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2006

Annual Statistical Report on


Osteopathic Medical Education
AACOM

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Cover photos courtesy of:

Lake Erie College of


Osteopathic Medicine
Bradenton Campus

A.T. Still University


Kirksville College of
Osteopathic Medicine

University of New
England College of
Osteopathic Medicine

Ohio University
College of Osteopathic
Medicine

2006

Annual Statistical Report on


Osteopathic Medical Education
AACOM

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

About This Report


This annual report is the 25th in a series that began publication in 1981. Prior to 2001, the report was called the Annual Statistical
Report. Between 2002-2004, the report was called the Annual Report on Osteopathic Medical Education. The data are derived
from the annual survey of the 20 schools of osteopathic medicine and three branch campuses operating in 2004-2005 and 20052006.
This report contains data on students, applicants, graduates, faculty, curriculum, research, and college finances.

AACOM

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine


5550 Friendship Boulevard
Suite 310
Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815
Telephone: (301) 968-4100
Web Site: http://www.aacom.org
E-mail: research@aacom.org

February 2007

Copyright 2007
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic or mechanical,
including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing
from the publisher.

Table of Contents
Trends & Highlights ........................................................................................................................ 1
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine ................................................................................................. 2
The Osteopathic Profession............................................................................................................. 4
Table 1: Distribution of Osteopathic Physicians (as of June 1, 2006)..................................................................................4

Section 1. Osteopathic Medical School Applicants and Applications . ..................................... 5


Table 2: Number of Applications Received by AACOMAS, First-Year Enrollment,

Total Enrollment and Graduates by School..........................................................................................................5
Table 3: AACOMAS Applicants to Osteopathic Medical Schools: Race/Ethnicity and

Women, by Entering Year.........................................................................................................................................6
Figure 1: MCAT Examinees and Osteopathic Medical School Applicants........................................................................7
Figure 2: AACOMAS Applicants by Gender, 1997-2006.......................................................................................................7
Figure 3: Underrepresented Minority Applicants, 1996 - 2006............................................................................................8
Figure 4: Average Number of Applications per Applicant, 1995-2005...............................................................................8
Table 4: Grade Point Averages and Mean Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) Scores

for Entering Students.................................................................................................................................................9

Section 2. Enrollment, Attrition and Graduates......................................................................... 11


Table 5: First-Year Enrollment, Total Enrollment and Graduates in Schools of Osteopathic Medicine in the U.S.,

by Gender and Entering Year................................................................................................................................ 11
Figure 5: Average Number of Applications per Applicant, 1995-2005............................................................................ 12
Figure 6: First-Year Enrollment by Gender, 1996-2005....................................................................................................... 12
Table 6: First-Year Enrollment by Race and Ethnicity, 1996-2005..................................................................................... 13
Table 7: Total Enrollment by Race and Ethnicity, 1996-2005............................................................................................. 13
Figure 7: First-Year Enrollment by Ethnic Group, 2004-05 and 2005-06......................................................................... 14
Figure 8: Total Enrollment by Ethnic Group, 2004-05 and 2005-06................................................................................. 14
Figure 9: Colleges by Enrollment (Entering Class Fall 2006).............................................................................................. 15
Table 8A: Total Enrollment of Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups by School, 2004-05.............................................. 16
Table 8B: Total Enrollment of Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups by School, 2005-06.............................................. 17
Figure 10A: Total Enrollment by Gender, 2004-05............................................................................................................... 18
Figure 10B: Total Enrollment by Gender, 2005-06............................................................................................................... 19
Table 9A: State Residency of First-Year Students by School, 2004-05.............................................................................. 20
Table 9B: State Residency of First-Year Students by School, 2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006)...................................... 21
Table 10: Graduates of Osteopathic Medical Schools by Race and Ethnic Group, 1996-2005................................... 22
Figure 11: Osteopathic Medical School Graduates, 1990-2009......................................................................................... 22
Table 11A: Attrition in Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2003-04........................................................................................ 24
Table 11B: Attrition in Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2004-05 ....................................................................................... 25

Section 3. Tuition, Loans and Scholarships................................................................................. 27


Table 12: Loans to Osteopathic Medical Students, 2003-04 and 2004-05....................................................................... 27
Table 13: Average First-Year Student Expenses at Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2003-04 through 2005-06......... 27
Table 14: Tuition and Fees for the D.O. Program in 2006-07............................................................................................. 28
Figure 12: Scholarships and Loans Awarded to Osteopathic Medical Students, 1993-94 Through 2004-05.......... 29
Figure 13: Sources of Scholarships Awarded to Osteopathic Medical Students, 1993-94 Through 2004-05 ......... 30

Section 4. Curriculum.................................................................................................................... 31
Table 15: Instructional Techniques in Osteopathic Medical Schools, 1996-97 Through 2005-06............................. 31
Table 16A: Selected Program Characteristics of the 20 Osteopathic Medical Schools and

Two Branch Campuses in 2004-05...................................................................................................................... 32
Table 16B: Selected Program Characteristics of the 20 Osteopathic Medical Schools and

Three Branch Campuses in 2005-06 as of August 1, 2006.............................................................................. 33
Table 17: Average Number of Hours Required in Basic/Non-Clinical Sciences in Years One and Two,

2004-05 and 2005-06.............................................................................................................................................. 34
Table 18: Average Number of Hours of Clinical Science Courses Required in Years One and Two,

2004-05 and 2005-06.............................................................................................................................................. 34

Section 5. Postgraduate Training................................................................................................. 35

Table 19A: Number of Weeks in Required Clinical Clerkships in Years Three and Four, 2004-05............................ 36
Table 19B: Number of Weeks in Required Clinical Clerkships in Years Three and Four,

2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006).............................................................................................................................. 37
Table 19C: Number of Weeks in Selective1 Clinical Clerkships in Years Three and Four, 2004-05.......................... 38
Table 19D: Number of Weeks in Selective1 Clinical Clerkships in Years Three and Four,

2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006).............................................................................................................................. 39
Table 20A: Characteristics of Hospitals Used for Clerkships, 2003-04............................................................................ 40
Table 20B: Characteristics of Hospitals Used for Clerkships, 2004-05 (as of August 1, 2006).................................... 41
Table 21A: Areas of Special Interest Included in the Curriculum of Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2004-05........ 42
Table 21B: Areas of Special Interest Included in the Curriculum of Osteopathic Medical Schools,

2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006).............................................................................................................................. 43
Table 22: Student Performance Indicators, 2004-05 and 2005-06.................................................................................... 44
Table 23A: Methods Used to Assess Clinical Competence of Osteopathic Medical Students, 2004-05.................. 45
Table 23B: Methods Used to Assess Clinical Competence of Osteopathic Medical Students,

2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006).............................................................................................................................. 45
Table 24: Role of the National Board Examinations (COMLEX) in the Curriculum of the 20 Osteopathic Medical
Schools and Three Branch Campuses, 2004-05 and 2005-06........................................................................ 46
Table 25: Outcome Indicators Used to Evaluate the Effectiveness of the Education Program at Osteopathic Medical
Schools and Branch Campuses, 2004-05 and 2005-06.................................................................................... 47
Table 26A: Type of Internships for D.O.s in AOA-Accredited Programs, 2004-05...................................................... 48
Table 26B: Type of Internships for D.O.s in AOA-Accredited Programs, 2005-06....................................................... 49
Table 27A: D.O.s in AOA-Accredited Residencies1 by Specialty, 2004-05..................................................................... 50
Table 27B: D.O.s in AOA-Accredited Residencies1 by Specialty, 2005-06..................................................................... 51
Table 28: OPTI Programs, 2004-05 and 2005-06................................................................................................................. 52

Section 6. Faculty............................................................................................................................ 53
Table 29: Faculty at Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2004-05 and 2005-06...................................................................... 53
Figure 14A: Full-Time Faculty by Discipline, 2004-05......................................................................................................... 54
Figure 14B: Full-Time Faculty by Discipline, 2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006)................................................................. 55
Figure 15: Volunteer Faculty by Discipline............................................................................................................................ 56
Table 30: Tenured Faculty at Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2004-05 and 2005-06...................................................... 57
Table 31: Faculty and Administrative Staff Distributed by Highest Degree, 2004-05 and 2005-06........................... 58

Section 7. Revenues & Expenditures ........................................................................................... 59


Table 32: Total Revenues and Expenditures in Osteopathic Medical Schools for Fiscal Year 2004........................... 59
Table 33A: Average Revenues and Expenditures per Osteopathic Medical School for Fiscal Year 2004.................. 60
Table 33B: Average Revenues and Expenditures per Osteopathic Medical School for Fiscal Year 2005

(as of August 1, 2006)............................................................................................................................................. 61
Table 34: Revenues and Expenditures as Percent of Total Revenues for Fiscal Year 2005 (as of August 1, 2006)... 62

Section 8. Contract and Grant Activities..................................................................................... 63


Table 35: Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools by Type of Award,

Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005.................................................................................................................................... 63
Table 36: Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools by Awarding Agency,

Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005.................................................................................................................................... 63
Table 37: Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools by Activity,

Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005.................................................................................................................................... 64
Table 38: Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools by Subject Area,

Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005.................................................................................................................................... 64
Table 39: Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools by Degree of Investigator,

Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005.................................................................................................................................... 65

Acknowledgments.......................................................................................................................... 66
Publications Available from AACOM ......................................................................................... 66
Geographic Locations of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine..................................................... 67

Construction of New Medical Schools

The growth of osteopathic medicine is leading to the creation of new schools that will introduce more state-ofthe-art osteopathic medical training facilities. LMU-DCOM, pictured below, is currently under construction.
Photos courtesy of Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine.
5/16/2006
6/7/2006
7/27/2006
8/2/2006

10/13/2006

11/3/2006

12/19/2006

7/1/2007

1/12/2007

9/9/2006

2/2/2007

Trends & Highlights


Osteopathic medical education continues to develop and keep pace with, and even surpass, the growth and development
in medical education in general. At the start of the 2006 academic year, there were 20 colleges of osteopathic medicine,
three of which have branch campuses. This means that there are 23 training sites for the D.O. degree. The data presented
below are derived from the American Association of Medical Colleges AAMC Data Book, January 2005.

Enrollment

Total enrollment in D.O. programs reached 13,406 in the 2005-06 academic year, an increase of 881 or 7% from the prior
year, and an increase of 2,589 or 24% since the beginning of the 21st century (2000-01 academic year). The growth in
first-year enrollment is more striking, reaching 3,908 in 2005-06, an increase of 262 or 7% in one year, and an increase of
34% over 2000-01. The colleges graduated 2,756 D.O.s in 2005, compared with 2,510 in 2001, an increase of 10%.
Total enrollment in allopathic medical schools reporting to AAMC (American Association of Medical Colleges) was
68,343 in 2005-06, an increase of 4% since 2000-01. First-year enrollment in allopathic medical schools in 2005-06 was
17,376, growing at the same 4% rate. The allopathic medical colleges graduated 15,736 M.D.s in 2004-05, compared with
15,796 in 2001, a slight decrease. In 2001 D.O.s accounted for 13.7% of U.S. trained medical school graduates; by 2005
that percentage had edged upward to 14.9%.

Applications

The AACOMAS applicant pool for admission rose from 6,898 for the classes entering in 2001 to 8,258 for classes
entering in 2005, an increase of 1,360 or 20%. With most applicants applying to more than one school, the number of
applications submitted by each applicant is relatively stable at about six. Over the same time frame, the total number of
applicants to allopathic medical schools through AMCAS (American Medical College Application Service) declined by
about 3%.

Demographics

For classes entering in 2005, women represented 50.9% of all applicants and 49.8% of first-year enrollment. While the
percentage of women in the entering class declined slightly from the prior year, the number of women increased by
119 as a result of overall growth in the size of the first-year classes. Ten years ago, for classes entering in 1996, women
accounted for 39.2% of applicants and 37.8% of first-year enrollees. In comparison, 49.8% of allopathic applicants and
48.5% of allopathic first-year enrollees were women in 2005. The increase in the number of women in allopathic medical
education over time has been similar to their growth in osteopathic medical education, but not as great because women
represented a greater percentage of applicants and enrollees in allopathic medical education ten years ago. This growth of
women in entering classes is reflected in total enrollment and graduation statistics.
Applications by members of historically underrepresented minority groups (Black/African American, Native American/
Alaska Native, and Hispanic/Latino) accounted for 11.8% of all AACOMAS applications in 2004-05, the largest percentage ever reported. Although the distribution varies from year to year, this represented the highest number of applications
ever received from applicants identifying themselves as Black/African American, and the third highest number of applications ever received from applicants identifying themselves as Hispanic/Latino. Both first-year and total enrollment
of underrepresented minority group members in osteopathic medical schools lags behind the percentage of applications.
In 2005, both first-year enrollment (at 337) and total enrollment (at 1,147) by members of underrepresented minority
groups are at a historical peak.

Graduation

A record 2,756 students graduated with the D.O. degree in 2005, an increase of 43% over ten years ago. Women accounted for 36% of the cohort graduating in 1996, and 42% of the cohort graduating in 2005. As enrollment by women continues to increase, women likely will constitute approximately 50% of D.O. graduates in coming years. Women accounted
for 47% of allopathic graduates in 2005. Underrepresented minority group members constituted 6.9% of osteopathic
graduates in 2005, (a total of 189 graduates), a decline from a high of 9.2% in 1999. Their numbers suggest significant
attrition or extended time of study when compared to the 261 underrepresented minority students who started medical
school in 2001. AACOM does not currently track enrollment by student. Further research on the outcomes of individual
students and cohorts might suggest approaches to improve graduation rates.


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine


A.T. Still University
College of Osteopathic Medicine Mesa (ATSU/COMMesa)
5850 East Still Circle
Mesa, Arizona 85206
(480) 219-6000
http://www.atsu.edu
A.T. Still University of Health Sciences/Kirksville
College of Osteopathic Medicine (ATSU/KCOM)
800 West Jefferson Street
Kirksville, Missouri 63501
(660) 626-2121
http://www.atsu.edu
Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine of
Midwestern University (AZCOM)
19555 North 59th Avenue
Glendale, Arizona 85308
(623) 572-3200
http://www.midwestern.edu/azcom/
Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine
of Midwestern University (CCOM)
555 31st Street
Downers Grove, Illinois 60515-1235
(630) 969-4400
http://www.midwestern.edu/ccom/
Des Moines University College of Osteopathic
Medicine (DMU-COM)
3200 Grand Avenue
Des Moines, Iowa 50312
(515) 271-1400
http://www.dmu.edu/com/
Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences
College of Osteopathic Medicine (KCUMB-COM)
1750 Independence Boulevard
Kansas City, Missouri 64106-1453
(816) 283-2000
http://www.kcumb.edu
Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM)
1858 West Grandview Boulevard
Erie, Pennsylvania 16509
(814) 866-6641
http://www.lecom.edu

LECOM Bradenton Campus


(LECOM-Bradenton)
5000 Lakewood Ranch Boulevard
Bradenton, Florida 34211-4909
http://www.lecom.edu/bradenton/
Lincoln Memorial University
DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine (LMUDCOM)
6965 Cumberland Gap Parkway
Harrogate, Tennessee 37752
(423) 869-3611
http://www.lmunet.edu/dcom
Michigan State University College of
Osteopathic Medicine (MSUCOM)
East Fee Hall
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
(517) 355-9616
http://www.com.msu.edu/
New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New
York Institute of Technology (NYCOM/NYIT)
Northern Boulevard
Old Westbury, New York 11568-8000
(516) 686-3747
http://iris.nyit.edu/nycom/
Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic
Medicine (NSU-COM)
3200 South University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33328
(954) 262-1100 or 1-800 356-0026
http://medicine.nova.edu
Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine (OUCOM)
Grosvenor, Irvine and Parks Halls
Athens, Ohio 45701
(740) 593-2500
http://www.oucom.ohiou.edu
Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
College of Osteopathic Medicine (OSU-COM)
1111 West 17th Street
Tulsa, Oklahoma 74107
(918) 582-1972
http://www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/college/


2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM)


4170 City Avenue
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19131-1694
(215) 871-6100
http://www.pcom.edu
PCOM Georgia Campus (PCOM-GA)
625 Old Peach Tree Road
Gwinett County, Georgia 30024
http://www.pcom.edu/General_Information/georgia/
georgia.html
Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine
(PCSOM)
147 Sycamore Street
Pikeville, Kentucky 41501-1194
(606) 432-9617
http://pcsom.pc.edu
Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine New York
(TOUROCOM)
230 West 125th Street
New York City, New York 10027
(212) 851-1199
http://www.touro.edu/med/
Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine
(TUCOM-CA)
1310 Johnson Lane
Vallejo, California 94592
(707) 638-5200 or 1-888-652-7580
http://www.tu.edu

University of North Texas Health Science Center at


Fort Worth / Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine at
Fort Worth (UNTHSC/TCOM)
3500 Camp Bowie Boulevard
Fort Worth, Texas 76107
(817) 735-2000
http://www.hsc.unt.edu/education/tcom/
Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine
(VCOM)
2265 Kraft Drive
Blacksburg, Virginia 24060
(540) 443-9106
http://www.vcom.vt.edu
Western University of Health Sciences/College of
Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific (Western U/
COMP)
309 East Second Street/College Plaza
Pomona, California 91766-1889
(909) 623-6116
http://www.westernu.edu/comp.html
West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine
(WVSOM)
400 North Lee Street
Lewisburg, West Virginia 24901-1961
(304) 645-6270
http://www.wvsom.edu

TUCOM-Nevada Campus (TUCOM-NV)


874 American Pacific Drive
Henderson, Nevada 89014
http://www.tu.edu/departments.php?id=44
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Osteopathic Medicine (UMDNJ-SOM)
One Medical Center Drive, Suite 312
Stratford, New Jersey 08084
(856) 566-6000
http://som.umdnj.edu/
University of New England College of
Osteopathic Medicine (UNECOM)
11 Hills Beach Road
Biddeford, Maine 04005
(207) 283-0171
http://www.une.edu/com/


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

The Osteopathic Profession


Table 1
Distribution of Osteopathic Physicians (as of June 1, 2006)

Location
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
1
2

Number of
Osteopathic
Physicians
Total

Active1

374
141
1,766
254
3,652
970
391
251
60
4,291
793
188
203
2,365
837
1,159
676
420
116
643
639
641
5,684
410
307
2,103
123

358
134
1,467
230
3,484
850
382
225
58
3,512
719
177
192
2,288
758
1,055
610
393
108
581
617
604
4,811
393
294
1,804
111

Location
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Unknown and Other2
Total

Number of
Osteopathic
Physicians
Total

Active1

143
459
199
3,222
248
3,736
668
58
4,074
1,643
577
6,060
225
374
97
532
3,558
252
64
824
804
649
699
62
256

139
408
191
2,876
206
3,541
623
56
3,629
1,470
506
5,422
199
346
91
487
3,127
240
54
780
687
615
634
57
228

58,940

52,827

Active D.O.s are under age 65 and have not informed the AOA that they have retired.
Includes military, U.S. territories and foreign.

