that would be excavated upon completion of the
earthworks as a whole (subject to grant of the DCO for the Hinkley Point C Project).
A1.2.8 A significant area of land would be required in order to stockpile and process these
materials, as well as accommodate contractor compounds and workshops, and other
activities. Land to the south of Green Lane (the Southern Construction Phase Area)
has been proposed for this purpose. This enables the earthworks balance to be
maintained within the application site and ensure that materials are retained on site,
therefore minimising the impact on the local environment caused by excessive
transport of materials off site. It has been estimated that approximately 13,000 HGV
movements per month for twelve months (assuming a bulking factor of 1.3 and 20
tonne payloads) would be required to remove the material from the site.
A1.2.9 As illustrated in Figure 4.1 of the CMS the proposed platforms comprise:
main platform: 14m AOD;
ancillary platform: 20m AOD;
nuclear and conventional island terracing: 3m and 6m AOD; and
various platforms in the Southern Construction Phase Area: 21m to 32m AOD.
A1.2.10 In determining the location and level of these platforms, consideration has also been
given to the following:
the need to be adjacent to the Built Development Areas East and West in order
for equipment, plant and materials as well as contractors compounds, to be sited
as close as possible to the construction works;
the need to use the land south of Green Lane, including the Holford Stream
valley, whilst maximising the separation distance between the construction works
and local residents to the south of the site to minimise potential disturbance; and
the need to retain in large part Green Lane, which runs east-west across the site
to the north of the Southern Construction Phase Area.
A1.2.11 The Holford Stream valley topography is unsuitable in its current form to be used as
a construction platform and would require modification to create a level platform.
Furthermore, the existing ground conditions within the floor of the valley are prone to
seasonal water-logging and soft alluvial deposits which make it inappropriate for use
for the laying down of equipment, plant and materials or for their transfer to and from
the Built Development Areas East and West.
A1.2.12 The most appropriate engineering solution to create the development platform
involves the placement of suitable fill material into the valley to create a stable, well
drained and level surface. In order to provide the platform, Holford Stream would
need to be either diverted or culverted. Consideration has been given to both options
and it has been determined that culverting is the best option in view of the following:
it could be accommodated beneath the construction platform, thus minimising the
requirement for additional land take;
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it could be protected from sediment laden run-off as a result of its enclosure within
an engineered structure;
it would maintain flows within the stream and therefore maintain discharge into
Wick Moor which is part of the Bridgwater Bay SSSI to the east of the site;
it could provide the capacity required to achieve conveyance of flows from the
upper part of the Holford Stream to the west, and can incorporate safe access for
inspection and maintenance;
it would minimise the risk of disruption of maintenance activities to the
construction operations; and
it would provide a safe solution for construction traffic, allowing the inclusion of
suitable gradients between platforms.
A1.2.13 The site preparation works are reliant on (and necessitate) Holford Stream being
culverted in order to provide the construction platform required for stockpiling and
other construction uses, whilst at the same time providing a means for the retention
on-site of incompetent materials excavated from Built Development Areas East and
West.
A1.2.14 The gradients between the Southern Construction Phase Area and the development
area to the north are limited so as to allow the safe passage of materials haulage
vehicles and construction plant. The Southern Construction Phase Area platform
needs to be set at an elevation of around 21m AOD to prevent vehicles having to
traverse steep slopes.
b) Surface Water and Groundwater Drainage
A1.2.15 As a result of the extensive earthworks operations, the existing surface water and
groundwater regimes would be affected by the excavation and ground terracing
works. The existing site contains no substantial waterbodies, although there are a
number of minor watercourses, including:
the Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch which enters the site on the western boundary,
north of Green Lane and runs in a west-east direction across the north-west area
of the site before discharging to the foreshore via a natural undulation;
Holford Stream, which enters the site on the western boundary, south of Green
Lane and runs in a west to east direction connecting beyond the application site to
watercourses in Wick Moor, which is part of the Bridgwater Bay SSSI to the east
of the site; and
Bum Brook which runs along the southern boundary in a west-east direction and
connects to watercourses in Wick Moor.
A1.2.16 Groundwater on site generally flows in a south to north direction but is interrupted by
an up-faulted inlier of Mercia Mudstone around the Green Lane area. This prevents
the groundwater flow from the south of the site reaching the Built Development Areas
East and West. As such the Built Development Areas East and West are effectively
a self-contained drainage catchment area. Generally the groundwater flow in the
Southern Construction Phase Area is captured by Bum Brook and Holford Stream
which flow to the east of the site. Here the streams flow to the east of Wick Moor
Drove before eventually discharging to the foreshore, at some distance from the site.
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A1.2.17 To accommodate both the surface water regime and groundwater flows affected by
the changes in elevation and the deep excavations, a dedicated drainage system
would need to be provided. Three spine drains would be provided to the north of
Green Lane running south to north discharging to the foreshore for the duration of the
full Hinkley Point C construction works. The existing Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch,
which enters the application site from the west before diverting north to the foreshore,
would be intercepted and re-routed to connect with the system of spine drains. This
system of spine drains would be accompanied by a number of Water Management
Zones (WMZs) to assist in the treatment of the run-off before discharge to the
foreshore. A system of spine drains would also be provided in the Southern
Construction Phase Area, and the drainage would be routed to two WMZs to the
west and east of the Southern Construction Phase Area, in order to ensure that the
ultimate discharge to Holford Stream is controlled to existing (i.e. greenfield) run-off
rates.
A1.2.18 The deep excavations proposed within the Built Development Areas would require
dewatering to remove groundwater from the excavations so as to ensure that the
working areas are as dry as possible. In order to control the inflow of water into the
excavation areas, a deep well system would be constructed after the creation of the
14m AOD level platform and a pumping system would be installed to remove any
water which may be collected by the wells before discharging water into the surface
water drainage system.
A1.3 Detailed Description of Works
a) Fencing and Public Rights of Way
A1.3.1 There are two elements to the fencing works: a simple timber post and rail fence 1m
high around the application site boundary, and an inner security (construction) fence
2.13m in height delineating the extent of the development site within the application
site.
A1.3.2 The outer timber post and rail fence would be constructed using traditional fencing
materials. The fence line would be established and pre-treated timber posts inserted
in augered holes which would then be backfilled and compacted. The horizontal
timber rails would then be nailed to the vertical posts. The inner security fence would
comprise vertical plastic coated galvanised steel posts between straining posts, set in
a concrete threshold cast to a depth of approximately 300mm, the plastic coated
chain link fixed in place using non-accessible fittings and the wires tensioned
between the posts. Barbed wire protection would be added to the top of the fence.
A1.3.3 It should be noted that the boundary post and rail fence would only be installed
where an existing fence, if any, is in poor condition, or is absent.
A1.3.4 Where Public Rights of Way (PRoW) are intersected by the new post and rail fence,
gates, including self-closing pedestrian gates, would be constructed.
A1.3.5 The construction fence would obstruct a number of PRoW and therefore alternative
routes would be provided around the sites perimeter, connecting with existing
PRoWs in the sites vicinity. Where the alternative route crosses ditches, the ditches
would be culverted and the levels made up so the new route can cross over them.
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A1.3.6 There would be a minimum of 4m separation distance between the outer timber
fence and the security fence between which the alternative routes would run. The
separation distance between the fences varies around the site, reaching up to
approximately 30m to the south of the site alongside Benhole Lane.
A1.3.7 In addition, a new route from Shurton to the alternative route around the site
perimeter would be provided, and EDF Energy would grant the public access to the
whole of the southern area between the southern development boundary and
application site boundary for quiet recreation (dog walking, circular walks etc.). (This
area would also be re-sown and managed as a wildflower meadow to mitigate
against habitat loss on-site).
A1.3.8 It should be noted that consent to authorise closure of PRoWs within the application
site will be sought from Somerset County Council, which has been consulted on the
process.
b) Site Clearance
i. Demolition of Existing Barns
A1.3.9 The three existing barns located on the Built Development Area East and West would
be demolished as part of the early site preparation works. These barns have been
classified as buildings of local importance and, therefore, would be preserved by
record in accordance with established standards and guidelines.
ii. Tree and Hedgerow Removal
A1.3.10 To enable the ground works to be undertaken, existing areas of woodland and
hedgerows would need to be removed. These works would be undertaken outside of
the bird nesting season if at all possible, or would only occur subject to surveys being
undertaken to verify that no active nests are present. Where possible, important
features would be retained including trees and hedgerows around the site boundary
and along the east-west aligned Green Lane and elsewhere within the site.
A1.3.11 The existing trees and hedges to be retained on the site would be protected during
construction in accordance with BS 5837:2005 Trees in Relation to Construction.
The root protection areas for the trees and hedges to be retained would be protected
during construction by the site fencing. The protective fencing would be inspected at
regular intervals to ensure integrity. All excavations for the footings of the site would
be outside of the root protection areas.
A1.3.12 It is envisaged that trees would be removed through cutting of the top growth of the
trees to stump level, followed by bole and root removal using excavating equipment.
It is intended that light cuttings would be gathered and shredded to provide a soil
improvement medium for onward use and/or used to line the alternative routes that
would be constructed around the site to mitigate impacts on PRoWs (or for other
suitable on-site uses). Hedgerows would be removed by removing the top growth
and cutting to stump level, before removing the roots with excavating equipment.
Stumps would be collected and, wherever possible, chipped on site and reused on or
off-site.
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iii. Vegetation Clearance
A1.3.13 The remaining vegetation on site would be cut where required and removed prior to
topsoil stripping from all areas that would be subject to excavation and stockpiling.
Further details on topsoil stripping are provided below in the text describing the
excavation and ground terracing activities. Vegetation and topsoil stripping would be
required prior to installation of the drainage and utilities infrastructure.
c) Platform Development and Ground Terracing
A1.3.14 The existing topography of the Built Development Areas varies from approximately
10m AOD to 35m AOD, generally falling in a south to north direction towards the
Bridgwater Bay. In order to create the required platforms, a comprehensive
earthworks strategy has been developed to maximise the reuse of excavated
material and a minimisation of the earthworks volumes. The first phase of this work
is the creation of the new platforms at their respective level.
A1.3.15 The existing underground material below the current site comprises a mixture of soil
and rock. An assessment of the thickness of the deposits found within the site has
been based on the extensive site investigation works. These have been used to
calculate the volume of material expected to be excavated, reused and stored during
the site preparation works. The assumptions of the thickness of the deposits are as
follows:
topsoil: 0.25m;
subsoil and overburden: 1.7m;
weathered rock: 3m; and
fresh rock: below the weathered rock (unweathered rock).
A1.3.16 It is estimated that approximately 2.3 million m
3
(unbulked) of material would be
excavated during the site preparation works, throughout the 15 month construction
period. Dependent on the structural properties of the material and the potential for
reuse, specific excavation and storage methodologies are required. This places
limitations on the use of the site for the materials, as the different properties of
materials requires that the types of materials have to be stored in separate stockpiles
and with different methodology in line with the sequence of the works around the site.
It is anticipated that on average approximately 200,000m3 (unbulked) of material
would be excavated within the application site per month throughout during the site
preparation works.
A1.3.17 It is anticipated that the work would commence in the areas to the north-west of the
application site and gradually move towards the south of the Built Development West
and East. A primary haulage road to the Southern Construction Phase Area would
be developed at an early stage to allow access for vehicles to the areas where the
soils and rock are to be stored. Wherever possible, to minimise the traffic
movements to the south, the appropriate materials would be retained to form
platforms in the areas where they are excavated.
A1.3.18 The sequence of construction is generally based on the following events:
removal of topsoil to storage area;
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removal of subsoil and overburden to storage areas, dependent upon individual
properties;
removal of weathered rock to either form platforms and/or storage area; and
removal of fresh rock as required to form platforms and/or storage area.
i. Topsoil and Subsoil
A1.3.19 Topsoil and subsoil would be separately stripped from all areas within the site that
would be subject to excavation and stockpiling. This would occur progressively over
the course of the first few months of the site preparation works.
A1.3.20 For the purposes of estimating the volumes of soil that would be generated a nominal
topsoil depth of 250mm has been assumed based on field survey, although in
practice the full depth of topsoil would be stripped. Where necessary subsoil would
be stripped to a depth of at least 500mm below the base of topsoil, discriminating it
from the overburden underneath.
A1.3.21 The stripped topsoil and subsoil would be transported to a storage area to the south-
west of the Southern Construction Phase Area. It is envisaged that the soil stores
would be constructed in a manner that would maximise their screening value for
views towards the site from the south. Soil bunds would also be provided along the
sites western boundary. This would help screen activities from users of Benhole
Lane and other receptors to the west of the site. When these screening bunds has
been completed the construction phase security fencing would be moved and
realigned on the inside of the bunds in order to screen the construction fence and the
adjacent haul route.
A1.3.22 It is envisaged that the soil stockpiles south of Green Lane would be approximately
4m above the current/final grade. The bund along the sites western boundary north
of Green Lane would be a minimum 2m high above the adjacent platform level.
Screen planting on top of the bund would further enhance the bunds screening
benefit.
ii. Overburden
A1.3.23 Overburden would then be excavated down to the upper surface of the weathered
rock. A similar methodology to that of the soil strip would be used to excavate the
overburden material as it is predominantly gravelly or sandy clay. The overburden
deposits would be located in storage according to grade and quality to either be used
as backfill in the creation of the construction platforms or stored for use in
landscaping.
A1.3.24 This excavated overburden material that would be used as backfill would be graded
and compacted to create level areas with some structural integrity. At this stage it is
anticipated that the majority of this material would be used as fill throughout the site,
particularly in creating the platform over the Holford Stream culvert.
iii. Weathered Rock
A1.3.25 The third type of material to be excavated would be the weathered rock. The
weathered rock comprises interspersed layers of mudstone and limestone with
varying thicknesses of each deposit. The excavation of this material would be limited
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to the areas of the site where subsequent deeper excavation into the fresh rock are
required. It is anticipated that the weathered rock can be excavated and transported
using conventional equipment, as noted above. Where the rock is less weathered
ripping and digging would probably be required. Ripping using single or multiple
digging points fixed to heavy tractors or excavators is an effective technique to
loosen rock which is closely jointed/fractured or is transitional between soil and rock.
However, it is unlikely that ripping would be required in the mudstones or the highly
weathered rock.
A1.3.26 During the site preparation works, it is anticipated that only non explosive techniques
would be employed for the loosening and size reduction of rock masses. These
common methods include impact hammers, hydraulic splitters and expansion
compounds. It is anticipated that the use of impact hammers would be the most
efficient method and would be used to carry out the majority of this work.
A1.3.27 It is also anticipated that this excavated material could be suitable for the
construction of specific platforms where the performance requirements permit, for
example the contractors compounds, plant storage areas and general lay-down
zones across the site. This material may need to be treated to meet the specification
for engineering backfill for the support of temporary or permanent buildings and
structures. This material, will be primarily used for the creation of the construction
platforms in all areas of the site, where the specification for fill material is less
onerous, ensuring that the earthworks balance is maintained.
iv. Fresh Rock
A1.3.28 The final type of material to be excavated would be fresh rock. Only a small
proportion, approximately 560,000m3, of this material would be excavated during the
site preparation works. The fresh rock consists primarily of mudstone with
interspersed bands of limestone.
A1.3.29 It is anticipated that the rock would be excavated using similar techniques as
described for the weathered rock. However increasing use of ripping and impact
hammers may be required, due to the properties of the rock. The fresh rock would
be transported to a sorting area where it would be crushed using the on site crushing
and screening plant. Once crushed and sorted, the rock would be either used
directly as backfill or stored for subsequent re-use as determined by the construction
programme.
d) Surface Water and Groundwater Drainage Strategy
A1.3.30 In line with the development of terracing it is essential that drainage of the existing
site is managed in a controlled manner. This needs to take into account the existing
drainage, the sequence of the construction work and the properties of materials that
create the new platforms. An overarching surface water and groundwater drainage
strategy has been developed for the site, using the following principles:
to provide a construction phase surface water drainage system that is fully
compliant with current legislation, regulations and guidance;
to ensure that water is discharged at controlled rates, where necessary, to
minimise impacts on important wildlife habitats, human health and safety, geology
and archaeology;
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to ensure that all surface water discharges meet appropriate water quality
standards in terms of suspended sediments and other possible contaminants (e.g.
hydrocarbons);
to ensure that the drainage is designed using the principals of Sustainable
Drainage Systems (SuDS), including water minimisation and reuse wherever
possible; and
the design for the drainage strategy is based on a 1 in 30 year storm event
occurring during the construction period.
A1.3.31 The following paragraphs provide details on the drainage infrastructure to be installed
during the site preparation works to manage surface water and groundwater
dewatering activities. The site is split into three main catchments, which are broadly
similar to the existing arrangement.
A1.3.32 To the north, where the Built Development Areas East and West generally drain
directly to Bridgwater Bay, consultation with the Environment Agency and Natural
England has indicated that the flow can be direct to the Bay without the need for
attenuation of flow rate or volume as at this location the water level is determined by
the tide and not fluvial flows. Discharges would be treated to limit suspended solids
concentrations to mean concentrations recorded during baseline surveys of the bay.
A1.3.33 The Southern Construction Phase Area and part of Built Development Area East
drain into Holford Stream. Here, both flow rate and water quality are important and,
therefore, it is anticipated that the quality and quantity of water would need to be
controlled. Enhancement of water availability to Wick Moor is provided by a slightly
increased catchment area but flow rates and water quality would be managed to
existing greenfield run-off rates through the creation of new WMZs.
A1.3.34 The third part of the site drains to Bum Brook and no change to the current drainage
works are proposed in this location.
i. Built Development Areas East and West
A1.3.35 The areas as noted above have been designed, where possible, to reflect the
existing catchment area, although the ground levels in the area would be
substantially changed. The drainage strategy comprises a number of phases to
accommodate construction activities as the landform is progressively reshaped. The
existing drainage in this area comprises a series of land drains which feed into the
Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch flow from west to east ditch, before eventually
discharging to the foreshore of Bridgwater Bay.
A1.3.36 To manage the discharge of surface water during the early site preparation activities
(i.e. soil stripping) a series of small dams may be constructed across the Hinkley
Point C Drainage Ditch; these would be located upstream of its existing discharge
location to the foreshore and would create an Early Works Water Management Zone
(EW-WMZ1). This system would ensure a controlled discharge to the foreshore. It is
anticipated that towards the end of the initial site preparation activities a further WMZ
(EW-WMZ2) would be progressively constructed to the west of EW-WMZ 1. It is
envisaged that WMZ 2 would replace WMZ 1 to allow the main earthwork operations
to begin in this area.
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A1.3.37 During the early initial stages of the proposed earthworks, a collector drain and three
spine drains (A, B and C) would be installed progressively working from the outfall
upstream to serve the Built Development Areas East and West.
A1.3.38 The main spine drains would be north-south aligned and located parallel to the
proposed internal haulage roads and would collect the surface water run-off from the
catchment. The drains are sized to eventually collect any surface water drainage
from temporary buildings in the Hinkley Point C construction works (e.g. construction
site offices) and routed north before discharge into Bridgwater Bay, through a
designed outfall structure in a controlled manner.
A1.3.39 The detailed arrangements for the catchment areas would take account of SuDS
principles, to minimise the impact of the development from the increased flow of
water to the drains and to maximise the amenity and biodiversity opportunities.
These principles initially look at the minimisation of water collection such that the
flows follow as near as possible the natural water flow of the site prior to the
development. It should be noted that the existing soils have a very low potential
rainfall acceptance and therefore infiltration opportunities may be limited. However,
the development of the platforms using granular material, give the opportunity to use
swales and infiltration ditches to collect and convey surface water run-off from the
platforms which would allow a proportion of infiltration into the ground.
A1.3.40 In addition, areas of soft landscape and permeable platform surfaces would be
created, wherever possible, to assist in the reduction of rainwater volume collected in
the drainage system. Run-off from the service roads would drain directly onto
adjacent vegetated surfaces, which would allow a level of treatment before infiltration
into the ground. Where required to maintain greenfield run-off rates to existing
watercourses, WMZs would include wet ponds and extended detention basins to
allow any rainfall to be collected, stored and treated prior to discharge. The
greenfield run-off rates would be controlled by the design of a suitably sized throttle
pipe, located at the invert level of the WMZ. The WMZs would have a high level
overflow to allow for rainfall exceeding the 1 in 30 year design event.
A1.3.41 It is proposed that each of the three main spine drains would have their own
designated WMZ (WMZ-1 to 3). The WMZs would be constructed as water detention
basins and wetland environments and would be installed prior to commissioning of
the spine drains.
A1.3.42 During this period, once the western-most spine drain has been constructed, the
existing Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch would be intercepted adjacent to the western
boundary of the site and diverted to the west spine drain in a pipe. Once
commissioned, this buried drain would be designed to allow the run-off from the area
to the west of the Built Development Areas site boundary into the main spine drain.
A1.3.43 The run-off from Built Development Areas East and West would be collected from a
series of open ditches and sumps located at strategic locations around the site to suit
the evolving earthworks. The collected run-off would be gravity fed, where possible,
into the main spine drains via manhole chambers located along its length. In
accordance with SUDS principles, measures to increase the rainwater infiltration to
the ground would be incorporated into the detailed arrangements for the catchment
layout.
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A1.3.44 Trenches for the new spine drains would be excavated to the correct line and level
using mechanical excavators. The trenches for the pipes would be excavated using
mechanical excavators to the correct line and level. These would be excavated to
sufficient depth to allow a 150mm minimum of approved bedding below the pipe.
The bed would be laid and the pipe bedded onto it. The pipes would be lifted in
place and jointed as required along each drainage length. Each drain would be
tested for water tightness in accordance with British Standards and the trenches
would be backfilled up to ground level with compacted granular material.
A1.3.45 The WMZs would be excavated to a specified size and depth. It is anticipated that
these would be excavated to a maximum depth of approximately 3m below the inlet
pipe level. These excavations would be laid to stable earth batters and the ground
blinded with a layer of coarse sand (75mm), prior to the laying of a Medium Density
Polyethylene liner sheet which would be anchored into trenches around the perimeter
of the pond and at intermediate positions to prevent uplift from groundwater
pressures. The WMZs would be laid to a fall towards the outlet and have an inlet and
outfall chamber constructed from reinforced concrete. The inlet chamber would be a
reinforced concrete structure designed to reduce the energy of the flow of water into
the WMZ and would be tied into the WMZ liner sheet. The outlet chamber would be
a reinforced concrete structure, designed to allow a hydraulic gradient across the
WMZ and would include a silt chamber, below the invert level of the outlet and
upstream of the discharge pipe. The outlet pipes would be designed to suit the
required volume of water except where it is necessary to control the flow to greenfield
rates, this would be achieved by the use of a throttle pipe, located at the invert level
of the WMZ outlet and sized to suit the required flow rate. The WMZs would have a
second high level overflow arrangement, to allow an increased discharge in the event
of a rainfall event greater than a 1 in 30 year event. The outlet chamber would be
tied into the WMZ liner in a similar manner to the inlet chamber.
A1.3.46 Flow from the three south-north gravity spine drains would then flow into an east-
west collector drain running parallel to the northern boundary of the site, discharging
through a designed outfall structure to the foreshore. A number of discharge outfall
options have been considered for discharge from the spine drains and WMZs onto
the foreshore. The proposed outfall location would be at the redundant Hinkley Point
A and B dry dock as this has been assessed to have the least environmental impact.
A1.3.47 The outfall structure would be constructed from reinforced concrete in a location
close to the cliff edge and would be constructed from both the top of the cliff and the
foreshore. Whilst the majority of the construction and materials handling could be
completed from the top of the cliff, to maintain a safe site there would be a
requirement to provide some minor vehicle access onto the foreshore. This minor
access would be located in close proximity to the proposed outfall work site at the
location where the difference in ground and beach levels are around 5m and where
there is no cliff to the foreshore. The foreshore access width would be minimised to
suit a single width access route (~4.5m) and would be locally graded to allow safe
access between the two levels. The construction would be similar to a typical
haulage road around the site, with interwoven fabric topped with a layer of well
compacted type 1 granular material. It is likely to be used infrequently, probably
between 10 and 20 vehicles per day, in each direction for approximately 4 weeks
during the proposed works.
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A1.3.48 The level of the outfall drain from the site is 7.5m AOD with the structure being
designed to dissipate any energy from the water as it discharges from the pipe. An
access structure is located nominally upstream from the outfall to allow access to the
outfall pipe and where necessary any sampling equipment required as part of the
discharge agreement.
A1.3.49 The drainage strategy has been designed on the basis of meeting the current
standards and, where required, discharge permits would be sought in conjunction
with this application. The maximum rate of run-off into Bridgwater Bay from the
single outfall for a 1 in 30 return event storm has been calculated to be around
13.5m3s-1 for the duration of the storm. For the Southern Construction Phase Area
the discharges into Holford Stream would be designed to accord with the greenfield
discharge rates. The potential impact of greater return period storms, e.g. 1 in 50 or
1 in 100 on the site would mean shorter retention periods within the Water
Management Zones. To prevent flooding of the application site during the main
Hinkley Point C works, there may be a need to create designed overflow channels
from the outlet described above, that allow the discharge of water from the WMZ
either into discrete locations or into the receiving waters. Provision in the design has
been made for rainfall events that exceed the normal design criteria for drainage
systems. It has been agreed that the construction drainage system would be
designed to a 3.33% Annual Exceedance Probability (AEP) standard but,
consideration of the 2% AEP and 1% AEP events have been included.
ii. Southern Construction Phase Area
A1.3.50 The drainage in the Southern Construction Phase Area would be routed through two
main areas, ultimately controlled through the WMZs, so as to achieve greenfield run-
off rates. The drainage routes comprise:
the area to the west of the southern area which would be routed through WMZ-5
to an outfall adjacent to the headwalls at the entrance to the new culvert which is
to be constructed along Holford Stream valley; and
run-off from the eastern catchments in the Southern Construction Phase Area
which would be routed through WMZ-4 to the east of this area, where flows would
be attenuated via a series of attenuation ponds, prior to controlled discharge into
the culverted Holford Stream.
A1.3.51 Holford Stream, which currently flows from west to east within the Southern
Construction Phase Area to the south of Green Lane, would be culverted to allow for
creation of a construction platform area which is essential to allow the proposed
nuclear power station to be built. The culvert would be constructed from land
adjacent to the western boundary of the site, across to the eastern boundary of the
site, where it would return water into the existing open Holford Stream watercourse.
A1.3.52 Once the culvert is constructed the stream would be diverted through a reinforced
concrete apron, located on land within the site adjacent to the western boundary, and
therefore into the culvert. The culvert would be laid to fall to suit the natural
topography of the existing ground until it reaches the eastern boundary of the site,
where the water would discharge into the existing open Holford Stream watercourse
by a similar reinforced concrete apron.
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A1.3.53 The culvert would be a pre-cast reinforced concrete structure, manufactured off-site
and laid on a suitably designed foundation to support the culvert and the thickness of
the engineering fill that would be placed above. The internal dimensions of the
culvert would be 2.5m by 2.5m, which has sufficient capacity to allow the water from
the upstream catchment of Holford valley to drain through it and also to allow for safe
vehicular (e.g. Bobcat) and personnel access for maintenance of the culvert. The
inlet and outlet of the culvert would be suitably screened to prevent unauthorised
access and to prevent blockage of the culvert from large items of vegetation flowing
into the culvert. In addition suitably sized ventilation shafts, with security grills to
prevent unauthorised access, would be provided along the length of the culvert.
A1.3.54 The culvert and its foundation would be constructed to the north of the existing
stream; the location would reduce the amount of excavation required to reach a
suitable bearing strata within the rock. Once the culvert is completed, the inlet and
outlet structures would be constructed and the stream diverted. Following the
diversion of the ditch backfilling would commence against the culvert and suitably
sized land drains would be incorporated adjacent to the culvert to allow any
groundwater recharge from the adjacent land to be collected and discharged through
the outlet structure and into Holford Stream. As the backfill material starts to
increase in level above the top of the culvert, the ventilation shafts would be
constructed until the ground reaches its final level. The top ventilation shafts would
be located at a safe height above the finished construction platform.
A1.3.55 Bum Brook, which flows from west to east immediately south of the sites southern
boundary, would remain unaltered.
iii. Drainage Catchment Areas
A1.3.56 Catchment Area 1 is located to the north western corner of the site and covers an
area of 325,724m2. During the site preparation works it would comprise areas of
hardstanding and well compacted granular material. A series of drainage ditches
and underground drainage systems would be installed to capture run-off and feed it
into the main spine drain C. The area includes WMZ 1, which serves this catchment
and catchment 10, which is sized at around 10,230m3, or approximately 60m square
x 3m deep.
A1.3.57 Catchment Areas 2 and 3 would drain the majority of the Built Development Areas,
with catchment 2 covering an area 264,418m2 and catchment 3 covering
265,190m2. The run-off from these two catchments would be accommodated by
spine drains A and B respectively and WMZ 2 and 3, which would be sized at around
50m square x 3m deep.
A1.3.58 Catchment Area 4 would cover an area of approximately 105,664m2. Run-off from
this area would ultimately be controlled to greenfield run-off rates through its
associated WMZ-4 and discharged into Holford Stream. Subject to detail, there is
the potential for run-off associated with this catchment to be directed into spine drain
B. WMZ 4, which serves this catchment and catchments 6, 7, 8, 9 and 13 would be
sized at 15,840m3 or around 75m square x 3m deep.
