www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 162
650. 588. 0388
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA 94066
Mon.-Sat. 10am-7pm
Sun. Noon t o 6pm
LINGERING DOUBTS
WORLD PAGE 31
‘3 DAYS’ LACKS
A REAL PUNCH
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19
UKRAINE AGREEMENT REACHED, BUT THE STREET RESISTS
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Redwood City gave Sims Metal
Management more than a dozen
new safety measures to implement
and extended the initial 60-day
evaluation period slated to end
Friday while the recycling opera-
tor considers the directive and out-
side agencies continue investigat-
ing a pair of fires within weeks of
each other at the port location.
Meanwhile, state Sen. Jerry
Hill, D-San Mateo, introduced leg-
islation Friday requiring state reg-
ulation of shredded automobile
material that he
said could drift
off site and con-
taminate the
environment. In
its announce-
ment of the bill,
Hill’s office
s p e c i f i c a l l y
cites Sims for
five of the six
fires at metal recycling facilities
in the Bay Area since 2007 of
which three were at the Redwood
City location. The last two blazes
in November and December led
Redwood City to impose the safe-
ty measures in December which
city officials on Friday reiterated
along with the new list.
A Sims spokeswoman said the
company was confused by Hill’s
bill including mention of the fires.
“We don’t understand how the
legislation relates to such fires but
as previously reported we have
taken numerous steps to eliminate
the fire risk referenced in the press
release,” said Jill Rodby, the pub-
lic relations and government
affairs manager for Sims’ Northern
California region.
City extends Sims restrictions, adds safety measures
Hill bill proposes regulation for automotive shredding facilities
Officer cleared
in San Bruno
fatal shooting
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A San Bruno police officer was
justified in fatally shooting the
driver of a stolen car who refused
demands to raise his hands and
instead accelerated toward him in a
bid to escape arrest, according to
the District Attorney’s Office.
The office announced Friday it
will not file charges against
Officer Andrew Harper and the
case of 25-year-old San Francisco
resident Ryan Salonga’s Oct. 22,
2013, death is closed.
Harper exercised his police pow-
ers “in an appropriately decisive
manner” against Salonga and
should “be commended” for stop-
ping his “deadly force and life-
endangering conduct,” District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe wrote in
a Feb. 5 letter to San Bruno Police
Chief Neil Telford.
Harper encountered Salonga and
passenger Sonny Ivone Tialavea
about 2:08 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22
Suspect killed after driving
stolen car at police officer
By Bree Fowler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — GoPro
isn’t exactly a household
name, but anyone who’s
spent a little time on
YouTube is surely familiar
with the thousands of snow-
boarding, surfing and even
skateboarding baby videos that its
cameras produce.
GoPro Inc., which makes a small
line of high-definition video cam-
eras geared toward extreme
sports athletes, is expe-
riencing a rare moment
in the spotlight. The San
Mateo-based company
is a common sight at the
Winter Olympics in Sochi,
Russia, showing up in
everything from the open-
ing ceremony to test runs of ski
As IPO looms, GoPro enjoys spotlight
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Plans to build a new Burlingame
recreation center to replace the
out-of-date facility are moving
forward with continued community
input, while a 35,500-square-foot
building located at the same loca-
tion is the front-runner.
The city has said the current
building is not seismically sound.
It is looking at a variety of
options, including three possible
locations for a new building, all of
which would still be east of the
Rec center plans progressing
Most popular option is building at same location with underground parking
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Children and their parents participate in the ‘Peninsula Music Together’class at the Burlingame Community Center.
Jerry Hill
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
The last two fires at Sims Metal Management occurred in November and
December. See SIMS, Page 23
See CENTER, Page 18 See GOPRO, Page 18
See OFFICER, Page 23
MEDAL COUNT
GOLD SILVER BRONZE TOTAL
9 U.S.A
Russia
Canada
7 11
9 10 7
9 5
27
26
24 10
Norway 10 8 22 4
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Paul
Lieberstein is 47.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1732
The first president of the United
States, George Washington, was born
in Westmoreland County in the
Virginia Colony.
“The passion for setting people
right is in itself an afflictive disease.”
— Marianne Moore, American poet (1887-1972)
Announcer Don
Pardo is 96.
Actress Drew
Barrymore is 39.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Stick fighter Learie Licorish, right, of the Campbell Trace gayelle, or stick fighting arena, fights rival Sean Lange of the Arouca
gayelle during the finals of the national stick fighting competition, in San Fernando,Trinidad and Tobago.
Saturday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs around 60.
Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Lows in the mid 40s. West winds 5 to 10
mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the upper 50s. West winds
5 to 10 mph.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becom-
ing mostly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s. West winds around
5 mph.
Monday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Monday ni ght: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Highs around 60.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1784, a U.S. merchant ship, the Empress of China, left
New York for the Far East to trade goods with China.
I n 1862, Jefferson Davis, already the provisional presi-
dent of the Confederacy, was inaugurated for a six-year term
following his election in Nov. 1861.
I n 1865, Tennessee adopted a new constitution which
included the abolition of slavery.
I n 1909, the Great White Fleet, a naval task force sent on
a round-the-world voyage by President Theodore Roosevelt,
returned after more than a year at sea.
I n 1924, President Calvin Coolidge delivered the first
radio broadcast from the White House as he addressed the
country over 42 stations.
I n 1934, Frank Capra’s romantic comedy “It Happened
One Night,” starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert,
opened at New York’s Radio City Music Hall.
I n 1943, Pan Am Flight 9035, a Boeing 314 flying boat,
crashed while attempting to land in Lisbon, Portugal.
Twenty-five people were killed; 14 survived, including
actress-singer Jane Froman.
I n 1959, the inaugural Daytona 500 race was held;
although Johnny Beauchamp was initially declared the win-
ner, the victory was later awarded to Lee Petty.
I n 1967, more than 25,000 U.S. and South Vietnamese
troops launched Operation Junction City, aimed at smash-
ing a Vietcong stronghold near the Cambodian border.
(Although the communists were driven out, they later
returned.)
I n 1974, Pakistan officially recognized Bangladesh (for-
merly East Pakistan).
I n 1980, the “Miracle on Ice” took place in Lake Placid,
N.Y., as the United States Olympic hockey team upset the
Soviets, 4-3.
P
resident Woodrow Wilson (1856-
1924) had a flock of sheep that
grazed on the White House lawn.
The wool from the sheep was sold to
raise money for the Red Cross during
World War I.
***
The known universe is 13.7 billion
years old.
***
INTERPOL, the world’s largest interna-
tional police organization, uses a glob-
al police communications system called
I-24/7. Through I-24/7 law enforcement
officials in all 186 member countries
can access and share crucial information
on criminals and criminal activities.