Source: American Osteopathic Association, AOA Masterfile and AOA Fact Sheet, June 2006.


2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

1. Applicants & Applications


Table 2
Number of Applications Received by AACOMAS1,
First-Year Enrollment, Total Enrollment and Graduates by School
2004-05

2005-06

College

First-Year
Total
First-Year
Total
Estimated
Applications
Graduates Applications
Enrollment Enrollment
Enrollment Enrollment Graduates
ATSU/KCOM
2,463
178
649
150
2,621
175
670
171
AZCOM
2,125
148
557
130
2,359
166
574
140
CCOM
2,943
175
676
153
3,197
182
690
164
DMU-COM
2,279
230
808
190
2,368
219
817
202
KCUMB-COM
2,216
239
926
231
2,228
251
940
230
LECOM-Bradenton3
2,560
163
163
1,746
166
323
LECOM
2,560
230
863
180
2,497
231
885
216
MSUCOM
1,685
148
538
124
1,923
205
616
112
NSU-COM
2,202
222
802
189
2,542
246
822
163
NYCOM/NYIT2
2,962
315
1,151
261
3,285
321
1,176
250
OSU-COM
1,180
89
348
83
1,238
93
352
92
OU-COM
2,125
116
427
98
2,338
115
431
103
PCOM-GA3
1,682
83
83
PCOM
3,539
274
1,025
245
3,825
275
1,041
248
PCSOM
1,340
79
265
54
1,476
80
278
56
TUCOM-CA
2,157
136
508
117
2,091
135
533
128
TUCOM-NV3
2,156
78
78
1,509
108
184
UMDNJ-SOM
1,984
96
365
82
2,401
102
384
107
UNECOM
1,879
124
491
105
2,443
125
499
91
UNTHSC/TCOM
1,483
135
501
115
1,701
140
520
115
VCOM3
1,379
156
307
1,673
160
467
Western U/COMP
2,033
207
710
180
2,321
219
724
153
WVSOM
1,500
108
367
69
1,635
111
397
88
Total

46,750

3,646

12,525

2,756

51,099

3,908

13,406

2,849

Note: Since most applicants apply to several schools, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of

individual applicants shown in Table 3.
1
Applicants for University of North Texas Health Science Center/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine use the Texas Statewide Application Service.
2
New York College of Osteopathic Medicines data include the Accelerated Program for Emigre Physicians (APEP) students.
3
The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine at Blacksburg, Virginia, admitted its first class in Fall 2003. Lake Eries branch campus at
Bradenton, Florida, and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine branch campus at Henderson, Nevada, admitted their first classes in Fall
2004. (LECOM reported the applicant pool for both campuses as a combined number for Fall 2004.) Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
branch campus at Suwanee, Georgia, admitted its first class in Fall 2005.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 3
AACOMAS Applicants to Osteopathic Medical Schools:
Race/Ethnicity and Women, by Entering Year
Group

1996
Black/African American
421
Native American/Alaska Native
90
Hispanic/Latino
436
Total Underrepresented Minority
947
Percent Underrepresented Minority 8.8%
White, Non-Hispanic
7,320
Asian/Pacific Islander
2,051
Other and Unknown
463
Total All Groups
10,781
Total Women
4,228
Percent Women
39.2%
Number of Schools Participating
16
in AACOMAS

Entering Year
1997
434
102
448
984
9.1%
7,224
2,107
449
10,764
4,293
39.9%

1998
442
78
416
936
9.8%
6,173
1,950
495
9,554
3,881
40.6%

1999
378
70
342
790
9.4%
5,583
1.592
431
8,396
3,518
41.9%

2000
414
72
343
829
10.8%
5,099
1,346
434
7,708
3,402
44.1%

2001
335
68
290
693
10.0%
4,731
1,226
248
6,898
3,151
45.7%

2002
342
55
287
684
10.8%
4,285
1,086
269
6,324
3,058
48.4%

2003
358
60
314
732
10.7%
4,567
1,201
314
6,814
3,348
49.1%

2004
404
63
350
817
11.3%
4,725
1,357
341
7,240
3,638
50.2%

2005
492
59
420
971
11.8%
5,230
1,669
388
8,258
4,202
50.9%

17

19

19

19

18

18

19

19

19

NOTES: 1. The Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine in Pikeville, Kentucky, and the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine in
Vallejo, California, admitted their first classes in 1997 and became AACOMAS participants with their 1998 entering classes. The Edward
Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia, began participating in AACOMAS in 2003 and admitted its first class
that year.

2. Data from the University of North Texas Health Science Center/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine are not included after 2000, as
those applications are processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service.
Sources: AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service and AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical
School Questionnaire, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the


Chicago College of Osteopathic
Medicine of Midwestern University.


2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Figure 1 - MCAT Examinees and Osteopathic Medical School Applicants


80,000
70,000
60,000

63,683

67,453

64,088

57,846

50,000

66,433
61,973

54,503

57,573

MCAT Examinees

40,000
30,000

Osteopathic Medical School Applicants Processed by AACOMAS

20,000
10,000
0

58,826

55,960 54,818

61,676

1994

10,213

10,781

1995

1996

10,764

1997

9,554

8,396

7,708

6,898

6,324

6,814

7,240

8,255

9,736

1998

1999

2000

20011

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Entering Class Year


1

Beginning with the 2001 entering class, applicant numbers do not include UNTHSC/TCOM, as those applications were processed through the
Texas Statewide Application Service. AACOMs Applicant Projection Model makes an adjustment for the direct applicants at UNTHSC/TCOM.

Note: The correlation between the two time series shown in this figure has been very high since 1991. The relationship is best fitted by a logistic
function between x and y where:
x = osteopathic medical school applicants in year t
y = weighted average of MCAT examinees in years t-1 and t-2
R = 0.97.
Source: AACOM, Applicant Projection Model

Figure 2 - AACOMAS Applicants by Gender, 1997-2006


14,000

Number of Applicants

12,000

Men

Women

10,764

10,000

9,554

9,476
8,396

8,000

8,258

7,708
6,898

6,000

6,324

6,814

7,240

4,000
2,000
0

1997

1998

1999

2000

20011

2002 1

2003 1

2004 1

2005 1

20061

Entering Year

Data do not include UNTHSC/TCOM, as those applications were processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service after 2000.

Source: AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service.


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Figure 3 - Underrepresented Minority Applicants, 1996 - 2006

Percent of All Applicants

15%

Black/African American

12%
9%

10.8%
9.8%

9.1%

9.4%

Native American

10.0%

Hispanic/Latino

10.8%

10.7%

2002 1

2003 1

11.3%

11.8%

11.8%

20051

20061

6%
3%
0%

1997

1998

1999

2000

20011

2004 1

Entering Year
1

Data do not include UNTHSC/TCOM, as those applications were processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service after 2000.

Source: AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service.

Figure 4 - Average Number of


Applications per Applicant, 1995-2005
10

Number of Applications
per Applicant

9
8
7
5

5.9

5.9

6
5.5

5.7

5.8
5.7

6.2

5.7
5.7

5.5

6.0

5.5

4
3
2
1
0

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Entering Year

Sources: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1995-96 through 2005-06 academic
years, and AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service.


2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 4
Grade Point Averages and Mean Medical College Admission Test
(MCAT) Scores for Entering Students
Group

Entering Year
2000
3.36
3.50
3.43

2001
3.36
3.50
3.43

2002
3.36
3.52
3.43

2003
3.36
3.54
3.45

2004
3.33
3.53
3.43

2005
3.36
3.54
3.44

Mean MCAT

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Biological Science
Physical Science
Verbal Reasoning
Writing Sample
J (Lowest
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T (Highest)
Unknown
Number of Scores
Reported

8.69
8.18
8.11
Percent
0.3%
1.7%
5.5%
16.4%
13.2%
14.8%
16.2%
20.2%
8.8%
2.4%
0.3%
0.0%

8.54
8.08
8.10
Percent
0.8%
1.8%
6.0%
19.6%
12.9%
14.1%
15.7%
18.8%
7.1%
1.6%
0.2%
1.4%

8.50
7.97
8.06
Percent
0.6%
1.8%
6.8%
19.2%
12.8%
16.0%
13.5%
17.0%
7.6%
2.2%
0.4%
2.3%

8.51
7.99
8.07
Percent
0.5%
2.0%
6.1%
19.8%
12.3%
15.2%
15.4%
18.1%
7.3%
1.6%
0.3%
1.3%

8.53
7.89
8.24
Percent
0.1%
1.6%
6.1%
20.0%
14.7%
17.5%
12.5%
16.2%
7.0%
2.1%
0.4%
1.3%

8.64
8.04
8.31
Percent
0.4%
1.4%
5.4%
20.5%
12.8%
17.0%
12.9%
18.5%
7.4%
2.3%
0.3%
1.1%

2,797

2,971

2,963

3,223

3,536

3,797

Science
Non-Science
Mean GPA

Note: Percents may not add to 100% due to rounding.


Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2000-01 through 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the


Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine.


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Photo courtesy of the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences College of Osteopathic Medicine.

10
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

2. Enrollment, Attrition and Graduates


Table 5
First-Year Enrollment, Total Enrollment and Graduates in
Schools of Osteopathic Medicine in the U.S., by Gender and Entering Year
Start of Number of FIRST-YEAR ENROLLMENT
Academic Schools in
%
Total
Women
Year
Operation
Women

1
2

TOTAL ENROLLMENT

GRADUATES

Total

Women

%
Women

Total

Women

%
Women

1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993

5
5
6
7
7
7
9
9
11
12
14
14
14
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
16

521
577
623
670
810
884
974
1,038
1,088
1,163
1,322
1,426
1,496
1,582
1,682
1,746
1,750
1,737
1,724
1,692
1,780
1,844
1,950
1,974
2,035
2,162

21
14
17
29
56
83
106
140
179
192
222
265
329
378
428
460
511
489
471
490
571
615
667
645
715
771

4.0%
2.4%
2.7%
4.3%
6.9%
9.4%
10.9%
13.5%
16.5%
16.5%
16.8%
18.6%
22.0%
23.9%
25.4%
26.3%
29.2%
28.2%
27.3%
29.0%
32.1%
33.4%
34.2%
32.7%
35.1%
35.7%

1,879
1,997
2,151
2,304
2,579
2,780
3,139
3,443
3,671
3,926
4,221
4,571
4,940
5,304
5,822
6,212
6,547
6,608
6,640
6,586
6,614
6,615
6,792
7,012
7,375
7,822

53
59
61
79
116
181
267
362
472
570
688
789
971
1,108
1,317
1,526
1,707
1,799
1,853
1,904
1,986
2,056
2,221
2,340
2,512
2,714

2.8%
3.0%
2.8%
3.4%
4.5%
6.5%
8.5%
10.5%
12.9%
14.5%
16.3%
17.3%
19.7%
20.9%
22.6%
24.6%
26.1%
27.2%
27.9%
28.9%
30.0%
31.1%
32.7%
33.4%
34.1%
34.7%

427
432
472
485
649
594
702
809
908
971
1,004
1,059
1,151
1,017
1,317
1,287
1,476
1,560
1,593
1,572
1,609
1,529
1,534
1,532
1,606
1,752

8
12
11
18
18
17
44
58
84
68
163
192
202
186
261
262
343
392
395
438
491
431
458
501
533
602

1.9%
2.8%
2.3%
3.7%
2.8%
2.9%
6.3%
7.2%
9.3%
7.0%
16.2%
18.1%
17.5%
18.3%
19.8%
20.4%
23.2%
25.1%
24.8%
27.9%
30.5%
28.2%
29.9%
32.7%
33.2%
34.4%

1994
1995
19961
1997
1998
1999

16
16
17
19
19
19

2,217
2,274
2,535
2,692
2,745
2,848

805
850
957
1,071
1,135
1,202

36.3%
37.4%
37.8%
39.8%
41.3%
42.2%

8,146
8,475
8,961
9,434
9,882
10,388

2,870
3,075
3,308
3,591
3,862
4,181

35.2%
36.3%
36.9%
38.1%
39.1%
40.2%

1,843
1,932
2,009
2,096
2,169
2,279

615
690
709
776
818
855

33.4%
35.7%
35.3%
37.0%
37.7%
37.5%

2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
20052

19
19
19
20
20
20

2,927
3,043
3,079
3,308
3,646
3,908

1,240
1,415
1,463
1,662
1,828
1,947

42.4%
46.5%
47.5%
50.2%
50.1%
49.8%

10,817
11,101
11,432
11,857
12,525
13,406

4,443
4,780
5,099
5,557
6,115
6,655

41.1%
43.1%
44.6%
46.9%
48.8%
49.6%

2,510
2,536
2,607
2,713
2,756
2,849

973
1,047
1,081
1,150
1,282
1,354

38.8%
41.3%
41.5%
42.4%
46.5%
47.5%

Beginning in 1996, the data include the Accelerated Program for Emigre Physicians (APEP) at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine.
Graduate data are estimated.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1967-68 through 2005-06 academic years.

11
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Figure 5 - First-Year Enrollment, 1986-2005


4,500
3,908
16 schools

19 schools

17
schools

3,646
3,308

3,043

3,000

2,848
2,692
2,535

2,500
2,000
1,500

3,079
2,927

2,745
20
schools

2,274

(+3 branches)

15 schools

3,500

(+2 branches)

Number of Students

4,000

1,750

1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Entering Year

Background photo courtesy of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia, PA.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1984-85 through 2005-06 academic years.

Figure 6 - First-Year Enrollment by Gender, 1996-2005


1,961

2,000
Women

1,818

Men
1,646

Number Enrolled

1,500

1,578

1,621

1,610

1,646

1,687

1,628
1,415

1,000

1,071

1,135

1,202

1,616

1,947

1,828

1,662

1,463

1,240

957

500

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Entering Year
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1995-96 through 2005-06 academic years.

12
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 6
First-Year Enrollment by Race and Ethnicity, 1996-2005
Entering Year

Group

1996
115
17
112
244
9.6%
1,972
307
12
2,535
28

Black/African American
Native American/Alaska Native
Hispanic/Latino
Total Underrepresented Minority
Percent Underrepresented Minority
White, Non-Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
Other and Unknown
Total All Groups
Foreign Nationals2

1997
121
29
114
264
9.8%
2,058
353
17
2,692
14

1998
124
13
83
220
8.0%
1,999
476
50
2,745
17

1999
112
17
107
236
8.3%
2,096
455
61
2,848
35

2000
104
19
99
222
7.6%
2,107
493
105
2,927
32

2001
116
25
120
261
8.6%
2,229
472
81
3,043
22

2002
120
26
120
266
8.6%
2,274
450
89
3,079
21

2003
132
18
124
274
8.3%
2,412
514
108
3,308
23

2004
148
28
147
323
8.9%
2,602
616
105
3,646
18

2005
156
22
159
337
8.6%
2,716
691
164
3,908
28

Data from 1996 on include students in the Accelerated Program for Emigre Physicians (APEP) at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine.
Foreign national students are included in each ethnic category and in the total. They are listed separately to document the number of foreign
nationals.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1996-97 through 2005-06 academic years.