A1.3.59 Catchment Area 5 would be located within the south-western area of the site, south
of Green Lane and would be used for stockpiling soil and rock. It would cover an
area of 258,007m2 and ground platforms in this area would vary from 21m AOD in
the north and 23m AOD in the south. These are indicative levels and would be
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determined by the amount of material at any one time during the earthworks. This
catchment area would be one of the first to be culverted and a catchment headwall
would be required to collect run-off from upstream. The catchment would include
WMZ 5 which is sized at 7,800m3.
A1.3.60 Catchment Area 6 would be used for storing rock with an area covering 118,072m2,
as such this platform would be compacted granular material with run-off entering
WMZ and discharged to Holford Stream at greenfield rates.
A1.3.61 Catchment Area 7 would be located to the east of the site in the Southern
Construction Phase Area and would serve the entrance to the site in the south. The
platforms in this area would be at 17m AOD. This catchment area would cover an
area of 27,176m2 and would comprise an area of hardstanding, well compacted
granular material and some buildings. It would drain into the same WMZ as
Catchment Area 6.
A1.3.62 Catchment Area 8 would be located in the south western corner of the Southern
Construction Phase Area. The majority of this catchment would not undergo site
preparation works. Within the development site the platform level would range from
20m AOD to the top of the topsoil storage. This level would vary depending on the
material sourced from the site. The catchment area covers an area of 138,119m2
and run-off would be captured by drains flowing west to east entering Catchment
Area 9 before being channelled north to WMZ 4 and ultimately discharging to Holford
Stream.
A1.3.63 Catchment Area 9 would be located in the south eastern corner of the development
site, where the platform level would be similar to the existing ground level. This
catchment area covers an area of 98,644m2. Run-off would be channelled north to
WMZ-4 before discharging to Holford Stream to the east of the site.
A1.3.64 Catchment Area 10 would be located to the west of Built Development Area West
outside the application site. This would cover an area of 243,900m2. The run-off
from this catchment would be accommodated by the Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch
and spine drain C.
A1.3.65 Catchment Area 11 would be located to the west of the South Construction Phase
Area outside the application site. This would cover an area of 590,000m2. The run-
off from this catchment would area would be controlled to greenfield run-off rates
through WMZ-5 before being discharged to Holford Stream.
A1.3.66 Catchment Area 12 is designated as the future catchment area between Bum Brook
and construction fence and remains unchanged in the site preparation works.
A1.3.67 Catchment Area 13 would surround the southern half of the common land and would
cover an area of 36,157m2. This catchment area would be designed to be a WMZ,
including attenuation ponds for controlling run-off from Catchment Areas 4, 6, 7 and
13 itself. The area might also comprise other water and sediment management
systems such as treatment areas for waters high in suspended solids.
A1.3.68 Catchment Area 14 would be located in the southern-most part of the application site
and would cover an area of 17,980m2.
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e) Deep Excavation Groundwater Dewatering
A1.3.69 As part of the creation of terraces, the area around the proposed site for the UK EPR
reactor units needs to be excavated to a lower level, although the exact formation of
the excavation would be completed during the main construction works. The
terraces would accordingly be reduced locally from the general 14m AOD level to
around 3m AOD for Unit 1 and 6m AOD for Unit 2. The working areas around the
deeper excavations would need to be as dry as possible. To allow the excavation
levels of 3m AOD and 6m AOD to be achieved safely, dewatering of the areas for the
removal of groundwater and surface water from the excavations would be required.
Dewatering operations would start in advance of the deep excavations so that the
working areas are as dry as possible during the excavation process. Water collected
from dewatering would be discharged to the surface water drainage system
described above.
A1.3.70 Most of the dewatering abstraction volume would arise from fractures and larger
pores in the saturated zone above the water table as transitional recharge water
moving downwards or held in small pores and pore connections by capillary forces in
the pre-dewatering saturated zone. This latter component comprises the specific
retention component which cannot drain by gravity and would be released into the
excavation as the material is broken up and removed.
A1.3.71 There are a number of methods for controlling the inflow of water into the excavation
areas, the most appropriate option being a deep well system. Deep wells would be
created initially by drilling deep boreholes using a drilling rig, then slotted plastic
pipes would be installed in the wells and surrounded by granular gravel bedding.
Pumps would be installed to connect the wells to the new surface water drainage
system. Water would be collected by the wells and pumped and discharged into the
drainage system (i.e. the spine drains) as described in the section on surface water
drainage.
A1.3.72 The Southern Construction Phase Area would not require any deep well drainage for
the construction of the nuclear power station, though localised groundwater drainage
systems may be required to deal with high groundwater tables. After installation of
the Holford Stream culvert, there would be a collector drains, located adjacent to the
culvert, at the current ground level, which are designed to capture any excess
groundwater and allow it to drain into the Holford Stream, downstream of the culvert.
f) Interaction with the Main Hinkley Point C Operational Drainage
A1.3.73 The main spine drains in the Built Development East and West would follow the
network of roads within the site during the main Hinkley Point C works and wherever
appropriate the operational drainage would be designed to take advantage of the
reuse of the construction surface water drainage network as possible.
A1.3.74 Although the final discharge method for the Hinkley Point C operational drainage is
likely to be different from the construction drainage, there may be key elements of the
drainage network that could be reused. For example, the drainage strategy has been
developed so that the surface water drainage from the two units and the construction
areas are independent. This would allow, in the latter stages of development, the
operational drainage to work independently of any ongoing development works and
eventually allow the area of the construction compounds to be reinstated once the
development is completed. In addition the main spine drains have been routed along
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the main haulage roads, which may eventually be used as the permanent roads.
Therefore, the spine drains may be able to serve the run-off from the road network in
a similar manner, for both construction and operational drainage although there may
be a need to divert the spine drains, to the final operational discharge position.
A1.3.75 The operational drainage design would need to take into account matters such as
increased run-off caused by storms with a high return period, exact sequencing of
operation/commissioning/construction, and reduced run-off coefficients for
catchments as the areas are reinstated with soft landscaping features. All of these
aspects would impact on the reuse of the construction surface water network, which
would be addressed within the DCO application to the IPC to be submitted in due
course.
g) Additional Works
A1.3.76 As described above, to support the development of the earthworks there are other
minor works that are required which are outlined below.
i. Temporary Retaining Structure
A1.3.77 The temporary retaining structure would be constructed along part of the northern
edge of the main platform, where the ground level is to be set at 14m AOD. The
structure would be approximately 200m long and is required to retain the elevated
main platform above the natural grade level, which varies between 9.5m and 14.0m
AOD. The retaining structure would be protected at its base to avoid potential scour
from waves overtopping the cliff. It is not intended to provide any flood defence or
protection from coastal erosion since it would be subsumed by the sea wall that
would be constructed along the frontage of the Hinkley Point C site upon grant of a
DCO (or, in the event of Hinkley Point C not being consented, it would be removed).
A1.3.78 The composition of the retaining structure will be based on the use of natural material
(excavated from site through ground levelling) and suitably reinforced for the required
strength to suit the difference in ground level.
A1.3.79 The exact construction details would be developed during detailed design, taking into
consideration aspects such as material properties, construction techniques,
programme, costs etc. Planning permission is being sought for the proposed earth
retaining structure which would be constructed on top of, and set back from, the
existing cliff line (approximately 10-30m dependant on structural and geotechnical
constraints). The design would be developed to ensure that there would be no need
for any further strengthening to the foreshore and to the existing cliff face.
A1.3.80 It is noted that changes between platform levels have generally been based on using
natural slopes (subject to the main contractors detailed method statements).
ii. Internal Haulage Roads
A1.3.81 A number of haulage roads would be developed on site to facilitate the movement of
vehicles and soil and rock materials around the site. These would comprise:
a north-south haulage road which would allow for the stockpiling of excavated
material within the Southern Construction Phase Area;
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a haulage road network in the northern part of the site, which would vary in
location and level to suit the ongoing platform development to eventually tie into
the site compounds as they are developed and running parallel to the spine
drains; and
a service road around the perimeter of the site within the security fence to allow
security and maintenance personal access to inspect and maintain the fence line.
A1.3.82 The haulage roads would be constructed in accordance with the current relevant
British Standards and the Highways Agency Design Manual as required for heavy
vehicle usage and estimated traffic volumes. These haulage roads would be
surfaced with compacted granular material and the surface water drainage would be
tied into the spine drains to be constructed during the site preparation works. These
would be aligned with the internal haulage roads and would collect the surface water
run-off before controlled discharge either to Bridgwater Bay for drainage to the north
of Green Lane, or Holford Stream for drainage to the south of Green Lane.
iii. Site Access and Roundabouts
A1.3.83 During site preparation an access/security gate would be installed in the north-east
part of the site to control access from the C182. A second site access gate would
later be provided to the south-east of the site for Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs).
A1.3.84 Two roundabouts would be constructed to the north-east and south-east of the site to
serve these access points; these would be constructed once the 14m AOD platform
and 17m AOD platform have been developed. The roundabouts would be
constructed off the line of Wick Moor Drove, so as to avoid disruption to the existing
traffic flow.
A1.3.85 The roundabouts would be designed and constructed in accordance with the
Highways Agency Design Manual for Roads and Bridges and The Manual of
Contract Documents for Highway Works. The central roundabout island and external
road lines would be constructed using pre-cast concrete road kerbs; these would be
installed onto cast in-situ concrete foundations and then finished with cast concrete
haunching.
A1.3.86 Surface water drainage of the roundabout and access road would be established
using either traditional concrete road gullies and or in combination with a combined
kerb and drainage system, tied into precast concrete manholes adjacent to the
roundabout. The surface water drainage would be discharged either to a soakaway
or an adjacent drainage ditch on the northern roundabout and through a WMZ on the
southern roundabout. All gully and service covers would be set at the correct
finished road level.
A1.3.87 The final road construction would be completed by potentially using a sub grade and
capping layer, a bound granular sub-base and bitumen macadam base and surface
course. The road thicknesses would be designed based upon the Californian
Bearing Ratio (CBR) of the ground and the expected traffic volumes and equivalent
vehicle weights, expressed in standard axles.
A1.3.88 Road markings and signage for the road and roundabout would be installed prior to
the transition between the existing road network and the new roundabouts. The
redundant sections of existing road may be utilised to accommodate abnormal load
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manoeuvres, those sections not required would be removed and landscaped after
the roundabouts are in operation so as to provide suitable planting and habitats in the
localised area. Landscaping would be specified in order to maintain design site lines
and visibility standards.
A1.3.89 Street lighting would be designed and installed to the current British Standard
European Norm (BSEN).
iv. Emergency Access
A1.3.90 Access to the application site could potentially be impeded by flooding of the C182 in
a major storm surge. Flood modelling predicts this would be a very unlikely event
that would necessitate breaching of the existing sea defences. The site itself would
in large part not flood due to the existing and proposed ground levels that are
elevated relative to the Holford valley, over which the C182 passes to the east of the
site. Therefore the site could, if necessary, be evacuated via the site haul roads,
accessing the C182 south of the Holford Valley crossing point.
v. Site Compounds
A1.3.91 Two principal compounds would be developed within the site once the final platform
levels have been attained. The Earthworks Contractors Area (Compound A) would
be located in the north-east corner of the site, in an area that would already be
covered in hardstanding. The Earthworks Contractor would mobilise within
Compound A and install the following additional facilities for the purposes of the site
preparation works:
temporary offices and amenities blocks (temporary portacabins not buildings);
a mobile plant for the crushing, grinding or size reduction of excavated rocks and
other materials such as any bricks, tiles or concrete that may be excavated;
an 11kV substation (see Provision of Utilities Infrastructure for further details);
a mobile wheel washer, with a water recycling design and fully self-contained unit
relying only on existing services at the compound to function (i.e. raw water and
electricity); and
a mobile weighbridge that can be positioned as required to weigh vehicles
containing materials to be used on site or disposed of as part of the works. The
weighbridge would be above ground.
A1.3.92 In addition, a concrete batching plant would be located within Compound A (approx
9.5m in height and incorporating a silo approx 20m high). This plant would be
installed, commissioned and used to supply concrete for on-site uses during site
preparation.
A1.3.93 The Main Civil Works Contractors Area (Compound B) would be located on the 20m
AOD platform in the north-western corner of the site. This would be developed upon
reaching the finished platform level and would be serviced ready for mobilisation of
the Main Civil Works Contractor, which would occur towards the end of the site
preparation works. It is envisaged that offices and other facilities (all portacabins)
would begin to be installed within the compound during this period. It is not intended
to install wheel washes etc within Compound B because access into the site would
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be via the site entrances at the eastern end of the site where these facilities would
exist.
A1.3.94 A second concrete batching plant would be installed in the vicinity of Compound B.
Its precise location has yet to be confirmed but it would be located on the 14m AOD
platform, most likely at a location to the south of UK EPR Reactor Unit 2 (in the north-
western part of the site). This plant would be of a similar construction to that
described above but it would be larger since it would be used to mix the cement for
the construction of the nuclear power stations themselves. It would be approximately
20m in height and would incorporate a silo approximately 25m high, from the platform
level. This batching plant would be installed and commissioned (including the
production of trial mixes and batches) during site preparation but would not be used
until the start of DCO construction works.
vi. Provision of Utilities Infrastructure
A1.3.95 During the site preparation works, as the land is re-profiled, the existing utilities
including potable water, electricity, sewage and communications infrastructure to the
north-east of the site would be re-routed as necessary and in agreement with the
respective utility owner would be extended to reach the satellite site compounds and
facilities.
A1.3.96 A temporary 11kV substation and local switchrooms would be necessary to provide
sufficient power, through a network to the plant required for the site preparation
works and the Hinkley Point C Project. The 11kV substation would be constructed
within the area of hard standing to the north-east of the site within the site
preparation contractors compound area. Between 20 and 30 local switchrooms
would be required, distributed across the 20m AOD development platforms. They
would be 2-3m2 in plan and between 1-2m high and are likely to be constructed from
glass reinforced plastic (GRP).
A1.3.97 Toilet facilities for the workforce during site preparation would be provided in the form
of temporary portaloo type units which would be deployed at the site as necessary.
A1.3.98 As the satellite compounds are developed up to three sewage treatment plants would
be constructed on the 20m AOD platform during the site preparation works, in
preparation for use during the Hinkley Point C construction works. The exact location
of the new plant on the site would depend on the needs of each individual contractor
and the associated stage of the earthworks programme. The sewage treatment
plants would be self-contained, packaged units, providing primary, secondary and
tertiary treatment.
A1.3.99 To maintain a continuous supply of raw and potable water to the site during
construction and eventual operation of the nuclear power station, an underground
reinforced concrete raw water service reservoir with a capacity of around 9,000m3 is
required on site. The reservoir would be serviced by a connection to the existing
water mains network. This connection is being developed by Wessex Water and
does not form part of the site preparation works. The reservoir would be
approximately 60m x 40m x 4m deep, in two compartments and located within the
20m AOD level platform.
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vii. Construction Lighting
A1.3.100 Appropriate lighting would be installed across the site during the site preparation
works. A lighting strategy has been prepared for site preparation that ensures:
provision of a safe working environment;
avoidance of over illumination;
avoidance of upwards lighting;
avoidance of light spill to neighbouring areas;
minimise adverse effects on bats; and
minimisation of energy consumption.
A1.3.101 This strategy complies with the CLGs guidance Lighting in the Countryside:
Towards Good Practice, other relevant guidance and British Standards, and
addresses the relevant environmental considerations including ecological constraints
and the protection of public amenity.
A1.3.102 With the proposed working hours of 07:0018:00 Monday to Friday and 07:0013:00
on Saturdays, the potential need for artificial lighting would be restricted to up to a
few hours at either end of the working day between November and February.
A1.3.103 Key elements of the lighting strategy are described in the following paragraphs.
A1.3.104 Task lighting only would be used for bulk earthworks (excavation,
screening/stockpiling and backfilling/land-raising), as well as for other related
activities including lighting of compounds, haul roads, etc. The design of task lighting
would limit the impact of such lighting on the environment. The task lighting would
not be installed site-wide but would target areas being worked (i.e. the areas of
excavation, backfill and the intervening haul routes).
A1.3.105 It is recognised that the Southern Development Phase Area is located in close
proximity to corridors of environmental sensitivity (both ecological and human). The
detailed construction phasing and methodologies within this area would endeavour to
minimise impacts of the temporary lighting on the environment. Green Lane and
Benhole Lane, which form the western and northern edges of this area, would be
recognised as dark zones for the site preparation works.
A1.3.106 The two proposed site access roundabouts from Wick Moor Drove would be lit to
highway standards. The northern roundabout is located within an existing lit section
of Wick Moor Drove; the southern roundabout and access to the site would require
an additional section of Highway Lighting to be implemented.
A1.3.107 In order to reduce the impacts of lighting on the surrounding countryside, it is not
currently envisaged that the security (construction) fence would need to be lit.
A1.4 Site Preparation Works Resource Requirements
a) Introduction
A1.4.1 The proposed works would take place over the agreed period in preparation for the
ongoing Hinkley Point C Project. To complete the works, a variety of resources
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including equipment, personnel and materials would be required. The exact details
regarding the numbers and capacities of equipment, numbers of personnel would
depend upon the individual working methods of the successful design and build
contractor. The resource needs would be developed from those estimated below in
line with the outline development programme.
b) Programme
A1.4.2 The site preparation works are scheduled to last for approximately 15 months.
Phase 0 and Phase 1 (fencing and site clearance) are due to last for 3 months in
total, with Phase 2 (earthworks) taking a further 12 months approximately.
c) Equipment
A1.4.3 The type and exact numbers of equipment would be confirmed once the detail design
and build contractor is appointed. The key elements of equipment revolve around
the platform development and ground terracing, supplemented with other smaller
vehicles for the delivery of personnel and materials to the application site. The
numbers of vehicles have been assumed to allow for excavation and handling of
approximately 200,000m3 of soil material (unbulked) per month. This is the design
rate which would be sought, month by month, for the duration of the site preparation
works (although a higher rate may be needed to make up for lost time due to poor
weather). It is envisaged that the main equipment would be brought onto site for the
duration of the works, parked and, where necessary, maintained in a dedicated area
located on the hardstanding to the north-east of the application site and then
removed at the completion of the works.
A1.4.4 At this stage the following types, capacities and maximum numbers of equipment
have been assumed:
bulldozers/scrapers between 15-20 of varying capacity retained on site for the
duration of the works;
heavy duty rollers for platform development, used in conjunction with the above
equipment as required and retained on site for the duration of the works;
excavators between 10-15 excavators of varying capacity retained on site for
the duration of the works;
earthworks bulk transport lorries between 20-25 of around 25m
3
capacity
retained on site for the duration of the works;
flat back/covered articulated lorries it is anticipated that up to a maximum of 120
deliveries to site per day of varying capacity;
personnel carriers expected to be a maximum of 200 per day to the site
compound, but increasing towards Q1 2012 to around 300 (although this may be
reduced with the development of detailed Travel Plans);
tree felling equipment expected to be around 5-10 retained on site for the
duration of the works;
fence augers expected to be up to 5, retained on site for the duration of the
works; and
cranes expected to be approximately 5-6 mobile cranes of varying capacity,
used intermittently as required, retained on site for the duration of the works
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(although there may be a need for specific increased capacity cranes for
operations such as lifting the culvert in place).
d) Site Preparation Works Workforce
A1.4.5 The workforce for the site preparation works would increase over time. It is
estimated that approximately 100 people would be required at the start of the site
preparation works rising to approximately 500 people towards the end of the works
(see Table A1.1).
Table A1.1: Indicative Numbers of Personnel
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5
Personnel 100 150 250 250 500
A1.4.6 The step increase in the workforce in Q5 is due to the mobilisation to site of the main
civil works contractor (e.g. for commissioning the batching plant and making
preparations for commencement of the civils works, subject to grant of the DCO) in
combination with completion of the networks (which is relatively labour intensive) and
ongoing earthworks associated with commencement of the deep excavations.
A1.4.7 It is proposed that the site preparation workforce would work a single shift pattern
each day, as follows:
from 07:00 to 18:00 on weekdays; and
from 07:00 to 13:00 on Saturdays.
A1.4.8 There would be no working during the evening or night-time, on Saturday afternoons,
Sundays or on public holidays.
e) Traffic and Transport
A1.4.9 The workforce for the site preparation works would be mostly civil operatives and
construction support staff which are expected to be recruited, where possible, from
the local area.
A1.4.10 Contractors are being strongly encouraged to minimise passenger traffic by the use
of buses for their staff into the site and priority would be given within the parking
allocation to multi-occupancy vehicles.
A1.4.11 For the duration of the site preparation works, construction shift patterns would be
scheduled to ensure peak development traffic demand does not overlap with the
highway network peak demand, namely 08:00-09:00 and 17:00-18:00 hrs.
A1.4.12 It is planned that the main construction plant would be delivered upon mobilisation for
Phase 2 and would remain on site for the duration of the site activity. Deliveries to
site would be programmed to avoid peak hours and would be staggered to coincide
with the commencement of the appropriate activity.
A1.4.13 The bulk of the HGV deliveries to site would be to import aggregate for use in the
construction of the haul routes and construction areas. To reduce HGV traffic this
would be limited to 200,000m3 (reduced from 500,000m3 in the original estimate)
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through maximising the use of site-won crushed rock. Larger wagons will also be
considered to reduce the number of deliveries.
A1.5 Removal and Reinstatement
a) Introduction
A1.5.1 This section outlines the scenario where a DCO is not granted by the IPC to
construct and operate a new nuclear power station at Hinkley Point C. These
arrangements, therefore, are the measures that EDF Energy envisage would be
triggered through a condition on any planning permission granted for the site
preparation works should a DCO consent not be granted by IPC. This would require
the removal of all infrastructure and the reinstatement of the land to its existing state
(with ecological improvement focussing on that land not reinstated for agricultural
use).
A1.5.2 This section describes the process of removing all temporary infrastructure installed
during the site preparation works and subsequent reinstatement of the site. The
removal and reinstatement phase is anticipated to take approximately three years,
followed by a five-year aftercare period to ensure that the landscape reinstatement,
including land created for the benefit of biodiversity, landscape character and
amenity, has been successful. The proposed strategy would comprise the following
activities:
removal of temporary infrastructure;
return of excavated material to its original location or as near as it is feasible with
due regard to the existing ground profiles and limiting the impact on the
environment;
reinstatement of the natural undulating topography of the site;
reinstatement of existing hydrology;
laying and grading of topsoil; and
reinstatement of land use types, including areas managed for agriculture,
biodiversity and amenity in accordance with the Landscape Mitigation and
Reinstatement Strategy.
b) Removal of Temporary Infrastructure
A1.5.3 The removal of temporary infrastructure would be undertaken in the first six months
of the removal and reinstatement phase; which itself would be undertaken in a
phased manner.
i. Installed Fencing around the Site
A1.5.4 All outer simple timber post and rail fencing installed around the perimeter of the
construction site would be extracted and removed off site (upon completion of the
works when public access to the site no longer needs to be restricted). The inner
security fences would be carefully removed to enable their reuse on other
construction sites. The concrete associated with the foundations of the fencing
would be excavated and disposed of off-site or would be crushed and re-used on-
site, e.g. as a surface for PRoW. The construction fence would not be removed until
completion of the earthworks.
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ii. Obstructed PRoW
A1.5.5 All PRoW that would be obstructed during the site preparation works would be re-
opened or re-instated. Green Lane would be upgraded to a bridlepath.
iii. Temporary Utilities Infrastructure
A1.5.6 The temporary utilities installed on site including the 11kV sub-station, other
substations, sewage treatment plant and raw water storage areas would removed.
These structures would be disconnected from the source, excavated and removed off
site.
iv. Site Compounds
A1.5.7 The site compounds established during the site preparation works would be
dismantled and removed. Areas of hardstanding would be broken up and removed
from site. This would include the internal haulage roads, access road and
roundabouts.
v. Temporary Retaining Structure
A1.5.8 The temporary retaining structure would be dismantled and the material re-used on
site.
vi. Surface Water Drainage Infrastructure
A1.5.9 The temporary drainage infrastructure would be removed in parallel with the
reinstatement of the features and levels in the earthworks and the existing
hydrological features, before the application site development, would be reinstated.
The intercepted Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch would be reinstated to enter the site
from the west before routing north and discharging to the foreshore to the north-west
of the site.
vii. Holford Stream Culvert
A1.5.10 The culverted stream would be reinstated to its previous above ground state during
the reinstatement of the Southern Construction Phase Area. Holford Stream would
be reinstated to flow from the west of the site to the east into Wick Moor in an open
ditch. The culvert would be excavated along its length and the pre-cast reinforced
concrete structure would be dismantled with the potential for reuse. The reinforced
concrete headwalls would be demolished, before being crushed and removed off-
site.
c) Return of Excavated and Stockpiled Material
A1.5.11 The volume of un-bulked excavated material stockpiled on site during the
construction phase would be approximately 2.3 million m
3
comprising a mix of topsoil,
overburden, weathered and fresh rock. As described above, the stockpiling would be
strategically managed to ensure the materials can be re-used either as fill material or
for reinstatement.
A1.5.12 During the reinstatement phase the stockpiled material would be loaded into
articulated trucks for transportation to where it is required for fill or reinstatement.
The average volume of material to be transported each month would be
approximately 200,000m3.
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A1.5.13 The return of stockpiled material would generally follow the reverse sequence of the
earthworks construction phase. The fresh rock would be taken from the Southern
Construction Phase Area and transported to the deep excavations created for the
foundations of the UK EPR reactor units to the north of the site. The rock would be
excavated with the equipment used on the Built Development Area East, transported
in articulated trucks and placed into the excavations, and then rolled and compacted
to remove the air. The deeper excavations for the UK EPR reactor units would be
brought up to a platform level of 10m AOD, similar to the existing level.
d) Reinstatement of the Natural Undulating Topography
A1.5.14 Following the infill of the excavations, the weathered rock and some overburden
would be used to re-profile the Built Development Area West to create an undulating
landform that reflects the existing profile. The Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch would
be reinstated.
A1.5.15 Once the Built Development Area West is completed, the weathered rock and
overburden would be transported to the Built Development Area East to be used for
re-profiling of the landform.
A1.5.16 In the second year of reinstatement, the Southern Construction Phase Area would be
reinstated to an undulating topography, similar to the existing profile. The
reinstatement of this area would follow a similar sequence to that of the Built
Development Areas West and East, using the weathered rock and overburden from
the stockpiled in the Southern Construction Phase Area to create undulations which
generally fold in a north to south direction, with valleys and ridges generally running
in a west to east direction. The reinstatement of the Southern Construction Phase
Area would be phased, with the western section to be reinstated first. Holford
Stream would be reinstated to its current, above ground form.
e) Reinstatement of Existing Hydrology
A1.5.17 As described above, the temporary drainage infrastructure would be removed and all
the existing hydrological features would be reinstated. The process of removing the
drainage features would be the reverse of construction with the drains and would be
in line with the sequence of reinstatement of the natural undulating topography.
f) Landscape Reinstatement
A1.5.18 Following the reinstatement of the topography of the northern areas of the site,
topsoil stockpiled in the Southern Construction Phase Area would be transported to
the Built Development Areas East and West in the first year. The topsoil would be
laid and graded in accordance with good practice and then planted as described in
the Landscape Mitigation and Reinstatement Strategy. This would be undertaken for
the Southern Construction Phase Area in the second year.
A1.5.19 The Landscape Mitigation and Reinstatement Strategy for the site aims to:
maintain and enhance the landscape character that preceded the works;
maintain and enhance biodiversity and ecological connectivity;
provide access and amenity to the site for the public;
support the proposed future uses for the site; and
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ensure the sustainable use of resources.
A1.5.20 This is a comprehensive strategy that EDF Energy believes would achieve these
aims. As described above, the landform would be reinstated to the existing gently
rolling hills and valleys, and Holford Stream reinstated to its present, above ground
state. This approach would allow the reinstated landscape to support the proposed
uses, provide continuity with the surrounding landscape character, and enhance
biodiversity. As illustrated in the proposals for landscape mitigation and
reinstatement, they would:
recreate of the existing agricultural pattern of field boundaries marked by
hedgerows;
provide semi-natural habitats such as woodland, species-rich hedgerows,
calcareous grassland and wetland;
provide arable conservation headlands;
provide surface water features, including the reinstated Holford Stream with
additional seasonal ponds and wetlands linking to Wick Moor; and
reinstate and provide new PRoW which would be clearly defined and signposted.
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APPENDIX A2: TEMPORARY J ETTY
DEVELOPMENT: PROJ ECT DESCRIPTION
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Construction Method Statement Appendix A2 | October 2011 1
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CONTENTS
APPENDIX A2: TEMPORARY J ETTY DEVELOPMENT.............................................................3
A2.1 Introduction......................................................................................................................3
A2.2 Temporary J etty Infrastructure.........................................................................................3
A2.3 J etty Construction..........................................................................................................12
A2.4 J etty Operation..............................................................................................................19
A2.5 J etty Dismantling and Restoration.................................................................................27
A2.6 J etty Removal................................................................................................................29
References.................................................................................................................................31