***
The National Toy Hall of Fame in
Rochester, N.Y., recognizes toys that
have been popular over a sustained peri-
od. Some of the toys that have made Hall
of Fame status are Monopoly, checkers,
Silly Putty, roller skates and marbles.
***
The coldest capital city in the world is
Ulaan-Baatar, Mongolia, where the tem-
perature gets down to 29.7 degrees F.
***
As an elephant gets older its feet get
bigger. When a lion ages it gets more
freckles on its nose. Feathers on a bald
eagle’s head turn white as they age.
***
Dollar bills are not made from paper.
They are composed of 25 percent linen
and 75 percent cotton. That’s why the
bills do not get destroyed in the wash.
***
The first dustless school chalk was
developed in 1902 by the company
Binney and Smith in Pennsylvania. The
following year, the company created the
first box of eight Crayola crayons,
which cost a nickel.
***
In a box of crayons, can you guess
which two crayon colors are usually used
the most? See answer at end.
***
The word orangutan means “people of
the forest” in the Malay language.
***
Kermit the Frog eats Dragonfly Ripple
ice cream when he goes to the county
fair in the “The Muppet Movie” (1979).
***
The original jeans by Levi Strauss
(1829-1902), created in 1850, had sus-
pender buttons. It wasn’t until 1922 that
belt loops were added to the jeans.
***
Oliver Hardy (1892-1957), the larger
half of the comedy team Laurel and
Hardy, became interested in movies
when he worked at the first movie theater
in his hometown. Hardy was the projec-
tionist and janitor at the Electric Theater
in Milledgeville, Ga., in 1910.
***
Atlanta, Ga., is the worst U.S. city to
live in for people who suffer from asth-
ma, according to the Asthma and Allergy
Foundation of America.
***
Wiping mini-blinds with a damp fabric
softener sheet will keep them from col-
lecting dust.
***
The fortune-telling machine in the
movie “Big” (1988) that makes 13-year-
old Josh Baskin suddenly become an
adult is called Zoltar Speaks. Tom Hanks
(born 1956) stars as the teenager in a
man’s body.
***
Neapolitan Mastiff dogs are commonly
used as guard dogs, mainly because they
weigh an average of 150 pounds.
***
Ronald Reagan (1911-2004) announced
he had Alzheimer’s disease, the Dallas
Cowboys defeated the Buffalo Bills in
the Super Bowl and Olympic figure
skater Nancy Kerrigan (born 1969) was
attacked. It all happened in 1994.
***
On July 4, 1976, the Sara Lee baking
company presented the United States
with a bicentennial birthday cake that
was four stories tall.
***
Answer: Black and red.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers Monday)
DAZED SHINY POLLEN COZIER
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When asked if they would be buying the little lodg-
ing establishment, they said -- YES, “INN-DEED”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SERSD
DIRNG
NAGRAH
WHORNT
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
Lotto
4 4 0
35 49 54 1 17
23 29
34
Powerball
Feb. 19 Powerball
22 24 10 15 31
Feb. 19 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
33 30 37 39
Fantasy Five
3 7 1
Daily three midday
32 45 46 15
Mega number
Feb. 21 Mega Millions
2 5 0
Daily three evening
0
19
1
Mega number
The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,
No. 9, in first place; California Classic, No. 5, in
second place;and Lucky Star,No.2,in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:41.05.
Actor Paul Dooley is 86. Hollywood “ghost singer” Marni
Nixon is 84. Movie director Jonathan Demme is 70. Actor
John Ashton is 66. Actress Miou-Miou is 64. Actress Julie
Walters is 64. Basketball Hall of Famer Julius Erving is 64.
Actress Ellen Greene is 63. Former Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tenn., is
62. Former White House adviser David Axelrod is 59. Actor
Kyle MacLachlan is 55. World Golf Hall of Famer Vijay Singh
is 51. Actress-comedian Rachel Dratch is 48. Actress Jeri
Ryan is 46. Actor Thomas Jane is 45. TV host Clinton Kelly
(TV: “The Chew”; “What Not to Wear”) is 45. Actress Tamara
Mello is 44. Actress-singer Lea Salonga is 43.
3
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Robbery. A person had their cellphone
stolen by three armed men on El Camino
Real before 3:37 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 20.l
Sus pi ci ous vehi cl e. Two girls reported
a man with sunglasses staring at them
from a van on Marsh Road before 3:11
p. m.
Di sturbance. A person reported being
shot by a BB gun on Main Street before
12:02 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 20.
Vandal i s m. A person had their 2006
black Dodge Charger’s tires slashed for
the third time on Convention Way before
9:56 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 20.
SAN BRUNO
Ident i t y t hef t. Someone used someone
else’s name, address and Social Security
number to open a credit card and charge
$1,500 on the 1200 block of El Camino
Real before 2:23 p.m. Monday, Feb. 17.
Ident i t y t hef t . Someone used someone
else’s business name and address to cash a
fraudulent check of $531.96 on the 1300
block of El Camino Real before 7:44 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 14.
Grand theft. A board motor was taken
from a boat on the 1600 block of Donner
Avenue before 5:42 a.m. Friday, Feb. 14.
Police reports
This looks bad
A person was reported for staring at
people and making them feel uncom-
fortable on Middlefield Road in
Redwood City before 3:41 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 20.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Right in the Peninsula’s backyard, South
San Francisco artist Barbara Butler builds
children’s play structures and her latest
project will help all kids — including those
with disabilities — play on playgrounds.
Butler, who runs her treehouse and custom
play structures business out of a South San
Francisco office, began this career in the
late ’80s after majoring in political science
in college, then pursing writing and paint-
ing. In addition to the residential work she
does, she also helps with public projects,
such as building an Americans with
Disabilities Act friendly playground in Palo
Alto that’s inclusive to all children.
“I did construction to pay the bills,” she
said. “I fell in love. … It combines play,
sculpting, woods and the outdoors.”
Originally from upstate New York, Butler
moved to San Francisco in 1983 and found-
ed Outer Space Designs, designing and
building unique decks and hot tubs. In 1987,
singer Bobby McFerrin and his wife request-
ed Butler make a play structure for their two
children. This is what really spurred Butler’s
career. Since then, she worked with clients
like Robert Redford; Will Smith and Jada
Pinkett; and Walt Disney Productions.
Butler’s Rough & Tumble Outpost play
structure was highlighted as the FAO
Schwartz “Ultimate Gift” in the 1999
Christmas catalog. AButler playhouse was
also used in the “Bicentennial Man” movie.
“At first people told me, ‘you can’t do
that, it’s not a real job,’” said Butler, who
lives in San Francisco.
She moved the office for Barbara Butler
Artist-Builder Inc. to the Peninsula 15 years
ago during the dot-com bubble. In her San
Francisco building, other tenants com-
plained about the noise from her studio.