Table 7
Total Enrollment by Race and Ethnicity, 1996-2005
Group
Black/African American
Native American/Alaska Native
Hispanic/Latino
Total Underrepresented Minority
Percent Underrepresented Minority
White, Non-Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
Other and Unknown
Total All Groups
Foreign Nationals2

Entering Year
1996
369
83
339
791
8.8%
7,106
1,022
42
8,961
84

1997
386
82
378
846
9.0%
7,374
1,184
30
9,434
53

1998
417
74
368
859
8.7%
7,528
1,400
95
9,882
61

1999
399
65
370
834
8.0%
7,855
1,535
164
10,388
99

2000
400
72
381
853
7.9%
7,940
1,734
290
10,817
111

2001
407
68
386
861
7.8%
8,062
1,817
361
11,101
72

2002
404
82
420
906
7.9%
8,410
1,782
334
11,432
91

2003
425
81
420
926
7.8%
8,748
1,822
361
11,857
75

2004
469
90
472
1,031
8.2%
9,209
1,961
324
12,525
75

2005
517
111
519
1,147
8.6%
9,637
2,126
496
13,406
76

Data from 1996 on include students in the Accelerated Program for Emigre Physicians (APEP) at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine.
Foreign national students are included in each ethnic category and in the total. They are listed separately to document the number of foreign
nationals.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1996-97 through 2005-06 academic years.

13
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Figure 7 - First-Year Enrollment by Ethnic Group, 2004-05 and 2005-06


Underrepresented minorities (Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American) made up 8.9%
of first-year enrollment in 2004-05 and 8.7% of first-year enrollment in 2005-06.
2004-05

2005-06

Asian/
Pacific
Islander
16.9%
White,
Non-Hispanic
71.4%

Asian/
Pacific
Islander
17.7%

Black 4.1%

Unknown 2.9%

Black 4.0%
Hispanic 4.0%

Hispanic 4.1%

Native
American 0.8%

Native
American 0.6%

White,
Non-Hispanic
69.5%

Unknown 4.2%

Note: Percents do not add to 100 due to rounding.


Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Figure 8 - Total Enrollment by Ethnic Group, 2004-05 and 2005-06


Underrepresented minorities (Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American) made up 8.2%
of total enrollment in 2004-05 and 8.6% of total enrollment in 2005-06.
2004-05

2005-06

Asian/
Pacific
Islander
15.7%
White,
Non-Hispanic
73.5%

Asian/
Pacific
Islander
15.9%
Black 4.0%

Black 3.7%
Hispanic 3.8%
Unknown 2.6%

Native
American 0.7%

Hispanic 3.9%
Native
American 0.8%

White,
Non-Hispanic
71.9%

Unknown 3.7%

Note: Percents do not add to 100 due to rounding.


Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

14
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Figure 9 - Colleges By Enrollment


Data are for Class Entering in Fall 2007
(In order by largest Total Enrollment)

200

Number of Students
400

600

800

1000

1200

NYCOM/NYIT
PCOM
KCUMB-COM
NSU-COM
LECOM
DMU-COM
MSUCOM*
Western U/COMP
ATSU/KCOM
CCOM
VCOM
AZCOM
TUCOM-CA
UNTHSC/TCOM*
LECOM-Bradenton
UNECOM
OU-COM*
WVSOM*
UMDNJ-SOM*
OSU-COM*
TUCOM-NV
PCSOM
PCOM-GA
LMU-DCOM
TOUROCOM

= Total Enrollment
= Incoming Class

ATSU/COM-Mesa

* Indicates Public School


Source: AACOM, Osteopathic College Information Book for EC 2007 (Second Edition).
Note: These numbers are compiled from prior-year entering class, and data were collected in spring prior to official
matriculation. While most schools reported an exact number, some final enrollment numbers may be slightly different.

15
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 8A
Total Enrollment of Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups by School, 2004-05
Total
Enrollment

Underrepresented
Racial/Ethnic Minority

College

ATSU/KCOM
AZCOM
CCOM
DMU-COM
KCUMB-COM
LECOM-Bradenton
LECOM
MSUCOM
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT1
OSU-COM
OU-COM
PCOM
PCSOM
TUCOM-CA
TUCOM-NV
UMDNJ-SOM
UNECOM
UNTHSC/TCOM
VCOM
Western U/COMP
WVSOM
All Schools

Number

Number

649
557
676
808
926
163
863
538
802
1,151
348
427
1,025
265
508
78
365
491
501
307
710
367
12,525

18
16
22
39
52
20
37
26
139
181
55
66
102
12
9
3
95
8
45
36
41
9
1,031

Asian/Pacific Islander

Percent of
Total
Enrollment
2.8%
2.9%
3.2%
4.2%
5.6%
12.3%
4.3%
4.8%
17.3%
15.8%
15.5%
14.7%
10.0%
4.5%
1.8%
3.8%
26.0%
1.6%
9.0%
11.7%
5.8%
1.6%
8.2%2

Number
78
57
134
41
94
34
111
59
124
306
16
34
108
11
123
20
86
43
131
30
291
30
1,961

Percent of
Total
Enrollment
12.0%
10.2%
19.8%
5.1%
10.2%
20.9%
12.9%
11.0%
15.5%
26.6%
4.6%
8.0%
10.5%
4.2%
24.2%
25.6%
23.6%
8.8%
26.2%
9.8%
41.0%
8.2%
15.7%2

Total Racial/Ethnic
Minority
Number
96
73
156
80
146
54
148
85
263
487
71
100
210
23
132
23
181
51
176
66
332
39
2,992

Percent of
Total
Enrollment
14.8%
13.1%
23.1%
9.9%
15.8%
33.1%
17.2%
15.8%
32.8%
42.3%
20.4%
23.4%
20.5%
8.7%
26.0%
29.5%
49.6%
10.4%
35.1%
21.5%
46.8%
10.6%
23.9%2

Notes: Percentages may not add across due to rounding.


The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) at Blacksburg, Virginia, admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM-Bradenton) and the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine (TUCOM-NV)
admitted their first classes at their branch campuses in Fall 2004.
1
New York College of Osteopathic Medicines (NYCOM/NYIT) data include the Accelerated Program for Emigre Physicians (APEP) students.
2
These percentages are based on total enrollment (12,525).
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

16
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 8B
Total Enrollment of Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups by School, 2005-06
Total
Enrollment

Underrepresented
Racial/Ethnic Minority

College

ATSU/KCOM
AZCOM
CCOM
DMU-COM
KCUMB-COM
LECOM-Bradenton
LECOM
MSUCOM
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT1
OSU-COM
OU-COM
PCOM-GA
PCOM-PA
PCSOM
TUCOM-CA
TUCOM-NV
UMDNJ-SOM
UNECOM
UNTHSC/TCOM
VCOM
Western U/COMP
WVSOM
All Schools

Number

Number

670
574
690
817
940
323
885
616
822
1,176
352
431
83
1,041
278
533
184
384
499
520
467
724
397
13,406

23
18
14
30
43
35
45
24
144
195
61
68
7
99
14
27
14
110
11
54
55
46
10
1,147

Percent of
Total
Enrollment
3.4%
3.1%
2.0%
3.7%
4.6%
10.8%
5.1%
3.9%
17.5%
16.6%
17.3%
15.8%
8.4%
9.5%
5.0%
5.1%
7.6%
28.6%
2.2%
10.4%
11.8%
6.4%
2.5%
8.6%2

Asian/Pacific Islander
Number
88
70
153
56
56
64
119
76
115
318
17
37
21
115
15
134
25
91
39
136
52
295
34
2,126

Percent of
Total
Enrollment
13.1%
12.2%
22.2%
6.8%
6.0%
19.8%
13.4%
12.3%
14.0%
27.0%
4.8%
8.6%
25.3%
11.0%
5.4%
25.1%
13.6%
23.7%
7.8%
26.2%
11.1%
40.8%
8.6%
15.9%2

Total Racial/Ethnic
Minority
Number
111
88
167
86
99
99
164
100
259
513
78
105
28
214
29
161
39
201
50
190
107
341
44
3,273

Percent of
Total
Enrollment
16.6%
15.3%
24.2%
10.5%
10.5%
30.6%
18.5%
16.2%
31.5%
43.6%
22.2%
24.4%
33.7%
20.6%
10.4%
30.2%
21.2%
52.3%
10.0%
36.5%
22.9%
47.1%
11.1%
24.4%2

Notes: Percentages may not add across due to rounding.


The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) at Blacksburg, Virginia, admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM-Bradenton) and the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine (TUCOM-NV)
admitted their first classes at their branch campuses in Fall 2004. The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM-GA) admitted its
first class at their branch campus in Fall 2005.
1
New York College of Osteopathic Medicines (NYCOM/NYIT) data includes the Accelerated Program for Emigre Physicians (APEP) students.
2
These percentages are based on total enrollment (13,406).
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

17
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Figure 10A - Total Enrollment by Gender, 2004-05


Total enrollment of women ranged from 33.3 to 56.4 percent.
Men
ATSU/KCOM
394
AZCOM
342
CCOM
326
DMU-COM
424
KCUMB-COM
491
LECOM-Bradenton2
86
LECOM
463
MSUCOM
263
NSU-COM
418
NYCOM/NYIT
521
OSU-COM
189
OU-COM
211
PCOM
493
PCSOM
152
TUCOM-CA
249
2
TUCOM-NV
52
UMDNJ-SOM
159
UNECOM
236
UNTHSC/TCOM
238
VCOM1
154
Western U/COMP
366
WVSOM
183
6,410
Total

Women
255
215
350
384
435
77
400
275
384
630
159
216
532
113
259
26
206
255
263
153
344
184
6,115
0

39.3%
38.6%
51.8%
47.5%
47.0%
47.2%
46.4%
51.1%
47.9%
54.7%
45.7%
50.6%
51.9%
42.6%
51.0%
33.3%

Men

56.4%

Women

51.9%
52.5%
49.8%
48.5%
50.1%

200

400

600

800

1,000

Total Enrollment
1
2

First class admitted 2003-04 academic year.


First class admitted 2004-05 academic year.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

18
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

1,200

Figure 10B - Total Enrollment by Gender, 2005-06


Total enrollment of women ranged from 39.6 to 57.0 percent.
Men
ATSU/KCOM
405
AZCOM
342
CCOM
322
DMU-COM
428
KCUMB-COM
475
172
LECOM-Bradenton2
477
LECOM
293
MSUCOM
NSU-COM
413
544
NYCOM/NYIT
188
OSU-COM
OU-COM
196
PCOM-GA3
38
487
PCOM
PCSOM
157
TUCOM-CA
246
108
TUCOM-NV2
UMDNJ-SOM
165
UNECOM
241
UNTHSC/TCOM
246
VCOM1
238
Western U/COMP
359
WVSOM
211
Total
6,751
1
2
3

Women
265
232
368
389
465
151
408
323
409
632
164
235
45
554
121
287
76
219
258
274
229
365
186
6,655
0

39.6%
40.4%
53.3%
47.6%
49.5%
46.8%
46.1%
52.4%
49.8%
53.7%
46.6%
54.5%
54.2%
53.2%
43.5%
53.8%
41.3%

Men

57.0%

Women

51.7%
52.7%
49.0%
50.4%
46.9%

200

400

600
800
Total Enrollment

1,000

1,200

First class admitted 2003-04 academic year.


First class admitted 2004-05 academic year.
First class admitted 2005-06 academic year.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

19
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 9A
State Residency of First-Year Students by School, 2004-05
State Resident

College

Total
First-Year
Enrollment

Number

ATSU/KCOM
AZCOM
CCOM
DMU-COM
KCUMB-COM
LECOM-Bradenton
LECOM
MSUCOM
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT1
OSU-COM
OU-COM
PCOM
PCSOM
TUCOM-CA
TUCOM-NV
UMDNJ-SOM
UNECOM
UNTHSC/TCOM
VCOM
Western U/COMP
WVSOM
Total

178
148
175
230
239
163
230
148
222
315
89
116
274
79
136
78
96
124
135
156
207
108
3,646

37
43
99
56
36
56
76
132
98
204
78
101
138
37
72
9
93
30
132
53
196
54
1,830

Percent
of Total
20.8%
29.0%
56.6%
24.4%
15.1%
34.4%
33.0%
89.2%
44.1%
64.8%
87.6%
87.1%
50.4%
46.8%
52.9%
11.5%
96.9%
24.2%
97.8%
34.0%
94.7%
50.0%
50.2%2

Non-Resident
Number
141
105
75
169
201
107
154
16
124
111
11
15
133
42
64
69
2
94
3
102
6
54
1,798

Percent
of Total
79.2%
71.0%
42.9%
73.5%
84.1%
65.6%
67.0%
10.8%
55.9%
35.2%
12.4%
12.9%
48.5%
53.2%
47.1%
88.5%
2.1%
75.8%
2.2%
65.4%
2.9%
50.0%
49.3%2

Foreign
Number
0
0
1
5
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
5
0
18

Percent
of Total
0.0%
0.0%
0.6%
2.2%
0.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.1%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.6%
2.4%
0.0%
0.5%2

Note: Percents may not add across to 100% due to rounding.


1
Includes students in Accelerated Programs for Emigre Physicians (APEP).
2
Percentages are based on total first-year students (3,646).
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

Photo courtesy of the


Michigan State University
College of Osteopathic Medicine.

20
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 9B
State Residency of First-Year Students by School, 2005-06
(as of August 1, 2006)
State Resident

College

Total
First-Year
Enrollment

Number

ATSU/KCOM
AZCOM
CCOM
DMU-COM
KCUMB-COM
LECOM-Bradenton
LECOM
MSUCOM
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT1
OSU-COM
OU-COM
PCOM-GA
PCOM
PCSOM
TUCOM-CA
TUCOM-NV
UMDNJ-SOM
UNECOM
UNTHSC/TCOM
VCOM
Western U/COMP
WVSOM
Total

175
166
182
219
251
166
231
205
246
321
93
115
83
275
80
135
108
102
125
140
160
219
111
3,908

25
39
74
59
200
58
73
185
129
230
80
113
35
164
26
83
9
100
28
126
70
135
50
2,091

Percent
of Total
14.3%
23.5%
40.7%
26.9%
79.7%
34.9%
31.6%
90.2%
52.4%
71.6%
86.0%
98.3%
42.2%
59.6%
32.5%
61.5%
8.3%
98.0%
22.4%
90.0%
43.8%
61.6%
45.0%
53.5%2

Non-Resident
Number
144
124
103
157
48
108
157
20
117
91
13
2
48
109
54
52
99
0
97
14
90
81
61
1,789

Percent
of Total
82.3%
74.7%
56.6%
71.7%
19.1%
65.1%
68.0%
9.8%
47.6%
28.4%
14.0%
1.7%
57.8%
39.6%
67.5%
38.5%
91.7%
0.0%
77.6%
10.0%
56.2%
37.0%
55.0%
45.8%2

Foreign
Number
6
3
5
3
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
26

Percent
of Total
3.4%
1.8%
2.8%
1.4%
1.2%
0.0%
0.4%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.7%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.4%
0.0%
0.7%2

Note: Percents may not add across to 100% due to rounding.


1
Includes students in Accelerated Programs for Emigre Physicians (APEP).
2
Percentages are based on total first-year students (3,908).
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

Photo courtesy of
Nova Southeastern University
College of Osteopathic Medicine.

21
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 10
Graduates of Osteopathic Medical Schools by Race and Ethnic Group, 1996-2005
Graduation Year

Group
Black/African American
Native American/Alaska Native
Hispanic/Latino

1996
47
14
80

1997
70
18
52

1998
60
24
86

1999
101
19
79

2000
75
15
87

2001
82
22
96

2002
94
11
70

2003
89
19
85

2004
92
17
90

2005
86
20
83

Total Underrepresented Minority


Percent Underrepresented Minority

141
7.3%

140
7.0%

170
8.1%

199
9.2%

177
7.8%

200
8.0%

175
6.9%

193
7.4%

201
7.3%

189
6.9%

White, Non-Hispanic
Asian/Pacific Islander
Other and Unknown
Total All Groups
Foreign Nationals1

1,574
216
1
1,932
31

1,672
195
2
2,009
10

1,686
228
12
2,096
13

1,683
278
9
2,169
19

1,785
285
32
2,279
23

1,933
333
44
2,510
20

1,853
440
68
2,536
13

1,916
424
74
2,607
16

1,998
416
100
2,713
12

2,065
426
76
2,756
13

NOTE: Data include students in the Accelerated Program for Emigre Physicians (APEP) at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine.
1
Foreign national students are included in each ethnic category and in the total. They are listed separately to document the number of foreign
nationals.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1996-97 through 2005-06 academic years.

Figure 11 - Osteopathic Medical School Graduates, 1990-2009


4,500
3,908

Actual

3,500

Estimated1

3,541
3,108
2,713
2,510

2,500

2,279

2,000
1,500

2,849
2,607

1,843
1,529
Graduates at 15 schools

1,000

2,756

2,536

16 schools

17
schools

19 schools

20
schools

(+3 branches)

3,000

(+2 branches)

Number of Graduates

4,000

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Graduation Year

Projections are from the existing 20 schools and three branch campuses and do not include the possible formation of new schools or campuses.

Background photo courtesy of the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in East Lansing, MI.
Sources: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1989-90 through 2005-06 academic years.

22
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Photo courtesy of the Western University of Health Sciences / College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific.
Photo courtesy of the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth
Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine.