TABLES
Table A2.1: Location Map of the Cardiff Grounds Off-shore Disposal Site ..................................9
Table A2.2: Indicative Aids to Navigation for the J etty...............................................................10
Table A2.3: Indicative Construction Programme........................................................................19
Table A2.4: Indicative Vessel Dimensions .................................................................................20
Table A2.5: Indicative Available Tides .......................................................................................24


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2 Construction Method Statement Appendix A2 | October 2011
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Construction Method Statement Appendix A2 | October 2011 3
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APPENDIX A2: TEMPORARY J ETTY
DEVELOPMENT
A2.1 Introduction
A2.1.1 This chapter describes the proposed temporary jetty development and includes
descriptions of its on-shore and off-shore infrastructure components (see
Section A2.2) and its phases, as follows:
construction (see Section A2.3);
operation (including maintenance) (see Section A2.4); and
dismantling and restoration (see Section A2.5); or
removal and site reinstatement, following construction, should a DCO for the
Hinkley Point C Project not be granted (see Section A2.6).
A2.2 Temporary J etty Infrastructure
a) On-shore Infrastructure
A2.2.1 The following paragraphs describe the on-shore infrastructure associated with the
jetty development.
i. Rock Extraction Area
A2.2.2 A rock extraction area would be created in the south-east corner of the jetty
application site to provide suitable granular fill material for construction of the
development platform for the aggregates storage area (at a finished level of 20m
AOD) and service road.
A2.2.3 At present, the land at the rock extraction site varies between approximately 16m and
25m AOD. Following extraction, the rock extraction area would have a level of
around 14m AOD.
A2.2.4 A crushing plant would be used to process the extracted rock to the required
specification. This plant would have tracks, screens, conveyors, a hopper/feeder
unit, a crushing chamber and a power unit.
ii. Service Road
A2.2.5 The service road would be aligned approximately in an east-west direction between
the aggregates storage area and the existing Hinkley Point Power Station Complex
access road. The route would follow, in part, an existing farm track and would cross
the Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch and a number of existing Public Rights of Way
(PRoWs). It would also branch off to the north to provide a means for limited
temporary access to the foreshore to facilitate construction of the initial jetty bridge
spans using land based plant on the upper foreshore. In addition, the service road
would be aligned in a north-south direction from the existing internal road to provide
access to the rock extraction area.
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A2.2.6 The service road would be 8m wide to allow two-way vehicular access. Its surface
would comprise 500mm of compacted granular fill. Approximately 5000m
3
of
compacted granular fill would be sourced from the rock extraction area and crushed
to the correct size before being used for the service roads construction. Surface
water run-off would fall into a soakaway running along each side the service road.
A2.2.7 Where the service road crosses the Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch, it is proposed to
locally culvert the ditch at the position of an existing crossing using a 1.25m diameter
concrete pipe approximately 16m in length.
A2.2.8 Where the service road branches north to the foreshore, it would be constructed
using compacted granular material, slope at 1 in 10 maximum and be 4.5m wide. It
is anticipated that this would be a short-term, temporary structure, that would be built
(c. one week), operated (c. three months) and dismantled (c. one week) within the
overall programme for the jetty developments construction phase.
iii. Aggregates Storage Area
A2.2.9 The aggregates storage area would be positioned close to the landward limit of the
jetty in order to minimise conveyor/pipeline distances required for materials transfer
to the stockpiles (for stone and sand) and silos (for cement), and to facilitate future
concreting operations for the Hinkley Point C Project.
A2.2.10 The aggregates storage area would comprise a concrete hardstanding area at a level
of approximately 20m AOD, on which the storage facilities would be laid out. Eight
uncovered aggregate stockpiles (including gravels) and six covered sand stockpiles
(including sand and stone dust) would be situated beneath an inclined conveyor and
tippers (that would extend from the jetty bridge). An inclined conveyor would rise
from the jetty to an elevated horizontal position above the stockpiles and discharge
into the individual stockpiles. The stockpiles would be separated by low walls /
bunds to avoid cross contamination. The sand stockpiles, as noted above, would be
enclosed within a canopy structure to control fugitive dust emissions.
A2.2.11 Cement would be stored in up to eight silos. The silos would have a maximum height
of 20m and a maximum diameter of 12m. The current design minimises height
based on fluidised discharge and indicates that the silos themselves (c.15m) would
have flat tops, would be supported on the ground by structural steelwork (c.3m), and
have a dust extractor (2m) on top (i.e. 20m high in total). It is anticipated that the
storage would include both ordinary Portland cement and cement replacement
products (e.g. pulverized fuel ash (PFA)).
A2.2.12 It is envisaged that two additional silos would be required to store the volumes of
cement required during the peak concrete production periods during the construction
of Hinkley Point C. These silos are expected to be larger (e.g. c.35m in height and
c.12m in diameter) and would form part of EDF Energys application for a DCO for
the Hinkley Point C Project. They are, therefore, not included in the Harbour
Empowerment Order (HEO) application and are not covered by this ES.
A2.2.13 The storage area would incorporate a drainage capture system which would
comprise open drainage ditches and underground pipes, and feed into an oil water
separator. This system would discharge into a water management zone (WMZ),
which would regulate the flow into the Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch (and,
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ultimately, Bridgwater Bay) to greenfield rates. The WMZ would cover an area of
approximately 50m by 30m and would be approximately 3m deep.
iv. Contractors Site Compound
A2.2.14 To aid construction, a dedicated facility would be established adjacent to the
aggregates storage area. This facility would be sized to accommodate up to
60 construction workers and include temporary offices, mess facilities and a toilet
block. These facilities are expected to take the form of Portakabin type structures.
A2.2.15 The facilities would be connected to services such as water supply, electrical power
and sewage facilities, all of which would be temporary services for the duration of the
construction works only. The water supply would comprise a bowser which would be
filled from the existing water supply located in the area of the site entrance. The
electrical supply would be provided by a diesel powered electrical generator. The
generator and its fuel supply would be bunded to prevent the discharge of spillages
into the adjacent watercourse (i.e. the Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch). The sewage
facility would be an underground collection tank or similar, suitably sized for the
number of staff and duration of the works. This would be pumped out periodically
and, therefore, would not discharge into the adjacent watercourse.
v. Fencing
A2.2.16 The aggregates storage area would have its own security fence. Initially, this fence
would comprise a 1.8m tall chain link fence. The line and level of the fence would
follow the existing topography and surround the confines of the aggregates storage
area. The fence would be moveable to allow potential re-positioning during the
works. Once fixed in position, barbed wire protection would be added to the top of
the fence, which would increase its height to approximately 2.14m.
vi. Soil Storage Areas
A2.2.17 Two soil storage areas would be created to store the topsoil and subsoil arising from
the cleared sites for the aggregates storage area and the rock extraction area. The
soil storage areas would be created on land situated to the east of the aggregates
storage area and to the north of the service road.
A2.2.18 The western topsoil storage area would have an approximate 100m x 110m footprint
and be 2m in height, while the eastern subsoil storage area would have an
approximate 100m x 50m footprint and 3m height (sized to accommodate the
estimated volumes of soil to be stored).
b) Off-shore Infrastructure
A2.2.19 Plans and cross-sections of the jettys on and off-shore infrastructure are provided in
Figures 1.1 and 1.2. Photomontages of the jettys off-shore infrastructure are
provided in Figure 1.3.
A2.2.20 The jetty would extend into the Ministry of Defences (MoD) Lilstock Range Danger
Area (D119), which includes a target area for military helicopter gunnery training.
Ongoing discussions between EDF Energy and the MoD indicate that the target area
would be moved westwards (i.e. away from the jetty) by the repositioning of its
marker buoys.
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i. Jetty Bridge
A2.2.21 The jetty bridge would extend landwards from the jetty head to the aggregates
storage area. It would be approximately 490m long and 11.5m wide. Based on a
review of maximum wave heights and a 5m wave on mean high water springs
(MHWS), the bridges deck level is positioned so as to provide a minimum 1m air gap
between the wave crest and the underside of deck beams. The deck level at its
seaward end would be +16.5m CD (i.e. 16.5 metres above Chart Datum), which
equates to 10.6m AOD (i.e. 10.6 metres above Ordnance Datum) (see Figure 1.2).
From this point, the bridge would rise on a constant grade to meet the ground level
on land which would be at +25.9m CD (i.e. 20m AOD) (see Figure 1.1).
A2.2.22 The bridge comprises a steel box truss structure supported on concrete cross-heads,
which in turn are supported on raking steel tubular piles driven into the bedrock (see
Figure 1.2). The box truss structure is of consistent form along the whole bridge up
to the last span to the jetty head, where two smaller trusses accommodate the
aggregates conveyor and cement pipeline. A typical crosshead would have two
raking piles but at main bridge joints there would be four raking piles. A special cross
head would be required at the location of the transfer hopper which would be larger
than the other cross heads. The box truss structure provides stability to the bridge
and the opportunity for large spans between the supporting cross heads of between
25 and 35m, thereby reducing the number of piles and the duration of the
construction programme. The number of bridge piles in the arrangement is between
45 and 55 depending on the final detailed design of the maximum possible span.
A2.2.23 The truss structure would incorporate a pipeline for transporting cement on its
western side, a conveyor for aggregates on its eastern side and service ducts along
its internal western face (see Figure 1.2). These, along with the open steel mesh
flooring, would be supported on longitudinal steel deck beams which, in turn, would
sit on transverse deck beams which are integral with the box truss structure.
A2.2.24 Maintenance walkways would be provided on either side of the pipeline and
conveyor, with the primary walkway being centrally located. Hand-railing would be
provided on both sides of the structure for the full length of the bridge. The central
walkway, which is 1.5m wide, would be used primarily for pedestrian access to the
jetty head, as a central maintenance (and emergency) route, and for the
transportation of small equipment and materials by using, for example, a wide wheel
based trolley.
A2.2.25 Where the jetty bridge connects to the land, it would be necessary to cross over the
coastal footpath and, therefore, minor works may be required to ensure that all health
and safety requirements would be met. For example, the footpath may need to be
lowered slightly to create headroom of some 4m, and a protective cover may need to
be constructed under the approach bridge to ensure that any spillage from above
does not pose a risk to the public using the footpath. Cover could comprise either a
self-supporting structure (e.g. an arch culvert tunnel) or a structure suspended from
the longitudinal beams.
A2.2.26 The jetty bridge would not include a dedicated surface water drainage system.
Rainfall run-off would drain directly into the sea.
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ii. Jetty Head
A2.2.27 The jetty head would comprise a concrete head sized to accommodate self-
discharging aggregates vessels (e.g. barges) of 5000 deadweight tonnage (dwt) and
2500 to 5000 dwt cement carriers. This arrangement assumes that the vessels
would discharge from port aft (i.e. from the back of the vessel on the left-hand side
facing the bow).
A2.2.28 The size of the main jetty head is expected to be in the order of 60m by 15m, and is
primarily based on providing a suitable berthing face and the requirement to
accommodate cement handling equipment. It is anticipated that the jetty deck would
be a 1.5m thick reinforced concrete slab supported by a combination of both vertical
and raking piles (70-90 in total). Some piles would need to be anchored to withstand
the berthing loads.
A2.2.29 The jetty head would have a fendered face to accommodate the berthing energy from
the laden vessels over a range of tides. Emergency access ladders and associated
equipment would be provided on the jetty deck.
A2.2.30 It is anticipated that the jetty head would have a mooring dolphin at its eastern and
western ends. The dolphins would consist of a concrete cap supported by raking
steel piles (although, at detailed design stage, consideration could be given to using
monopole construction for the dolphins). The dolphins would be accessed via steel
walkway bridges and would take the vessel mooring ropes.
A2.2.31 The berthing face of the jetty head would be parallel to the prevailing dominant east-
west tidal current direction and generally parallel to the prevailing west through to
south-west winds. This approach to the berths design should assist vessel
manoeuvring because, for example, berthing with the ship heading into the prevailing
conditions is preferable as it allows greater control of the vessel.
A2.2.32 The jetty head would not include a dedicated surface water drainage system.
Rainfall run-off would drain directly into the sea.
A2.2.33 Some basic welfare facilities would be accommodated on the jetty head. A welfare
cabin (see Figure 1.2) would include a self-contained portable toilet which would be
regularly emptied (i.e. it would not discharge to sea or into a foul drainage
connection).
iii. Berthing Pocket
A2.2.34 It is considered necessary for the berth to operate with vessels afloat rather than on
the seabed (i.e. not using a Not Always Afloat But Safely Aground (NAABSA) berth)
due to the exposed nature of the berth. Aggregates vessels would operate within
tidal access windows which are estimated to be seven hours on spring tides (giving
5.5 hours for off-loading) and 7.5 hours on neap tides (giving six hours for off-
loading). Cement carriers would need some 15 hours to off-load and would have to
remain at the berth during low water; hence there would be a preference to deliver
cement on neap tides, when there is least difference between high and low water
levels.
A2.2.35 In order to increase the tidal window available for off-loading the cement carriers
without going aground, a berthing pocket would be dredged seaward of the jetty
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8 Construction Method Statement Appendix A2 | October 2011
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heads berthing face (see Figure 1.2). The berthing pockets dimensions would be
approximately 160m long by 27m wide by up to 3m deep. The sides of the berthing
pocket would have slopes of 1 in 5. An additional depth allowance of up to 0.5m
could be dredged due to over-dredging of the berthing pocket, making a total depth
of up to 3.5m. This is because it is assumed that the appointed dredging contractor
would over-dredge by up to 0.5m to ensure that the required 3m depth is provided
across the berthing pocket.
A2.2.36 Given the berthing pockets dimensions and side slopes, approximately 22,725m
3
of
dredged material is expected to arise from the berthing pocket. The maximum
potential for over-dredging (i.e. by 0.5m) would add up to 2,160m
3
dredged material.
Therefore, the total volume of dredged material that would arise from the berthing
pocket would be approximately 24,885m
3
.
iv. Disposal of Dredged Material
A2.2.37 It is anticipated that the dredged material would be disposed of at an existing off-
shore disposal site known as the Cardiff Grounds (see Table A2.1).
A2.2.38 The Cardiff Grounds is one of a number of existing off-shore disposal sites located
within the Bristol Channel that are established to receive dredged material. For
example, there are various sites off Cardiff, Swansea Bay Outer and Newport along
the Welsh Coast, off Portishead and Avonmouth along the English coast, and in the
middle of the Bristol Channel at a site known as the Merkur Buoy.
A2.2.39 It is anticipated that a degree of in-filling of the berth pocket could occur over time
and, hence, maintenance dredging of the pocket could be required over the
operational period for the jetty.
v. Materials Handling and Conveyance Equipment
A2.2.40 The jetty development would incorporate materials handling and conveyance
equipment for imported aggregates and cement.
A2.2.41 For importing aggregates, there would be a height adjustable aggregate receiving
hopper to the east of the jetty head, which would be connected to an articulated
conveyor arm (see Figure 1.2). The supporting structure for the hopper is provided
by the jetty head and the adjacent mooring dolphin. This adjustable hopper is
necessary to allow discharge from a self-discharging dredgers conveyor over various
states of the tide. When not in use, it can be stowed at jetty deck level so as to
prevent damage from wind and waves. Aggregate deposited in the receiving hopper
would be transported along an articulated conveyor arm and deposited into a transfer
hopper on the jetty bridge and, thereafter, along the jetty bridge via the conveyor to
stockpiles at the aggregates storage area.
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Construction Method Statement Appendix 2 | October 2011 9
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Table A2.1: Location Map of the Cardiff Grounds Off-shore Disposal Site

A2.2.42 For importing cement, there would be a loading arm and cement receiver and
booster on the jetty head (see Figure 1.2). The loading arm would be used to
connect a vessels onboard cement discharge pipe to the jettys cement receiver and
booster for the pipeline to shore.
vi. Aids to Navigation
A2.2.43 New navigation aids are proposed to provide safe navigation for vessels using and
passing the jetty (see Plate 2.2; source Eagle Lyon Pope, 2009 (Ref 1.11).
A2.2.44 It is expected that the western end of the jetty head and the eastern mooring dolphin
would be each marked with two fixed green lights in a vertical line with a range of
three nautical miles (nm). Since it is estimated that there could be some 15 days a
year with fog, it is expected that there would be a fog signal to alert any passing
small craft of the jetty position, especially as the jetty is proposed to extend into
Bridgwater Bay.
A2.2.45 It is also expected that the 2m bathymetric contour is marked by lit green marker
buoys situated to the west and east of the jetty to indicate the limits of the shallow
water during vessels approaching and departing manoeuvres.