“I moved to South San Francisco and
found a great old warehouse,” Butler said.
Butler does travel a lot. She flies in for
design meetings, but builds at the ware-
house. Then, the company will fly in for
installations, which take about three to five
days to complete. She specializes in wood
and custom builds.
Fifty percent to 60 percent of her work is
residential, while the other part is for public
use. Public use includes preschools, parks,
developments and affordable housing proj-
ects.
One such public project she’s currently
working on is the Magical Bridge
Playground in Mitchell Park in Palo Alto in
conjunction with the city and Friends of the
Magical Bridge, a project of Friends of the
Palo Alto Parks. The project is for kids of all
abilities — including children in wheel-
chairs — and is ADAcompliant. The univer-
sal access playground includes ramping sys-
tems to enable wheelchairs to travel the
entire length of the play structure; smooth
rubber surfacing (instead of traditional bark
or sand) to be friendly to those with limited
mobility; playhouse structure and commu-
nity stage fully accessible to inspire imagi-
nations; a raised sand play table; and The
Quiet Corner to invite people to gather, rest
or play chess. Construction should start
this summer and finish by the end of August.
“The public ones are really close to my
heart,” Butler said. “I get to hit kids of all
income brackets and am really shaping their
childhood experiences. Magical Bridge is
really dear to me. I want to make it super,
super fun for kids of all abilities. It’s for
everyone to enjoy. ”
For more on Butler visit
barbarabutler.com.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Artist creates famous play structures
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
South San Francisco’s Barbara Butler has built
residential and public playgrounds since 1987.
4
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Alleged ‘Valentine’s Day
bandit’ arrested in San Francisco
A man connected with two bank rob-
beries, one in Millbrae Jan. 10 and the sec-
ond in Burlingame Feb. 14, was arrested
Thursday afternoon near his residence in
San Francisco, according to the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office.
At approximately 4 p.m., detectives from
the Burlingame Police Department, the
Sheriff’s Office and the FBI located Reginald
Sydney Jones, 62, near his residence, exe-
cuted a search warrant at his residence and
found evidence related to both robberies,
according to the Sheriff’s Office.
He was booked into San Mateo County
Jail for two counts of bank robbery with
bail set at $750,000, according to the
Sheriff’s Office.
The suspect was dubbed the “Valentine’s
Day bandit” because of the latest crime in
Burlingame at the Bank of the West Feb. 14.
He allegedly robbed Chase Bank in Millbrae
Jan. 10 in which he displayed a handgun,
according to police.
County accepts 478
coastside acres from POST
The county accepted 478 acres of coast-
side land donated by the Peninsula Open
Space Trust to expand the 40-acre Quarry
Park.
The land, commonly known as Wicklow,
is located about four miles north of Half
Moon Bay east of Highway 1 in El
Granada.
“This is great news for anyone who
enjoys the outdoors,” Supervisor Don
Horsley, whose district includes the coast-
side, said in a prepared statement.
POST initially preserved the Wicklow
property in 2002 after receiving a 462-acre
donation from Bay Area builder Mike
O’Neill and his family. It is named after the
county where he grew up in Ireland.
The scenic land was previously used for
cattle grazing and up to four luxury estate
homes could have been built there had the
owners opted for development over dona-
tion.
The existing facilities like parking and
restrooms at neighboring Quarry Park make
for a natural gateway to the Wicklow addi-
tion, said Parks Director Marlene Finley.
The transaction is expected to be com-
plete within the next four months if not
sooner.
Local briefs
STATE
GOVERNMENT
• State Sen. Jerry
Hi l l , D- San
Mat eo, introduced
legislation that
would require credit
card issuers and
retailers in California to adopt microchip-
based credit card technology by Oct. 1
2015.
Retail fraud from counterfeit credit cards
has more than doubled since 2007 in the
United States, one of the last countries in
the world that relies almost exclusively on
magnetic strip identification technology
for credit cards, according to Hill’s office.
Under Hill’s Senat e Bi l l 1351, begin-
ning on Oct. 1, 2015, cards issued or
renewed by banks or credit card companies
would have to utilize chip technology
while retailers would be required to have
scanners capable of reading the new cards.
• Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-
Menlo Park, introduced Assembl y Bi l l
1 9 7 0 to create a Communi ty
Investment and Innovation Program
that will provide financial support to local
governments for projects that aim to
reduce their local carbon footprints and
spur innovation.
Under the Community Investment and
Innovation Program, local and regional
governments will have the opportunity to
apply for grant funding made available
through the state’s cap and trade auction
revenue. Eligible grant applicants must
implement projects that reduce greenhouse
gases, whether it is diverting solid waste
from landfills, increasing electric vehicle
infrastructure or promoting clean energy
solutions, according to Gordon’s office.
REGIONAL GOVERNMENT
• SamTrans is seeking volunteers for its
Ci t i zens Advi sory Commi t t ee.
Member of the public interested in provid-
ing input on local transit programs can
volunteer to be on the 15-member commit-
tee that meets on the last Wednesday of
each month and acts in an advisory capaci-
ty to the SamTrans’ Board of
Direct ors.
There are openings for two community
representatives, two multimodal represen-
tatives and four bus rider representatives.
For more information call (650) 508-
6279.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Redwood City Council will hear
a mid-year general fund budget update and
consider holding a budget study session
Monday, June 9 followed by the hearing to
pass the budget Monday, June 23.
The Ci t y Counci l meets 7 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 24 at City Hall, 1017
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
5
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Tuesday February 25th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Basque Cultural Center
599 Railroad Ave., So. San Francisco, CA 94080
Tuesday March 4th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
Peninsula Jewish Community Center
800 Foster City Blvd., Foster City, CA 94404
Conference Room A
(This Event/Program Is Not Sponsored By The PJCC)
Tuesday February 25th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
Mimi’s Café
2208 Bridgepointe Parkway, San Mateo, CA 94404
Wednesday March 5th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Zephyr Café
3643 Balboa Street, San Francisco, CA 94121
(Outer Richmond District San Francisco)
Wednesday February 26th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Hampton Inn & Suites – Skyline Room
2700 Junipero Serra Blvd., Daly City, CA 94015
Wednesday March 5th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
Harry’s Hofbrau – Private Banquet Room
1909 El Camino Real, Redwood City, CA 94063
Wednesday February 26th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
United Irish Cultural Center – Boardroom
2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94116
Thursday March 6th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Millbrae Library – Room A
1 Library Lane, Millbrae, CA 94030
Thursday February 27th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Hawthorn Suites by Wyndham
1628 Webster Street, Alameda, CA 94501
Thursday March 6th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
United Irish Cultural Center
2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94116
(Outer-Sunset District)
Thursday February 27th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
Sapore Italiano Restaurant–La Stanza Room
1447 Burlingame Avenue, Burlingame, CA 94010
Thursday March 20th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Shari’s Cafe
2010 Rollingwood Drive, San Bruno, CA 94066
Tuesday March 4th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Home Town Buffet
212 Greenhouse Marketplace, San Leandro, CA 94579
Thursday March 20th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
CyBelle’s Front Room Restaurant
1385 9th Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94122
(Sunset District)
The Law Offices of CR Abrams, P.C.