23
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 11A
Attrition in Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2003-04
Number of Students
Reason

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total
Withdrawals/Dismissals
Dismissed for academic failure
Withdrew in poor academic standing
Transferred to another medical school
Personal reasons
Career change
Failure to take/pass COMLEX
Other

21
1
3
18
6
0
2

11
1
1
9
2
0
1

32
2
2
27
8
0
3

16
0
11
3
1
0
3

11
0
11
1
2
0
2

27
0
22
4
3
0
5

3
0
6
3
0
0
0

2
0
3
0
2
0
1

5
0
9
3
2
0
1

2
0
1
0
0
2
1

0
0
0
0
0
0
1

2
0
1
0
0
2
2

Total Withdrawals/Dismissals

51

25

74

34

27

61

12

20

0.1%

0.3%

Withdrawal/Dismissal Attrition Rate 3.1%


Leave of Absence
Poor academic performance/
remediation
Academic enrichment, research, study
for another degree
Personal reasons
Failure to take/pass COMLEX
Other
Total Leaves of Absence
Leave of Absence Attrition Rate
Enrollment 2003-04

1.5%

2.2% 2.2%

1.9%

2.1% 0.8%

0.7%

0.7% 0.4%

20
0
0

21
0
0

41
0
0

9
4
0

19
6
0

28
10
0

7
16
0

12
3
0

19
19
0

3
3
0

7
3
0

10
6
0

20

24

44

20

26

46

29

17

46

12

19

1.2%
1,646

1.4%
1,662

1.0%
1,175

0.7%
2,775

1.3% 1.3%
3,308 1,541

1.9%
1,396

1.6% 1.9%
2,937 1,513

1.3%
1,324

1.6% 0.4%
2,837 1,600

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

Photo courtesy of the


Oklahoma State University
Center for Health Sciences
College of Osteopathic Medicine.

24
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 11B
Attrition in Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2004-05
Number of Students
Reason

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total
Withdrawals/Dismissals
Dismissed for academic failure
Withdrew in poor academic standing
Transferred to another medical school
Personal reasons
Career change
Failure to take COMLEX
Other

21
11
3
14
5
0
0

16
4
0
15
3
0
0

37
15
3
29
8
0
0

9
2
4
2
3
0
0

6
2
8
7
1
0
1

15
4
12
9
4
0
1

2
1
10
2
1
2
0

2
3
3
1
0
1
0

4
4
13
3
1
3
0

0
0
1
0
1
3
0

0
0
1
1
0
1
0

0
0
2
1
1
4
0

Total Withdrawals/Dismissals

54

38

92

20

25

45

18

10

28

0.2%

0.3%

Withdrawal/Dismissal Attrition Rate 3.0%


Leave of Absence
Poor academic performance/
remediation
Academic enrichment, research, study
for another degree
Personal reasons
Failure to take/pass COMLEX
Other
Total Leaves of Absence
Leave of Absence Attrition Rate
Enrollment 2004-05

2.1%

2.5% 1.3%

1.5%

1.4% 1.2%

0.7%

1.0% 0.3%

10

16

15
0
0

18
0
0

33
0
0

12
7
0

18
8
0

30
15
0

6
17
0

17
27
0

23
44
0

2
17
0

7
6
0

9
23
0

25

24

49

21

27

48

25

45

70

21

13

34

1.4%
1,818

1.3%
1,828

1.0%
1,313

1.2%
2,825

1.3% 1.3%
3,646 1,579

1.7%
1,620

1.5% 1.7%
3,199 1,501

3.3%
1,354

2.4% 1.4%
2,855 1,512

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

Photo courtesy of
Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine.

25
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

3. Tuition, Loans and Scholarships


Table 12
Loans to Osteopathic Medical Students, 2003-04 and 2004-05
2004-05
(as of August 1, 2006)

2003-04
Type of Aid

Number of
Awards
11,527
10,809
2,440
130
143
20
81
0
3,565
36
146
28,8971

Unsubsidized Stafford Student Loan


Subsidized Stafford Student Loan
Perkins Loan
Primary Care Loan (PCL)
State government loans
Osteopathic association loans
Loans for Disadvantaged Students (LDS)
Robert Wood Johnson loans
Alternative loans
Other loans (outside funded)
Other loans (school funded)
Total

Total Dollar
Amount
$279,611,137
90,117,953
6,888,952
3,193,425
923,400
297,411
765,553
0
34,769,371
343,871
556,629
$417,467,702

Number of
Awards
12,424
11,239
2,254
117
35
5
180
0
4,337
336
281
31,2081

Total Dollar
Amount
$302,298,885
114,835,237
5,461,944
2,989,383
611,099
5,000
2,024,704
0
47,720,909
2,570,730
1,041,609
$479,559,500

NOTE: What appears to be significant variation in the number and amount of Loans for Disadvantaged Students and Other Loans is
accounted for by variations in how the colleges report these loans from year to year.
1
This represents the total number of awards given to 10,720 students in 2003-04 and 11,310 students in 2004-05. Many students
receive multiple awards through different loan programs.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-04 through 2005-06 academic years.

Table 13
Average First-Year Student Expenses at
Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2003-04 through 2005-06
2003-04
Expenses
Tuition:
In-State residents
Out-of-State residents
Fees:
In-State residents
Out-of-State residents
Books and equipment
Required transportation
Room and board (single students)
Total:
In-State residents
Out-of-State residents

2004-05

2005-061

Private
Schools

Public
Schools

Private
Schools

Public
Schools

Private
Schools

Public
Schools

$28,586
29,445

$13,074
25,353

$28,078
30,606

$16,445
32,753

$31,299
32,157

$17,835
35,220

656
656
2,969
1,885
11,715

3,898
7,485
4,105
1,249
10,167

532
532
3,272
2,209
11,120

1,843
2,284
4,198
1,258
10,980

523
523

950
950

$45,811
$46,669

$32,492
$48,359

$46,966
$47,739

$34,723
$51,473

N.A.

N.A.

$31,822
$32,680

$18,785
$36,170

NOTE: Numbers may not add down due to rounding.


1
For 2005-06, data include only tuition and fees.
Sources: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2003-04 through 2005-06 academic years, Tuition Survey for 2004-05, and
Osteopathic Medical College Information Book, 2005 entering class.

27
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 14
Tuition and Fees for the D.O. Program
in 2006-07
Tuition and Fees1

Osteopathic
Medical School

State Residents

Non-Residents

Private Schools:
ATSU/KCOM
AZCOM
CCOM
DMU-COM
KCUMB-COM
LECOM-Br & PA
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT
PCOM-PA & GA
PCSOM
TUCOM-CA
TUCOM-NV
UNECOM
VCOM
WesternU/COMP
Mean

$36,045
$39,208
$36,852
$31,720
$36,460
$25,775
$26,780
$37,003
$35,298
$29,250
$36,210
$36,418
$37,455
$29,995
$37,230
$34,113

$36,045
$39,208
$40,953
$31,720
$36,460
$26,775
$33,370
$37,003
$35,298
$29,250
$36,210
$36,418
$37,455
$29,995
$37,230
$34,893

Public Schools:
MSUCOM
OSU-COM
OU-COM
UMDNJ-SOM
UNTHSC/TCOM
WVSOM

$25,544
$16,488
$24,081
$22,491
$13,964
$19,086

$55,544
$31,708
$34,080
$35,056
$29,714
$46,936

Mean

$20,276

$38,840

Fees are included in tuition starting in 2004-05. In previous years, fees were
stated separately.

Source: AACOM, Tuition Survey for 2006-07.

28
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Figure 12 - Scholarships and Loans Awarded to Osteopathic Medical Students,


1993-94 Through 2004-051
$500
$458.1

450

$417.5

400

$375.8
$344.3

Dollars (Millions)

350

$331.1
$299.8

300

$276.2
$256.7

250

$234.1
$209.6

200

$175.4

$189.6

Loans

150
100
50

$23.3

0
93-94

$25.2

$26.3

$28.6

$31.4

$34.7

$35.9

$38.7

94-95

95-96

96-97

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

$42.9

$48.0

$53.7

Scholarships
01-02

02-03

$55.8

03-04

04-05

Academic Year
1
2

Data for 2004-05 as of August 1, 2006.


Scholarships include fellowships, grants, fee waivers, work-study, etc.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1994-05 through 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine New York.


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

29

Figure 13 - Sources of Scholarships Awarded to Osteopathic


Medical Students, 1993-94 Through 2004-05
$35
$32.75

$30.87

30

Armed Forces
NHSC
State
Miscellaneous1
Other2

25

Dollars (Millions)

Armed Forces

20

15

$14.34
$12.88

Other2
$9.44

10

$7.30
$4.96

State

$4.07

$3.25

$4.54

NHSC

$2.36

Miscellaneous1

$0.47

$4.02

$0.48

$1.00

93-94

94-95

95-96

96-97

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

Academic Year
1

Miscellaneous scholarships include Exceptional Financial Need, Indian Health and osteopathic associations.
Other scholarships include fellowships, grants, fee waivers, work-study, etc.
3
Data for 2004-05 as of August 1, 2006.
2

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1994-95 through 2005-06 academic years.

30
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

4. Curriculum

Table 15
Instructional Techniques in Osteopathic Medical Schools, 1996-97 Through 2005-06

Instructional Technique
Computer-Assisted Instruction:
(Computers are used to present stimuli
to students and evaluate their responses)
Problem-Based Learning:
(Case-based method, small group tutorials and self-directed learning are used)
Self-Instruction:
(Areas where educational materials
designed for self-instruction are used)
Standardized Patients:
(Persons trained to portray history and
physical findings are used)
Distance Learning:
(Internet used for on-line lectures and
interactive learning)
Knowledge-Based Learning
Communities:
(Students participate in researching
information and sharing knowledge)
1

Average Number of Courses or Clerkships


Per School Using the Technique
1996- 1997- 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 200597
98
99
00
01
02
03
04
05
061
4.1

5.1

7.0

6.3

7.0

11.0

9.6

9.5

11.0

11.1

6.8

4.1

7.2

7.8

8.7

8.1

9.0

9.6

7.7

7.8

4.9

4.8

7.2

6.4

7.2

10.4

8.0

9.1

6.9

10.5

5.1

2.5

3.1

1.7

3.2

3.4

3.6

3.5

4.6

5.2

3.0

4.9

3.8

4.9

5.2

3.5

New item in 2000-01

New item in 2005-06

0.1

As of August 1, 2006.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 1996-97 through 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine California.


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

31

Table 16A
Selected Program Characteristics of the 20 Osteopathic
Medical Schools and Two Branch Campuses in 2004-05
Program Characteristics
Program characteristics applicable to the first year:
Admitted after high school senior year
Early/conditional acceptance following high school
Admitted after second year of college (60 credit hours)
Admitted after third year of college (90 credit hours)
Accepted pending/after completion of fourth year of college
Program characteristics applicable to all four years:
Optional three-year program
Optional five-year program
Formal faculty advisement program
School assigns students to formal faculty advisement
Combined baccalaureate/D.O. program
D.O./Ph.D. programs offered in all disciplines
D.O./Ph.D. programs offered in some disciplines1
D.O./J.D. program
D.O./M.P.H. program
Masters/D.O. program
Accelerated program for students with M.S. or Ph.D.
Program Characteristics
Degree of integration of basic and clinical sciences in
curriculum
Minimum weeks of required instruction for D.O. degree:
Total weeks in first year of D.O. curriculum
Total weeks in second year of D.O. curriculum
Total weeks in third year of D.O. curriculum
Total weeks in fourth year of D.O. curriculum
1

Number of
Schools/
Campuses

Number of
Students

0
2
0
10
22

0
13
0
41
3,410

0
13
19
18
4
2
5
2
7
12
1

0
168
10,154
9,625
27
1
29
4
69
138
2

Minimum
Number of
Years

N.A.

3
5
--7
6
5
5
4
4
3

Average

Range

53.0%

10.0%-100%

157.6
37.8
38.0
45.7
41.8

148-178
30-46
29-47
36-52
28-48

Disciplines cited were biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology, molecular biology, pharmacology and physiology.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

32
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 16B
Selected Program Characteristics of the 20 Osteopathic
Medical Schools and Three Branch Campuses in 2005-06,
as of August 1, 2006
Program Characteristics
Program characteristics applicable to the first year:
Admitted after high school senior year
Early/conditional acceptance following high school
Admitted after second year of college (60 credit hours)
Admitted after third year of college (90 credit hours)
Accepted pending/after completion of fourth year of college
Program characteristics applicable to all four years:
Optional three-year program
Optional five-year program
Formal faculty advisement program
School assigns students to formal faculty advisement
Combined baccalaureate/D.O. program
D.O./Ph.D. programs offered in all disciplines
D.O./Ph.D. programs offered in some disciplines1
D.O./J.D. program
D.O./M.P.H. program
Masters/D.O. program
Accelerated program for students with M.S. or Ph.D.
Program Characteristics
Degree of integration of basic and clinical sciences in
curriculum
Minimum weeks of required instruction for D.O. degree:
Total weeks in first year of D.O. curriculum
Total weeks in second year of D.O. curriculum
Total weeks in third year of D.O. curriculum
Total weeks in fourth year of D.O. curriculum
1

Number of
Schools/
Campuses

Number of
Students

0
1
0
5
23

0
5
0
44
4,288

0
10
17
18
5
2
5
1
8
8
2

0
199
10,683
9,271
70
1
28
3
47
126
89

Minimum
Number of
Years

N.A.

3
5
--7
6
5
6
4
4
4

Average

Range

50.6%

10.0%-100%

158.9
38.5
37.2
45.5
43.1

148-183
30-49
29-46
39-52
28-51

Disciplines cited were biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology, molecular biology, pharmacology and physiology.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

33
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 17
Average Number of Hours Required in Basic/Non-Clinical Sciences
in Years One and Two, 2004-05 and 2005-06
Basic Science/
Non-Clinical Area
Gross Anatomy
Pathology
Physiology
Pharmacology
Biochemistry
Microbiology
Neuroscience
Histology/Microanatomy
Immunology
Ethics/Policy/Law
Embryology
Genetics
Epidemiology
History of Osteopathic Medicine
Miscellaneous
Total

Average Number of
Required Hours
during 2004-05

Average Number of
Required Hours
during 2005-061

Lecture

Lecture

Percent of
Total Basic
Science
Hours
Skills/Lab

72.3
107.4
99.4
85.2
77.9
63.8
51.2
36.0
23.9
18.1
16.3
16.0
10.1
4.8
9.4

105.4
24.2
7.3
1.5
5.3
13.0
17.7
21.6
0.9
0.1
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.0
3.1

19.9%
14.8%
12.0%
9.7%
9.3%
8.6%
7.7%
6.5%
2.8%
2.0%
1.8%
1.8%
1.1%
0.5%
1.4%

691.8

200.4

100.0%

Percent of
Total Basic
Science
Hours
Skills/Lab

68.9
109.5
99.3
91.7
71.8
66.0
52.4
35.9
25.4
21.4
16.9
15.7
9.5
4.4
14.3
703.0

95.9
20.0
6.8
3.9
6.4
9.7
12.7
21.0
0.8
1.8
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.0
2.0

18.6%
14.7%
12.0%
10.8%
8.8%
8.6%
7.4%
6.4%
3.0%
2.6%
1.9%
1.8%
1.1%
0.5%
1.8%

181.0

100.0%

As of August 1, 2006.
Note: Numbers and percents may not add down due to rounding.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Table 18
Average Number of Hours of Clinical Science Courses Required
in Years One and Two, 2004-05 and 2005-06

Clinical Science Area

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine


Internal Medicine
Family Medicine
Physical/Differential Diagnosis
Clinical Procedures
Behavioral Medicine
Surgery
Obstetrics/Gynecology
Pediatrics
Preventive Medicine/Public Health
Radiology
Geriatrics
Nutrition
Emergency Medicine
Miscellaneous
Total
1

34

Average Number of
Required Hours
during 2004-05
Lecture

Skills/Lab

71.7
118.1
52.6
32.9
24.2
49.2
29.0
31.8
29.6
19.2
15.7
14.0
12.9
6.0
57.7
564.6

128.5
10.2
48.9
36.0
31.4
4.3
6.5
4.2
5.8
0.0
1.3
2.3
0.0
5.3
25.2
310.0

Percent
of Total
Clinical
Science
Hours
22.9%
14.7%
11.6%
7.9%
6.4%
6.1%
4.1%
4.1%
4.0%
2.2%
2.0%
1.9%
1.5%
1.3%
9.5%
100.0%

Average Number of
Required Hours
during 2005-061
Lecture

Skills/Lab

75.7
130.5
56.1
38.5
21.8
48.6
30.6
30.5
28.1
21.3
15.3
12.2
12.4
8.9
43.1
572.2

126.5
17.1
63.6
44.2
29.2
9.0
13.1
10.0
9.4
4.4
1.6
4.3
0.4
8.1
18.8
359.8

Percent
of Total
Clinical
Science
Hours
21.7%
15.8%
12.8%
8.9%
5.5%
6.2%
4.5%
4.4%
4.0%
2.8%
1.8%
1.8%
1.4%
1.8%
6.6%
100.0%

As of August 1, 2006.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

5. Postgraduate Training

Photo courtesy of the


West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine.