Hinkley Point
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10 Construction Method Statement Appendix A2 | October 2011
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Table A2.2: Indicative Aids to Navigation for the J etty

vii. Roadway along the Jetty Bridge
A2.2.46 It is anticipated that a roadway would be built along the jetty bridge as an
independent structure adjacent to the truss bridge already in place, but supported by
the existing concrete cross heads and raking piles (see Figure 1.2). The roads deck
arrangement would comprise pre-cast concrete deck units on steel beams and
provide a road that would be 5m wide.
A2.2.47 The roadway would not include a dedicated surface water drainage system. Rainfall
run-off would drain directly into the sea.
viii. Jetty Head Extension
A2.2.48 It is expected that the jetty head would be extended to accommodate a mobile crane
at the jetty head in order to offload various construction materials and facilitate their
transportation to the aggregates storage area (see Figure 1.2). The jetty head would
be sized to allow vehicles to turn on the deck (and return along the jetty bridges
roadway) and to facilitate the anticipated movement of a mobile crane at this location.
A2.2.49 The jetty head extension would not include a dedicated surface water drainage
system. Rainfall run-off would drain directly into the sea.
c) Lighting Strategy
A2.2.50 Appropriate lighting would be installed across the site during the jetty developments
construction. The primary aim of the lighting strategy is to ensure that, in the
absence of natural light, a safe working environment is maintained. The lighting
strategy for the site would:
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provide a safe working environment;
meet key standards and statutory requirements;
allow for 24 hour working;
meet the requirements of bulk carriers;
minimise upwards lighting;
minimise light spill and light pollution; and
minimise energy consumption.
i. On-shore Lighting
A2.2.51 On-shore lighting has been designed in accordance with British Standard (BS)
12464-2 (2007) and the Bat Conservation Trust Bats and Lighting in the UK version
3 May 2009. Hence temporary works areas, in particular those adjacent to the
foreshore and bat corridors, would be provided with lamps with low UV content such
as controllable LED lighting, metal halide lamps and high pressure sodium (white
light) lamps; minimising the potential for light spill on bat corridors and flora and
fauna associated with foreshore, as well as minimising the UV content.
A2.2.52 On-shore lighting would include haul road lighting and lighting of the stockpile area.
The luminaires will be aligned to avoid upward light and light spill onto sensitive
areas.
A2.2.53 Task lighting would be used during the construction and operation of the onshore
works wherever possible. The aim of task lighting is to provide a strategic light
source for areas that require an appropriately lit and safe environment to undertake
specific required work. Task lighting will only be provided where required on the site
to recommended light levels for the duration of specific works. Task lighting is not
anticipated to be on columns greater than 8m, it is anticipated to comprise light levels
between 5 and 50lux and design features that would limit obtrusive light will be
incorporated.
A2.2.54 Task lighting is likely to be required for the following activities:
traffic areas for slow moving vehicles would require a lighting level of 10lux;
clearance, excavation and loading would require a lighting level of 20lux;
building and facility construction areas would require a lighting level of 50lux; and
detailed construction would require a lighting level of 100lux.
ii. Off-shore Lighting (incorporating the intertidal area)
A2.2.55 Off-shore lighting of the jetty needs to meet a number of regulations and standards.
For example, the Docks Regulations 1988, which contain safety requirements for
general dock work applicable to the jetty, require:
average illumination of 20lux in all working areas;
average illumination of 5lux in all means of access to working areas;
lighting to be uniform; and
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12 Construction Method Statement Appendix A2 | October 2011
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lighting to be suitable for safe working (this may require the lighting to allow
operators to detect spillage/leaks, read labels and correctly distinguish different
colours).
A2.2.56 British Standard EN 12464-2 covers shipyards and docks, and would be applicable to
the jetty development. It requires an illumination level of 20lux and also has
requirements for diversity (uniformity of lighting), glare and colour rendering.
A2.2.57 The planned operation of the jetty development would influence the lighting control
scheme and associated light spill. Operation after dark is a certainty, particularly
during the Hinkley Point C Projects peak construction and during shorter winter
days, because delivery to the jetty would be when the tide and weather conditions
permit. Construction activities in the offshore area will be carried out 24 hours a day
and night time lighting would therefore be required to comply with various health and
safety requirements.
A2.2.58 The operational lights on the temporary jetty would be provided along its length and
mounted along the conveyor and on the jetty head. PROTECTA 18W T8 fluorescent
luminaire type lights are proposed which are low-powered and would be mounted at
a relatively low level to minimise visibility from sensitive receptors.
A2.2.59 Flood lighting around the jetty head would be required for safe barge movement and
unloading. It would be used when barge operations are carried out and would be
limited to the area around the jetty head and mooring dolphins.
A2.2.60 Providing the jetty and aggregates storage area can be operated safely, they would
be lit so unloading and other operations can take place. If the jetty and stockpiles are
not in use and it is dark, lighting could be switched off, although some minimal
lighting for safe movement around site might still be necessary.
A2.2.61 Navigational lighting would be on all of the time during the jettys operation in
accordance with the IALA Recommendation O-139 The Marking of Man-Made
Offshore Structures. Two masts with navigation lights would be installed on the jetty
head. The lights would be visible up to 2 miles from the temporary jetty and directed
to the sea.
A2.3 J etty Construction
A2.3.1 The following paragraphs are intended to provide an indication of the construction
methodology for the proposed temporary jetty development. This description is
based upon the concept design and provides an indicative approach to construction
subject to detailed design and the appointed contractors preferred approach.
However, construction of this type of jetty would be substantially undertaken from sea
(e.g. from jack-up platforms) and, to a lesser extent, from the foreshore (i.e. using
land based plant the first three or four spans). In addition, there would be a
construction base located on-shore (e.g. for accommodation, concrete casting,
advanced fabrication, etc.) and this is reflected in the text which follows.
a) On-shore Works
A2.3.2 The construction methods to be used for the on-shore works would be traditional civil
engineering techniques.
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i. Soil Stripping
A2.3.3 Topsoil and subsoil would be stripped from the rock extraction area and the
aggregates storage area and placed at the respective soil storage areas. This
activity would leave the site ready for the works described in the following
paragraphs.
ii. Rock Extraction Area
A2.3.4 Rock would be excavated from an area of land that is currently at between 16m and
25m AOD. It is envisaged that the appointed contractor would work from the north in
a southerly direction, removing the topsoil, overburden, weathered rock and then
fresh rock, until sufficient material (approximately 107,000m
3
) is available to use as
fill. After excavation, the rock extraction areas floor would be at a level around 14m
AOD and its sides are likely to be at a slope of 1 in 2. The area would be excavated
using tracked excavators. The resulting materials would be crushed to the size
required by a crusher plant and then distributed around the site by articulated bulk
material transport trucks for use in constructing the service road and platform for the
aggregates storage area.
iii. Service Road
A2.3.5 Initially, crushed rock would used to create the subgrade of the service road. The
ground would be tested to determine its strength and then, where appropriate, a layer
of woven fabric or plastic ground reinforcement would be laid. The road would then
be made up with a minimum of 500mm of well compacted granular fill. The road
would be laid to shed run-off into soakaways running alongside the road. The
service road would be constructed using traditional earth moving equipment and
plant, including tracked excavators, tracked bulldozers and articulated trucks for the
transport of materials on site. Heavy duty rolling equipment would be used to
compact the road and a small crane used intermittently to offload some bulk
materials. Service road construction could require some excavation works of soft
spots along the alignment.
A2.3.6 The culvert for the Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch would be constructed by laying a
1.25m diameter concrete pipe on the bed of the existing channel. Initially, the
existing bridge and some vegetation around the ditch would be removed to allow
access and temporary measures made to allow the ditch to flow during the
construction of these works. The bed of the ditch would then be excavated to
remove any soft material and provide a suitable bed for the new pipework. The
pipework would be placed at an invert level that corresponds to the existing ditch and
concrete placed up to the mid point of the pipe. The service road construction would
then be made good with well compacted granular material up to the required level
and with a natural slope down into the existing ditch. The roads top surface would
be blinded with fines as necessary and the face of the slope would be protected
using stones of a greater single size grading so as to protect the face from scour.
A2.3.7 As for the service road, the temporary access to the foreshore would be constructed
by the placement of compacted granular material, but at a slope of 1 in 10 and a
width of 4.5m. Its slopes would be graded to allow safe access between the different
levels.
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iv. Aggregates Storage Area: Platform Construction
A2.3.8 The area would be cleared of vegetation, soil stripped (with soil taken to the storage
areas) and excavated as necessary to reach the formation level (i.e. c.20m AOD).
Soft spots would be replaced with well compacted granular material and, where
required, woven or plastic grid soil reinforcement laid onto the formation level.
Additional excavation would take place to accommodate drainage to capture surface
water and discharge it into the existing natural surface water drainage (i.e. the small
watercourse known as the Hinkley Point C Drainage Ditch, which currently
discharges onto the foreshore). The drainage excavation would be backfilled with
imported bedding and granular material up to formation level. Finally, the granular
sub-base material would be sourced from the rock extraction area, crushed, laid and
compacted in layers to complete the formation. These earthworks would be
undertaken using traditional earth moving plant, such as mechanical scrapers,
mechanical shovels, excavators and articulated trucks.
v. Aggregates Storage Area: Storage Facilities
A2.3.9 The stockpile areas would be set out and a layer of plastic damp proof membrane
sheeting would be laid across the formation. Steel reinforcement would be laid onto
the sheeting and then the concrete floor slab would be cast, in bays, and laid to falls
for drainage. The external and intermediate segregation walls would then be
installed using pre-cast concrete.
A2.3.10 For the cement silos, appropriately designed foundations would be constructed. This
would involve excavation works, installation of steel reinforcement cages, and casting
of the new concrete foundation. The steel silos are expected to be fabricated off site
and then transported on low loader to the site and erected onto the foundations. The
surrounding area would then be completed, with concrete paving laid to falls to allow
vehicular access to the storage areas.
A2.3.11 Minor piping, conveying and offloading equipment would also be erected in place to
link with the main conveyor and pipeline from the jetty bridge.
vi. Contractors Site Compound
A2.3.12 To construct the contractors compound, concrete footings would be cast in the
ground and then Portakabin type facilities erected and founded on them. The ground
area below these facilities would comprise gravel. The facilities would be connected
to temporary services. Water would be supplied from a bowser, which would require
no construction works. Electricity would be supplied from a diesel powered
generator, which would require the construction of a concrete walled bund around the
generator and its fuel supply. Sewage treatment would be undertaken off-site and an
underground collection tank would be used, which would require small-scale
excavation works to install it.
vii. Fencing
A2.3.13 To construct the fence, firstly lines would be established and holes excavated for the
posts and concrete threshold. Vertical plastic coated, galvanised steel posts would
then be erected in place with wire straining posts. Once a number of posts are
erected and the fence line is fixed, the concrete thresholds would be cast between
the straining posts. The plastic coated chain link fencing would be fixed in place
using non-accessible fittings and the wires tensioned between the straining posts.
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Barbed wire protection would then be added to the top of the fence. The security
fence would be constructed using traditional fencing equipment and plant including
tracked excavators, dumper trucks, flatbed delivery vehicles, a small crane for
offloading materials, and concrete delivery lorries.
b) Off-shore Works
i. Site Demarcation
A2.3.14 The appointed contractor would demarcate the main working area for the jetty and
the access routes from the cliff across the foreshore. The actual demarcation
method would be elected by the appointed contractor, however, it is expected that
demarcation would entail the installation of marker posts around the working areas
as appropriate. Buoys could be attached to the marker posts to identify the location
when submerged. The appointed contractor would be required to demarcate the
foreshore access routes from the cliff to the working area, and this may be
undertaken using portable markers installed during tidal working windows. In
addition, the contractor might maintain guards to ensure that the public are warned
and excluded from these areas. It is envisaged that signage would be installed
around the site perimeter.
ii. Jetty Bridge including Materials Handling and Conveyance Equipment
A2.3.15 In constructing the jetty bridge, 45 to 55 steel tubular piles in the order of 860mm
diameter would be installed 4m to 5m into the bedrock layer. The depth of pile
penetration could vary since the ground investigation data available to date suggests
that there might be a weathered layer or weaker layer within the rock mass which
may necessitate additional penetration. It might not be feasible to drive the piles
directly into the rock mass; hence the installation method is anticipated to be either
by drilling and driving or by pre-drilling and concreting the pile into the socket, subject
to further ground investigation data.
A2.3.16 With the drill and drive method, the pile is seated onto the rock head, a drill is
inserted down the pile shaft and a hole drilled into the rock mass; the pile is then
driven into the hole, the hole is extended and the pile is driven further into the hole
until the required penetration is achieved. This technique would generate a degree
of piling noise but is not anticipated to create much in the way of bed disturbance.
A2.3.17 The alternative pile installation method is for the pile to be placed into a concrete
filled rock socket. The pile is firstly driven to rock head, a drill is inserted down the
pile and the rock socket is drilled and then enlarged using the under-reaming blades
to a diameter greater than the pile. Concrete is placed into the rock socket and the
pile is driven into the wet concrete. Shear rings on the pile provide a degree of
tension capacity.
A2.3.18 Preliminary calculations indicate that the steel piles for the bridge would need to be
able to resist uplifting forces. This could be achieved by using concrete fill within the
pile, anchors, or by concreting the pile into a socket.
A2.3.19 Once the piles are driven, concrete cross heads would be placed over the pile bents.
It is anticipated that the cross head units would be pre-cast with in situ stitching to the
pile, thus minimising over water concrete works.
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A2.3.20 The steel box truss structure units would be prefabricated in lengths that span
between cross head supports. The prefabricated units would incorporate the steel
longitudinal and transverse deck beams. It is also anticipated that the cement
pipeline, aggregate conveyor and open mesh flooring would be installed within the
units whilst on-shore.
A2.3.21 The inshore end of the jetty bridge, including the first few spans across the upper
foreshore, would be installed using land based plant. For the drilling and placing of
the tubular piles it is anticipated that various plant would be required for the
installation of approximately one pile per day, including a 120t crawler crane, 30t
excavator with drill attachment, piling hammer, 20t excavator to load spoil and 25t
dump truck to remove spoil (4-6 loads per day). It is envisaged that this would result
in approximately 10 vehicles per day, including 3-4 concrete deliveries. In addition,
piles would be brought to site by barge and tug, at a rate of one delivery per week.
A2.3.22 To place the concrete cross heads and deck steelwork it is anticipated that various
plant would be required on a daily basis, including a 120t crawler crane and a 25t
excavator. Crossheads and truss units would be brought to site by barge and tug at
an expected delivery rate of one delivery per week.
A2.3.23 In addition to the above, there would be support plant and equipment such as tractor
and trailer, small dumper trucks, lighting towers, welding sets, etc. required on an ad-
hoc basis. There would also be miscellaneous deliveries each day; these items
would be transported on the tractor and trailer.
A2.3.24 All plant would be required to drive on the foreshore via the temporary service road
and move out of the tidal zone at the end of each shift. The typical speed of tracked
plant is 5mph over this type of terrain.
A2.3.25 The piles beyond the upper foreshore would be installed from sea-based plant in the
form of piling equipment operated from jack-up barges.
A2.3.26 The bridging units would then be lifted by crane provided off a jack-up barge and
installed over the cross heads.
iii. Jetty Head including Materials Handling and Conveyance Equipment
A2.3.27 To support the jetty head, dolphin and fendering, 70-90 steel tubular piles in the order
of 910mm diameter would be driven in a similar manner to those installed for the jetty
bridge. Pile installation would be undertaken from a jack-up barge. Tension anchors
would be installed in selective piles or the piles could be concreted into rock sockets.
A2.3.28 The jetty head deck and dolphins are anticipated to be cast in situ reinforced
concrete, with construction activities being undertaken from a jack-up barge. The
use of pre-cast concrete elements could be considered during detail design.
A2.3.29 Once the jetty head is constructed, the installation of the materials handling and
conveyance equipment (i.e. receiving cement silo and booster, loading arm and
crane, conveyors, pipeline, receiving aggregate hopper, etc.) would take place. It is
envisaged that the equipment to be installed on the jetty head would be delivered by
sea and off-loaded using a crane barge.
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iv. Berthing Pocket and Disposal of Dredged Material
A2.3.30 Existing ground investigation information indicates 4m of superficial deposits over
rock head at the proposed position of the berthing pocket. It is proposed to dredge
up to 3.5m of this material to create a berth pocket (including up to 0.5m of over-
dredge), thus improving tidal access windows for off-loading of cement. The actual
dredging method would depend on the dredging equipment available to the
contractor appointed to undertake the works. However, it is expected that dredging
would take place using one of the two dredging methods described below.
A2.3.31 One method would be to use a small trailing suction hopper dredger (i.e. hopper
capacity in the range of 2,000m
3
to 5,000m
3
). This type of dredger is a self-propelled
vessel. It has a draghead that extends to the seabed and agitates the sediment as it
moves forward. The agitated sediment along with some of the surrounding water is
sucked into the draghead and up a suction pipe by a centrifugal pump. The mix of
sediment and water is discharged into the dredgers onboard hopper. The hopper
filling process may entail over-flowing (and/or diverting) excess water and some of
the finer-grained sediment overboard. Once the hopper is full, the draghead is
retracted and the dredger sails to the disposal ground, releases the dredged material
through the hoppers bottom doors, and returns to the dredging location.
A2.3.32 An alternative method would be to use a mechanical dredger, such as a backhoe
dredger. This type of dredger typically works from a jack-up pontoon (i.e. it is a static
piece of equipment) and is supported by a self-propelled transport barge with a built
in hopper (hopper capacity in the range of 1,000m
3
). This type of dredger is, in
essence, a hydraulic excavator that uses a bucket on the end of a boom and dipper
crane arm to remove the seabed sediment and then bring it above the water surface
and place it into a barge moored alongside. Once the barge is full, it sails to the
disposal ground, releases the dredged material through its bottom doors, and returns
to the dredging location.
v. Aids to Navigation
A2.3.33 The appropriate aids to navigation (e.g. lights) would be attached to the jetty head
and/or its associated structures (e.g. the mooring dolphins) and to marker buoys
deployed at sea at the locations indicated on Plate 1.2. It is anticipated that the
marker buoys (including their lights) and the anchoring system would be pre-
fabricated and brought to site on a barge and deployed by a crane mounted on the
barge. The anchors are likely to take the form of pre-cast concrete blocks, which
would be sized to remain in place given the hydrodynamic regime (e.g. c.5m
3
). The
chains are likely to take the form of steel link chains. The anchors, chains and buoys
are likely to be connected and deployed by the crane placing the anchor on the
seabed.
vi. Roadway along the Jetty Bridge
A2.3.34 It is envisaged that the roadway would be constructed from cross-head to cross-head
using a crane on a jack-up barge or land based plant to lift the materials into place.
The pair of steel beams would be placed on bearings and then the pre-cast deck
units would be placed on the steel beams. Pockets within the deck units would be
positioned over shear connectors on the steel beams and the pockets subsequently
concreted in situ. The lighting columns would be supported on the concrete cross
heads and installed from the completed roadway.
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vii. Jetty Head Extension
A2.3.35 The jetty head extension would be constructed in a similar manner to the jetty head.
It is anticipated that 25 to 35 steel tubular piles in the order of 910mm diameter would
be driven using a similar methods to that described for the jetty bridge. Pile
installation would be undertaken from a jack-up barge. Tension anchors would be
installed in selective piles or the piles could be concreted into rock sockets. The jetty
head extensions deck is expected to comprise in situ cast reinforced concrete, with
construction activities being undertaken from a jack-up barge. The use of pre-cast
concrete elements could be considered during detail design.
A2.3.36 It is anticipated that a mobile crane would be transported to site by road, either
directly or on the back of a transporter, and driven along the roadway to the jetty
head extension.
c) Construction Working Hours
i. On-shore Works
A2.3.37 Working hours for construction of the on-shore components of the jetty, including the
initial spans of the jetty bridge and the service road to the foreshore would be:
from 07:00 to 18:00 on weekdays;
from 07:00 to 13:00 on Saturdays; and
no working on Sundays, bank holidays or public holidays.
ii. Off-shore Works
A2.3.38 It is anticipated that construction of the jetty would require working hours of 24 hours
a day and seven days a week. Construction would take place with one or two shifts
a day with variable start and finish times as dictated by the state of the tide. These
hours are needed to expedite the jettys construction in relation to the restrictions
imposed on working due to tidal conditions.
d) Construction Programme
A2.3.39 An indicative construction programme for the jetty development is provided in
Plate 1.3.
A2.3.40 Subject to the appropriate consents being granted and other tasks being completed
(e.g. detailed design, contract procurement, etc.), construction of the jetty is
anticipated to commence in Q2 2012 and finish in Q2 2013.
e) Construction Personnel
A2.3.41 Up to 60 construction workers are estimated to be required during the construction of
the jetty development at any one time.