1-877-322-9778
Protecting American Families for 25 years! Married
couples are encouraged to attend together Call now to
reserve your seat!
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Aformer San Mateo school administrator,
father and 42-year resident of San Mateo,
Mark Avelar recently accepted the highest
honor by the San Mateo County/Silicon
Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau for
his hospitality work.
Avelar, 67, was presented with the Margi
Grant Heart of Hospitality Award, given each
year to a person who selflessly devotes his
time to helping the hospitality industry.
“I was very surprised,” he said. “Anne
LeClair (president and CEO of the bureau) is
sneaky. She fooled me. I thought I was going
there to hear the guest speaker talk about the
Super Bowl — she knows I’m a huge 49ers
fan. Then, she invited some of my friends
there.”
Avelar’s volunteer efforts to bring multiple
golfing events to the area have generated
thousands of room nights for San Mateo
County hotels and a great deal of business for
area restaurants and rental
car companies, it was
noted at the awards cere-
mony.
“It was wonderful to see
these honorees recog-
nized,” LeClair said in an
official statement. “They
are the people who make
our industry successful,
day in, day out.”
Avelar used to teach
history and physical education at El Camino
High School and ultimately ended up retiring
in 2006 after serving as deputy superintend-
ent in the San Mateo Union High School
District. His last 15 years of work were for
that district. These days, he travels and vol-
unteers most of the time.
“I did some consulting work and mentoring
of new principals,” he said. “I did that for
three years, then decided to become fully
retired about four to five years ago.”
He definitely hasn’t been inactive since his
retirement. He is active in the San Mateo
Rotary Club, is on a senior housing board,
helps with fundraising campaigns and is
active in golf tournaments. He also plays a
lot of golf and is a member of The Olympic
Club in San Francisco.
“I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my years in the
Rotary and feel connected to the community,”
Avelar said. “I’ve gotten to know great peo-
ple in San Mateo in businesses and local gov-
ernment.”
He also travels with his wife of 45 years.
His 31-year-old daughter is a physical thera-
pist in the Bay Area. Just this year, he’ll be in
Mexico, Palm Springs and Wisconsin for
work he does as a golf course rater for
Golfweek Magazine. He will also go to
Arizona with some golf buddies and Lake
Tahoe in July for his annual family vacation.
Working on the Rotary
scholarship committee is also
an enjoyable task for Avelar.
“It’s very rewarding
work,” he said. “I get to
meet some great kids.”
The Margi Grant Heart of Hospitality Award
is named after a dedicated bureau employee
who retired in 2008, after working at the
bureau for more than 25 years.
Also honored at the bureau’s annual meet-
ing were four Peninsula Recognition for
Passionate Service award winners. The
Innovation in Hospitality Award recipient
was Danny Tam. Anthony Silveira was given
an award for Outstanding Community
Service. Yanna Karbushev was the recipient
of the Behind the Scenes Service Award. The
Unsung Hero Service Award was awarded to
Victoria Wong. Honorable mentions were
given to: Gabriela Melgoza, Matthew Poole,
Maria Zavala, Harry Hayes, Joyce Luo, Yoyo
Chen, Horacio Prieto, Teri Ching, Paul
Schenkman and Julie Schenkman.
Retired school administrator honored
Mark Avelar
6
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
After more than four years with
Half Moon Bay, City Manager
Laura Snideman announced her
departure citing family considera-
tions when taking an executive
position with Napa County — her
childhood home.
Her last day will be March 19
and Mayor John Muller said the
city will seek an interim city man-
ager before seeking a permanent
replacement.
“We’re going to miss Laura —
there’s no doubt about it,” Muller
said in a press release. “She was
the right leader at the right time
for Half Moon Bay. Her extensive
knowledge of municipal manage-
ment and commitment to restoring
the fiscal health of the city were
fundamental in getting us back on
track. Luckily, Laura leaves behind
an incredible foundation and orga-
nizational structure that’s built for
long-term success. The fact that
she is making a
personal sacri-
fice for her fam-
ily at this time
says even more
about her char-
acter than just
her many
a c c o mp l i s h -
ments.”
S n i d e m a n
o r i g i n a l l y
joined the city in 2009 as the
administrative officer before being
named city manager in 2010. She
has a long history in local govern-
ment having worked for the cities
of Redwood City, San Carlos and
San Mateo before making the
move to Half Moon Bay.
“My time in Half Moon Bay has
been deeply rewarding — both
professionally and personally, ”
Snideman said in a press release.
“In addition to many great friend-
ships that I’ll take with me, I am
very proud of what we accom-
plished over the past four years.
Working together, we found inno-
vative solutions and took decisive
actions to get the city of Half
Moon Bay back on solid financial
ground. The progress we’ve made
is extraordinary and a model to
other cities that may face similar
challenges.”
Snideman helped navigate the
city through a tumultuous time in
getting the city’s budget back into
positive territory, helping the city
contract its police services with
the San Mateo County Sheriff’s
Office and making plans for infra-
structure improvements.
Muller said the city is in a good
position now but she will be
missed and that her announcement
was a surprise.
“It was unforeseen. I always
stress that in local government
that you should be prepared for the
unexpected and this was unexpect-
ed,” he said. “She’s such a wonder-
ful person.”
Half Moon Bay city manager resigns
Laura
Snideman
O
n Wednesday, Feb. 26,
the 2014 San Mateo
County Office of
Education Science,
Technol ogy, Engi neeri ng
and Math (STEM) Fair Open
House will take place at the
Hi l l er Aviation Museumi n
San Carlos. The fair is a county-
wide event that aims to foster a
greater interest and deeper under-
standing of science, mathematics,
engineering and technology
among San Mateo County stu-
dents. The fair is the qualifying
event for science projects to enter
both the San Francisco Bay Area
and California State Fairs.
The public is welcome to
attend. Attendees will see more
than 340 projects designed and
created by current county stu-
dents. Fifth- and sixth-grade proj-
ects will be highlighted from
5:30 p.m- 6:30 p.m., with the
seventh-grade- through 12th-
grade projects directly following
from 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
The museum is located at 601
Skyway Road in San Carlos.
***
Spruce Elementary School
in South San Francisco will host
an Aztec dance event 6 p.m.-
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 27.
Adults pay $5, students pay $2
and kids under 4 are free. It helps
raise funds for Spruce
Elementary School
Pl ayworks.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by educa-
tion reporter Angela Swartz. You can
contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105
or at angela@smdailyjournal.com.