35
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 19A
Number of Weeks in Required Clinical Clerkships
in Years Three and Four, 2004-05
Range of Weeks If Required Clerkship
Clinical Clerkships

Family/Community Medicine
Internal Medicine
General Surgery
Pediatrics
Obstetrics/Gynecology
Emergency Medicine
Psychiatry
Geriatrics
Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine
Critical Care
Cardiology
Radiology
Anesthesiology
Orthopedics/Orthopedic Surgery
Pulmonary Medicine
Neurology
Otolaryngology
Thoracic/Cardiovascular Surgery
Other, Including Electives

Ambulatory
(Outpatient)
6-16
4
0
4
0
4-8
0
4
2-4
0
0
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
1-4

Clinical
(Inpatient)
4
4-16
4-8
4
4
4-8
4
0
0
4
0
0
1-2
4
0
0
0
2
0

Mixed

4-24
4-12
4-12
4-8
4-8
4-8
4
2-4.5
4
4
4
2-4
2.5
2
4
2
2
0
1-16

Percent
Number
of
of Schools
Student
& Branch
Time in Campuses
Required Requiring
Clerkship Clerkship
22.4%
18.3%
11.8%
9.6%
8.6%
8.1%
7.4%
2.0%
1.9%
1.4%
1.4%
1.0%
0.7%
0.5%
0.4%
0.2%
0.2%
0.2%
3.8%

21
21
21
21
21
19
20
6
6
4
4
4
4
2
1
1
1
1
6

Average
Number
of Sites
per
School &
Branch
Campus
96.7
40.4
29.8
33.3
27.5
28.5
26.2
10.8
18.3
24.0
39.4
18.8
19.3
10.0
2.0
96.0
4.0
5.0
41.0

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

36
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 19B
Number of Weeks in Required Clinical Clerkships
in Years Three and Four,
2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006)
Range of Weeks If Required Clerkship
Clinical Clerkships

Ambulatory
(Outpatient)

Family/Community Medicine
Internal Medicine
General Surgery
Pediatrics
Obstetrics/Gynecology
Emergency Medicine
Psychiatry
Geriatrics
Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine
Cardiology
Critical Care
Radiology
Anesthesiology
Orthopedics/Orthopedic Surgery
Pulmonary Medicine
Otolaryngology
Neurology
Thoracic/Cardiovascular Surgery
Other, Including Electives
1

Clinical
(Inpatient)

4-16
4
0
4
0
4-8
0
4
2-4
0
0
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
1-12

4
4-16
4-8
4
6
4
4
0
0
4
4
2
1-2
4
0
0
0
2
0

Mixed
4-20
4-16
4-12
4-12
4-8
4-8
4-8
2-8
4
2-4
4
2
2
2
4
2
2
0
1-26

Percent
Number
of
of Schools
Student
& Branch
Time in Campuses
Required Requiring
Clerkship Clerkship
19.5%
18.4%
12.9%
10.3%
8.7%
8.3%
7.7%
2.2%
2.2%
1.7%
1.3%
1.0%
0.7%
0.5%
0.3%
0.3%
0.2%
0.2%
3.8%

17
21
21
21
21
19
21
6
7
5
4
4
3
2
1
2
1
1
5

Average
Number
of Sites1
per
School &
Branch
Campus
104.6
43.1
35.0
35.4
32.5
33.5
23.2
12.3
21.0
55.8
22.8
22.2
14.7
14.0
N.I.
12.0
54.0
N.I.
190.3

Number of sites was reported by 19 schools.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

37
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 19C
Number of Weeks in Selective1 Clinical Clerkships
in Years Three and Four, 2004-05
Range of Weeks for
Selective Clerkship
Clinical Clerkship

Internal Medicine
Pediatrics
Family/Community Medicine
Obstetrics/Gynecology
Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine
Emergency Medicine
General Surgery
Cardiology
Critical Care
Gastroenterology
Pulmonary Medicine
Hematology/Oncology
Infectious Disease
Psychiatry
Nephrology
Neurology
Orthopedics/Orthopedic Surgery
Rehabilitation Medicine
Rheumatology
Urology/Urological Surgery
Otolaryngology
Anesthesiology
Dermatology
Geriatrics
Radiology
Ophthalmology
Pathology
Thoracic/Cardiovascular Surgery
Public Health
Other
1
2

Ambulatory
(Outpatient)

Clinical
(Inpatient)

Mixed

0
0
4
0
4-24
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
2
2
0
4-8
0
0
2
0
0
0
0

4
6
0
6
0
4-20
4-12
4
4-8
4
4
4
4
6
4
0
2-4
0
0
4
4
4
0
0
4
2
4
0
0
4-8

4-28
4-28
4-36
4-28
4-24
4-20
4-24
4-28
4-24
4-28
4-24
4-24
4-28
4-24
4-24
4-24
2-24
4-24
4-24
2-24
2-24
2-24
2-24
4-24
2-28
2-24
2-24
4-24
4-20
4-24

Average
Percent
Number
Number
of
of Schools
of Sites
Student
& Branch
per
Time in Campuses
School &
Selective
Offering
Branch
Clerkship Clerkship
Campus
5.6%
5.0%
4.9%
4.4%
4.4%
3.6%
3.4%
3.2%
3.2%
3.2%
3.2%
3.1%
3.1%
3.1%
3.0%
3.0%
3.0%
3.0%
3.0%
3.0%
2.9%
2.8%
2.8%
2.8%
2.8%
2.7%
2.6%
2.6%
1.9%
4.8%

17
15
15
13
17
17
15
15
14
15
15
15
13
11
14
14
17
13
14
16
16
14
12
12
14
14
12
12
8
7

35.7
22.3
64.2
20.1
17.2
34.6
28.8
20.3
13.6
12.7
13.8
9.2
9.8
10.4
10.7
13.1
19.2
8.2
5.7
7.6
11.9
25.4
16.6
8.7
24.3
10.1
8.3
4.1
2.9
38.1

Selectives are elective courses with a limited number of options, such as clerkships in rural areas.
Number of sites was reported by 20 schools and branch campuses.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

38
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 19D
Number of Weeks in Selective1 Clinical Clerkships
in Years Three and Four,
2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006)
Range of Weeks for
Selective Clerkship
Clinical Clerkship

Internal Medicine
Pediatrics
Family/Community Medicine
Obstetrics/Gynecology
Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine
Emergency Medicine
General Surgery
Cardiology
Critical Care
Gastroenterology
Pulmonary Medicine
Hematology/Oncology
Infectious Disease
Psychiatry
Nephrology
Neurology
Orthopedics/Orthopedic Surgery
Rehabilitation Medicine
Rheumatology
Urology/Urological Surgery
Otolaryngology
Anesthesiology
Dermatology
Geriatrics
Radiology
Ophthalmology
Pathology
Thoracic/Cardiovascular Surgery
Public Health
Other
1
2

Ambulatory
(Outpatient)

Clinical
(Inpatient)

Mixed

6-16
6-16
4-16
16
4-6
0
0
12
12
8
4-8
0
8
8
8
8
2-4
8
0
2
2-4
2-4
4-8
8
8
2-4
8
0
4-8
4

4-16
16
12
20
0
4
4-12
4-12
4-12
4-8
4-12
4-8
4-8
8
4-8
8
2-4
4-8
0
4
4
2-8
8
8
2-8
2-4
4-8
0
8
4

4-24
4-24
4-24
4-20
4-12
4-20
4-24
4-12
4-12
4-12
4-12
2-12
2-12
4-16
2-12
4-12
2-20
4-16
4-24
2-24
2-16
2-20
2-20
4-10
2-12
2-16
2-8
4-24
2-12
4-12

Average
Percent
Number
Number
of
of Schools
of Sites
Student
& Branch
per
Time in Campuses
School &
Selective
Offering
Branch
Clerkship Clerkship
Campus
5.1%
4.9%
4.5%
4.1%
3.2%
2.7%
3.4%
3.3%
3.5%
3.2%
3.4%
2.9%
3.1%
2.8%
2.9%
3.1%
2.9%
3.0%
3.0%
3.0%
2.7%
2.9%
3.0%
2.4%
2.5%
2.7%
2.6%
2.6%
2.4%
8.4%

16
14
14
12
15
14
15
15
14
15
15
13
14
11
13
14
15
12
14
16
15
12
12
10
12
14
12
12
10
7

58.8
36.4
78.5
27.7
20.2
41.2
40.3
25.0
19.6
15.6
15.7
12.7
13.1
16.9
12.0
20.1
20.9
15.9
6.9
11.5
12.2
25.6
21.1
6.1
37.2
16.7
12.9
10.0
9.9
45.1

Selectives are elective courses with a limited number of options, such as clerkships in rural areas.
Number of sites was reported by 16 schools.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

39
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 20A
Characteristics of Hospitals Used for Clerkships,
2003-04

Bed Capacity

Beds in Use

Admissions

Emergency Room
Visits

Births

Inpatient Surgeries

Outpatient Surgeries

D.O.s on Statf

M.D.s on Staff

Number of Hospitals
in OPTI

ATSU/KCOM
AZCOM
CCOM
DMU-COM
KCUMB-COM
LECOM
MSUCOM
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT
OSU-COM
OU-COM
PCOM
PCSOM
TUCOM-CA
UMDNJ-SOM
UNECOM
UNTHSC/TCOM
WesternU/COMP
WVSOM
All Schools

Number of In-State
Hospitals

College1

Number of Hospitals

Averages Per Hospital

54
32
11
27
60
68
12
12
37
26
22
45
24
19
4
19
12
15
9
508

17
32
10
5
23
36
12
12
30
26
22
34
20
10
4
6
12
14
9
334

282
281
446
316
302
276
335
399
399
134
284
388
181
326
402
323
293
322
353
303

229
251
330
249
237
243
310
347
368
119
201
297
160
304
299
273
253
297
271
254

12,058
14,497
18,291
11,135
10,851
10,561
13,964
14,297
16,344
4,258
8,383
15,207
7,817
11,633
17,237
12,416
10,612
10,225
12,652
11,717

30,353
32,233
45,668
37,231
35,670
29,909
49,306
39,179
47,275
14,502
32,664
26,791
28,502
38,925
51,804
39,621
35,637
39,097
33,184
33,560

1,239
1,857
1,969
968
1,027
893
1,309
1,828
2,114
384
782
1,160
573
2,205
1,340
1,079
1,879
1,325
923
1,207

3,901
4,392
5,380
3,195
2,858
3,145
4,262
3,271
4,355
1,011
2,372
5,278
1,988
3,032
3,322
3,613
3,000
2,066
3,462
3,382

5,097
4,464
6,214
5,820
5,852
5,922
9,272
3,824
5,746
1,459
5,030
4,841
4,125
5,089
4,919
6,401
3,183
3,182
7,744
5,109

58
30
55
261
76
44
223
54
32
25
67
59
4
65
172
44
29
39
18
55

265
277
475
240
277
231
225
508
406
53
154
306
113
319
405
300
264
192
154
256

11
3
10
5
2
24
12
9
18
4
11
31
6
3
3
10
3
5
7
177

Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine at Blacksburg, VA, (VCOM) admitted its first class in Fall 2003. There will be no third-year
students until the 2005-06 academic year.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

40
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 20B
Characteristics of Hospitals Used for Clerkships,
2004-05 (as of August 1, 2006)

Bed Capacity

Beds in Use

Admissions

Emergency Room
Visits

Births

Inpatient Surgeries

Outpatient Surgeries

D.O.s on Statf

M.D.s on Staff

Number of Hospitals
in OPTI

ATSU/KCOM
AZCOM
CCOM
DMU-COM
KCUMB-COM
LECOM
MSUCOM
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT
OSU-COM
OU-COM
PCOM
PCSOM
TUCOM-CA
UMDNJ-SOM
UNECOM
UNTHSC/TCOM
VCOM
WesternU/COMP
WVSOM
All Schools

Number of In-State
Hospitals

College1

Number of Hospitals

Averages Per Hospital

37
35
13
28
51
60
12
13
37
22
27
48
48
25
4
20
11
13
9
9
522

9
35
12
6
18
17
12
13
28
22
27
38
28
12
4
7
11
12
9
9
343

294
507
409
296
321
283
302
373
393
143
285
373
189
270
406
286
295
206
258
353
311

228
229
309
218
254
224
281
323
333
120
219
307
156
228
297
244
258
206
238
281
241

10,915
12,788
16,311
9,936
16,870
11,187
14,149
19,813
17,093
6,139
9,555
16,658
7,540
10,703
17,226
11,745
10,914
7,183
9,676
13,812
12,465

34,799
36,554
35,955
34,955
40,514
21,504
47,606
57,612
43,011
16,452
49,894
26,141
27,053
29,740
50,472
38,419
32,139
23,752
40,585
35,730
33,616

1,153
2,232
1,406
802
1,165
767
1,251
1,873
1,705
409
1,042
1,059
656
1,232
1,260
1,197
1,837
358
1,727
1,021
1,124

3,610
3,688
4,267
2,791
3,384
3,010
3,658
5,029
4,421
980
3,053
4,540
2,045
2,394
2,989
3,397
3,226
2,686
2,169
4,026
3,275

3,676
4,044
5,091
5,589
6,246
4,788
9,128
4,962
5,165
1,445
6,037
5,215
3,628
4,121
5,202
5,032
3,144
2,702
2,708
8,478
4,908

64
169
50
117
77
47
182
58
31
48
66
53
13
51
166
42
42
6
20
21
63

261
302
372
205
286
246
216
489
438
49
216
317
141
278
346
275
277
115
217
172
259

6
1
12
1
2
17
12
9
19
4
13
34
7
3
4
10
3
1
4
6
168

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine branch campus in Bradenton, FL, (LECOM-Bradenton) and Touro University College of Osteopathic
Medicine branch campus in Henderson, NV, (TUCOM-NV) admitted their first classes in Fall 2004. There will be no third-year students until the
2007-08 academic year.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

41
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 21A
Areas of Special Interest Included in the Curriculum
of Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2004-05
Average Number of Students Receiving
Training per School/Branch Campus
Special Area of Training

Required Course

Average
Number
AIDS
233.7
Alcoholism or Substance Abuse
235.1
Community Health
227.2
Death and Dying
233.1
Doctor-Patient Relationship
272.4
Ethical Problems in Medicine
239.8
History of Medicine
238.0
Prevention and Health Maintenance
234.5
Adolescent Medicine
217.2
Biostatistics
215.5
Environmental Medicine/Toxicology
202.0
Epidemiology
218.2
Genetics/Counseling/Engineering/Therapy
231.7
Geriatrics
237.6
Health Care Systems
240.7
Medical Jurisprudence
208.3
Nutrition
245.0
Abortion
204.6
Human Sexuality
231.6
Medical Informatics
251.7
Occupational Health
207.2
Patient Health Education
242.3
Practice Management
235.6
Rehabilitation
248.4
Risk Management
258.4
Womens Health Issues
227.3
Alternative or Complementary Medicine
238.6
Child/Spouse/Parent Abuse
215.3
Home Health Care
212.6
Research Methods
215.0
Utilization Review & Quality Assurance
210.2
Ethics in Medical Research
224.1
Organ/Tissue Procurement
188.4
Medical Humanities
270.6
Technology Assessment
211.5
Other
152.3

Range
73-618
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-618
73-501
78-618
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
73-501
78-501
73-501
73-501
78-501
78-501
73-501
78-501
73-501
78-501
78-501
73-501
73-501
78-501
78-501
73-501
97-193

Elective Course
Average
Number
75.0
130.0
37.5
78.0
200.0
136.0
0.0
73.5
45.0
20.0
32.5
10.0
66.0
66.3
60.0
50.0
20.0
0.0
30.0
60.0
0.0
130.0
66.0
30.0
0.0
70.0
127.8
34.0
10.0
15.8
0.0.
23.0
0.0
55.7
0.0
29.8

Range
30-120
120-140
20-55
20-122
120-280
122-150
27-120
40-50
20
10-55
10
10-122
17-122
60
50
20
30
60
130
60-72
30
70
30-307
34
10
6-24
6-50
26-100
6-75

Clerkship
Rotation
Average
Number
254.6
264.8
245.3
255.1
283.2
252.3
219.6
266.9
214.4
266.2
232.2
242.4
207.6
265.6
247.3
200.3
240.8
208.2
236.4
246.5
206.9
290.7
233.5
212.4
225.7
238.8
230.6
222.9
199.7
194.2
191.3
224.1
194.0
196.6
208.4
0.0

Range
89-533
89-483
83-458
83-458
54-533
120-458
10-458
89-533
54-458
89-458
10-458
10-458
89-458
89-533
83-483
25-458
83-458
54-458
89-458
25-458
50-458
120-533
83-458
54-458
54-458
72-458
30-458
54-458
54-458
25-458
25-458
20-458
25-458
25-458
25-458

Schools
and Branch
Campuses
Reporting
Training in
Topic
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
19
19
19
18
18
17
14
14
14
5

NOTE: Averages are based on schools and branch campuses reporting training in the particular area.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