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A2.4 J etty Operation
A2.4.1 The jetty would be available to import aggregates (gravel and sand) and cement
once the on-shore works are in place and available to import other construction
materials once the structure is complete.
Table A2.3: Indicative Construction Programme
Year 2012 2013
Quarter Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2
On-shore Works
Mobilisation and site set up
Service road / hardstanding / drainage
Stockpiles, silos and sandshed
Jetty Works
Mobilisation and site set up
Install piles for jetty bridge
Cast / install pile caps and crossheads
Install roadway deck on crossheads
Install bridge trusses
Install finishing works to jetty bridge
Install piles for jetty head
Cast jetty head deck
Install piles for mooring dolphins
Cast dolphin heads
Install linkspans / finishing to jetty head
Install jetty services (lighting, power)
Dredging of berthing pocket

a) Jetty Import of Aggregates and Cement
i. Materials Import: Types and Volumes of Materials
A2.4.2 The peak concrete production for the Hinkley Point C Project is anticipated to be in
the region of 30,000m
3
per month, which would occur during placing of the concrete
for the reactor buildings together with other site works. It is anticipated that there
would be two production peaks each lasting in the region of six months. Concrete
production would require the various imported materials, including cement (or cement
replacement products), sands, stone dust and aggregates.
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A2.4.3 Under the peak demand scenario, the following volumes of materials would need to
be imported via the jetty:
cement: 10,500 tonnes/month;
sand: 21,000 tonnes/month; and
stone: 36,000 tonnes/month.
A2.4.4 The normal concrete production for the Hinkley Point C Project is anticipated to be in
the region of 12,000m
3
per month. Under the normal demand scenario, the following
volumes of materials would need to be imported via the jetty:
cement: 4,200 tonnes/month;
sand: 8,400 tonnes/month; and
stone: 14,400 tonnes/month.
ii. Materials Import: Vessel Types and Numbers
A2.4.5 It is anticipated that vessels would include aggregate barges and cement carriers.
Whilst the selection of operational vessels would be made by the appointed
contractor, indicative vessel dimensions can be determined (see Table A2.4).
Table A2.4: Indicative Vessel Dimensions
Parameter Aggregate Barges Cement Carrier Cement Carrier
Weight (dwt) 5,000 2,500 4,300
Length (m) 100 78 92
Beam (m) Up to 17.5 12 14
Loaded draught (m) 6.0-6.7 5.3 6.3
A2.4.6 Based upon the dimensions identified in Table A2.4, the anticipated peak numbers of
vessels visiting the jetty per month would be:
cement carriers: 5/month (2,500 dwt) or 3/month (4,300 dwt);
aggregates vessels (sand): 5/month; and
aggregates vessels (stone): 8/month.
A2.4.7 Based upon the dimensions identified in Table A2.4Table A2.3: , the anticipated
normal numbers of vessels visiting the jetty per month would be:
cement carriers: 1/month (4300 dwt);
aggregates vessels (sand): 2/month; and
aggregates vessels (stone): 4/month.
iii. Materials Import: Vessel Manoeuvres
A2.4.8 It is assumed that vessels would berth on a rising tide and approach the berth as
soon as there is sufficient depth of water for the required under keel clearance.
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Vessels would always try to approach the berth with the bow facing into the wind
and/or current (whichever is the stronger), as this enables greater vessel control and
manoeuvrability. A rising (or flood tide) would mean that the tidal current is flowing
from west to east and would, therefore, require the vessel to head in a westerly
direction when berthing and thus be port side alongside the jetty for unloading
materials (hence the jetty head is designed for port aft discharge of materials).
A2.4.9 It is not envisaged that a pilot would be required to berth vessels but, should one be
required, then the pilot would board a vessel at a designated position (probably
between one to two nautical miles from the jetty) and would steer it to approach the
berth at slow speed from a north-easterly direction. Once the vessel is 10m to 20m
off the berth, the mooring lines would start to be run from the ship to shore (or vice
versa). These lines would then be tensioned and used together with the engines
(and bow thruster if fitted) to assist in bringing the vessel alongside the berth.
A2.4.10 Assuming that vessels would not be taking the ground while at the jettys berth, the
vessel would depart the berth during an ebb tide with the current in an east to west
direction from astern. This current direction would not be preferred, but should be
tolerable for a departure manoeuvre. For departure, a vessel would firstly reduce the
number of mooring lines to the jetty whilst maintaining position alongside the berth.
This would allow the final lines to be released relatively quickly before using the
engines to clear the berth in a north-westerly direction. The pilot would then
disembark (if a pilot has been engaged) before the vessel proceeds on passage to
the next port or standing off waiting for the next tide. There is expected to be some
water disturbance due to propeller and thruster wash during these manoeuvres.
iv. Materials Import: Vessel Movements
A2.4.11 To supply 30,000m
3
per month of aggregates and cement to meet the peak periods
of demand for concrete production during the Hinkley Point C Project, 16 to 18
vessels (i.e. 13 aggregates vessels and 3-5 cement carriers) would need to use the
jetty. Taking berthing and departure manoeuvres into account, during peak months
there would be 32 to 36 vessel movements.
A2.4.12 To supply 12,000m
3
per month of sand, aggregates and cement to meet the normal
periods of demand for concrete production during the Hinkley Point C Project, 7
vessels (i.e. 6 aggregate barges and 1 cement carrier) would need to use the jetty.
Taking berthing and departure manoeuvres into account, during normal months there
would be 14 vessel movements.
v. Materials Import: Materials Unloading and Handling
A2.4.13 Aggregate vessels would unload via their on-board unloading equipment, which
typically takes the form of a conveyor. Aggregate discharge rates would vary
depending on the vessels onboard unloading equipment. Although self-discharging
dredgers have a quoted discharge rate of some 2,000 tonnes per hour, an average
discharge rate of 1,000 tonnes per hour is considered much more achievable and
has been accommodated by the jettys design. From the vessels conveyor,
aggregate would be discharged into the articulated hopper on the jetty head and onto
an articulated conveyor which spans the distance to the transfer hopper on the jetty
bridge. The transfer hopper would discharge aggregate onto the conveyor along the
jetty bridge, which would transport aggregate via a distribution conveyor, feeding the
stockpiles at the aggregates storage area.
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A2.4.14 The stockpiles would be contained and divided by low bund walls and open on at
least one side so that aggregate can be gained by front loading shovel and
transported to a concrete batching plant during construction of Hinkley Point C. The
batching plant does not form part of the jetty development covered by this ES. It is
anticipated that the stockpiles would contain about one months supply of aggregate
to help mitigate berth downtime due to adverse weather and sea conditions. Surface
water run-off due to rainfall would be managed as part of the aggregates storage
areas drainage system including, as necessary, sand and/or silt separation using
catch pits or separators.
A2.4.15 The aggregates to be brought to the jetty could potentially be sourced from a number
of locations including quarries on land (e.g. South Wales) and extraction sites in the
sea (i.e. licensed aggregate dredging areas). However, it is anticipated that on-shore
quarries would be the most likely source because a marine source could necessitate
processing (i.e. washing) to reduce the chloride content of aggregates prior to use.
Since no provision is made for aggregate washing on site, it is not considered in this
ES.
A2.4.16 Cement carriers discharge using an onboard pneumatic system for blowing the
cement through a pipeline. The cement vessel would discharge to a receiving silo on
the jetty head. The silo would incorporate a booster pump to pump the cement
through the cement pipeline along the jetty bridge to the silos at the aggregates
storage area. The pipeline joints would be flanged and sealed with gaskets, as
appropriate, in order to prevent cement dust escaping from the pipeline.
A2.4.17 The achievable pumping rates depend on the number of manifolds, diameter of the
pipeline or hose, the distance from the pump to the shore silo, and the difference in
height between the vessel and the silo. In the case of the jetty development, the
distance from the vessel to the silo would be relatively long and it could be necessary
to incorporate a booster pump in the pipeline to increase the discharge rate. For
example, it is most likely that an additional booster pump could be required on-shore
to lift the cement into the silos. This would effectively mean that the vessel would be
only required to pump to the jetty head, because the shore pump would transfer the
cement to the silos on-shore. In these conditions, it is estimated that a discharge
rate of some 100 to 250 tonnes per hour could be achieved.
vi. Materials Import: Timing of Materials Unloading
A2.4.18 At present, it is assumed that vessels would be able to berth 24 hours a day, subject
to the tide and weather limits.
A2.4.19 As identified on Table A2.4, 5,000 dwt aggregates vessels have an indicative loaded
draft of 6.0 to 6.7m. With a tide level of +5.8m CD and seabed level of -2.0mCD, the
vessel would approach the berth with 1.1m to 1.8m under keel clearance. The
vessel would remain at the berth through high water and discharge its cargo. The
vessel would then depart by the time the tide drops to +5.8mCD, although departure
could take place on a slightly lower tidal level if the draft was reduced after off-
loading and subsequent ballasting.
A2.4.20 Accordingly, the aggregate unloading is expected to take some 5.5 to 6.0 hours
which would necessitate a discharge rate of some 1,000 tonnes per hour. Therefore,
it is considered that aggregate barges can gain access to the jetty on virtually all
tides, using the upper half of the tidal cycle each time. However, there could be other
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operational restrictions, such as weather down time, plant breakdowns, etc. which
would need to be taken into account.
A2.4.21 Cement carriers have a lower indicative loaded draft and a slower discharge rate
than aggregate barges, which means they would remain berthed for longer to unload
their contents. Since 2,500dwt vessels would need 15 hours to unload and 4,300dwt
vessels would need 30 hours to unload, cement carriers would remain berthed
throughout one full tidal cycle, including at low tide, and hence the need for the
dredged berthing pocket to provide an additional 2m water depth.
b) Jetty Import of Other Construction Materials
i. Materials Import: Types and Volumes of Materials
A2.4.22 Once constructed, the jetty would be used to import other materials needed for the
construction of Hinkley Point C. It is anticipated that these imported materials would
include unitised and/or pre-fabricated items such as pre-cast concrete pipeline units
(e.g. for the intake and outfall structures), steel reinforcement bars (e.g. for concrete),
brickwork, cabling, piping, ducting, etc.
A2.4.23 The jetty would not be used to offset the import of abnormal indivisible loads (AILs)
via EDF Energys dedicated wharf at Combwich because its design cannot
accommodate the types of vessels used to import AILs and its equipment cannot
unload and convey the AILs.
ii. Materials Import: Vessel Types, Numbers, Manoeuvres and Movements
A2.4.24 The vessel types, numbers, manoeuvres and movements associated with the jetty
development are not known with precision at the current time. However, some
indicative scenarios for the jetty development can be anticipated based on the types
of materials likely to be imported and the availability of the jetty (i.e. the spare tides
during which a vessel could be berthed at the jetty).
A2.4.25 As for the import of aggregates, it is anticipated that the jetty would receive vessels of
sizes up to 5,000dwt due to the limitations of the berth (e.g. the water depth available
at the berth).
A2.4.26 It is anticipated that vessels would make best use of the tidal windows available to
them. Therefore, the potential operational capacity of the jetty (i.e. the number of
vessels potentially using the jetty) would depend on the availability of jettys berth
over spare tides. Spare tides are those tides when the berth is not occupied by a
vessel delivering aggregate or cement for concrete production during the
construction of Hinkley Point C, or when the berth cannot be occupied due to
adverse weather.
A2.4.27 Assuming an average of 60 tides per month, a preliminary analysis of spare tides has
been made (see Table A2.5). This analysis identifies the indicative number of tides
available per month, over winter and summer, during periods of peak and normal
concrete demand, and both including and excluding tides in between aggregate and
cement deliveries. As would be expected, there would be more opportunity to import
materials during normal concrete production compared to peak concrete production.

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Table A2.5: Indicative Available Tides
Available Tides (including tides in between
aggregate and cement deliveries)
Available Tides (excluding tides in between
aggregate and cement deliveries)
Peak Concrete
Production
Normal Concrete
Production
Peak Concrete
Production
Normal Concrete
Production
Winter Summer Winter Summer Winter Summer Winter Summer
26 32 38 (25*) 44 4 11 29 (2*) 36
Note: * if aggregates supplied by smaller vessels of 1,200dwt
A2.4.28 The tides available when aggregate and cement deliveries are excluded represent
the most realistic scenario of spare tides for the jetty. Under this scenario, there
would be between 4 and 29 spare tides during winter months and between 11 and 36
spare tides per month during summer months.
A2.4.29 During the months of peak demand for aggregates and cement for concrete
production during construction of Hinkley Point C, there would be between 4 and 11
spare tides per month. Assuming one vessel per every spare tide and taking
berthing and departure manoeuvres into account, there would be a monthly
maximum of between 8 and 22 vessel movements to add to the 32 to 36 vessel
movements associated with the import of aggregates and cement.
A2.4.30 During the months of normal demand for aggregates and cement for concrete
production during construction of Hinkley Point C, there would be between 29 and 36
spare tides per month. Assuming one vessel per every spare tide and taking
berthing and departure manoeuvres into account, there would be a monthly
maximum of between 58 and 72 vessel movements to add to the 14 vessel
movements associated with the import of aggregates and cement.
A2.4.31 It is anticipated that vessels would access and depart the jetty with similar
manoeuvres to those described for aggregate dredgers and cement vessels.
iii. Materials Import: Materials Unloading and Handling
A2.4.32 It is assumed that vessels would be unloaded using the mobile crane situated on the
extended jetty head. The crane would load materials onto trucks, which would then
transport the materials along the jetty bridge and on-shore to the construction site for
Hinkley Point C.
A2.4.33 The timing of unloading operations would have to fit around the times when the jetty
is not being used for importing aggregates and cement, and around the tidal cycle as
relevant to the vessel (e.g. in terms of draught available across the tidal cycle).
c) Jetty Maintenance
i. Maintenance of Handling and Conveyance Equipment
A2.4.34 During the operational life of the jetty, a degree of maintenance would be required.
Given that the import of aggregates and cement would be within discrete timeframes
related to demand and tides, and that EDF Energy might want to import other
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materials via the jetty, it is important that downtime due to equipment failure is limited
as far as reasonably practicable.
A2.4.35 It is considered that the main area of maintenance would be mechanical and
electrical maintenance associated with the receiving aggregates hopper and
articulated conveyor and the cement booster pumps and pipeline. Maintenance and
minor replacement of items would be undertaken locally unless significant
replacement of equipment is required. Maintenance walkways are to be provided
along the jetty bridge on either sides of the aggregates conveyor and cement pipeline
via the 1.5m wide central walkway.
A2.4.36 Should it be necessary to replace significant pieces of equipment, which would be
very unlikely, delivery could be achieved by a vessel berthing at the jetty and using
its onboard unloading equipment to unload items. Following construction of the jetty,
delivery could be achieved either by a vessel berthing at the jetty and using the crane
on the jetty head, or by truck driving along the jettys roadway with items being off-
loaded and craned into position.
A2.4.37 During routine maintenance operations, regular inspection of hydraulic equipment
would be undertaken in order to ensure that pollution associated with hydraulic oils is
avoided. It is expected that this would include inspection of the crane located on the
jetty head.
ii. Maintenance of the Berthing Pocket
A2.4.38 It is anticipated that a degree of sediment infilling would occur over time and, hence,
maintenance dredging of the berthing pocket might be required to ensure sufficient
water depth for vessel berthing and unloading operations. A maintenance dredging
regime has not been determined for the berthing pocket, but it is anticipated that the
method for maintenance dredging and the dredged material disposal site would be
similar to capital dredging.
A2.4.39 Accordingly, it is anticipated that a small trailer hopper suction dredger or a backhoe
on a jack-up platform would be used to carry out the dredge, and that the dredged
material would be disposed of at the Cardiff Grounds.
iii. Maintenance of Aids to Navigation
A2.4.40 It is expected that the aids to navigation would be inspected every 6 or 12 months to
ensure that the lights and systems are working correctly and the marker buoys are in
the correct position (i.e. that they have not been dragged out of position by currents).
d) Aggregates Storage Area
A2.4.41 The aggregates storage area would receive and store the imported aggregates and
cement in the stockpiles and silos. The area provides storage for approximately one
months typical demand for materials in the eight aggregate stockpiles, four sand
stockpiles, two stone dust stockpiles and up to eight cement silos. This level of
storage would provide contingency against disruption to supply via the jetty primarily
due to weather downtime, but also from other supply issues.
A2.4.42 Given the aggregate storage areas arrangement, it has been considered that
transfer of aggregates and cement to the concrete batching plant would be by trucks
or tankers, respectively. However, it is conceivable that, depending on the location of
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the batching plant, transfer of aggregates and cement could be made by an
arrangement of conveyors and pipelines, respectively.
e) Lighting
A2.4.43 The jetty and the on-shore area would be designed to operate in periods 24 hours a
day, seven days a week. These areas would need to be lit at relevant times to
provide a safe working environment. The jetty developments lighting strategy is
described in Section 1.2. The following paragraphs describe operations for which
lighting might be required.
i. Jetty Operations
A2.4.44 When unloading aggregates, the vessel would discharge during a specific tidal
window on the upper half of the tidal cycle and if this occurs during dusk / darkness,
operational lighting would be required during the unloading period and for a short
time either side of the window. When unloading cement the vessel would remain at
the berth for up to 30 hours and the operational lighting would be required throughout
this time during periods of dusk / darkness. In addition, operational lighting would be
required during any maintenance work on the jetty.
ii. On-shore Operations
A2.4.45 The on-shore area may be lit for longer periods than the jetty, as on-shore
distribution of aggregates and cement may occur a 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at
periods of peak concrete production during the construction of Hinkley Point C.
During non-operational periods, a lower level of lighting would be maintained
throughout the facility for security and safety reasons.
f) Working Hours
A2.4.46 It is anticipated that operation of the jetty and the aggregates storage area would
require working over 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Operation would take
place with one or two shifts a day with variable start and finish times as dictated by
the state of the tide. These hours are needed to operate the jetty development in
relation to the restrictions imposed on operations (e.g. berthing and unloading of
vessels) due to tidal conditions.
g) Operation Programme
A2.4.47 The jetty development is proposed as a temporary feature to facilitate construction of
the Hinkley Point C Project and, therefore, it is expected to be operational for up to
eight years.
A2.4.48 Use of the jetty would be related to the demand for aggregates and cement for
concrete production during the construction of Hinkley Point C. It is anticipated that
there would be two periods, each of six months, during which the jetty would be
operating at its maximum potential in terms of berth occupancy by aggregate barges
(over high tides on all tidal ranges) and cement carriers (over all states of the tide
during neap tidal ranges).
A2.4.49 The jettys usage would reduce as Hinkley Point Cs first reactor unit becomes
operational and would cease in advance of Hinkley Point Cs second reactor unit
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becoming operational. It is expected at this point, the jetty would be no longer
required and dismantling would be initiated (see Section 1.5).
h) Operation Personnel
A2.4.50 Up to 10 operation workers are estimated to be required during the operation of the
jetty development at any one time. It is estimated that four to six linesmen would be
required for berthing the vessels and a further two to four workers would be required
for the unloading operation (this would depend on the shore discharging
arrangement).
A2.5 J etty Dismantling and Restoration
A2.5.1 The temporary jetty would be dismantled at the end of its operational life. It is
anticipated that reuse of materials handling equipment would be feasible along with
reuse and/or recycling of some of the jettys structural items.
A2.5.2 Once the jettys infrastructure has been dismantled and taken off-site, the land
affected by the platform for the aggregates storage area would be restored to its
former use for agriculture.
a) On-shore Works Dismantling
A2.5.3 The hardstanding platform area created for the aggregates stockpiles and cement
silos would be broken out. The resulting rubble would be crushed for on- or off-site
re-use.
b) Off-shore Works Dismantling
A2.5.4 The following paragraphs set out the dismantling and restoration activities for the
jetty in the order that they are expected to take place.
i. Materials Handling and Conveyance Equipment at the Jetty Head
A2.5.5 The materials unloading and handling equipment at the jetty head (e.g. articulated
conveyor, silo, booster, hoppers and crane) would be dismantled and shipped away
from the jetty. It is anticipated that many of these items could be reused by EDF
Energy or sold on for use by others.
ii. Materials Handling and Conveyance Equipment along the Jetty Bridge
A2.5.6 It is anticipated that following some local dismantling work the steel truss inclusive of
the cement pipeline and aggregate conveyor would be removed in units in a similar
manner to that in which it was installed. This would require a crane barge to
transport the units.
iii. Roadway along the Jetty Bridge
A2.5.7 The roadway deck would be systematically dismantled in a linear manner. Firstly, the
pre-cast concrete deck sections would be removed from the steel beams. This would
involve local breaking out of the in situ concrete surrounding the shear studs; hydro-
demolition could be used in order to minimise damage to reinforcement. The steel
beams would then be disconnected from the cross heads and removed. It should be
feasible to re-use the steel beams and pre-cast concrete deck sections at another
location.
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iv. Jetty Bridge
A2.5.8 The concrete cross heads would be dismantled from the piles by cutting of the piles
immediately below the cross head. The concrete could be recycled, subject to the
degree of reinforcement.
A2.5.9 It is not considered feasible to pull out the steel tubular piles, hence cutting of the
piles at rock head/seabed level would be used to remove the main section of pile
shaft. On the foreshore, where the pile locations could pose a risk to people walking
and falling into holes, the remaining section of pile and internal void would be in-filled
with grout. At locations on the foreshore where the holes/restoration are visible, a
natural stone slab would be placed into the concrete plug. The voids left within the
seabed beyond the foreshore would not be plugged with concrete but allowed to infill
naturally with seabed deposits.
A2.5.10 A barge with craneage would be necessary to support, dismantle and transport these
units for recycling as reuse is considered impractical. If tension anchors are used in
place of concrete infill, the piles could be re-used.
v. Jetty Head
A2.5.11 The dismantling of the jetty head structure and dolphin caps (including an extended
jetty head) would involve demolition of the in situ reinforced concrete into sections,
which would then be cut from the pile heads and lifted onto a barge for subsequent
removal from the site. The dismantling of the tubular piles would be undertaken in a
similar manner to those of the jetty bridge.
A2.5.12 The voids left within the seabed would not be plugged with concrete but allowed to
infill naturally with seabed deposits.
vi. Aids to Navigation
A2.5.13 Dismantling of the marker buoys would entail the recovery of the anchors, chains and
buoys by crane. They are expected to be placed on a barge and taken off-site for re-
use, recycling and, if necessary, disposal.
c) Restoration
A2.5.14 Following infrastructure dismantling, the western area affected by the jetty
developments on-shore works (e.g. the aggregates storage area, WMZ) would be
restored. The eastern area of the jetty developments on-shore works (e.g. service
road, rock extraction area) would become part of the Hinkley Point C Projects
permanent works (e.g. the nuclear power station) and, therefore, would not be
restored.
A2.5.15 Restoration would seek to restore and enhance the landscape character, improve
biodiversity, and provide improved public access. The western part of the site would
be restored for predominantly agriculture use, with some woodland and hedgerow
planting. All proposed planting is to be of native species of local provenance where
possible, selected to fit with existing local landscape character and to suit site
conditions. The stripped topsoil and subsoil to be retained and stored on site would
be used for the restoration works.
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A2.5.16 In addition, the existing PRoWs would be reinstated and Green Lane upgraded to a
bridleway. Footpaths and bridleways would be clearly defined and signposted, and
maintained to a high standard. Access would take into account the needs of less
able people. For example, self-closing bridle gates would be proposed, rather than
stiles, to avoid creating barriers to the less able.
A2.5.17 The restoration strategy for the jetty development would form part of the overall land
restoration strategy associated with the completion of construction of Hinkley Point C.
d) Working Hours
A2.5.18 Dismantling and restoration of all components of the jetty development is anticipated
to require the following working hours:
from 07:00 to 18:00 on weekdays;
from 07:00 to 13:00 on Saturdays; and
no working on Sundays, bank holidays or public holidays.
e) Dismantling and Restoration Programme
A2.5.19 It is expected that dismantling and restoration would take approximately two years,
including dismantling of the jetty, earthworks to reprofile the site and planting.
f) Dismantling and Restoration Personnel
A2.5.20 Up to 25 workers are estimated to be required for dismantling and restoration of the
jetty development at any one time.
A2.6 J etty Removal
A2.6.1 The jetty development would be removed and the site reinstated if it is not required
because the Hinkley Point C Project is not granted its consent. This would comprise
two key activities: infrastructure removal and site reinstatement.
a) Infrastructure Removal
A2.6.2 To physically remove the jetty developments on-shore and off-shore infrastructure,
the same process would be adopted as that described for dismantling in Section 1.5.
b) Working Hours
A2.6.3 Removal and reinstatement of the jetty and the on-shore components of the jetty
development is anticipated to require the following working hours:
from 07:00 to 18:00 on weekdays;
from 07:00 to 13:00 on Saturdays; and
no working on Sundays, bank holidays or public holidays.
c) Removal and Reinstatement Programme
A2.6.4 No programme is set for removal and reinstatement because this component of the
jetty development may not be required, unless circumstances dictate otherwise.
However, the timescales for infrastructure removal would be similar to that described
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30 Construction Method Statement Appendix A2 | October 2011
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for dismantling (see Section 1.5) and the timescales for removal and reinstatement
are estimated to be up to one year for removal and two years for reinstatement.
d) Removal and Reinstatement Personnel
A2.6.5 It is estimated that up to 25 construction workers would be required, at any one time,
during the removal of the jetty and reinstatement of the site in the development area.
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References

1.1 Eagle Lyon Pope (2009). Marine Impact Assessment. Eagle Lyon Pope.

FIGURE TITLE:
DOCUMENT:
DATE: DRAWN: SCALE:
REVISION: FIGURE NO:
SCALE BAR
KEY
HINKLEY POINT C PROJECT
ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT
CONSTRUCTION METHOD
STATEMENT APPENDIX A2
SECTION OF THE JETTY
01
SEPT 2011 M.P AS SHOWN@A3
Copyright 2011 EDF Energy plc. No part of this drawing is to be reproduced without prior permission of EDF Energy
APPENDIX A2; FIGURE 1.1
3
1
9
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5
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BP
BP
4
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0
m
4
1
FIGURE TITLE:
DOCUMENT:
DATE: DRAWN: SCALE:
REVISION: FIGURE NO:
SCALE BAR
KEY
HINKLEY POINT C PROJECT
ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT
CONSTRUCTION METHOD
STATEMENT APPENDIX A2
SECTIONS OF THE JETTY HEAD, JETTY
BRIDGE, TRUSS BOX AND JETTY PLAN
01
SEPT 2011 M.P AS SHOWN@A3
Copyright 2011 EDF Energy plc. No part of this drawing is to be reproduced without prior permission of EDF Energy
APPENDIX A2; FIGURE 1.2
145000
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FIGURE TITLE:
DOCUMENT:
DATE: DRAWN: SCALE:
REVISION: FIGURE NO:
SCALE BAR
KEY
HINKLEY POINT C PROJECT
ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT
CONSTRUCTION METHOD
STATEMENT APPENDIX A2
SECTION OF THE JETTY
01
SEPT 2011 M.P NTS@A3
c Copyright 2011 EDF Energy plc. No part of this drawing is to be reproduced without prior permission of EDF Energy
APPENDIX A2; FIGURE 1.3
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APPENDIX A3: CONSTRUCTION LIGHTING
STRATEGY
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Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011 1
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CONTENTS
APPENDIX A3: CONSTRUCTION LIGHTING STRATEGY......................................................... 3
A3.1 Introduction...................................................................................................................... 3
A3.2 Site Context ..................................................................................................................... 5
A3.3 Objectives and Mitigation .............................................................................................. 18
A3.4 HPC Construction Lighting Strategy.............................................................................. 23
A3.5 Summary ....................................................................................................................... 34
A3.6 Dusk Views.................................................................................................................... 37