STATE 7
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The leader of the state
Senate said Friday that a fellow Democratic
lawmaker should resign or face suspension
after he was indicted on multiple federal cor-
ruption charges.
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell
Steinberg said he has the support of the
Senate’s Democratic caucus in calling for
Sen. Ron Calderon to resign or take a leave
of absence after he was indicted on bribery,
conspiracy and money laundering charges.
Calderon, D-Montebello, is charged with
using his office to extract bribes from a hos-
pital executive and undercover FBI agents
who pretended to be involved in the film
industry. Federal prosecutors said the
amount was $100,000 in cash.
“Given the seriousness of charges that
strike at the very heart of what it means to be
a public official, Senator Calderon’s continued
service is a cloud over all the important work
that we must get done this year. It is in the
best interests of the people and the Senate if
he resigns. I call on him to do so,” Steinberg,
D-Sacramento, said in a statement.
Mario Beltran, a spokesman for
Calderon, said he had no immediate
response. Calderon’s criminal attorney,
Mark Geragos, has not returned repeated
requests for comment.
If Calderon does not
resign or take a leave of
absence, the Senate will
seek to suspend him,
Steinberg said. He noted
that the Senate Rules
Committee already
stripped Calderon of his
committee assignments.
Steinberg said that
while it is true that
Calderon is innocent unless proven guilty,
the Senate’s ethics code also governs sena-
tors’ behavior. But he said it would be diffi-
cult for the Senate’s ethics committee to
conduct its own investigation while the fed-
eral prosecution proceeds because the U.S.
Attorney’s Office asked the Senate not to
call any witnesses in the case.
Steinberg was among three senators
named in an earlier leaked FBI affidavit in
the Calderon investigation. All three said
they were told by federal prosecutors that
they were not targets of the investigation,
and none has been charged.
The indictment released Friday says
Calderon was in contact with three senators
as he attempted to influence legislation,
listed only as senators A, B and C. It also
refers to an unindicted co-conspirator, who
remains unidentified.
Senate leader says indicted lawmaker should resign
REUTERS
Andre Birotte Jr.,U.S.Attorney for the Central District of California,speaks at a news conference
in Los Angeles. California state Sen. Ron Calderon has been indicted on federal charges that
he accepted some $100,000 in cash bribes from a businessman and undercover FBI agents
in connection with legislation, prosecutors said.
Ronald
Calderon
By Scott Smith
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRESNO — Without a lot more rain and
snow, many California farmers caught in
the state’s drought can expect to receive no
irrigation water this year from a vast system
of rivers, canals and reservoirs interlacing
the state, federal officials announced Friday.
The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation released
its first outlook of the year, saying that the
agency will continue to monitor rain and
snow fall, but the grim levels so far prove
that the state is in the throes of one of its
driest periods in recorded history.
Farmers who rely on the federally run
Central Valley Project received only 20 per-
cent of their normal water allotment last
year and were expecting this year’s bad
news. Some communities and endangered
wildlife that rely on the federal water source
will also suffer deep cuts.
The state’s snowpack is at 29 percent of
average for this time of year, which means
that for farmers it’s going to be a hard year.
“My gross sales are probably going to be
cut in half,” said Bill Diedrich, who farms
1,500 acres of almonds, tomatoes and
other crops in the parched Central Valley
community of Firebaugh. “Some farmers
out here are going to lose everything
they’ve got.”
Gov. Jerry Brown last month declared
California’s drought emergency, and both
state and federal officials have pledged mil-
lions of dollars to help with water conser-
vation and food banks for those put out of
work by the drought.
California officials who manage the State
Water Project, the state’s other major water
system, have already said they won’t be
releasing any water for farmers, marking a
first in its 54-year history.
California farmers won’t get federal water
LOCAL/NATION/WORLD 8
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
www.cityofsanmateo.org
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
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º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
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Immediate
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Job Requirements:
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Gayle Stauffer
Longtime San Carlos resident Gayle Stauffer died peace-
fully with her family at her bedside Feb. 13, 2014. She was
born to Fred and Bernice Winterberg June
21, 1932, in San Francisco.
Survived by her sister Gayle Benedict
of Washington; daughter Stacy Stauffer;
son Gregory Stauffer and cousin Lynda
Iversen of Portland, Ore. Gayle had many
careers in her life starting as an ice skater
in Ice Capades, a flight attendant with
United Airlines, administrative assistant
for various local companies and all along
the way heavily involved with communi-
ty theater such as San Carlos Chickens Ball, Claypipers,
Kiwanis Show and Belmont Community Players. She want-
ed to have a celebration of life because of the love she had
for her family, friends, music and show business.
Her life’s celebration will be 1 p.m.-5 p.m. March 1 at the
San Mateo County Mounted Patrol Grounds, 521 Kings
Mountain Road, Woodside. Sign the guestbook at
www.crippenflynn.com.
Theresa Nadine Delande
Theresa Nadine Delander, born Dec. 5, 1947, died Feb. 18,
2014.
She was a resident of Paicines.
Wife of the late Roger John Delander Jr. Devoted mother
of Roger John Delander III, Michael Christopher Delander
and Greg Mark Delander. Grandmother of Raya Delander,
Rowen Delander and Sierra Delander. Daughter of William
Albert Taylor and Ethel Louise Taylor. Sister of John E.
Taylor and Cindy Zoe Holmboe.
Friends may visit 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25 and are
invited to attend a 6:30 p.m. vigil at Sneider & Sullivan &
O’Connell’s Funeral Home,
977 S. El Camino Real in San Mateo. Afuneral mass will
be celebrated at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26 at St. Gregory
Catholic Church, 28th Avenue and Hacienda Street in San
Mateo. Committal at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma.
Donations may be made to St. Gregory’s Catholic Church.
Allen Orin Howery
Allen Orin Howery, Born in San Mateo Oct. 18, 1970,
died Jan. 7, 2014.
He graduated from Aragon High School in 1988 and spent
all his life in the San Mateo area. Survived by his father and
stepmother Albert and Joyce Howery, sister Teresa Pale,
stepbrother Todd Shipley and stepsister Debbie Rivera and
their families. Also survived by aunts, uncles, nieces,
nephews and cousins. He will be greatly missed. Preceded in
death by his mother, Rose Howery.
Acelebration of his life will be 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22
at Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral Home, 977 S.
El Camino Real, San Mateo.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of
approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on
the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries,
email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdai-
lyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary
printed more than once, longer than 200 words or without
editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising depart-
ment at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituaries
By Kristen Wyatt
and Michelle L. Price
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER — Two Western states with
some of the nation’s lowest smoking
rates are considering cracking down
even more by raising the tobacco age
to 21.