42
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 21B
Areas of Special Interest Included in the Curriculum
of Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006)
Average Number of Students Receiving
Training per School/Branch Campus
Special Area of Training

Required Course

Average
Number
AIDS
224.7
Alcoholism or Substance Abuse
248.0
Community Health
238.1
Death and Dying
248.6
Doctor-Patient Relationship
296.7
Ethical Problems in Medicine
285.6
History of Medicine
221.8
Prevention and Health Maintenance
281.9
Adolescent Medicine
229.9
Biostatistics
207.1
Environmental Medicine/Toxicology
252.5
Epidemiology
238.4
Genetics/Counseling/Engineering/Therapy
241.8
Geriatrics
250.0
Health Care Systems
219.3
Medical Jurisprudence
198.6
Nutrition
243.8
Abortion
230.0
Human Sexuality
219.8
Medical Informatics
255.5
Occupational Health
204.8
Patient Health Education
285.3
Practice Management
254.2
Rehabilitation
261.4
Risk Management
275.3
Womens Health Issues
278.8
Alternative or Complementary Medicine
259.9
Child/Spouse/Parent Abuse
241.2
Home Health Care
223.3
Research Methods
212.1
Utilization Review & Quality Assurance
214.5
Ethics in Medical Research
216.2
Organ/Tissue Procurement
200.3
Medical Humanities
252.7
Technology Assessment
278.1
Other1
253.5

Range
73-631
73-631
83-480
83-486
80-631
84-486
84-486
83-570
73-480
80-480
83-631
84-486
83-486
76-480
84-486
73-480
73-486
73-480
73-480
73-486
83-480
83-486
75-486
75-631
80-480
73-486
84-480
73-486
73-480
83-480
108-480
73-480
83-480
83-480
92-480
171-486

Elective Course
Average
Number
60.0
98.7
35.0
57.7
150.0
150.0
0.0
48.0
40.0
20.0
32.5
10.0
8.0
318.0
30.0
0.0
68.0
30.0
20.0
0.0
45.0
40.0
6.0
30.0
50.5
38.0
118.0
34.0
30.0
112.0
6.0.
31.0
0.0
78.7
0.0
42.6

Range
30-120
36-140
20-55
3-120
30-300
150
40-56
30-50
20
10-55
10
6-10
318
30
46-90
30
20
45
40
6
30
26-75
20-56
20-324
34
30
12-318
6
12-50
6-202
5-149

Range

Schools
and Branch
Campuses
Reporting
Training in
Topic

84-545
84-493
91-437
120-440
84-545
120-440
10-440
96-545
84-440
96-440
10-493
10-440
84-440
98-545
84-493
25-440
84-440
84-440
92-440
25-440
50-440
120-545
84-440
75-440
84-440
84-440
30-440
84-440
84-440
25-440
25-440
20-440
25-440
25-440
25-437
241-267

23
22
23
22
23
23
23
23
22
23
21
23
22
22
22
22
23
21
21
21
18
23
19
20
22
21
23
20
21
22
19
19
17
17
13
9

Clerkship
Rotation
Average
Number
254.4
273.5
269.0
270.0
301.3
271.1
216.2
259.6
235.7
253.3
233.6
243.2
225.1
279.7
251.3
211.2
242.6
223.8
259.2
249.3
228.8
291.6
238.1
253.9
258.8
246.3
225.2
245.8
247.6
211.9
207.6
209.3
225.6
221.7
218.4
254.0

NOTE: Averages are based on schools and branch campuses reporting training in the particular area.
1
Most often mentioned other areas were Medical Spanish and Pain Management.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

43
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 22
Student Performance Indicators, 2004-05 and 2005-06
Number of Schools and Branch Campuses Using Indicator
2004-05 Academic Year
Indicator

Pass-Fail (or variant)


Narrative evaluation
Letter grade
Numerical grade
Composite class rank by year
Other
1

Basic
Science
Courses
15
1
8
14
14
0

Electives/
Selectives
16
7
5
5
6
0

Required
Clinical
Clerkships
15
12
7
10
9
0

2005-06 Academic Year1


Basic
Science
Courses
14
1
7
14
14
2

Electives/
Selectives
13
8
5
4
5
2

Required
Clinical
Clerkships
11
12
8
9
9
4

Data as of August 1, 2006.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

44
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 23A
Methods Used to Assess Clinical Competence
of Osteopathic Medical Students, 2004-05
Number of Schools and Branch Campuses
Using Method in Specific Portions
of Curriculum
Method

Random observations by faculty/residents


Planned/repeated observations by faculty/residents
Chart review
Computer simulation
Oral examination
Written examination
Multiple station examination without standardized patients
Multiple station examination with standardized patients
Planned/repeated observation with simulated or standardized patients
Other

Part of a
Preclerkship
Course

Part of a
Clerkship

9
18
5
9
13
22
16
17
17
2

20
19
16
8
11
19
4
9
8
0

Part of a Final
Comprehensive
Evaluation for
Graduation
4
6
5
2
1
6
2
6
3
2

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

Table 23B
Methods Used to Assess Clinical Competence
of Osteopathic Medical Students,
2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006)
Number of Schools and Branch Campuses
Using Method in Specific Portions
of Curriculum
Method

Random observations by faculty/residents


Planned/repeated observations by faculty/residents
Chart review
Computer simulation
Oral examination
Written examination
Multiple station examination without standardized patients
Multiple station examination with standardized patients
Planned/repeated observation with simulated or standardized patients
Other

Part of a
Preclerkship
Course

Part of a
Clerkship

11
17
6
9
13
22
15
19
19
3

19
19
14
10
8
18
3
9
8
2

Part of a Final
Comprehensive
Evaluation for
Graduation
3
4
3
2
0
4
0
4
1
1

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

45
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 24
Role of the National Board Examinations (COMLEX) in the Curriculum
of the 20 Osteopathic Medical Schools and Three Branch Campuses,
2004-05 and 2005-06
School and Branch Campus Requirements for COMLEX

2004-05

2005-061

Level I
22

Level II
22

Level I
21

Level II
21

PE
19

Number of schools/branch campuses requiring a passing grade for


advancement or graduation

22

16

21

17

Number of schools/branch campuses in which exam grade is a factor in


advancement or graduation

22

16

21

19

15

Number of schools/branch campuses providing a study/review period

22

13

19

11

Number of schools/branch campuses providing mandatory drills,


tutorials, review programs or other organized, faculty-directed
preparatory sessions

Number of schools/branch campuses providing voluntary drills,


tutorials, review programs or other organized, faculty-directed
preparatory sessions

13

10

11

62.4%

49.0%

52.9%

44.3%

59.8%

17

14

15

499.4

492.9

511.2

513.0

Number of schools/branch campuses requiring COMLEX exams

Percent students participating in voluntary preparatory sessions


Number of schools/branch campuses providing special remediation for
students who fail
Mean COMLEX score

96.3% Pass

NOTE: COMLEX Level I and Level II scores are standardized to a mean of 500, with a minimum passing score of 400. The PE is pass-fail.
1
Data for 2005-06 as of August 1, 2006.
Sources: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

46
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 25
Outcome Indicators Used to Evaluate the Effectiveness of the Education Program
at Osteopathic Medical Schools and Branch Campuses, 2004-05 and 2005-06
Outcome Indicators Used
Results of COMLEX exams or USMLE
Student scores on written exams developed by:
Department
School
Extramural body (i.e., specialty society)
Student comments from AACOMs Annual Indebtedness and Career Plans Survey
Student evaluation of courses
Specialty choice of graduates
Specialty certification rates
Licensure rates of graduates
Practice location of graduates (e.g., rural, urban, inner city)
Academic/research careers/opportunities of graduates
Practice type of graduates
Residency appointments
Assessment of residency performance of graduates
Residency completion rates
Other
1

Number of Schools and


Branch Campuses
2004-05
20

2005-061
21

21
10
5
17
22
19
9
12
13
12
11
17
14
9
4

23
13
6
15
23
18
4
10
10
7
12
16
13
6
4

Data for 2005-06 as of August 1, 2006.

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Osteopathic Medicine.
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

47

Table 26A
Type of Internships for D.O.s in AOA-Accredited Programs, 2004-051
Internship Type
Traditional Rotating Internship
Special Emphasis
Anesthesiology
Diagnostic Radiology
Emergency Medicine
Family Practice
General Surgery
Psychiatry
Specialty Track
Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine/Pediatrics
Obstetrics/Gynecology
Otolaryngology/Facial Plastic Surgery
Pediatrics
Urological Surgery
Other2
Total

Number of
Programs
93
99
6
4
17
54
16
2
72
33
0
18
13
6
2
9
2273,4

Percent
34.1%
36.3%
2.2%
1.5%
6.2%
19.8%
5.9%
0.7%
26.4%
12.1%
0.0%
6.6%
4.8%
2.2%
0.7%
3.3%
100.0%3

Number of
Interns
535
269
10
7
55
157
36
4
171
104
0
31
16
18
2
18
9934

Percent
53.9%
29.5%
1.0%
0.7%
5.5%
15.8%
3.6%
0.4%
18.7%
10.5%
0.0%
3.1%
1.6%
1.8%
0.2%
1.8%
100.0%

Note: Percent may not add to total due to rounding.


1
The response rate for this survey was 191 out of 262 hospitals (72.9%) with AOA accreditation as listed in the AOA
OPTI List, October 2004.
2
Other includes people doing internships exceeding one year and involving more than one specialty (i.e., Internal
Medicine [Specialty Track] and Emergency Medicine [Special Emphasis]).
3
The number of programs by specialty (273) exceeds the total number of programs (227), as some hospitals combined
internship types in their reporting.
4
Responding internship programs include 55 interns in 21 combined internship/residency programs.
Source: AACOM, Graduate Medical Education Survey, 2004-05 academic year.

48

Photo courtesy of the Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine.


2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 26B
Type of Internships for D.O.s in AOA-Accredited Programs, 2005-06
Internship Type
Traditional Rotating Internship
Special Emphasis
Anesthesiology
Diagnostic Radiology
Emergency Medicine
Family Practice
General Surgery
Psychiatry
Specialty Track
Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine/Pediatrics
Obstetrics/Gynecology
Otolaryngology/Facial Plastic Surgery
Pediatrics
Urological Surgery
Other2
Total

Number of
Programs1
125
142
6
7
22
82
22
3
103
51
1
20
14
16
1
10
3803

Percent
32.9%
37.4%
1.6%
1.8%
5.8%
21.6%
5.8%
0.8%
27.1%
13.4%
0.3%
5.3%
3.7%
4.2%
0.3%
2.6%
100.0%

Number of
Interns
734
318
9
13
78
164
46
8
227
129
1
38
16
42
1
21
1,3003

Percent
56.5%
24.5%
0.7%
1.0%
6.0%
12.6%
3.5%
0.6%
17.5%
9.9%
0.1%
2.9%
1.2%
3.2%
0.1%
1.6%
100.0%

Note: Percent may not add to total due to rounding.


1
The response rate for this survey was 183 out of 269 hospitals (68.0%) with AOA accreditation as listed in the AOA
OPTI List, July 2005.
2
Other includes internships exceeding one year and involving more than one specialty (i.e., Internal Medicine [Specialty
Track] and Emergency Medicine [Special Emphasis]).
3
Responding internship programs include 158 interns in 80 combined internship/residency programs.
Source: AACOM, Graduate Medical Education Survey, 2005-06 academic year.

Photo courtesy of the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine.


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

49

Table 27A
D.O.s in AOA-Accredited Residencies1 by Specialty, 2004-05
Responding Programs2
Residency Program Specialty
Anesthesiology
Dermatology
Emergency Medicine3
Family Practice3
Family Practice and Emergency Med.
Family Practice and OMT
Internal Medicine3
Internal Med. and Emergency Med.
Internal Medicine and Pediatrics
Internal Medicine Subspecialties
Neurology
Neurological Surgery
Neuromusculoskeletal Med./Osteo.
Manipulative Treatment
Obstetrics/Gynecology and Subspec.3
Ophthalmology
Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery
Otorhinolaryngology and
Facial Plastic Surgery3
Pediatrics
Pediatric and Emergency Medicine
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Plastic/Reconstructive Surgery
Proctology
Psychiatry
Radiology-Diagnostic
Sports Medicine
Surgery-General3
Urological Surgery
Vascular Surgery
Total

Residents and Fellows


Percent of
Total Filled
2.2%
1.9%
16.0%
25.0%
0.4%
0.7%
9.2%
1.7%
0.0%
3.3%
1.0%
0.5%
0.3%

Number

Percent

Approved

Funded

Filled

9
10
28
90
4
5
36
8
1
21
5
4
3

2.5%
2.7%
7.6%
24.5%
1.1%
1.4%
9.8%
2.2%
0.3%
5.8%
1.4%
1.1%
0.8%

53
45
430
1,011
17
24
395
63
4
101
32
15
13

48
35
385
824
10
17
311
46
0
82
26
12
10

46
40
338
529
8
14
194
36
0
69
21
11
7

23
9
23
16

6.3%
2.5%
6.3%
4.4%

230
41
236
76

184
36
221
68

147
30
210
61

6.9%
1.4%
9.9%
2.9%

7
1
1
1
1
3
11
4
31
9
3
367

1.9%
0.3%
0.3%
0.3%
0.3%
0.8%
3.0%
1.1%
8.4%
2.5%
0.8%
100.0%

56
4
9
3
2
34
86
11
265
17
7
3,280

40
1
8
2
1
16
84
9
243
17
4
2,740

34
1
6
2
1
15
77
7
198
16
1
2,119

1.6%
0.0%
0.3%
0.1%
0.0%
0.7%
3.6%
0.3%
9.3%
0.8%
0.0%
100.0%

Note: Percents may not add down due to rounding.


1
The response rate for this survey was 191 out of 268 hospitals (71.3%) with AOA accreditation as listed in the AOA OPTI List, October 2004.
2
Includes 23 fellows in nine programs and 131 residents in combined internship/residency programs.
3
The approved and funded numbers for these programs include both interns and residents because they are combined programs.
Source: AACOM, Graduate Medical Education Survey, 2004-05 academic year.

50
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 27B
D.O.s in AOA-Accredited Residencies1 by Specialty, 2005-06
Responding Programs2
Residency Program Specialty
Anesthesiology
Dermatology
Emergency Medicine3
Family Practice3
Family Practice and Emergency Med.
Family Practice and OMT
Geriatrics
Internal Medicine3
Internal Med. and Emergency Med.
Internal Medicine and Pediatrics
Internal Medicine Subspecialties
Neurology
Neurological Surgery
Neuromusculoskeletal Med./Osteo.
Manipulative Treatment
Obstetrics/Gynecology and Subspec.3
Ophthalmology
Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery
Otorhinolaryngology and
Facial Plastic Surgery3
Pediatrics
Pediatric Subspecialties
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Plastic/Reconstructive Surgery
Preventive Medicine
Proctology
Psychiatry
Radiology-Diagnostic
Sports Medicine
Surgery-General3
Urological Surgery
Vascular Surgery
Other
Total

Residents and Fellows


Percent of
Total Filled
1.8%
2.0%
16.1%
24.0%
0.6%
0.0%
0.1%
11.1%
1.6%
0.1%
3.5%
1.3%
1.4%
0.2%

Number

Percent

Approved

Funded

Filled

10
12
35
111
5
1
1
47
8
1
39
13
8
4

2.2%
2.6%
7.7%
24.3%
1.1%
0.2%
0.2%
10.3%
1.8%
0.2%
8.5%
2.8%
1.8%
0.9%

57
64
606
1,302
32
2
2
548
66
3
165
63
49
20

50
63
512
1,068
24
0
2
444
54
3
126
54
47
13

50
56
448
668
18
0
2
310
44
3
97
36
39
6

27
8
24
17

5.9%
1.8%
5.3%
3.7%

264
35
257
82

221
34
239
74

165
33
225
68

5.9%
1.2%
8.1%
2.4%

11
2
1
1
1
1
5
12
7
33
3
7
2
457

2.4%
0.4%
0.2%
0.2%
0.2%
0.2%
1.1%
2.6%
1.5%
7.2%
0.7%
1.5%
0.4%
100.0%

113
4
8
3
6
2
68
113
22
314
21
14
13
4,318

100
1
8
2
6
1
56
102
19
284
20
6
13
3,646

70
0
8
2
6
1
41
95
14
244
20
4
10
2,783

2.5%
0.0%
0.3%
0.1%
0.2%
0.0%
1.5%
3.4%
0.5%
8.8%
0.7%
0.0%
0.1%
100.0%

Note: Percents may not add down due to rounding.


1
The response rate for this survey was 183 out of 269 hospitals (68.0%) with AOA accreditation as listed in the AOA OPTI List, July 2005.
2
Includes 23 fellows in 24 programs and 341 residents in 80 combined internship/residency programs.
3
The approved and funded numbers for these programs include both interns and residents because they are combined programs.
Source: AACOM, Graduate Medical Education Survey, 2005-06 academic year.