TABLES
Table A3.1 Lighting Mitigation Summary.................................................................................... 35

FIGURES
Figure 1 Site Location .................................................................................................................. 5
Figure 2 Photo of Existing Hinkley Point Power Station Complex at Night................................. 10
Figure 3 Viewpoint Locations Night Views .............................................................................. 11
Figure 4 Lighting Baseline: Night View 1 Lilstock, Coastal Footpath....................................... 12
Figure 5 Lighting Baseline: Night View 2 Hilltop Lane, Quantock Hills AONB......................... 12
Figure 6 Lighting Baseline: Night View 3 A39, Holford Lay-by, Quantock Hills AONB............ 13
Figure 7 Lighting Baseline: Night View 4 Local Road to the South of the Site ........................ 13
Figure 8 Key Local Lighting Receptors ...................................................................................... 16
Figure 9 Key Lighting Receptors (Wide Site Context) ................................................................ 17
Figure 10 Local Lighting Mitigation............................................................................................. 22
Figure 11 Construction Lighting Zones ...................................................................................... 24
Figure 12 Illumination Table....................................................................................................... 27

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Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011 3
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APPENDIX A3: CONSTRUCTION LIGHTING
STRATEGY
A3.1 Introduction
a) Outline
A3.1.2 This document describes the lighting strategy for constructing Hinkley Point C (HPC),
and supports the DCO application to the IPC as well as informs the Environmental
Impact Assessment and preparation of the Environmental Statement (ES). It
contains information on construction lighting within the HPC development site and
includes on-site campus accommodation lighting and temporary jetty lighting during
the HPC construction phase.
A3.1.3 Lighting strategy for the operational HPC proposed development is described in a
separate Appendix to Volume 2 Chapter 2 of the ES.
A3.1.4 The HPC construction programme is anticipated to commence with the site
preparation works, followed by the main construction, pursuant to the Development
Consent granted by the IPC.
A3.1.5 HPC preliminary works (site preparation works and temporary jetty development)
would be implemented during the HPC construction phase. A site preparation works
planning application (including site preparation works lighting strategy) was submitted
to West Somerset Council (WSC) in November 2010 and in July 2011 the Council
resolved to grant planning permission, subject to execution of Section 106 agreement
and the imposition of conditions and informatives in accordance with the officers
recommendations. A Temporary Jetty Harbour Empowerment Order (HEO) was
submitted to Marine Management Organisation in December 2010. The subsequent
HEO Addendum report was submitted in June 2011 and included a lighting strategy
for the construction and operation of the temporary jetty.
A3.1.6 The HPC construction lighting strategy incorporates the HPC preliminary works
(temporary jetty and site preparation works) lighting strategies.
b) Project Description
A3.1.7 A detailed description of the HPC development is provided in the description of
Proposed Development, Volume 2 Chapter 2 of the ES. The HPC construction is
described in the Construction, Volume 2 Chapter 3 of the ES.
A3.1.8 Construction of the permanent buildings and associated infrastructure (the
permanent development) would take place in the north-eastern part of the HPC
development site, to the north of Green Lane. In order to support this construction,
temporary contractor facilities and storage areas would be required to the west and
south of the HPC permanent development.
A3.1.9 Lighting of access and haulage roads on the construction site would be provided by
EDF Energy. Lighting of the main construction area and contractors areas would be
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4 Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011
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the responsibility of the individual contractors, but EDF Energy would require such
lighting to comply with this lighting strategy.
A3.1.10 The overall construction site area is bisected by a track (Green Lane) running east-
west, which would be retained and protected for most of its length. Two crossing
points would be provided for construction traffic. The southern limit for main
construction activity has been set as OS grid line 144750mN, to provide a landscape
buffer zone between the main construction activity and the village of Shurton. Early
restoration works and the construction of an emergency access road would take
place within this buffer zone. However, these works would not be a source of
significant lighting.
A3.1.11 A temporary jetty would be located in the north-western part of the HPC development
site during the construction phase to facilitate the import of bulk materials, primarily
aggregate, sand and cement for concrete production, together with other construction
materials.
A3.1.12 An on-site accommodation campus would be located in the south-eastern corner of
the HPC development site during the construction phase.
A3.1.13 The construction of the National Grid 400kV substation would be located in the
south-eastern corner of the HPC permanent development.
c) Aim of the Report
A3.1.14 This report provides the construction lighting strategy for the HPC development site
according to the principles set out in the Department for Communities and Local
Government (CLG) guidance Lighting in the Countryside: Towards Good Practice
1
,
other relevant guidance and British Standards (BS), and addresses the relevant
technical, planning and environmental considerations.
A3.1.15 The strategy is supplemented by a Technical Appendix, which describes technical
details of the scheme, including technical drawings of the lighting proposals, and
focuses on the Health and Safety and engineering considerations.
d) Scope
A3.1.16 The scope of this report has been prepared in line with the above guidelines and,
following this introduction (Section 1), it contains the following sections:
Section 2: Site Context, which examines the relevant environmental baseline
conditions (predominantly landscape, visual and ecological) within and around the
HPC development site as well as a summary of the relevant legislation,
standards, good practice guidelines and policies.
Section 3: Objectives and Mitigation, which identifies the objectives for the lighting
scheme (taking into account the opportunities and constraints identified in the
previous section) and proposes mitigation measures.


1
DCLG (1997) Lighting in the Countryside: Toward Good Practice London: HMSO
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Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011 5
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Section 4: HPC Construction Lighting Strategy for the construction phase of the
HPC proposed development.
Section 5: Summary.
Section 6: Dusk Views.
Section 7: Technical Appendix.
A3.2 Site Context
a) Introduction
A3.2.2 This section examines the planning, legislative and environmental issues of
relevance to the lighting strategy. A desktop study has been carried out to identify
the main planning and environmental issues that should be taken into account when
considering the impact of the HPC proposed development on the local and wider
area.
Figure 1 Site Location

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6 Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011
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b) Site location
A3.2.3 The application site is located within the district of West Somerset (see Introduction
A3.2.4 This section examines the planning, legislative and environmental issues of
relevance to the lighting strategy. A desktop study has been carried out to identify
the main planning and environmental issues that should be taken into account when
considering the impact of the HPC proposed development on the local and wider
area.
A3.2.5 Figure 1). Two other local planning authority areas, namely Sedgemoor and Taunton
Deane, lie within 10km of the site.
c) Study area
A3.2.6 The study area for the site context appraisal covers the Landscape and Visual Impact
Assessment (LVIA) study area is described in detail in Volume 2 Chapter 22 of the
accompanying Environmental Statement.
A3.2.7 The geographical extent of the LVIA study area under consideration includes:
Lowland Somerset up to 18km from the HPC development site;
Exmoor National Park up to 25km from the HPC development site;
Mendip Hills AONB up to 21km from the HPC development site; and
Welsh coastline up to 21km from the HPC development site.
d) Landscape character
A3.2.8 For a detailed assessment of landscape character within and around the site, see
Volume 2, Chapter 22 of the ES. A brief summary of the local landscape character
is provided below.
A3.2.9 In the local context, the HPC development site is located within the Quantock Vale
Local Landscape Character Area (LLCA), on the northern coast of Somerset, which
is characterised by rolling farmland containing wide valleys and gentle hills which are
rarely above 60m Above Ordnance Datum (AOD).
A3.2.10 The Quantock ridge is a dominant feature to the south-west and the landform around
the site is predominantly overlain by an essentially agricultural landscape of small
fields, hedges, hedgerow trees and small woodlands. The local area of particular
sensitivity to lighting is the strip of farmland located adjacent to the coast to the west
of the site. Due to its open and gently undulating character, and limited tree and
hedgerow cover, wide views of the HPC development site are available from
the west.
e) Legislation, policy and guidance
A3.2.11 The lighting strategy should comply with the following legislation:
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974;
The Environmental Protection Act 1990;
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Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and Conservation of Habitats
and Species Regulations 2010; and
The Dock Regulations, 1988.
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
A3.2.12 The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007 and the Workplace
(Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, both made under the Health and
Safety at Work etc Act 1974, provide that suitable and sufficient lighting must be
provided at construction sites and all workplaces, including outdoor places. The
Regulations therefore cover both the activities carried out during construction and
during the operation of the power station. DF Energys Health, Safety, Environmental
and Quality policy statement places safety at the heart of the construction project and
as such the primary aim of the lighting strategy is to ensure a safe working
environment is maintained even in the absence of natural light.
The Environmental Protection Act 1990
A3.2.13 The Environmental Protection Act 1990 ("EPA 1990") was amended by section 102
of the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005 to add artificial light emitted
from premises so as to be prejudicial to health or a nuisance to the list of statutory
nuisances set out in the EPA 1990. This does not apply to artificial light from
lighthouses, prisons, airports, harbours and railway or tramway premises, nor to
street lighting for public service or goods vehicles, however it would apply to the
lighting emitted from the HPC development site.
A3.2.14 The lighting strategy would comply with relevant British Standards and the best
practice guidelines prepared by Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers
(CIBSE), Institution of Lighting Engineers, and Dark Sky Association to minimise
obtrusive light and ensure compliance with the Clean Neighbourhoods and
Environment Act 2005/EPA1990.
Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and Conservation of
Habitats and Species Regulations 2010
A3.2.15 All species of bat are protected by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as
amended) and the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010. These
Regulations make it an offence to harm or disturb bats (see Volume 2, Chapter 20
for a full explanation of offences).
The Dock Regulations
A3.2.16 The Dock Regulations (1988) contain safety requirements for general dock work and
would be applicable to the temporary jetty development. These impose duties on
employers and employee on the shore and also on ship owners, master and crew.
The duties include requirements for lighting, access, maintenance and rescue from
the water.
A3.2.17 A full list of Statutory Regulations and Electrical Works British Standards applicable
to the HPC proposed development is provided in the Technical Appendix. The key
British Standards relevant to the lighting design are:
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BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2: Outdoor Work Places;
BS 5489-1:2003 + A2:2008 Code of practice for the design of road lighting Part
1: Lighting of Roads and Public Amenity Area; and
International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities
(IALA) Recommendation O-139 The Marking of Man-Made Offshore Structures.
BS EN 12464-2:2007
A3.2.18 To enable people to perform outdoor visual tasks efficiently and accurately,
especially during the night, adequate and appropriate lighting has to be provided.
The degree of visibility and comfort required in a wide range of outdoor work places
is governed by the type and duration of activity.
A3.2.19 This standard specifies requirements for lighting tasks in most outdoor work places
and their associated areas in terms of quantity and quality of illumination.
A3.2.20 Tables scheduling areas, tasks and activities relevant to this development are as
follows:
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas.
Table 5.2 Building Sites.
Annex A Additional recommendations with respect to safety and health of workers
at work.
BS 5489-1:2003 + A2:2008
A3.2.21 This standard gives recommendations on the general principles of road lighting,
gives recommendations on aesthetic and technical aspects, and advises on statutory
provisions, operations and maintenance.
A3.2.22 It gives recommendations for the design of lighting for all types of highways and
public thoroughfares, including those specifically for pedestrians and cyclists, and for
pedestrian subways and bridges.
A3.2.23 The standard would be used to ensure that statutory design criteria are met where
the primary roads in the development site interface with the surrounding public road
network.
IALA Recommendation O-139
A3.2.24 The requirements for shipping are controlled by the International Maritime
Organisation. Typically a jetty lighting mast would be required consisting of 2 lights
separated by 2m vertically mounted 2m above mean high water spring water level.
The lights are to be visible from a range of 2 miles.
A3.2.25 The HPC Construction Lighting Strategy takes into account the relevant guidance,
namely:
Lighting in the Countryside: Towards Good Practice 1997.
The Society of Light and Lighting (SLL) Lighting Handbook 2009.
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Institute of Lighting Engineers (ILE) (2005) Guidance notes for the reduction of
obtrusive light.
Bat Conservation Trust Bats and Lighting in the UK version 3 May 2009.
International Dark Sky Association.
Lighting in the Countryside: Towards Good Practice
A3.2.26 Lighting in the Countryside: Towards Good Practice was issued by the Department of
the Environment in 1997. The purpose of the Good Practice Guide is to provide
practical advice on the prevention and control of lighting impacts and it identifies a
number of objectives that should be considered when developing the lighting
strategy.
The SLL Lighting Handbook
A3.2.27 The SLL Lighting Handbook provides further guidance behind the specific
requirements of the British Standards and also identifies other sources of technical
information.
ILE Guidance notes
A3.2.28 The ILE guide specifically identifies the sources of obtrusive lighting and provides
further explanation of the British Standard requirements.
Bats and Lighting in the UK (Version 3, May 2009)
A3.2.29 The Bat Conservation Trust document aims to raise awareness of the impact of
lighting on bats and suggests mitigation measures to minimise the impact on bats
resulting from various scenarios.

International Dark Sky Association
A3.2.30 Dark Sky policy refers to the aims of the International Dark Sky Association (IDA)
with regards to the avoidance of light pollution. The IDAs goals are to be effective in
stopping the adverse environmental impact on dark skies by building awareness of
the problem of light pollution and of the solutions.
A3.2.31 IDA describes light pollution as any adverse effect of artificial light including sky glow,
glare, light trespass, light clutter, decreased visibility at night, and energy waste. The
IDA has a number of policy initiatives and collates technical information identifying
best practice for avoiding light pollution.
A3.2.32 Lighting can have a significant impact on the landscape character and visual
receptors. The legislation, policy and guidance relevant to the landscape and visual
issues in relation to the HPC proposed development are examined in Volume 2,
Chapter 22 of the Environmental Statement.
f) Lighting baseline condition
A3.2.33 The site lies within an area with dark skies at night and the only significant source of
lighting in the vicinity of the HPC development site is the existing Hinkley Point Power
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Station Complex. Figure 2 illustrates the existing Hinkley Point B power station
at night
2
.
Figure 2 Photo of Existing Hinkley Point Power Station Complex at Night


A3.2.34 The site was visited in October 2010 and 4 initial views were recorded to illustrate the
level of existing lighting at night. Viewpoint locations are shown on Figure 3.
Figures 4 to 7 illustrate the views of the existing Hinkley Point Power Station
Complex from receptors located around the site, including the West Somerset Coast
Path, landscape to the south-east of the site and two views from the Quantock Hills
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).
A3.2.35 Additionally, thirteen locations were selected for dusk views and agreed with the
Statutory Consultees during informal consultation on 19 April 2011. Site visits to
record the views were carried out in June and July 2011. Baseline photographs of all
13 dusk views are included in Section 6. Full resolution baseline dusk photographs
are presented in Volume 2, Chapter 22. The locations were selected from selected
Principal Viewpoints for the LVIA (refer to Volume 2, Chapter 22) agreed with the
Statutory Consultees. The locations of all viewpoints are shown on Volume 2,
Chapter 22, Figures 22.9 and 22.9a.


2
Source: Water.Technologies.net a product of Net Resources International
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Figure 3 Viewpoint Locations Night Views


A3.2.36 Figure 4 illustrates a night view from West Somerset Coast Path north of Lilstock
(PRoW no. WL24/10). This viewpoint is located approximately 2.4km from the HPC
development site boundary and is included in Volume 2, Chapter 22 of the ES as a
Principal Viewpoint 3.
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Figure 4 Lighting Baseline: Night View 1 Lilstock, Coastal Footpath

A3.2.37 Figure 5 illustrates a night view from Hilltop Lane located within the north-eastern
fringes of the Quantock Hills AONB. This viewpoint is located approximately 4km
from the HPC development site and is representative of views from the north-eastern
part of the Quantock Hills AONB.
Figure 5 Lighting Baseline: Night View 2 Hilltop Lane, Quantock Hills AONB

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A3.2.38 Figure 6 illustrates a night view from the A39 lay-by within the Quantock Hills AONB.
This viewpoint is located approximately 5.5km from the HPC development site and is
representative of views from the eastern edge of the Quantock Hills AONB and A39.
Figure 6 Lighting Baseline: Night View 3 A39, Holford Lay-by, Quantock Hills AONB

A3.2.39 Figure 7 illustrates a night view from a local road to the south of the HPC
development site located 0.6km to the south of the existing Hinkley Point Nuclear
Power Station Complex. The viewpoint is included in Volume 2 Chapter 22 of the
ES as a Principal Viewpoint 12.
Figure 7 Lighting Baseline: Night View 4 Local Road to the South of the Site

A3.2.40 All recorded night views show the existing Hinkley Point Power Station Complex as a
source of significant light pollution due to poor control of light distribution and poor
colour rendering of the existing lights (orange low pressure sodium lights). Figure 7
illustrates direct glare from the lights and that there is minimal control of horizontal
light distribution, which causes problems with light spill and direct upward light.
These problems enhance the glow effect from the development.
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g) Environmental considerations
A3.2.41 Protection of the environment is an important consideration in developing a lighting
strategy for the construction of the HPC proposed development. It is recognised that
the application site is located within an area with several environmental constraints.
They include:
Area of dark skies and landscape character sensitive to light sources;
The Quantock Hills AONB overlooks the site from the south west and Mendip Hills
AONB is located to the north east of the site;
Exmoor National Park is located approximately 14km to the west of the site;
The site is located adjacent to a designated area of outstanding scenic
interest; and
Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), RAMSAR and Special Protection Area
(SPA) designations of the foreshore recognise important bird populations (see
Volume 2, Chapter 20).
A3.2.42 A minimum of ten bat species have been recorded using the HPC development site,
including lesser and greater horseshoe and barbastelle bats, which are all
uncommon in England and Wales. Barbastelle bats are also a feature of the Exmoor
and Quantocks Oakwood Special Area of Conservation (SAC) (located over 5km
from the HPC development site) and it is possible the bats from the SAC use the
HPC development site for commuting and foraging. The Green Lane through the
centre of the site, Benhole Lane along the western boundary and the Bum Brook
along the southern boundary have been identified as key bat corridors because of
the extensive use by the bats present at the site of these features (see Volume 2,
Chapter 20).
A3.2.43 There are no local landscape designations that cover any part of the HPC
development site. However, there are a number of local planning designations
covering landscapes of particular interests that are present in the LVIA study area.
Full list of landscape designations is provided in Volume 2, Chapter 22 of the ES.
A3.2.44 There are a number of PRoW crossing the HPC development site and in its
immediate vicinity, including a coastal path which runs along the top of the low cliff
line. For more details please refer to Volume 2, Chapter 25 of the ES.
A3.2.45 There are no known sites of international importance for cultural heritage within the
HPC development site, however a Scheduled Monument (Wick Barrow, also known
as Pixies Mound) is located to the east of the proposed HPC proposed development.
There are also no listed buildings within the HPC development site. An important
Grade II* listed building, Fairfield House, is located approximately 3km south west.
For more details on Scheduled Monuments and listed buildings please refer to
Volume 2, Chapter 23 of the ES.
A3.2.46 The effect of temporary jetty lighting on fish, marine mammals and red seaweed
Corallina has been considered in Volume 2, Chapter 19 of the ES. The assessment
concluded the temporary jetty lighting would cause minimal impacts on marine
ecology. The key receptor under consideration is the intertidal area, which is a
habitat for Corallina.
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h) Key local lighting receptors
A3.2.47 The analysis of the site context, landscape character and environmental constraints
led to the identification of several key local receptors which have the potential to be
affected by lighting. Key local lighting receptors are selected based on the
professional judgement of the environmental assessors and include landscape,
visual, historic, ecological or amenity receptors which are located either in close
proximity of the HPC development site or are of high sensitivity and have the highest
potential to be impacted upon by HPC construction lighting. Lighting impacts on all
relevant receptors is assessed in the relevant ES chapters.
A3.2.48 The following key local lighting receptors have been selected in the vicinity of the
application site (see Figure 8):
Settlements/hamlets of Wick, Shurton, Burton and Knighton and Doggetts farm;
Users of Public Rights of Way in the vicinity of the site;
Bristol Channel;
Intertidal area (encompassing the Severn Estuary SPA/Ramsar and Bridgwater
Bay SSSI);
Hinkley County Wildlife Site lying partly within the HPC development site and
around the existing Hinkley Point Power Station Complex;
Areas of farmland around the site; and
Key bat corridors (in particular corridors running through the HPC
development site).
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Figure 8 Key Local Lighting Receptors

i) Key lighting receptors in the wider context
A3.2.49 Other receptors located within the LVIA study area and considered in the lighting
strategy include (see Figure 9):
Quantock Hills AONB;
Mendip Hills AONB;
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Exmoor National Park;
Area of outstanding scenic interest; and
Elevated areas of farmland within the study area represented by Principal and
Secondary Viewpoints (see Volume 2 Chapter 22 of the ES).
Figure 9 Key Lighting Receptors (Wide Site Context)