Utah and Colorado lawmakers both
voted favorably on proposals
Thursday to treat tobacco like alcohol
and take it away from 18- to 20-year-
olds, a move inspired by new research
on how many smokers start the habit
as teenagers.
“By raising the age limit, it puts
them in a situation where they’re not
going to pick it up until a much later
age,” said Marla Brannum of Lehi,
Utah, who testified in favor of the idea
there.
In Colorado, the testimony was sim-
ilar — that pushing the tobacco age
could make it harder for teens to access
tobacco, and possibly reduce usage
rates among adults.
“What I’m hoping to do is make it
harder for kids to obtain cigarettes,”
said Rep. Cheri Gerou, a Republican
who sponsored the measure.
Both proposals face several more
votes. But they’re the furthest any
states have gone to curb access to cig-
arettes by teens. The director of tobac-
co studies at University College
London didn’t know of any other coun-
tries considering a tobacco age thresh-
old of 21, but he said raising the tobac-
co age from 16 to 18 in the United
Kingdom proved to be “a public health
winner. ”
Altria Group Inc., which owns the
country’s largest cigarette maker,
Philip Morris USA, said in a statement
Friday that they support 18 as the min-
imum age to purchase tobacco, which
Congress approved in 2009.
The company, whose tobacco brands
include Marlboro, Parliament and
Virginia Slims, said states should wait
until the Food and Drug
Administration finishes a pending
study of about raising the purchase age
higher than 18.
“While we recognize that these are
difficult issues, we believe Congress
has established a thoughtful process
for understanding the issue better, and
we intend to engage in that process,
with FDA, as it takes its course,” the
statement said.
Colorado, Utah move to
hike smoking age to 21
Utah and Colorado lawmakers both voted favorably on proposals Thursday to
treat tobacco like alcohol and take it away from 18- to 20-year-olds.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CELAYA, Mexico — Mexico is on
track to become the United States’ No.
1 source of imported cars by the end of
next year, overtaking Japan and
Canada in a manufacturing boom that’s
turning the auto industry into a bigger
source of dollars than money sent
home by migrants.
The boom is raising hopes that
Mexico can create enough new jobs to
pull millions out of poverty as north-
bound migration slows sharply, but
critics caution that most of the new car
jobs are low-skill and pay too little.
Mexico’s low and stagnant wages have
kept the poverty rate between 40 and
50 percent since the passage of the
North American Free Trade Agreement
two decades ago.
An $800 million Honda plant that
opened Friday in the central state of
Guanajuato will produce more than
200,000 Fit hatchbacks and compact
sport-utility vehicles a year, helping
push total Mexican car exports to the
U.S. to 1.7 million in 2014, roughly
200,000 more than Japan, consulting
firm IHS Automotive says.
Mexico to trump Japan as
No. 2 car exporter to U.S.
Detroit draws first map
to get out of bankruptcy
DETROIT — Detroit presented its
first full road map for leaving bank-
ruptcy Friday, outlining an elaborate
plan to restructure $18 billion in debt,
demolish thousands of blighted homes
and invest in the broken-down infra-
structure that has made the city a sym-
bol of urban decay.
If approved by a judge, the wide-
ranging proposal would sharply reduce
payments to some retirees and credi-
tors. Pension holders could expect to
get 70 percent to 90 percent of what
they are owned, while many banks
would receive as little as 20 percent.
Around the nation
OPINION 9
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Job loss nonsense
Editor,
Why is it so difficult to understand
the real effect of the now-infamous
CBO projection of the labor market
impact of the ACA, unless you really
want to misrepresent the issue
(“Boston Herald Other voices: The
job loss from the Affordable Care
Act” in the Feb. 7 edition of the Daily
Journal)?
Republican politicians and right-
wing media are correct when pointing
to the CBO report as nonpartisan, but
they are totally wrong when they call
the projected 2.3 million equivalent
employee reduction as layoffs result-
ing in more unemployment. The CBO
projection has nothing to do with
employer-generated layoff actions,
only voluntary employment changes
by employees who no longer are
dependent upon their old workplace
for health insurance. These people do
not become what is defined as “unem-
ployed.” Some simply cut back on
their hours. Spouses may not have to
work full time anymore just to keep
health insurance. Some may now
have the chance to start businesses
on their own, and some may retire
earlier due to expanded Medicare, as
clearly explained by those who issued
the report.
However, and this is an important
point totally ignored by those who
fight against the success of
Obamacare: Those positions left open
will to some extent have to be filled.
By whom? The previously unem-
ployed, of course, so that the net
result is less unemployment. Listen,
Republicans: This is personal free-
dom at work. The whole thing is
actually quite simple, unless you grab
any opportunity to trash health cov-
erage for all, preying on gullible peo-
ple ready to swallow anything to take
Obama down. Compassionate and
patriotic? Yeah.
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Recognize the
1992 Khojaly Massacre
Editor,
On Feb. 26, Azerbaijani-Americans
will commemorate the 22nd anniver-
sary of the first largest mass killing
of civilians in Europe since World
War II. On that night in 1992, during
the Nagorno-Karabakh War, Armenian
forces supported by Russia’s 366th
infantry regiment attacked the
Azerbaijani town of Khojaly and mas-
sacred its fleeing residents. According
to Newsweek, “many were killed at
close range while trying to flee; some
had their faces mutilated, others were
scalped.” 613 civilians, including
106 women and 63 children, were tor-
tured to death, hundreds more went
missing. More than 1,000 people
received permanent health damage,
and 1,275 people were taken hostage.
More than 150 children lost one or
both of their parents.
Human Rights Watch, Amnesty
International, Associated Press and
many other sources attested the fact
that the Armenian forces carried out
the massacre. Armenian field com-
mander, Monte Melkonyan, gave a
shocking witness account of the
Khojaly “killing fields” in his diary,
reproving fellow Armenian fighters
for the war crime. Finally, Armenia’s
incumbent president, Serzh Sargsyan,
admitted in an interview that his
forces acted in revenge to “break the
stereotype” of Azerbaijanis. Yet, the
official Armenia and the Armenian-
American lobby deny these facts;
instead they push a myth that
Azerbaijanis massacred their own citi-
zens.
As the United States mediates a
peaceful settlement of the Armenia-
Azerbaijan conflict, our recognition
of its largest atrocity is important for
healing and reconciliation. In the
recent years, the legislatures in
Massachusetts, Texas, Georgia,
Pennsylvania, New Mexico,
Arkansas, Oklahoma, Tennessee,
West Virginia, Florida and
Connecticut recognized the Khojaly
Massacre. I join members of the Pax
Turcica Institute in requesting a reso-
lution to commemorate the victims of
this horrific act of ethnic cleansing.
Sample text of recognition is avail-
able at http://khojaly.azeris.org.