51
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 28
OPTI Programs, 2004-05 and 2005-06
School
AZCOM and CCOM1
ATSU/KCOM
& DMU-COM2
KCUMB-COM
LECOM
MSUCOM2
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT

OPTI
Midwestern University OPTI (MWU/OPTI)
Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institution of Kirksville (OPTIK)
Kansas City University of Medicine & Biosciences-College of Osteopathic
Medicine Educational Consortium (KCUMB-COMEC)
Lake Erie Consortium for Osteopathic Medical Training (LECOMT)
Statewide Campus System/Michigan State University College of
Osteopathic Medicine (SCS of MSUCOM OPTI)
Consortium for Excellence in Medical Education (CEME)
New York College of Osteopathic Medicine Educational Consortium
(NYCOMEC)

Hospitals Hospitals
2004-05
2005-06
17
19
24

24

22

21

25

25

19

20

21

21

OSU-COM

The Osteopathic Medical Education Consortium of Oklahoma (OMECO)

OU-COM
PCOM3

Centers for Osteopathic Research and Education (CORE)


PCOM MEDNet
Applachian Osteopathic Postgraduate Training Institute Consortium, Inc.
(A-OPTIK, Inc.)
Touro University Medical Education Consortium (TUMEC)
UMDNJ-SOM OPTI
Northeast Osteopathic Medical Education Network (NEOMEN)
Texas OPTI
OPTI-West Educational Consortium (OPTI-WEC)
Mountain State OPTI (MSOPTI)
Total

13
36

13
37

18

22

3
7
19
6
11
9
2622

4
6
19
7
11
10
2692

PCSOM & VCOM


TUCOM
UMDNJ-SOM
UNECOM
UNTHSC/TCOM2
WesternU/COMP
WVSOM

MWU/OPTI has seven additional hospitals for third- and fourth-year clerkships (14 total sites for clerkships) including one from SCS of MSUCOM
OPTI.
2
The OPTIK OPTI has two sites that are also included in the SCS of MSUCOM OPTI and one site included in Texas OPTI. Those three sites were
each counted twice to reflect membership in each OPTI.
3
PCOM MEDNet has 12 additional hospitals for third- and fourth-year clerkships (19 total sites for clerkships).
Source: American Osteopathic Association, Opportunities, Directory of Osteopathic Postdoctoral Education Programs, Supplemental OPTI Affiliation List, October 2004 and July 2005.

52
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

6. Faculty

Table 29
Faculty at Osteopathic Medical Schools, 2004-05 and 2005-06
2004-05 Academic Year

Faculty
Men
Women
Basic
Science
Unknown
Total
Men
Women
Clinical
Science
Unknown
Total
Men
Women
Total
Faculty
Unknown
Total
Academic/
Men
AdminisWomen
trative
Total
Staff
Men
Women
Total
Unknown
Staff
Total
% Total

Full
Time
404
152
0
555
597
290
0
887
1,000
442
0
1,442
492
792

Part
Time
73
33
0
106
790
230
0
1,021
864
263
0
1,127
46
60

Volunteer
73
19
0
92
10,713
2,217
737
13,667
10,786
2,236
737
13,759
37
2

1,284

106

1,492
1,234
0
2,726
15.4%

909
324
0
1,233
6.9%

2005-06 Academic Year (as of August 1, 2006)

550
204
0
753
12,100
2,738
737
15,575
12,650
2,941
737
16,328
574
855

% Total
Staff
3.1%
1.2%
0.0%
4.2%
68.1%
15.4%
4.5%
87.7%
71.2%
16.6%
4.5%
92.3%
3.2%
4.8%

Full
Time
432
150
0
582
608
299
0
907
1,040
448
0
1,489
515
745

Part
Time
87
49
12
145
1,338
342
95
1,775
1,425
390
107
1,922
59
88

39

1,429

8.0%

1,260

146

10,823
2,238
737
13,798
77.7%

13,224
3,796
737
17,757
100.0%

74.5%
21.4%
4.1%

1,555
1,193
0
2,749
15.9%

1,484
478
107
2,069
12.0%

Total

100.0%

Volunteer
71
21
0
92
8,983
1,989
1,383
12,355
9,054
2,010
1,383
12,447
23
2

590
220
12
822
10,929
2,629
1,478
15,036
11,519
2,849
1,490
15,858
597
835

% Total
Staff
3.4%
1.3%
0.1%
4.8%
63.2%
15.2%
9.3%
63.2%
66.6%
16.5%
9.4%
92.5%
3.4%
4.8%

25

1,432

8.3%

9,077
2,012
1,383
12,472
72.1%

12,116
3,683
1,490
17,289
100.0%

70.1%
21.3%
8.6%

Total

100.0%

Note: Numbers may not add to totals due to rounding in the conversion from FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent positions). Percents may not add to 100%
due to rounding,
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the


Touro University
College of Osteopathic Medicine
Nevada Campus.

53
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Figure 14A - Full-Time Faculty by Discipline, 2004-05


Gen. Prac./Fam. Med.

16.0%
9.7%

Internal Medicine
Anatomy

8.7%

Biochemistry
Psychiatry

6.2%
6.1%

Pharmacology

5.7%

Osteo. Principles & Practice

5.6%

Physiology

5.6%

Microbiology

4.6%

General Surgery

4.1%

Pathology

3.3%

Pediatrics
Ob/Gyn

3.3%

Geriatrics
Radiology
Neurology

2.6%
2.1%
1.9%
1.2%

Other

0.0%

13.4%

2.5%

5.0%

7.5%
10.0%
12.5%
15.0%
Percent of Total Full-Time Faculty

17.5%

20.0%

Note: Percents may not add to 100 due to rounding.


1
Includes Anesthesiology, Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Physical Medicine/
Rehabilitation, Preventive Medicine/Public Health, and Urology.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

54
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Figure 14B - Full-Time Faculty by Discipline, 2005-06 (as of August 1, 2006)


Gen. Prac./Fam. Med.

15.2%

Internal Medicine

9.4%

Anatomy

8.4%

Microbiology

7.0%

Osteo. Principles & Practice

6.4%

Pharmacology

6.0%

Physiology

5.9%

Biochemistry

5.7%

Psychiatry

4.6%

Pathology

3.8%

Pediatrics

3.6%

Prev. Med./Public Health

3.1%

General Surgery
Ob/Gyn
Geriatrics

2.7%
2.6%
2.0%

Radiology

1.4%

Neurology

1.3%

Other1
0.0%

11.0%

2.5%

5.0%

7.5%
12.5%
10.0%
15.0%
Percent of Total Full-Time Faculty

17.5%

20.0%

Note: Percents may not add to 100 due to rounding.


1
Includes Anesthesiology, Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Physical Medicine/
Rehabilitation, and Urology.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

Photo courtesy of the


Philadelphia College of
Osteopathic Medicine
Georgia Campus.

55
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Figure 15 - Volunteer Faculty by Discipline1


Internal Medicine

26.2%
24.4%

Gen. Pract./Fam. Med.


General Surgery
Pediatrics

12.7%
6.5%

Ob/Gyn

4.7%

Emergency Medicine
Psychiatry

2.5%

Radiology

2.3%

Osteo. Principles & Practice


Orthopedic Surgery

4.0%

A. 2004-05

2.0%
1.8%

Neurology

1.6%

Anesthesiology
Dermatology

1.5%
1.0%

Other2
0%

8.9%

3%

6%

9%

12%

15%

18%

21%

24%

27%

30%

Percent of Total Full-Time Faculty


Gen. Pract./Fam. Med.

27.7%
22.2%

Internal Medicine
General Surgery

11.4%

Pediatrics

7.5%

Emergency Medicine

4.7%

Ob/Gyn

4.7%

Psychiatry
Orthopedic Surgery
Osteo. Principles & Practice
Radiology
Neurology
Anesthesiology

3.2%
3.1%

(as of August 1, 2006)

2.3%
2.0%
1.7%

Otolaryngology

1.5%

Dermatology
Physical Med./Rehabilitation

1.3%

1.4%

Pathology
Urology

1.2%

Ophthalmology

1.1%

1.2%

Other

0%

B. 2005-06

2.7%

5.9%

3%

6%

9%

12%

15%

18%

21%

24%

27%

Percent of Total Full-Time Faculty


Note: Percents may not add to 100 due to rounding.
1
Data do not include administrative staff.
2
Includes Anatomy, Biochemistry, Geriatrics, Microbiology, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pharmacology, Physical Medicine/
Rehabilitation, Physiology, Preventive Medicine/Public Health, and Urology.
3
Includes Anatomy, Biochemistry, Geriatrics, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Preventive Medicine/Public Health.

56

Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

30%

Table 30
Tenured Faculty at Osteopathic Medical
Schools, 2004-05 and 2005-06
2004-05 Academic Year
Faculty

Basic
Science
Clinical
Science
Total
Faculty
Academic/
Administrative
Staff
Total
Staff

Men
Women
Total
Men
Women
Total
Men
Women
Total
Men
Women

Full
Time
182
54
236
116
32
148
298
86
384
42
9

Part
Time
10
2
12
26
2
28
36
4
40
0
0

Volunteer
0
0
0
12
2
14
12
2
14
0
0

Total

51

Men
Women
Total
% Total

340
95
435
88.8%

36
4
40
8.2%

2005-06 Academic Year (as of August 1, 2006)

192
56
248
154
36
190
346
92
438
42
9

% Total
Staff
39.2%
11.4%
50.6%
31.5%
7.3%
38.8%
70.6%
18.8%
89.4%
8.6%
1.8%

51

10.4%

12
2
14
2.9%

389
101
490
100.0%

79.4%
20.6%

Total

100.0%

Full
Time
198
55
253
117
32
149
315
87
402

Part
Time
7
1
8
28
2
30
35
3
38

Volunteer
0
0
0
5
2
7
5
2
7

Total
205
56
261
150
36
186
355
92
447

% Total
Staff
45.9%
12.5%
58.4%
33.6%
8.0%
41.6%
79.4%
20.6%
100.0%

No Information
315
87
402
89.9%

35
3
38
8.5%

5
2
7
1.6%

355
92
447
100.0%

79.4%
20.6%
100.0%

Note: Percentages may not add to total due to rounding.


Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the A.T. Still University / College of Osteopathic Medicine Mesa.
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

57

Table 31
Faculty and Administrative Staff Distributed
by Highest Degree, 2004-05 and 2005-06
2004-05 Academic Year
Highest Degree

Baccalaureate
Masters
D.O.
D.O, + Other Graduate Degree
M.D.
M.D. + Other Graduate Degree
Ph.D.
Other Doctorate
Other
Unknown
None
Total

Private
Schools
Percent
2.3%
2.1%
36.1%
0.6%
47.0%
0.8%
4.1%
1.0%
1.3%
0.0%
4.6%
100.0%

Public
Schools
Percent
1.2%
2.4%
64.3%
1.0%
21.8%
0.5%
6.1%
1.6%
0.5%
0.0%
0.3%
100.0%

Total
Percent
1.9%
2.2%
45.1%
0.8%
39.0%
0.8%
4.7%
1.2%
1.0%
0.0%
3.3%
100.0%

2005-06 Academic Year


(as of August 1, 2006)
Private
Schools
Percent
2.3%
2.1%
37.2%
0.8%
41.0%
1.0%
4.7%
1.2%
1.1%
1.8%
6.7%
100.0%

Public
Schools
Percent
1.4%
3.2%
62.9%
1.8%
17.3%
1.0%
9.4%
1.8%
0.4%
0.2%
0.6%
100.0%

Total
Percent
2.1%
2.4%
44.6%
1.1%
34.2%
1.0%
6.1%
1.4%
0.9%
1.4%
5.0%
100.0%

Percents may not add to 100% due to rounding.


Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

58
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

7. Revenues & Expenditures


Table 32
Total Revenues and Expenditures in Osteopathic Medical Schools for Fiscal Year 20041
($ Millions)

Item
Current Fund Revenues
A.

Tuition and Fees


D.O. Program
Other Programs
B. Government Appropriations
Federal
State
Local
C. Parent University
Appropriations
D. Grants and Contracts4
Federal
State
Local
Private
E. Indirect Cost Recoveries
F. Gifts
G. Endowment Income
H. Medical Practice Plans
I.
GME Revenue
J. Other
K. TOTAL Current Fund
Revenues
L. TOTAL Expenditures and
Transfers5
M. Excess of Revenues Over
Expenditures and Transfers

Recorded in Medical
School Accounts2

35.7
35.5
0.2
2.2
0.0
2.2
0.0

10.4
10.4
0.0
13.8
0.0
13.8
0.0

All
Schools
46.1
45.9
0.2
16.0
0.0
16.0
0.0

0.0

13.0

0.0

53.2
31.5
8.7
0.0
11.6
4.8
0.9
4.9
97.3
11.5
14.4

67.9
42.0
10.4
0.0
14.0
6.1
5.9
8.0
120.3
37.6
51.0

0.7
0.3
0.0
0.0
0.4
0.1
1.0
0.0
2.4
0.0
3.9

422.9

340.4

763.3

353.8

326.7

69.1

13.7

Private Public
296.0
276.8
19.2
16.9
0.9
16.0
0.0

35.9
33.9
2.0
117.7
0.0
117.7
0.0

0.0

0.0

14.7
10.5
1.7
0.0
2.5
1.4
5.0
3.1
23.0
26.1
36.7

All
Schools
331.9
310.8
21.2
134.6
0.9
133.7
0.0

Not Recorded in Medical


School Accounts3
Private Public

Total
Private Public

All
Schools
378.0
356.6
21.4
150.6
0.9
149.7
0.0

331.8
312.3
19.4
19.1
0.9
18.2
0.0

46.3
44.3
2.0
131.5
0.0
131.5
0.0

13.0

13.0

0.0

13.0

0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
1.3
0.0
0.0
3.8
0.0
0.0

0.7
0.3
0.0
0.0
0.4
1.4
1.0
0.0
6.2
0.0
3.9

15.5
10.9
1.7
0.0
2.9
1.5
6.0
3.1
25.4
26.1
40.5

53.2
31.5
8.7
0.0
11.6
6.1
0.9
4.9
101.1
11.5
14.4

68.6
42.3
10.4
0.0
14.4
7.5
6.9
8.0
126.5
37.6
54.9

59.1

29.3

88.3

482.2

369.7

851.7

680.5

50.5

27.9

78.4

404.3

354.6

758.9

82.8

8.6

1.3

9.9

77.7

15.0

92.7

Note: Numbers may not add across or down due to rounding.


1

Includes 20 schools and data for Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine branch campus in Henderson, Nevada, which admitted its first
class in Fall 2004. Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine data include its branch campus in Bradenton, Florida, which admitted its first class in
Fall 2004. Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
3
These are funds that benefit the medical school but are received or expended by an entity other than the medical school, such as a parent university.
Examples include institutional support such as plant operation and maintenance, as well as payment of faculty salaries by an affiliated institution.
4
Includes amounts received from restricted grants, contracts and cooperative agreements, as well as amounts expended for direct costs of current
operations.
5
From Expenditures by Function.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

59
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 33A
Average Revenues and Expenditures per Osteopathic Medical School for Fiscal Year 20041
($ Millions)

Item
Current Fund Revenues
A.

E.
F.
G.
H.

Tuition and Fees


D.O. Program
Other Programs
Government Appropriations
Federal
State
Local
Parent University
Appropriations
Grants and Contracts4
Federal
State
Local
Private
Indirect Cost Recoveries
Gifts
Endowment Income
Medical Practice Plans

I.

GME Revenue

B.

C.
D.

J.
K.

Other
TOTAL Current Fund
Revenues
L. TOTAL Expenditures and
Transfers6
M. Excess of Revenues Over
Expenditures and Transfers

Recorded in Medical
School Accounts2
Private Public

Not Recorded in Medical


School Accounts3

Total

All
All
All
Private Public
Private Public
Schools5
Schools5
Schools5
15.1
2.2
1.7
2.1
20.7
7.7
17.1
14.1
2.2
1.7
2.1
19.5
7.4
16.2
1.0
0.01
0.0
0.01
1.2
0.3
1.0
6.1
0.1
2.3
0.7
1.2
21.9
6.8
0.04
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.04
6.1
0.1
2.3
0.7
1.1
21.9
6.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

18.5
17.3
1.2
1.1
0.1
1.0
0.0

6.0
5.7
0.3
19.6
0.0
19.6
0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.8

0.0

0.6

0.8

0.0

0.6

0.9
0.7
0.1
0.0
0.2
0.1
0.3
0.2
1.4

8.9
5.2
1.5
0.0
1.9
0.8
0.1
0.8
16.2

3.1
1.9
0.5
0.0
0.6
0.3
0.3
0.4
5.5

0.05
0.02
0.0
0.0
0.03
0.01
0.1
0.0
0.2

0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.6

0.03
0.01
0.0
0.0
0.02
0.1
0.05
0.0
0.3

1.0
0.7
0.1
0.0
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.2
1.6

8.9
5.2
1.5
0.0
1.9
1.0
0.1
0.8
16.8

3.1
1.9
0.5
0.0
0.7
0.3
0.3
0.4
5.7

1.6

1.9

1.7

0.0

0.0

0.0

1.6

1.9

1.7

2.3

2.4

2.3

0.2

0.0

0.2

2.5

2.4

2.5

26.4

56.7

34.7

3.7

4.9

4.0

30.1

61.6

38.7

22.1

54.5

30.9

3.2

4.7

3.6

25.3

59.1

34.5

4.3

2.3

3.8

0.5

0.2

0.5

4.9

2.5

4.2

Note: Numbers may not add across or down due to rounding.