A3.2.50 The Quantock Hills AONB is located at its closest approximately 3.7km to the south
west of the HPC development site. The AONB covers an area of about 125km
2
and
reaches a height of 384m overlooking the development site. The Mendip Hills AONB
lies approximately 19.5km north-east of the HPC development site.
A3.2.51 Exmoor National Park is situated within the counties of Somerset (71% of the park)
and Devon. The boundary of the National Park is located approximately 14km, and
beyond, to the west of the HPC development site.
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A3.2.52 The HPC development site is bounded by an area of outstanding scenic interest,
which extends farther to the south-west and was designated by Natural England for
its outstanding scenic, historic and scientific interest.
j) Consultation
A3.2.53 The need for assessment of HPC construction lighting was confirmed during
consultation. The selection of representative night and dusk viewpoint locations was
agreed with the Statutory consultees on 19 April 2011.
A3.3 Objectives and Mitigation
a) The need for lighting
A3.3.2 The primary aim of the construction lighting for the HPC proposed development is to
ensure that, in the absence of natural light, a safe working environment is
maintained. Appropriate lighting of the HPC proposed development under
construction should conform with the required Health and Safety and environmental
legislation and guidance.
A3.3.3 Due to the proximity of nationally protected landscapes, the Quantock Hills AONB
and an area of outstanding scenic interest, the HPC development site has been
categorised as lying within an environmental Zone E1 which requires the maximum
control and limitation of intrusive light sources on the surrounding landscape in
accordance with the legislation, planning and guidance.
A3.3.4 As defined in the BSEN 12464, Designated Environmental Zone E1 is an intrinsically
dark area such as national parks or protected sites. Zone E2 is defined as low
district brightness areas, such as industrial or residential rural areas. Wherever
possible, lighting should comply with the environmental Zone E1 standard.
A3.3.5 A lighting system would be required for the following areas:
HPC permanent development construction area (within the HPC footprint) where
the main HPC construction activities would take place;
contractors areas north and south of Green Lane;
jetty stockpile area and off-shore;
National Grid substation;
haul road crossings at Green Lane;
stockpile areas south of Green Lane;
on-site accommodation campus;
on-site mitigation area (south of 144750mN latitude);
roundabouts at Wick Moor Drove; and
security fence.
A3.3.6 The primary objectives of the lighting strategy shall be to achieve the following:
provide a safe working environment;
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comply with planning requirements;
meet key standards and statutory requirements;
target lighting at where it is required;
avoid over illumination;
Avoid upwards lighting;
Avoid light spill to neighbouring areas;
Minimise energy consumption;
Minimise disruption to bat corridors; and
meet the requirement of the bulk carriers.
b) Approach
A3.3.7 The lighting strategy recognises the requirements of health and safety and protection
of the environment and aims to minimise the impact of light on important receptors in
the following way:
The lighting scheme must allow for safe construction of HPC and by ensuring the
schemes compliance with all relevant health and safety standards.
The lighting scheme should attempt to minimise the amount of light spill to areas
outside the working or access areas. Wherever possible, this requirement would
be met by considering the number of fittings and their mounting height; an overall
lighting requirement can be met by a smaller number of high output fittings
mounted at a higher elevation or a higher number of smaller output fittings
mounted at lower level. These have to be considered against economic
requirements. The use of downward facing lighting fittings (directional lighting)
would also reduce the amount of light spill
During the construction of HPC, the majority of areas to the north of Green Lane
and some areas to the south of Green Lane would require some 24 hour working.
It is recognised that the HPC development site is located in the vicinity of areas of
environmental sensitivity. The detailed construction phasing and methodology of
operations would minimise impacts of construction lighting on the environment.
Due to important bat routes located along Green Lane, Benhole Lane and Bum
Brook (see Figure 8), the proposed lighting would be designed to minimise ultra
violet (UV) emissions and shielding would be used to minimise the light spill onto
key ecological areas (particularly bat corridors).
Lighting in the on-site mitigation area (south of 144750mN latitude) would be
minimised to reduce impacts on the nearby residential and ecological receptors.
Task lighting may be required in this area to implement the works in the initial
phases of the project.
Task lighting would target only those areas being actively worked and the detailed
lighting and working arrangements would be designed to minimise light pollution.
The impact of the lighting from the development on these AONBs should be
minimised by following a Dark Sky policy through a strategy of lighting techniques
including directional lighting and reduction of glare at night.
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c) Mitigation
A3.3.8 A range of mitigation measures are available to address lighting impacts. The
appropriate measures would be selected from the following options:
A3.3.9 As part of the mitigation measures to minimise light spill, the following should be
considered
Design to correct illumination levels. Do not over-light an area thus avoiding
adding to sky glow.
Develop a computer model of the construction lighting and use to analyse
changing usage of lighting during the construction process and assist in the
selection of luminaire positioning. Where light spill is considered to be outside of
the design criteria limitations then further mitigation measures should be provided.
Move luminaires away from boundaries;
Use of shields and baffles to reduce light spill to a minimum;
Introduce controls to avoid unnecessary night time lighting;
Ensure luminaires are orientated correctly following installation;
Provision of manmade structures for shielding.
A3.3.10 As part of the mitigation measures to minimise upwards light and distant visual
impact, the following should be considered:
Use of full cut-off exterior luminaires to avoid light above the horizontal;
Direct light downwards wherever possible to illuminate the task and avoid sky
glow; and
Ensure appropriate luminaires are chosen.
A3.3.11 As part of the mitigation measures to minimise the impact of lighting on bats, the
following should be considered:
Type of lamp to minimise UV content;
Light spill control to avoid obtrusive light;
Height of lighting columns to be minimised to reduce risk of light spill;
Lighting levels to be kept to the minimum required to achieve a safe working
environment; and
Control of lighting to ensure light is only provided when required.
A3.3.12 Further technical details related to lighting mitigation, such as lamp selection details,
luminaire and column types, manmade structures and lighting controls, are provided
in the Technical Appendix.
A3.3.13 In addition to lighting mitigation measures, several retained and proposed landscape
features within and around the HPC development site would contribute to lighting
mitigation. These features are illustrated on Figure 10 and include:
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Existing landform which reduce the potential impact of lighting on surrounding
farmland, local settlements and PRoW in the vicinity of the HPC development site.
Existing topography includes the Green Lane ridge (majority to be retained) and
local rolling landform around the site which would reduce impact of lighting from
areas to the south and west of the HPC development site.
Proposed landform includes a temporary construction screening bund along the
north-western site boundary, which would reduce lighting impacts on the PRoW
along Benhole Lane and undulating topography/screening bunds implemented as
part of the early restoration within the on-site mitigation area located south of
144750mN latitude, which would reduce the lighting impacts from the nearby
villages, hamlets and farms to the south and south west of the HPC development
site.
Strong hedgerow field pattern and woodland blocks and scrub, including advance
screen planting implemented in Spring 2011, contribute to reducing the impact of
lighting due to a degree of enclosure they provide.
Existing woodland and hedgerows outside the HPC development site which would
provide some screening from flat and open Wick Moor.
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Figure 10 Local Lighting Mitigation


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A3.4 HPC Construction Lighting Strategy
a) Construction lighting proposals
A3.4.2 For the purpose of this lighting strategy, the HPC construction site has been divided
into several lighting zones, based upon analysis of the construction requirements.
These are illustrated on Figure 11 and are as follows:
Zone A - Permanent development construction area;
Zone B Jetty stockpile area;
Zone C - Contractors areas subdivided into zones C1 (north of Green Lane), and
areas C2 and C3, both located south of Green Lane;
Zone D National Grid substation area;
Zone E Green Lane crossings;
Zone F Stockpiles south of Green Lane;
Zone G On-site mitigation area;
Zone H On-site accommodation campus;
Zone I Green Lane;
Zone J Security fence;
Zone K Roundabouts and site access at Wick Moor Drove; and
Temporary jetty off-shore lighting, including navigation lights, flood lighting and the
lighting of the jetty itself.
A3.4.3 For details of lighting requirements, lamp options and specific constraints for each
area refer to Technical Appendix.
b) Relationship with the standalone jetty and site preparation works
A3.4.4 The HPC construction lighting strategy incorporates lighting strategies for HPC
preliminary works (temporary jetty and site preparation works). During the HPC
construction phase, the on-shore construction lighting zones shown on Figure 11
supersede the zones defined in lighting strategies for the site preparation works and
temporary jetty.
A3.4.5 During the first phase of the HPC construction there would be an overlap of the HPC
construction lighting strategy with the site preparation works and the temporary jetty
lighting strategies (on-shore). This would apply to all zones north of Green Lane and
a part of Zones C and F south of Green Lane. This overlap, however, would not
result in an increase of lighting impacts due to limited lighting required for the
standalone temporary jetty and site preparation works (predominantly task lighting).
A3.4.6 The off-shore lighting for the temporary jetty during the HPC construction phase is
shown on Figure 11.

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Figure 11 Construction Lighting Zones

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c) Description of lighting in HPC construction zones
i. Zone A Permanent development construction area
A3.4.7 Lighting in the permanent development construction area would be required for the
following areas, tasks or activities:
clearance, excavation and loading on trucks;
traffic areas for vehicles;
building and facility construction areas;
batching plants; and
fabrication facilities.
A3.4.8 The lighting for each of these areas, tasks or activities would require lighting to
different specifications over the course of construction (for details refer to Technical
Appendix). To meet the challenging engineering requirements of this main
construction area, Zone A must be generally very well lit and would be characterised
by various illumination levels. To meet these engineering requirements, it is
proposed to use a combination of Metal Halide luminaires, LED and high pressure
sodium luminaires.
A3.4.9 The permanent development construction area would comprise a number of tower
and mobile cranes, most of which would be equipped with lighting.
A3.4.10 It is not possible to precisely define the illumination levels for the construction within
the permanent development zone due to challenging construction requirements in
this area and the large scale of the construction activities. The lighting levels
provided in the Technical Appendix are based on the preferred construction
parameters and are most likely to occur during construction, however, they may be
exceeded for limited periods of time and the specified lux levels should be treated as
indicative.
A3.4.11 Light spill onto the neighbouring areas would be minimised by using available lighting
control measures.
A3.4.12 The permanent development construction area would require 24 hour lighting.
ii. Zone B Jetty stockpile area
A3.4.13 The lighting in the jetty stockpile area would conform to the lighting scheme set out in
the HPC preliminary works temporary jetty development lighting strategy submitted to
MMO in June 2011.
Temporary jetty construction
A3.4.14 During the temporary jetty construction phase lighting within the stockpile area would
be limited to task lighting. Task lighting would be also used in Zone B to provide a
strategic light source for areas that require an appropriately lit and safe environment
to undertake required operations on-shore. Task lighting would only be provided
where required, to the recommended light levels and for the duration of the task
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undertaken, thereby restricting the overall light required on the site during temporary
jetty construction.
A3.4.15 The anticipated design criteria of task lighting is as follows:
Column heights to be less than 8m;
Light levels to be between 5 and 50 lux to be determined by the task undertaken
(100 lux may be required for specific short-term operations); and
Utilise design features that limit obtrusive light (see Technical Appendix).
A3.4.16 Temporary task lighting would be localised to the area of the activity and for its
duration only. The task lighting luminance levels for specific operations would be as
follows:
Traffic areas for slow moving vehicles would require the lighting level of 10 lux,
which is an equivalent of lighting on a local road.
Clearance, excavation and loading would require the lighting level of 20 lux, which
is an equivalent of lighting of a supermarket car park or city centre precinct.
Building and facility construction areas would require the lighting level of 50 lux,
which is an equivalent of lighting of a railway station platform or a motorway
junction.
Detailed construction would require the lighting level of 100 lux, which is an
equivalent of lighting of a building entrance canopy, bus station, local outdoor
bowls green, or light during a very dark overcast day.
A3.4.17 The proposed working hours for the on-shore construction of the temporary jetty and
the associated infrastructure that would require the use of task lighting are 07:00
18:00 Monday to Friday and 07:00 13:00 on Saturdays with no night-time working.
This means that the potential need for artificial lighting would be primarily restricted to
short periods of darkness during working hours at either end of the working day in the
November February period. If works are carried out during darkness, artificial
lighting would be required in order to ensure that the works are carried out safely.
Health and Safety legislation would require work areas to be properly lit. EDF
Energy requires the flexibility of working during these hours in order to meet the
project schedule. Figure 12 illustrates the average hours per day of
illumination required.
A3.4.18 It is not anticipated that the maximum extents of Zone B illustrated in Figure 11
would require to be lit at any one time as task lighting would limit the requirement to
lighting compound areas, access and haul roads and specific working areas only. In
order to minimise the use and impact of lighting the contractors and subcontractors
would be required to comply with the lighting design principles described in
this document.
Temporary jetty operation
A3.4.19 During the operational phase of the jetty, the majority of Zone B would require 24
hours lighting. In addition to task lighting within Zone B, which would have the same
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specifications as during the jetty construction phase, lighting would be also required
for the stockpiles and haul roads.
A3.4.20 The on-shore lighting layout of the stockpile and haul road area is illustrated in the
Technical Appendix. To ensure sufficient lighting of haul roads and stockpile area,
luminaires would be aligned to avoid upward light and light spill onto sensitive areas.
A3.4.21 During operation of the jetty, the part of Zone B to the east of the stockpile, which
was previously used by the jetty construction contractors, would be used by other
contractors and effectively become part of Zone C1.
Figure 12 Illumination Table

iii. Zone C - Contractors areas
A3.4.22 The contractors areas are subdivided into zone C1 located north of Green Lane, and
two zones located south of Green Lane, namely zones C2 and C3.
A3.4.23 All of Zone C would be lit by the contractors and the detailed specifications for this
zone are not known at this stage and would be provided by the individual contractors.
However, the contractors areas may include luminaires other than those specified in
this strategy provided that they are similar in construction and illuminance and
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comply with the calculated illumination averages and necessary mitigation
requirements.
A3.4.24 Lighting in Zone C1 would be used for contractors areas. Part of Zone C would be
the site entrance, lit by EDF. Due to the proximity of Green Lane and a key bat
corridor, light spill to Green Lane would comply with Environmental Zone E1 and
would be minimised by using available lighting control measures and lamps with low
UV emissions. Light spill to foreshore area would comply with Environmental
Zone E1.
A3.4.25 Zone C2 also adjoins Green Lane and a key bat corridor. Light spill to Green Lane
would comply with Environmental Zone E1 and would be minimised by using
available lighting control measures and lamps with low UV emissions.
A3.4.26 Zone C3 would be used for contractors areas and have similar characteristics to
Zone C1, however, this zone would not require lighting mitigation measures targeted
at minimising light spill onto key bat corridors.
iv. Zone D National Grid (NG) substation area
A3.4.27 During the construction of NG substation typical construction hours would be 7.30 to
17.30. Occasionally, night-time working may be required.
A3.4.28 Mobile lighting towers of approximately 7m height would be used when necessary for
the NG substation construction work.
A3.4.29 Due to the proximity of Green Lane and a key bat corridor, light spill to Green Lane
would comply with Environmental Zone E1 and would be minimised by using
available lighting control measures and lamps with low UV emissions.
v. Zone E Green Lane crossings
A3.4.30 Due to the presence of a key bat corridor along the Green Lane, this Zone would not
contain high level lights to minimise the impact on bats. However, cowled low-level
lighting may be deployed to encourage bats to fly high over the road and avoid
impact with vehicles. Task lighting would be used in this area, but only during
construction of the road. Lamps adjacent to bat corridors would have low UV
emissions.
A3.4.31 To minimise lighting impact on bat crossing points, a computer model of the
construction lighting would be developed and used to analyse changing usage of
lighting during the construction process and assist in the selection of luminaire
positioning. Where light spill is considered to be outside of the design criteria
limitations then further mitigation measures should be provided.
Zone F Stockpiles south of Green Lane
A3.4.32 It is envisaged that the stockpile area south of Green Lane would require task lighting
for specific operations only and no permanent lighting would be installed in this area.
For general task lighting specifications please refer to the description of lighting
within Zone B.
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A3.4.33 Due to the proximity of Green Lane and a key bat corridor, light spill to Green Lane
would comply with Environmental Zone E1 and would be minimised by using
available lighting control measures and lamps with low UV emissions.
vi. Zone G On-site mitigation area
A3.4.34 In zone G task lighting would be required only for the early landscape restoration
including landform and planting proposals and the construction of an emergency road
and the proposed bridge across Bum Brook. The emergency access road located
within Zone G would not have permanent lighting in order to minimise lighting
impacts to the residential areas in Shurton and sensitive ecological receptors. Once
the early restoration scheme is implemented, the proposed landform would provide
screening of construction lighting located to the north of Zone G from the nearby
residential areas and minimise lighting impact on sensitive ecological receptors.
A3.4.35 For task lighting specifications please refer to the description of lighting within ZoneB.
vii. Zone H On-site accommodation campus
A3.4.36 Lighting would be used during the construction and operation of the on-site
accommodation campus, which would include 15 accommodation buildings, two
football pitches, car parking, amenity building, and internal access roads. During the
construction of the on-site accommodation campus, typical construction hours would
be 7.30 to 17.30. Occasional night-time working may be required.
The completed on-site accommodation campus would include internal and
external lighting. The internal lighting would be associated with the proposed
accommodation and amenity buildings. The external lighting would include the
following areas:
perimeter and security (CCTV) lighting;
car parking;
residential roads and highway lighting;
amenity lighting; and
football pitches.
A3.4.37 The design of the campus lighting has been prepared to ensure that upward light spill
is minimised, and that light distribution cut offs from campus luminaires do not result
in severe lighting contrast on light receiving surfaces such as floors and walls. All
luminaires, lamps, optics and equipment would be specified and located to minimise
any direct upward light component in order to reduce light pollution. In addition light
trespass and light spill would be minimised.
A3.4.38 The campus site has been assessed in terms of its appropriate Environmental Zone
as Environmental Category E1.
Perimeter and security (CCTV) lighting
A3.4.39 The lighting columns at the perimeter of the accommodation campus Zone H would
be typically 5m high and equipped 45W lanterns. Lighting in the middle section of
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this zone could vary from LEDs mounted on 0.9m columns up to 90W lanterns
mounted on 8m columns.
A3.4.40 The operational design criteria for the external lighting stipulate a minimum lighting
level of 1 lux horizontal and vertical illuminance, to ensure that the CCTV cameras
can operate effectively and maintain the efficacy of the site security. Vertical
illuminance calculations have been carried out at an assumed face level of 1.5m
above ground level as recommended within BS EN 13201-3:2003 Part 3 calculation
of performance.
A3.4.41 For areas with security concerns and high pedestrian flow within the site a Light
Source Colour Rendering Index (Ra) of 60 is recommended.
Car parking lighting
A3.4.42 All campus sites have areas of car or other vehicular parking that would require the
application of specific design guidance
A3.4.43 The campus designs have used the Medium traffic criteria, as the Heavy traffic
criteria would provide an average level of 20 lux with a minimum of 5 lux (at 0.25 Uo)
which, compared to the other standards, would over-light the proposed standard car
parking areas.
Residential road and highway lighting
A3.4.44 The proposed internal road lighting for the campus site is that of typical local access
roads. The standard recommended therefore takes the assumed crime level,
environmental zone, and traffic flow into consideration. Possible further energy
saving could be achieved by implementing a part night switching regime on the
campus; this would be dependent on working hours for the site. The lighting within
this zone would be designed according to the S3 standard.
A3.4.45 However use of a white light source with an Ra of at least 60 would allow a
reduction in this standard by one level to achieve a standard of S4 average of 5 lux,
minimum of 1 lux.
A3.4.46 Some of the busier spine roads associated with the development may require a
higher level of lighting due to the increase in traffic flow. S3 as described above
would be more suitable but still utilising a white light source with a Ra value of at
least 60.
A3.4.47 Any possible adoptable highways works on this site would need liaison with the local
authority lighting engineer to agree lighting standards, levels & associated equipment
specifications.
Amenity lighting
A3.4.48 Amenity lighting would be via low level bollard lighting when possible. All amenity
lighting must direct no light above 95 degrees to ensure compliance with the Dark
Sky principles of this project.
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Football pitches
A3.4.49 There are two sports pitches located to the east of the proposed on-site campus.
The design would assume the outdoor sport facilities are football only and for an
amateur level of play. The design would consider the needs of players and officials
and the environmental factors, mainly carbon footprint and the prevention of light
pollution.
viii. Zone I Green Lane
A3.4.50 The roads crossing Green Lane would not be directly illuminated, except as noted
above for Zone E, in order to maintain the strategy for the bat corridor. Where
lighting is required to the perimeter of Green Lane, this would be designed to form a
light barrier to help identify the geographical limitations of the corridor.
A3.4.51 There may be instances where lighting from the tower crane operations could spill
onto Green Lane zone. The impact of the lighting would be modelled and assessed
prior to implementation and mitigation in the form of lamp shields and physical
barriers would be provided where necessary to reduce light spill to acceptably low
levels.
A3.4.52 The computer model of the construction lighting would be used to analyse changing
usage of lighting during the construction process and assist in the selection of
luminaire positioning. Where light spill is considered to be outside of the design
criteria limitations then further mitigation measures would be provided
A3.4.53 Light spill to Green Lane from adjacent areas would comply with Environmental Zone
E1 and would be minimised by using available lighting control measures and lamps
with low UV emissions.
ix. Zone J Security fence
A3.4.54 Good and safe practice would seek to follow the requirements set in regulation for
operating sites and the perimeter fence and access and security points should be
illuminated.
A3.4.55 Low level lighting around the perimeter security fence would help the patrolling of the
site and have a deterrent value. LED lighting with an appropriate luminaire would be
a suitable light fitting and the light produced should illuminate the fence in such a way
that activity can be seen at the fence and just outside the fence.
A3.4.56 The lighting columns would be self-standing, typically 4m in height and positioned so
as not to interfere with the patrol track. Security fencing around the construction area
perimeter would be lit up to 10 lux level.
A3.4.57 Requirement for security lighting should follow those of the operating site regarding
security and access points. Security work areas would require 20 lux levels which
would allow security staff to work safely and proficiently.
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x. Zone K roundabouts at Wick Moor Drove
A3.4.58 The two proposed site entrances and associated roundabouts would require
permanent lighting infrastructure (columns and luminaries) installed to highway
standards and specification.
A3.4.59 The northern roundabout is located within the section of Wick Moor Drove that is
currently lit so the roundabout lighting proposals are an addition to the existing
scheme.
A3.4.60 The southern roundabout would create an additional section of highway lighting
along Wick Moor Drove.
A3.4.61 The anticipated design criteria of highway lighting are as follows:
column heights in the roadway conflict areas, adjacent to the new roundabouts
would not exceed the height of the existing columns in these areas and would
therefore be limited to 8m;
light levels to be less than 20 lux; and
utilise design features that limit obtrusive light.
xi. Temporary jetty lighting (off-shore)
A3.4.62 The off-shore lighting for the temporary jetty would conform to the lighting scheme
set out in the HPC Preliminary Works Temporary Jetty Development lighting strategy
submitted to MMO in June 2011.
Temporary jetty construction
A3.4.63 During the temporary jetty construction phase, off-shore construction activities would
be carried out 24 hours a day and would require night lighting to comply with health
and safety regulations. The mobile jack-up rigs to be used during construction of the
temporary jetty would require lighting within the off-shore zone within the HPC
development site boundary.
A3.4.64 The technical details of lighting required within the off-shore construction area are not
available at this stage of design. They would be specified by the contractors
commissioned to undertake the works and would be subject to EDF approval.
A3.4.65 The proposed off-shore construction lighting would comply with the objectives for
construction lighting set out above.
A3.4.66 Construction lighting requirements for working from the intertidal zone would be
similar to the on-shore construction lighting. The construction lighting details would
be specified by the contractors commissioned to undertake the works and would be
subject to EDF approval. In this zone, special care would be taken to avoid over-
illuminating the intertidal zone due to environmental considerations.
Temporary jetty operation
A3.4.67 The temporary jetty off-shore lighting during its operational phase would consist of
navigational lights, flood lighting around the jetty head, and lighting on the jetty itself.
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A3.4.68 The temporary jetty would be equipped with navigation lighting according to the
according to the IALA Recommendation O-139 The Marking of Man-Made Offshore
Structures. Two masts with navigation lights would be installed on the jetty head
(location to be confirmed). The lights would be visible up to 2 miles from the
temporary jetty and directed towards the sea.
A3.4.69 Flood lighting around the jetty head would be required for safe vessel movement and
unloading. It would be used when vessel operations are carried out and would be
limited to the area around the jetty head including mooring dolphins.
A3.4.70 The final specifications of floodlights are not known at this design stage and would be
provided by the contractors. They may include products other than that specified
below provided that they are similar in construction and illuminance and comply with
the calculated illumination averages.
A3.4.71 The proposed floodlights (844 70W SON-T type; cat. ref. 844l/070/HS) would be
installed on 6m masts and would be aligned to avoid upward light and light spill onto
sensitive areas.
A3.4.72 The operational lights on the temporary jetty to be used during the construction of
Hinkley Point C would be provided along its entire length and mounted along the
conveyor and on the jetty head. PROTECTA 18W T8 fluorescent luminaire type is
proposed. These low-powered lights would be mounted at relatively low level to
minimise visibility from sensitive receptors.
d) Management of Construction Lighting
A3.4.73 The needs for construction lighting would change continuously throughout the
construction period. The drivers for change include the changing nature of work
activities; the changing state of the construction of the permanent works; addition,
modification and removal of temporary works; and re-routing of haulage roads. To
cater for this dynamic situation, a computer model of the construction lighting would
be developed and maintained under the supervision of an experienced lighting
engineer.
A3.4.74 Examples of the output of such a model are included as scenarios 1-3 in the
Technical Appendix. Scenario 1 illustrates the effect of high level lighting, such as
lighting mounted on tower cranes, on a close matrix within the main construction
area. This indicates that, for this scenario, the spill onto Green Lane is less than 0.1
lux and would meet the criteria for Green Lane.
A3.4.75 Scenario 3 shows the effect of removing most of the two southernmost rows of
floodlights from Scenario 1 and raising the height of two of the floodlights nearer the
centre of the zone. Whilst the 0.1 lux contour moves further away from Green Lane,
the lighting levels at the southern edge of the lit zone reduce, and the acceptability of
this would need to be judged against the nature of work to be undertaken in this part
of the lit zone.
A3.4.76 Scenario 2 illustrates lighting mounted at 30m above ground in a zone closer to
Green Lane. This indicates that light spill onto Green Lane reaches 1 lux. Additional
mitigation, such as shields or baffles, would be required to reduce the spill onto
Green Lane to an acceptable level (<0.1 lux).
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A3.4.77 The lighting engineer would utilise model scenarios and his own experience to
assess appropriate mitigations and he would ensure their correct deployment in order
to achieve an acceptable result.
A3.4.78 EDF Energy would ensure that all proposed additions, changes and removals of
lighting are modelled prior to their implementation, in order to check their
acceptability. No changes to construction lighting would be permitted by EDF Energy
until such modelling has been undertaken and all necessary controls and mitigations
identified. EDF Energy would monitor the implementation of lighting changes to
ensure that they are carried out in accordance with the proposals and meet the
requirements of this strategy. The lighting engineer would also carry out periodic
lighting surveys to validate the model predictions.
A3.5 Summary
a) Introduction
A3.5.2 The HPC construction lighting strategy has been designed to meet the objectives
outlined for the HPC proposed development and minimise potential lighting impacts
on key lighting receptors identified following the analysis of the environmental context
for the proposed development.
A3.5.3 The construction of HPC would require lighting on-site to ensure a safe working
environment for all construction activities, compliance with planning requirements
and to meet key standards and statutory requirements.
A3.5.4 The proposed HPC construction lighting scheme:
complies with planning requirements, meets key standards and statutory
requirements and provides a safe working environment;
is designed to appropriate light levels;
locates the significant sources of lighting away from sensitive receptors, such as
residents of nearby settlements or key bat corridors, and minimises lighting impact
on these key receptors;
includes luminaires with shields and baffles to limit light spill onto sensitive areas;
includes lighting columns of a minimum height required for safe construction;
includes controls to avoid unnecessary illumination;
includes full cut-off luminaires to prevent upward light and minimise light pollution;
ensures light is directed downwards to illuminate the task and avoid light pollution;
considers the choice of energy-efficient luminaires which provide enough
illumination to safely undertake construction activities while limiting their impact on
lighting receptors; and
contains light sources appropriate for use and the identified environmental
considerations.
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011 35
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
A3.5.5 The HPC construction lighting would be visible from many surrounding areas.
However, several lighting mitigation measures have been designed to minimise the
impact on key lighting receptors.
A3.5.6 The impact of lighting on key bat corridors within the HPC development would be
minimised by reduction of light spill, compliance with Environmental Zone E1
standard and physical barriers preventing the spill onto the Green Lane.
A3.5.7 The visibility of lighting in the medium to long distance would gradually decrease and
the visual change would not be very high due to significant light pollution from the
existing Hinkley Point Power Station, which influences the existing baseline
conditions.
A3.5.8 The light pollution would be minimised using full cut-off luminaires to prevent upward
light and directing light downwards.
b) Lighting Mitigation
A3.5.9 The HPC construction lighting scheme has been designed to mitigate lighting impact
on the receptors identified in Section A3.2 in line with the relevant legislation, British
Standards, policy and guidance. Table A3.1 summarises how the strategy aims to
mitigate the impact of construction lighting on the key lighting receptors.
A3.5.10 To ensure the sensitive lighting receptors would not be affected by lighting during
construction, a computer model of the construction lighting would be developed and
used to analyse changing usage of lighting during the construction process and
assist in the selection of luminaire positioning. Where light spill is considered to be
outside of the design criteria limitations then further mitigation measures would be
provided.
A3.5.11 The relevant technical chapters of the ES asses the significance of environmental
impacts based on the information provided in this strategy.
Table A3.1 Lighting Mitigation Summary
Receptor Mitigation measure
Residents of Wick,
Shurton, Burton and
Knighton and Doggetts
farm
Moving lighting away from settlements moving construction boundary to
144750mN latitude (inherent to design).
Existing and proposed landform and screen planting south of 144750mN
(including existing landscape features, advanced planting and early
landscape restoration).
Green Lane ridge and rolling landform, strong hedgerow field pattern, and
off-site mitigation contribute to screening.
Use of task lighting within working hours only.
Reducing upward light, light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary
illumination beyond work areas.
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
36 Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Receptor Mitigation measure
Users of PRoW in the
vicinity of the site
Moving construction boundary to 144750mN latitude (inherent to design).
Existing and proposed landform and screen planting south of 144750mN
(including existing landscape features, advanced planting and early
landscape restoration).
Screening bund along the north-western boundary of the HPC development
site.
Green Lane ridge and rolling landform, strong hedgerow field pattern, and
off-site mitigation contribute to screening.
Use of task lighting within working hours only.
Reducing upward light, light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary
illumination beyond work areas.
Bristol Channel Appropriate lighting specification, minimising the zone required for flood
lighting.
Using controls to avoid unnecessary illumination beyond work areas.
Reducing light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary illumination
beyond work areas.
Intertidal area Appropriate lighting specification, minimising the zone required for flood
lighting.
Using controls to avoid unnecessary illumination beyond work areas.
Reducing light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary illumination
beyond work areas.
Hinkley Point County
Wildlife Site
Use of task lighting within working hours only.
Reducing upward light, light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary
illumination beyond work areas.
Areas of farmland
around the site
Moving construction boundary to 144750mN latitude (inherent to design).
Existing and proposed landform and screen planting south of 144750mN
(including existing landscape features, advanced planting and early
landscape restoration).
Screening bund along the north-western boundary of the HPC development
site.
Green Lane ridge and rolling landform, strong hedgerow field pattern, and
off-site mitigation contribute to screening.
Use of task lighting within working hours only.
Reducing upward light, light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary
illumination beyond work areas.
Key bat corridors Minimising UV light content.
Maintaining buffers between sensitive bat corridors and luminaires.
Directing lights downwards.
No lighting is proposed along the majority of Green Lane (Zone I) bat
corridor.
No lighting along the Benhole Lane bat corridor (except from low level
lighting along the security fence).
Screening bund along the north-western boundary of the HPC development
site and retained landscape features along Benhole Lane contribute to
screening.
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011 37
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Receptor Mitigation measure
Quantock Hills AONB Directing lights downwards.
Reducing upward light, light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary
illumination beyond work areas.
Compliance with Dark Sky policy and relevant BS.
Lighting designed to Environmental Zone E1 standard (where possible).
Mendip Hills AONB Directing lights downwards.
Reducing upward light, light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary
illumination beyond work areas.
Compliance with Dark Sky policy and relevant BS.
Lighting designed to Environmental Zone E1 standard (where possible).
Exmoor National Park Directing lights downwards.
Reducing upward light, light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary
illumination beyond work areas.
Compliance with Dark Sky policy and relevant BS.
Lighting designed to Environmental Zone E1 standard (where possible).
Area of outstanding
scenic interest
Screening bund along the north-western boundary of the HPC development
site.
Green Lane ridge and rolling landform, strong hedgerow field pattern, and
off-site mitigation would contribute to screening.
Use of task lighting within working hours only.
Reducing upward light, light spill and using controls to avoid unnecessary
illumination beyond work areas.
A3.6 Dusk Views
Dusk View 1 Principal Viewpoint 3 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)


NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
38 Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Dusk View 2 Principal Viewpoint 7 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)

Dusk View 3 Principal Viewpoint 9 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011 39
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Dusk View 4 Principal Viewpoint 10 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)

Dusk View 5 Principal Viewpoint 11 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)


NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
40 Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Dusk View 6 Principal Viewpoint 12 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)

Dusk View 7 Principal Viewpoint 16 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)


NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011 41
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Dusk View 8 Principal Viewpoint 18 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)

Dusk View 9 Principal Viewpoint 19 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)


NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
42 Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Dusk View 10 Principal Viewpoint 27 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)

Dusk View 11 Principal Viewpoint 29 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)


NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011 43
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
Dusk View 12 Principal Viewpoint 34 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)

Dusk View 13 Principal Viewpoint 37 (see ES Volume 2, Chapter 22)

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
44 Construction Method Statement Appendix 3 | October 2011
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
A3.7 Technical Appendix



Hinkley Point C:
Construction Works

Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix


Sept 2011



























Jacobs Reference No: B1454108/REP/E/003




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Client: NNB Generation Company Ltd
Project: Hinkley Point C;
Construction Works
J ob No: B1454108
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Jacobs Engineering U.K. Limited

This document has been prepared by a division, subsidiary or affiliate of Jacobs Engineering U.K. Limited (J acobs) in its professional capacity as
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Contents
1 Introduction 4
2 Lighting Mitigation Strategies 5
2.1 Definition of Obtrusive Light 5
2.2 Light Spill 5
2.3 Upward Light 6
2.4 Bat Sensitive Areas 6
2.5 Tower Crane Floodlights 7
2.6 Lamp Selection 7
2.7 Luminaire Type 8
2.8 Column Types 8
2.9 Manmade Structures 8
2.10 Lighting Controls 8
3 Lighting Design Criteria 9
3.1 Objective 9
3.2 Schedule of Lighting Design Criteria 9
3.2.1 Definitions 9
3.2.2 Construction Lighting Zones 10
3.2.3 Technical Requirements 11
3.3 Sustainability 15
Appendix A References 16
Appendix B Glossary of Terms 17
Appendix C Tower Crane Lighting Impact Assessment Drawings 18
Appendix D Zone B Jetty Stockpile Area Drawings 19
























Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 4 of 20
1 Introduction
The purpose of this Technical Appendix is to develop the technical aspects of the
lighting strategy for the construction works to be carried out at Hinkley Point C, to
identify mitigation strategies, and to define the design criteria necessary to enable
safe working whilst addressing planning and environmental considerations.

The construction works are divided into a number of functional areas, the use of
which will vary throughout the construction stage. Further details are provided in the
Project Description, Chapter 6, Volume 2 of the Planning Application.

The intention of the lighting strategy is to ensure the external lighting is safe,
functional, energy efficient and designed to minimise light pollution.

The strategy is limited to the area within the development site boundary and is
therefore not applicable to any of the existing Hinkley Point Power Station Complex
facilities.










Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 5 of 20
2 Lighting Mitigation Strategies

2.1 Definition of Obtrusive Light

Figure 1 Illustration from Institution of Lighting Engineers publication Guidance Notes for the
Reduction of Obtrusive Light
1


The lighting design will consider the effect of light spill and direct upward light onto
neighbouring areas.

Consideration will also be given to finishes of horizontal and vertical surfaces to
minimise the impact of upwards reflected light which would add to the effect of
obtrusive light.

The area of development is considered to be an intrinsically dark area and in
accordance with BS EN 12464-2 the spill light outside of the construction zone will
be minimised.

Key lighting receptors will be considered as Environmental Zone E1.

2.2 Light Spill
For an Environmental Zone E1 the design criteria for obtrusive light spill should
meet the following standards:-

Environmental
Zone
Light Trespass
E
v
(lx)
Source Intensity
l (cd)
Luminance
L
b
(cd.m
-2
)
Luminance
L
s
(cd.m
-2
)
E1 0 0 0 50

E
v
is the maximum value of vertical Illuminance on neighbouring areas from light spill.
l is the light intensity of the light source in the potentially obtrusive direction.
L
b
is the maximum average luminance of the vertical plane of neighbouring area from direct
illumination.
L
s
is the maximum average luminance of signs from direct illumination.


Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 6 of 20
There are no specific curfew requirements and so the lower figures from BSEN
12464 Table 2 should be taken as the design limits.

As part of the mitigation measures to minimise light spill, the following should be
considered:-

a) Design to the correct illumination level. Do not over-light an area thus avoiding
adding to sky glow
b) Develop a dynamic computer model of the permanent plant lighting and use to
analyse changing usage of lighting during the construction process. Where light
spill is considered to be outside of the design criteria limitations then further
mitigation measures should be provided.
c) Move luminaires away from boundaries
d) Use of shields and baffles to reduce spill light to a minimum
e) Introduce controls to avoid unnecessary night time lighting
f) Ensure luminaires are orientated correctly following installation
g) Reduce the height of columns
h) Provision of manmade structures


2.3 Upward Light
For an Environmental Zone E1 the design criteria for obtrusive upwards light should
meet the following standards:-

Environmental
Zone
Upward Light
ULR (%)
E1 0

ULR is the proportion of luminance that is emitted above the horizontal given as a percentage.

As part of the mitigation measures to minimise upwards light, the following should
be considered:-

a) Use of full cut-off exterior luminaires to avoid light above the horizontal.
b) Direct light downwards wherever possible to illuminate the task, not upwards to
avoid sky glow.
c) Ensure appropriate luminaires are chosen


2.4 Bat Sensitive Areas
In accordance with the recommendations of the Bat Conservation Trust - Bats and
Lighting in the UK version 3 May 2009
2
, specific bat corridors have been provided
within the masterplan as identified in the Fig 10 of the Lighting Strategy.

The bat corridors will be treated as neighbouring receptors in respect to light spill.

Particular considerations for mitigating the impact of the lighting on bats will include:-
Type of lamp to minimise UV content
Light spill to avoid obtrusive light
Height of lighting columns to be considered to reduce risk of light spill
Lighting levels to be kept to the minimum required to achieve a safe working
environment
Control of lighting to ensure light is only provided when required

Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 7 of 20

2.5 Tower Crane Floodlights
The use of floodlights on tower cranes to service the construction zone may impact
on the ability of the lighting to meet specific Environmental Zone criteria. Three
crane floodlighting scenarios have been modelled using lighting calculation and
visualisation software, to assess the impact of the light spill onto local receptors.

The impact assessment drawings are referenced in Appendix C.

2.6 Lamp Selection
In accordance with the recommendations of the Bat Conservation Trust - Bats and
Lighting in the UK version 3 May 2009, lamps with low UV content would be used in
areas adjacent to the bat corridors.

Appropriate lamps include the following:-

(a) LED
The use of LED lighting in the external environment are now widespread, and this
type of lighting has a number of advantages including; high efficiency, long service
life, controllable light sources and low UV radiation content.

3
Efficiency (lumens/w) 30 to 100
Colour temp (k) 2685 to 6500
Colour Rendering (Ra) 40 to 85
Life (hrs) 15,000 to 60,000

(b) Ceramic Metal Halide
Ceramic metal halide produce a high quality white light with good colour rendering
but should be of the type with low UV emissions. Installed in an appropriate fitting
the small lamp allows good directional control of the light output.

3
Efficiency (lumens/w) 65 to 97
Colour temp (k) 3000 to 4400
Colour Rendering (Ra) 78 to 93
Life (hrs) 6,000 to 10,000

(c) High Pressure Sodium (Delux SON)
The high pressure sodium lamp is an efficient source of light, it has a long life with
reasonable lumen maintenance however the colour rendering on the standard lamp
is not as good as some other lamps and may therefore not be suitable for all
construction and operational application. Light is emitted with a small component of
UV light and is therefore suitable for use adjacent to the bat corridors.

3
Efficiency (lumens/w) 75 to 86
Colour temp (k) 2,150
Colour Rendering (Ra) 65
Life (hrs) 6,000 to 9,000

Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 8 of 20
2.7 Luminaire Type
All luminaires should be of the type to have flat lens with the operating position
being parallel to the working surface.



Figure 2 Typical flat lens fittings as Philips Optiflood and Mini Iridium

The full range a symmetrical and asymmetrical light distribution would be used to
control the light within the required design parameters and minimise light spill.


2.8 Column Types
Column heights would be selected by balancing the impact of potential light spill and
glare from high columns with the requirement to provide a higher number of low
columns.

Consideration would be given to the use of low columns adjacent to bat sensitive
areas, with the columns being located away from the boundary lines.

The column heights in the roadway conflict areas, adjacent to the new roundabouts
would not exceed the height of the existing columns in these areas and would
therefore be limited to 8m.

The columns in the areas of task lighting will be temporary structures and therefore
restricted to 8m.

2.9 Manmade Structures
Physical structures would be used to mitigate light spill onto local receptors.

An on-site mitigation area, as identified as Zone G in the Construction Lighting Zone
plan, would be provided to the South of the site to act as such a physical barrier.
The area would comprise of a screening bund and planting

2.10 Lighting Controls
The lighting would be automatically controlled to suit the functional requirement of
the area and therefore would only operate when there is a safety or operational
requirement for lighting. A flexible lighting control strategy would be able to vary to
support the changing lighting requirements throughout the construction stage.

The lighting control strategy would take into account the type of lamp used and
particular consideration would be given to the use of LED lamps in areas where
there is potential for close control of the lighting operating times due to the
instantaneous nature of LED lamp operation.


Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 9 of 20
3 Lighting Design Criteria
3.1 Objective
The primary objectives of the lighting strategy shall be to achieve the following;-

Provide a safe working environment
Target lighting at where it is required
Avoid over illumination
Avoid upwards lighting
Avoid light spill to neighbouring areas
Minimise energy consumption
Minimise disruption to bat corridors


3.2 Schedule of Lighting Design Criteria
The lighting design criteria for the Permanent Plant Construction Works areas are
scheduled together with the particular constraints.

The areas are defined as follows:-

Zone A Permanent development construction area
Zone B J etty Stockpile Area
Zone C Contractors Areas
Zone D National Grid Substation
Zone E Green Lane Crossings
Zone F Stockpiles south of Green Lane
Zone G On Site mitigation area
Zone H On-site accomodation campus
Zone I Green Lane (bat corridor)
Zone J Security Fence
Zone K Highway lighting

These areas are identified on the Construction Lighting Zone plan.

3.2.1 Definitions
The following symbols are used in the design criteria schedules:-

E
m
maintained Illuminance (lux) on reference surface taken as ground level
U
0
Minimum Illuminance Uniformity
GR
L
Glare Rating limits
R
a
Minimum Colour Rendering Index

Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 10 of 20
3.2.2 Construction Lighting Zones



Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 11 of 20
3.2.3 Technical Requirements

Area Zone A - Permanent Development Construction Areas
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas at Outdoor Workplaces
Table 5.3 Building Sites
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.1.2 Traffic Areas for slow moving vehicles 10 0.4 50 20
5.3.1 Clearance, Excavation & Loading 20 0.25 55 20
5.3.2 Building & Facility Construction Areas 50 0.4 50 20
5.3.3 Detailed Construction / Batching Plant 100 0.4 45 40
5.3.4 Fabrication Facilities 200 0.5 45 40
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Light spill to foreshore area to be minimised.



Area Zone B - Jetty Stockpile Areas
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas at Outdoor Workplaces
Table 5.7 Industrial Sites and Storage Areas
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.1.2 Traffic Areas for slow moving vehicles 10 0.4 50 20
5.7.2 Continuous Handling of Raw Materials 50 0.4 50 20
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Light spill to foreshore area to comply with Environmental Zone E1.
Refer to Appendix D for notional lighting layout plans
















Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 12 of 20

Area Zone C1 - Contractors Areas
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas at Outdoor Workplaces
Table 5.3 Building Sites
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.1.2 Traffic Areas for slow moving vehicles 10 0.4 50 20
5.3.2 Building & Facility Construction Areas 50 0.4 50 20
5.3.3 Detailed Construction / Batching Plant 100 0.4 45 40
5.3.4 Fabrication Facilities 200 0.5 45 40
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Light spill to foreshore area to comply with Environmental Zone E1.
Light spill to Green Lane (bat corridor) to comply with Environmental
Zone E1.
Lamps to have low UV emissions adjacent to bat corridors.



Area Zone C2 - Contractors Areas
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
BS EN 12193: 2007 Light and Lighting - Sports Lighting
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas at Outdoor Workplaces
Table 5.3 Building Sites
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.1.2 Traffic Areas for slow moving vehicles 10 0.4 50 20
5.3.2 Building & Facility Construction Areas 50 0.4 50 20
5.3.3 Detailed Construction / Batching Plant 100 0.4 45 40
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Light spill to Green Lane (bat corridor) to comply with Environmental
Zone E1.
Lamps to have low UV emissions adjacent to bat corridors.












Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 13 of 20
Area Zone C3 - Contractors Areas
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas at Outdoor Workplaces
Table 5.3 Building Sites
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.1.2 Traffic Areas for slow moving vehicles 10 0.4 50 20
5.3.2 Building & Facility Construction Areas 50 0.4 50 20
5.3.3 Detailed Construction / Batching Plant 100 0.4 45 40
5.3.4 Fabrication Facilities 200 0.5 45 40
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints None


Area Zone D - National Grid Substation Area
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas at Outdoor Workplaces
Table 5.3 Building Sites
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.1.2 Traffic Areas for slow moving vehicles 10 0.4 50 20
5.3.1 Clearance, Excavation & Loading 20 0.25 55 20
5.3.2 Building & Facility Construction Areas 50 0.4 50 20
5.3.3 Detailed Construction / Batching Plant 100 0.4 45 40
5.3.4 Fabrication Facilities 200 0.5 45 40
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Light spill to Green Lane (bat corridor) to comply with Environmental
Zone E1.
Lamps to have low UV emissions adjacent to bat corridors.


Area Zone E - Green Lane Crossings
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.3 Building Sites
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.3.1 Clearance, Excavation & Loading 20 0.25 55 20
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Task lighting only during construction of the road.


Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 14 of 20
Area Zone F Stockpiles
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas at Outdoor Workplaces
Table 5.7 Industrial Sites and Storage Areas
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.1.2 Traffic Areas for slow moving vehicles 10 0.4 50 20
5.7.2 Continuous Handling of Raw Materials 50 0.4 50 20
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Light spill to bat corridors to comply with Environmental Zone E1.
Lamps to have low UV emissions adjacent to bat corridors.



Area Zone G - On-Site Mitigation Area
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.3 Building Sites
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.3.1 Clearance, Excavation & Loading 20 0.25 55 20
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Task lighting only during construction of the screening bund and road.



Area Zone H - On-Site Accommodation Campus
Applicable Standard BS EN 12464-2:2007 Lighting of Workplaces Part 2 Outdoor Work Places
BS EN 12193: 2007 Light and Lighting - Sports Lighting
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Table 5.1 General Circulation Areas at Outdoor Workplaces
Table 5.9 Parking Areas
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

5.1.1 Footpath 5 0.25 50 20
5.1.2 Traffic Areas for slow moving vehicles 10 0.4 50 20
5.1.4 Unloading Area 50 0.4 50 20
5.9.1 Car Park 5 0.5 55 20
A.21 Football Pitch 75 0.5 55 20
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Environmental Zone E1.



Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 15 of 20
Area Zone I - Green Lane
Applicable Standard Bat Conservation Trust - Bats and Lighting in the UK
No lighting to suit the requirements of a bat corridor
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

Not applicable - - - -
Lamp Options None
Specific Constraints Light spill from adjacent zones to be mitigated



Area Zone J - Security Fence
Applicable Standard Security standard for operating power station
Lighting Requirements for areas, tasks and activities in accordance with:-
Low level columns to be located a min of 2m inside fence line
Area, task or activity E
m
U
o
GR
L
R
a

Zone between inner and outer fence 10 (min) 0.22 50 20
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Environmental Zone E1.



Area Zone K - Highways
Applicable Standards BS 5489-1:2008 CoP for Design of Road Lighting Part 1 Amenity Areas
Lighting criteria defined in BSEN 13201-2:2003 Road Lighting Part 2
Performance Requirements
Area, task or activity Lighting Class
Traffic routes ME4a, ME3b, ME3a subject to average daily traffic
Conflict areas CE2, CE3 subject to average daily traffic
Lamp Options Metal Halide (low UV), LED, High Pressure Sodium
Specific Constraints Lighting design to co-ordinate with existing road lighting installation


3.3 Sustainability
Sustainability and energy efficiency would be considered during the use of the task
lighting.

The lighting would maximise the use of long life lamps and consider the impact of
lamp disposal on any waste management strategy.



Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 16 of 20
Appendix A References


1 Institute of Lighting Engineers (ILE) Guidance notes for the reduction of
obtrusive light, 2005
2 Bat Conservation Trust Bats and Lighting in the UK version 3 May 2009
3 The Society of Light and Lighting (SLL) Lighting Handbook 2009






Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 17 of 20
Appendix B Glossary of Terms

Light Trespass (E
v
)
Light emitted by a lighting installation that falls outside the boundaries of the area for
which the lighting installation is designed

Source Intensity (I)
Intensity of the light source in the potentially obtrusive direction measured in
candelas (cd)

Luminance (L
b
)
Maximum average luminance of the vertical plane of a neighbouring area from direct
illumination, measure in cd/m
2


Luminance (L
s
)
Maximum average luminance of the vertical plane of signs from direct illumination,
measure in cd/m
2


Upward Light (ULR)
Proportion of the flux of the luminaire that is emitted above the horizontal, when the
luminaire is mounted in its installed position and attitude

Maintained Illuminance (E
m
)
Value below which the average luminance on the specified surface is not allowed to
fall. NOTE: It is the average luminance at the time maintenance should be carried
out

Minimum Illuminance Uniformity (U
o
)
Ratio of minimum luminance to average luminance on a surface

Glare Rating limits (GR
l
)
Upper limit of glare by the CIE Glare Rating system

Minimum Colour Rendering Index (R
a
)
Quantitative measure of the ability of a light source to reproduce the colours of
various objects faithfully in comparison with an ideal or natural light source

Curfew
Time during which stricter requirements (for the control of obtrusive light) will apply



Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 18 of 20
Appendix C Tower Crane Lighting Impact Assessment Drawings


B1454116/1400/01 Tower Crane Light Pollution Impact Assessment
Scenario 1
B1454116/1400/02 Tower Crane Light Pollution Impact Assessment
Scenario 2
B1454116/1400/03 Tower Crane Light Pollution Impact Assessment
Scenario 3


Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 19 of 20
Appendix D Zone B Jetty Stockpile Area Drawings


B1454110/FLA/8008 Hinkley Point Temporary Aggregate J etty Stockpile
Area Lighting Layout
B1454110/FLA/8009 Hinkley Point Temporary Aggregate J etty Stockpile
Road Lighting Layout


Hinkley Point C Construction Works Lighting Strategy Technical Appendix Page 20 of 20