Frank Kurmanay
Burlingame
Letters to the editor
Express News, San Antonio
R
aising the nation’s debt ceil-
ing should be routine. This
allows the federal govern-
ment to pay its bills — obligations
substantially imposed by Congress.
But this has become not so routine.
Last week, the House majority’s lead-
ership needed the House minority to
muster enough votes to accomplish
even this boilerplate legislation. And
on Wednesday, Republican leaders,
because of recalcitrance in the GOP
rank and file, had to provide the votes
to allow a floor vote on the legisla-
tion, which then passed 55-43.
That so much effort was required to
accomplish what should be so routine
says much about the dysfunctional
state of Congress these days. But in
this drama, some sanity emerged. Our
hope is that it lasts.
House Speaker John Boehner pre-
vented another useless display of
brinkmanship by outwardly defying
his own caucus, which secretly wanted
to avoid another crisis but didn’t want
to take the heat for raising the debt
ceiling.
And the same dynamic existed in
the Senate, where Texas’ own John
Cornyn joined Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell to get past the 60 votes to
clear a procedural hurdle to get the bill
to the floor.
Then there’s Texas’ other senator,
Ted Cruz. He forced the need to get
those 60 votes. Yes, the junior sena-
tor yearned for yet another showdown
after helping engineer the last shut-
down in October. The country was not
amused.
In the House, only 28 Republicans
voted for the measure, joining 221
Democrats. Conservative groups are
now calling for the speaker’s ouster.
And both McConnell and Cornyn
had to know they were helping pri-
mary election foes. Cornyn’s chal-
lengers have laughably been trying to
paint one of the most conservative
senators in the country as a liberal.
The GOP caucuses likely won’t
admit it, but Boehner, McConnell and
Cornyn all took one for their team.
And helped the nation.
But here’s the biggest takeaway.
Important legislation got approved in
the House because the speaker allowed
a floor vote. And it got approved in
the Senate because a few Republicans
finagled the bill onto the floor for a
vote.
This has been rare. Legislation has
been blocked, in the House because of
the so-called Hastert rule, which dic-
tates that no legislation moves if the
majority of the GOP caucus disap-
proves. And procedural maneuvers by
the minority party in the Senate have
blocked legislation there.
So, how many meaningful measures
might now be law with the kind of
straight-up votes that occurred here?
Imagine: members of Congress run-
ning in this midterm election on
accomplishment rather than obstruc-
tion.
Taking one for the team
Special district
dysfunctions
W
hat job would pay $1,100 per hour? At more than
$2 million in annualized pay, one would think it
would require a high level of skill, education and
experience. One might think a ballplayer, surgeon or top
tech talent would fill the bill.
One would be wrong. To make $1,100 per hour all one
needs to be is a part-time politi-
cian.
That’s right. As reported last
fall, one San Mateo County har-
bor commissioner in 2012
received pay and benefits work-
ing out to $1,100 per hour for
attending commission meetings.
Of course, attending meetings
actually required some work. A
former harbor commissioner
received $18,348 in benefits, and
she’s dead. Lifetime benefits for
commissioners require payment
to her son, who is on her health
insurance policy until he is 26.
The San Mateo County Harbor Commission is one of the
more egregious examples of special district dysfunction. As
reported in this newspaper, the Harbor Commission has
devolved into a morass of personal recriminations, finger-
pointing, dueling harassment complaints and public out-
rage. Things have gotten so bad that armed sheriff’s
deputies must attend their meetings.
In just one example of district dysfunction, the newly
hired finance director found almost $38,000 in uncashed ten-
ant checks in the desk drawer of an employee. Due to the
mismanagement, some tenants were wrongly charged with
being in arrears while others weren’t billed for their berth
fees at all. The district is one of 24 independent special dis-
tricts in the county. These exist to provide such services as
sewer, water and fire protection, as well as health care, vec-
tor control and more. They have their own elected board
members and employees.
Because they are small and provide obscure services (vec-
tor control?), the districts avoid scrutiny and board members
are re-elected with little or no opposition. Yet they collec-
tively spend a large amount of tax dollars, many times in
outrageous and incompetent ways.
Overseen by the Local Agency Formation Commission,
they are to have a service review every five years. Yet, the
San Mateo County LAFCo has just one full-time employee
and, as the civil grand jury points out, it is behind on timely
reviews and those it does perform can be perfunctory at best.
As a result, the civil grand jury has stepped in to investi-
gate mismanagement, incompetence, malfeasance and other
issues in special districts across the county. In the last two
years, the civil grand jury issued investigative reports on
five separate special districts.
Reportedly in the middle of a Harbor Commission investi-
gation, the civil grand jury has already investigated the
commission twice since 2000. The Los Trancos County
Water District was investigated five years ago for continuing
to exist, but no longer providing water to customers.
Moreover, the Sequoia Healthcare District has been investi-
gated five times since 2000.
The Sequoia Healthcare District has a history of question-
able expenditure of the tax payments extracted from home-
owners. Recently, the district gave its CEO a raise, increas-
ing his salary to $192,800 retroactive to April of last year.
The CEO supervises one full-time employee.
The SHD has spent more than $11 million on a nursing
program at Cañada College in conjunction with San
Francisco State University, which made the district’s tax-
payers the largest single donor to San Francisco State last
year, according to the San Francisco Business Times. Yet,
there are no requirements that students live in the district or
that graduates work there.
The SHD can only point to 50 graduates employed in the
county, let alone in the district. That means district taxpay-
ers have shelled out $220,000 per the locally employed,
with no guarantee that any actually provide services to
those who paid for the program.
In another case, the civil grand jury found that the San
Mateo County Mosquito and Vector Control District so
incompetently run that it did no background checks on
potential employees. The result was hiring a finance director
convicted of previous embezzlement. Management granted
her family and medical leave while she was in fact serving
prison time for embezzlement charges.
It comes as no surprise that she and an accomplice embez-
zled hundreds of thousands of dollars from district taxpayers
before being caught.
Special districts play an important role in our county,
many times delivering vital services. However, their small
size should not let them escape oversight and public scruti-
ny. It’s up to voters to pay attention. Otherwise, part-time
politicians will continue to earn $1,100 per hour and con-
victed embezzlers will be hired to oversee your tax dollars.
John McDowell is a longtime county resident having first
moved to San Carlos in 1963. In the intervening years, he
has worked as a political volunteer and staff member in
local, state and federal government, including time spent as
a press secretary on Capitol Hill and in the George W. Bush
administration.
Other voices
John McDowell
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Dow 16,103.30 -29.93 10-Yr Bond 2.73 -0.02
Nasdaq 4,263.41 -4.13 Oil (per barrel) 102.27
S&P 500 1,836.25 -3.53 Gold 1,325.00
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Under Armour Inc., up $5.49 to $112.68
The athletic gear maker skated past its Olympic dustup and signed an
extended deal with U.S. Speedskating.