1

Includes 20 schools and data for Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine branch campus in Henderson, Nevada, which admitted its first
class in Fall 2004. Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine data include its branch campus in Bradenton, Florida, which admitted its first class in
Fall 2004. Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
2
These are funds received or expended directly by the medical school.
3
These are funds that benefit the medical school but are received or expended by an entity other than the medical school, such as a parent university.
Examples include institutional support such as plant operation and maintenance, as well as payment of faculty salaries by an affiliated institution.
4
Includes amounts received from restricted grants, contracts and cooperative agreements, as well as amounts expended for direct costs of current
operations.
5
In this table, the average for All Schools is based on the 20 schools and one branch campus, and is not the sum of public and private school
percentages.
6
From Expenditures by Function.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2004-05 academic year.

60
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 33B
Average Revenues and Expenditures per Osteopathic Medical School for Fiscal Year 20051
(as of August 1, 2006)
($ Millions)

Item
Current Fund Revenues
A.

E.
F.
G.
H.

Tuition and Fees


D.O. Program
Other Programs
Government Appropriations
Federal
State
Local
Parent University
Appropriations
Grants and Contracts4
Federal
State
Local
Private
Indirect Cost Recoveries
Gifts
Endowment Income
Medical Practice Plans

I.

GME Revenue

B.

C.
D.

J.
K.

Other
TOTAL Current Fund
Revenues
L. TOTAL Expenditures and
Transfers6
M. Excess of Revenues Over
Expenditures and Transfers

Recorded in Medical
School Accounts2
Private Public

Not Recorded in Medical


School Accounts3

Total

All
All
All
Private Public
Private Public
Schools5
Schools5
Schools5
16.6
2.4
1.7
2.2
22.1
7.7
18.0
15.1
2.4
1.9
2.3
20.8
7.8
17.4
1.3
0.01
0.0
0.01
1.5
0.8
1.3
5.6
0.1
2.7
0.8
0.1
21.8
6.4
0.03
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.04
0.0
0.03
5.6
0.1
2.7
0.8
0.1
21.8
6.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

20.8
18.4
1.5
0.1
0.04
0.8
0.0

5.9
5.9
0.8
19.0
0.0
19.0
0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.7

0.0

0.5

0.7

0.0

0.5

1.0
0.6
0.2
0.0
0.2
0.1
0.3
0.2
1.2

9.7
6.2
1.6
0.0
1.6
1.0
0.2
0.5
15.7

3.3
2.1
0.6
0.0
0.6
0.3
0.3
0.3
5.0

0.05
0.02
0.0
0.0
0.03
0.01
0.02
0.0
0.2

0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.7

0.03
0.01
0.0
0.0
0.02
0.1
0.02
0.0
0.3

1.0
0.7
0.2
0.0
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.2
1.4

9.7
6.2
1.6
0.0
1.6
1.2
0.2
0.5
16.4

3.3
2.1
0.6
0.0
0.6
0.4
0.3
0.3
5.3

1.5

1.3

1.5

0.0

0.0

0.0

1.5

1.3

1.5

2.1

3.7

2.5

-0.2

0.0

-0.1

1.9

3.7

2.4

27.2

57.9

35.2

3.3

5.5

3.9

30.5

63.4

39.1

22.4

55.5

31.0

3.1

4.8

3.6

25.5

60.3

34.6

4.8

2.4

4.2

0.2

0.7

0.3

5.0

3.1

4.5

Note: Numbers may not add across or down due to rounding.


1

Includes 20 schools and data for Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine branch campus in Henderson, Nevada, which admitted its first
class in Fall 2004. Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine data include its branch campus in Bradenton, Florida, which admitted its first class in
Fall 2004, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine data include its branch campus in Suwanee, Georgia, which admitted its first class in Fall
2005. Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
2
These are funds received or expended directly by the medical school.
3
These are funds that benefit the medical school but are received or expended by an entity other than the medical school, such as a parent university.
Examples include institutional support such as plant operation and maintenance, as well as payment of faculty salaries by an affiliated institution.
4
Includes amounts received from restricted grants, contracts and cooperative agreements, as well as amounts expended for direct costs of current
operations.
5
In this table, the average for All Schools is based on the 20 schools and one branch campus, and is not the sum of public and private school
percentages.
6
From Expenditures by Function.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

61
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 34
Revenues and Expenditures as Percent of Total Revenues for Fiscal Year 20051
(as of August 1, 2006)
Item
Current Fund Revenues

Recorded in Medical
School Accounts2
Private Public

A.

Tuition and Fees


73.0%
11.5%
D.O. Program
67.6% 10.2%
Other Programs
5.4%
1.3%
B. Government Appropriations
3.2%
32.9%
Federal
0.2%
0.0%
State
3.0%
32.9%
Local
0.0%
0.0%
C. Parent University
0.0%
0.0%
Appropriations
D. Grants and Contracts4
3.8%
16.8%
Federal
2.5%
10.7%
State
0.6%
2.8%
Local
0.0%
0.0%
Private
0.7%
2.8%
E. Indirect Cost Recoveries
0.3%
1.7%
F. Gifts
1.3%
0.4%
G. Endowment Income
0.7%
0.9%
H. Medical Practice Plans
4.5%
27.2%
I.
GME Revenue
5.6%
2.3%
J. Other
7.7%
6.4%
K. TOTAL Current Fund
100.0% 100.0%
Revenues
L. TOTAL Expenditures and
82.4% 95.9%
Transfers6
M. Excess of Revenues Over
17.6%
4.1%
Expenditures and Transfers

Not Recorded in Medical


School Accounts3

Total

All
All
All
Private Public
Private Public
Schools5
Schools5
Schools5
46.6%
73.4% 34.1%
58.9%
73.0%
13.5%
47.8%
42.9%
73.1% 34.1%
58.7%
68.2%
12.3%
44.5%
3.6%
0.3%
0.0%
0.2%
4.9%
1.2%
3.3%
15.9%
3.0% 49.5%
20.1%
3.1%
34.3%
16.3%
0.1%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.2%
0.0%
0.1%
15.8%
3.0% 49.5%
20.1%
3.0%
34.3%
16.2%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%

22.2%

0.0%

14.0%

2.4%

0.0%

1.4%

9.4%
6.0%
1.6%
0.0%
1.6%
0.9%
0.9%
0.8%
14.3%
4.2%
7.2%

1.4%
0.6%
0.0%
0.0%
0.8%
0.4%
0.7%
0.0%
4.7%
0.0%
-5.8%

0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
4.5%
0.0%
0.0%
11.9%
0.0%
0.0%

0.9%
0.4%
0.0%
0.0%
0.5%
2.0%
0.4%
0.0%
7.3%
0.0%
-3.6%

3.6%
2.3%
0.6%
0.0%
0.7%
0.3%
1.2%
0.6%
4.6%
5.0%
6.3%

15.3%
9.8%
2.6%
0.0%
2.6%
1.9%
0.3%
0.9%
25.9%
2.1%
5.8%

8.5%
5.5%
1.4%
0.0%
1.5%
1.0%
0.8%
0.7%
13.6%
3.8%
6.1%

100.0% 100.0%

100.0%

100.0% 100.0%

100.0%

100.0%
88.2%

94.3%

86.7%

91.5%

83.7%

95.1%

88.5%

11.8%

5.7%

13.3%

8.5%

16.3%

4.9%

11.5%

Note: Numbers may not add to 100% due to rounding.


1

Includes 20 schools and data for Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine branch campus in Henderson, Nevada, which admitted its first
class in Fall 2004. Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine data include its branch campus in Bradenton, Florida, which admitted its first class in
Fall 2004, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine data include its branch campus in Suwanee, Georgia, which admitted its first class in Fall
2005. Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
2
These are funds received or expended directly by the medical school.
3
These are funds that benefit the medical school but are received or expended by an entity other than the medical school, such as a parent university.
Examples include institutional support such as plant operation and maintenance, as well as payment of faculty salaries by an affiliated institution.
4
Includes amounts received from restricted grants, contracts and cooperative agreements, as well as amounts expended for direct costs of current
operations.
5
In this table, the percentage for All Schools is based on the 20 schools and is not the sum of public and private school percentages.
6
From Expenditures by Function.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2005-06 academic year.

62
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

8. Contract and Grant Activities


Table 35
Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools
by Type of Award, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005
Total for
Contract/Grant

Type

Number
New
Ongoing
Non-Competing Renewal
Competing Renewal
No-Cost Extension
Unknown
Total

278
244
87
10
54
0
673

Awarded in FY2004

Amount
Amount
Percent
($ Millions) ($ Millions)
$ 43.1
$ 28.1
42.2%
60.6
19.7
29.6%
52.6
16.3
24.4%
2.2
1.3
1.9%
13.0
1.2
1.8%
0
0
0.0%
1
$171.5
$66.6
100.0%

Total for
Contract/Grant
Number
371
281
88
9
65
7
821

Awarded in FY2005
(as of August 1, 2006)

Amount
Amount
($ Millions) ($ Millions)
$ 47.3
$26.7
77.9
21.8
62.5
14.1
2.3
1.6
11.8
1.0
4.3
0.1
$206.1
$65.41

Percent
40.8%
33.3%
21.6%
2.5%
1.5%
0.2%
100.0%

Note: Columns may not add to total due to rounding.


1
This amount was awarded within the particular fiscal year. It differs from the amount of contract/grant revenue reported in Table 34 because the latter
represents only those funds expended in FY2004 and FY2005 for current operations.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004--05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Table 36
Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools
by Awarding Agency, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005

Agency

Number

FY2004
Awards
($ Millions)

Percent

Number

57
4
6
130
30
57
68
134
15
6
1
61
104
0
673

$12.2
0.4
0.6
22.9
4.3
9.1
4.6
2.4
1.9
0.1
0.0
0.7
7.5
0.0
$66.6

18.3%
0.7%
0.9%
34.3%
6.4%
13.7%
6.9%
3.6%
2.9%
0.1%
0.0%
1.0%
11.2%
0.0%
100.0%

58
14
9
186
35
63
83
142
10
6
0
79
133
3
821

BHPr/HRSA/HHS
CDC
Defense
NIH
Other Federal
State or Local Government
Foundation
Pharmaceutical company
Biotechnology company
American Osteopathic Association
American Hospital Association
School-Sponsored
Other
Unknown
Total

FY2005
Awards as
of August
1, 2006
($ Millions)
$ 9.7
4.4
0.6
21.2
5.4
8.7
2.8
2.0
0.9
0.1
0.0
0.7
9.0
0.0
$65.4

Percent

14.8%
6.7%
0.9%
32.4%
8.2%
13.3%
4.3%
3.1%
1.4%
0.1%
0.0%
1.1%
13.7%
0.0%
100.0%

Note: Columns may not add to total due to rounding.


Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

63
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

Table 37
Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools
by Activity, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005

Activity

Number

FY2004
Awards
($ Millions)

Cooperative agreements
Demonstration project
Evaluation project
Fellowship
General institutional support
Program project
Research career award
Research contract
Research grant
Service/outreach
Training grant
Other
Unknown
Total

8
1
11
13
10
17
2
151
298
77
85
7
0
673

$ 0.4
0.1
0.5
0.6
0.4
3.9
0.1
5.6
28.9
6.9
18.3
0.9
0.0
$66.6

Percent

Number

0.6%
0.1%
0.8%
0.8%
0.5%
5.9%
0.1%
8.4%
43.4%
10.4%
27.4%
1.4%
0.0%
100.0%

8
1
10
10
13
31
0
164
409
81
82
11
1
821

FY2005
Awards as
of August
1, 2006
($ Millions)
$ 0.4
0.0
0.0
0.2
1.8
6.4
0.0
6.1
30.3
8.3
11.5
0.3
0.0
$65.4

Percent

0.6%
0.0%
0.0%
0.3%
2.8%
9.8%
0.0%
9.4%
46.3%
12.7%
17.6%
0.5%
0.1%
100.0%

Note: Columns may not add to total due to rounding.


Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

Table 38
Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical Schools
by Subject Area, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005

Subject Area

Number

FY2004
Awards
($ Millions)

Basic biomedical research


Behavioral research
Clinical research
Drug study
OMT/OPP
Graduate medical education
Medical education
Community outreach/service
Other
Unknown
Total

269
9
43
114
24
38
76
90
10
0
673

$28.9
0.7
3.9
1.7
1.3
4.8
15.5
8.6
1.1
0.0
$66.6

Percent

Number

43.4%
1.1%
5.9%
2.6%
2.0%
7.3%
23.3%
12.8%
1.6%
0.0%
100.0%

363
21
50
114
20
36
93
103
18
2
821

FY2005
Awards as
of August
1, 2006
($ Millions)
$28.1
2.3
5.1
1.2
1.3
4.1
15.3
6.1
1.2
0.1
$65.4

Percent

43.0%
3.5%
7.8%
1.8%
1.9%
6.3%
23.4%
9.3%
1.8%
0.2%
100.0%

Note: Columns may not add to total due to rounding.


Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years.

64
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Table 39
Contract and Grant Awards at Osteopathic Medical
Schools by Degree of Investigator,
Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005
Degree
Ph.D.
D.O.
D.O., Ph.D.
M.D.
M.D., Ph.D.
Other
Total

FY2004
Number1
226
110
3
22
4
51
416

Percent
54.3%
26.4%
0.7%
5.3%
1.0%
12.3%
100.0%

FY2005
as of August 1, 2006
Number1
247
103
4
23
3
63
443

Percent
55.8%
23.3%
0.9%
5.2%
0.7%
14.3%
100.0%

Note: Numbers may not add to 100% due to rounding.


1
Totals do not match Tables 35 through 38, as some awards were for contracts and
grants with more than one principal investigator, and investigators can have more
than one award.
Source: AACOM, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaires, 2004-05
and 2005-06 academic years.

Photo courtesy of the Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern University.


American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

65

Acknowledgments
This summary presents the major findings from AACOMs annual survey of all the osteopathic medical colleges in the
United States operating in the academic year 2005-06. It was conducted in cooperation with school administrators and
faculty, whose assistance in compiling the data is greatly appreciated.
This report was prepared by Tom Levitan, M.Ed.; Lorrie Van Akkeren developed the data base, assisted with the tabulations, and prepared the tables and figures. She was assisted by Susan Merritt and Cathy Golden. Wendy Bresler provided
editorial assistance, and the publication design was completed by David Churchill.

Publications Available from AACOM


Osteopathic Medical College Information Book
Contains a brief description of each of the osteopathic medical schools
and their admissions criteria, minimum entrance requirements, supplemental application information, class size and enrollment data, application deadlines, tuition, and other related information.
Available free of charge on AACOMs website.

Debts, Plans and Opinions


of Osteopathic Medical Students
Detailed survey that examines indebtedness of students at osteopathic
medical colleges. The characteristics and career plans of students are
compared upon entrance to osteopathic medical school and just prior to
their graduation.
Available on AACOMs website. Printed copies are $18.

Clinical Osteopathically Integrated


Learning Scenarios (COILS)

A series of 10 learning modules that demonstrate the integration and


distinctiveness of the osteopathic approach to patient care. Geared
primarily toward educators in osteopathic programs, the COILS provide
an overview of how osteopathic principles and osteopathic manipulative
medicine are integrated into care for patients with these specific conditions. Each module includes evaluation questions and forms.
Order from AACOMs website. $15 each.

66
2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education

Locations of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

UNECOM

CCOM
DMU-COM

LECOM
MSUCOM

TUCOM-CA
KCUMB-COM

WesternU/COMP
AZCOM

PCOM

OU-COM

ATSU/KCOM

PCSOM

TUCOM-NV

TOUROCOM
NYCOM/NYIT
UMDNJ-SOM

AACOM
WVSOM
VCOM

LMU-DCOM
OSU-COM

ATSU/COM-Mesa

PCOM-GA
UNTHSC/TCOM

indicates branch campus


LECOM-Bradenton

Abbreviation Key
AACOM
ATSU/COM-Mesa
ATSU/KCOM
AZCOM
CCOM
DMU-COM
KCUMB-COM
LECOM
LECOM-Bradenton
LMU-DCOM
MSUCOM
NSU-COM
NYCOM/NYIT
OSU-COM
OU-COM
PCOM
PCOM-GA

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

A.T. Still University / College of Osteopathic Medicine Mesa

A.T. Still University / Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine

Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern University

Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern University


Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences College of Osteopathic Medicine


Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine Bradenton Campus

Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine


Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine

New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of the New York Institute of Technology

Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine
Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Georgia Campus

TOUROCOM

Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine


Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine New York

TUCOM-CA

Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine California

PCSOM

TUCOM-NV
UMDNJ-SOM
UNECOM
UNTHSC/TCOM
VCOM
Western U/COMP
WVSOM

NSU-COM

Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine Nevada Campus

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Osteopathic Medicine


University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine

University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth / Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine
Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine

Western University of Health Sciences / College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific


West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

67

Photo courtesy of the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of the New York Institute of Technology

AACOM

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine


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Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815-7231
research@aacom.org
Phone: (301) 968-4100
http://www.aacom.org