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., down 40 cents to $73.12
Stifel Nicolaus downgraded the retailer,citing risks with its pricing strategy
risks, political risks on minimum wage and macroeconomics.
Newmont Mining Corp., down $1.08 to $23.38
Gold prices,which tumbled harder than they have in more than a decade
last year, hit the miner hard in the final quarter of 2013.
Ameren Corp., up $2.07 to $40.88
The utility holding company named insider Warner Baxter as its next
chief executive, succeeding Thomas Voss in the top job.
Nasdaq
Intuit Inc., up $3.39 to $77.24
The company raised its outlook as demand for its online tax-preparation
software grows during the country’s tax filing season.
Express Scripts Holding Co., down $3.11 to $74.01
The loss of its largest customer crimped quarterly profit at the pharmacy
benefits manager and margins were under pressure.
Dish Network Corp., up 85 cents to $57.92
The satellite broadcaster’s strong earnings surprised investors, showing
the company added subscribers despite some softness in overall sales.
Qlik Technologies Inc., up 22 cents to $28.14
The software company beat expectations on profit and revenue during
the fourth quarter in which it continued to grow globally.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Stocks slipped on
Friday, pushing the market to a week-
ly loss, as investors assessed the lat-
est round of company earnings.
Express Scripts, the largest U.S.
pharmacy benefits manager, fell after
its fourth-quarter earnings slipped,
hurt by the loss of UnitedHealth, a
large customer. Groupon plunged
after the online deals company said it
expects to post a loss this quarter and
issued a weak outlook for the year.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
rose in early trading Friday and had
almost wiped out its loss for the year
by late morning, climbing to within
two points of it record close. By late
afternoon the index started to turn
lower.
The stock market has gained this
month after getting a boost from
decent corporate earnings for the
fourth quarter and optimism that the
economy will start to pull out of its
winter slump as the weather
improves.
While investors have been willing
to overlook much of the weak eco-
nomic data this month, they appear
reluctant to push the stock market
back above its recent highs before
they see firmer evidence that the
economy is sustaining its recovery.
Investors are “giving the economic
data points a bit of a free pass, but at
the same time they’re not fully con-
vinced either,” said Robert Pavlik,
chief market strategist at Banyan
Partners, a wealth management firm.
The S&P 500 index fell 3.53
points, or 0.2 percent, to 1,836.25.
The index lost 2.38 points for the
week and is now 12 points below its
record close of 1,848.38, set Jan. 15.
The Dow Jones industrial average
fell 29.93 points, or 0.2 percent, to
16, 103. 30. The Nasdaq composite
dropped 4.13 points, or 0.1 percent,
to 4,263.41.
Among individual stocks, Express
Scripts fell $3.11, or 4 percent, to
$74.01 after it reported its results.
Groupon plunged $2.25, or 21.9
percent, to $8.03 after the online
deals company said it was ramping up
its marketing campaign and forecast
2014 pre-tax earnings to be only
slightly higher than last year.
Stock investors have had a bumpy
ride so far this year.
The S&P 500 was down almost 6
percent for the year at the start of
February amid concerns about slow-
ing growth in China and other emerg-
ing markets, as well as worries about
the state of the U.S. economy. Since
then stocks have rebounded, but
some investors aren’t convinced the
recovery will last.
“I’ve felt all along that this is
going to be a very volatile year,” said
Uri Landesman, president of Platinum
Partners, an investment management
company. “For me, you’ve got a lot
more downside than upside.”
The S&P 500 rose almost 30 per-
cent last year, and investors are now
too bullish on the stock market,
making it vulnerable to a sell-off,
Landesman said.
Ameren, a utility company based in
St. Louis, Mo., was among the win-
ners on Friday.
The stock rose $2.07, or 5.3 per-
cent, to $40.88, making it the
biggest gainer in the S&P 500.
Ameren reported earnings that beat
Wall Street’s expectations after cold
weather boosted demand for gas and
electricity.
Early gain fades for stocks; S&P 500 declines
“I’ve felt all along that this is going to be a very volatile
year. ... For me, you’ve got a lot more downside than upside.”
— Uri Landesman, president of Platinum Partners
By Joan Lowy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It looks like the gov-
ernment is more conflicted about cellphones
on planes than most travelers. Even as one
federal agency considers allowing the calls,
another now wants to make sure that doesn’t
happen.
Passengers — particularly those who fly
often — oppose allowing calls in flight,
polls show. In line with that sentiment, the
Department of Transportation signaled in a
22-page notice posted online Friday that it
wants to retain a ban on the calls. But the
notice comes just two months after the
Federal Communications Commission
voted to pursue lifting the ban.
Transportation regulates aviation con-
sumer issues. The FCC has responsibility
over whether the use of cellphones in flight
would interfere with cellular networks on the
ground.
FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has said he
wants to repeal the current ban, calling it
restrictive and outdated. He also wants the
airlines, not the government, to have final
say on in-flight calling. He declined to com-
ment Friday on the Transportation
Department’s notice.
Echoing some travelers’ concerns,
Transportation said it believes allowing
passengers to make cellphone calls “may
be harmful or injurious” to other passen-
gers.
This is because “people tend to talk louder
on cellphones than when they’re having
face-to-face conversations,” the department
said. “They are also likely to talk more and
further increase the noise on a flight, as pas-
sengers would not be simply talking to the
persons sitting next to them but can call
whomever they like.”
Some planes already have seat-back
phones in place, but they are rarely used, it
said.
The “concern is not about individual calls,
but rather the cumulative impact of allowing
in-flight calls in close quarters,” the depart-
ment said.
In an Associated Press-GfK poll three
months ago, 48 percent of those surveyed
opposed letting cellphones be used for
voice calls while planes are in flight, while
19 percent were in favor and 30 percent were
neutral.
Cellphone calls on planes? Don’t ask the feds
By Josh Baok
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Sales of existing
U.S. homes plummeted in January to
the worst pace in 18 months. Cold
weather, limited supplies of homes on
the market and higher buying costs
held back purchases.
The National Association of
Realtors said Friday that sales fell to a
seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.62
million units last month. That was
down 5.1 percent from the December
pace. The sales rate declined 5.1 per-
cent over the previous 12 months.
Higher mortgage rates and higher
prices have contributed to a slowdown
in home buying in five of the past six
months. Freezing temperatures and
snowstorms have also caused most
housing activity to slip this winter.
The flagging sales suggest a decelera-
tion from the momentum for much of
2013, when 5.09 million homes were
sold, the most in seven years.
“Such a picture confirms that the
U.S. housing market reached its peak
at the end of 2013 and further reaccel-
eration is unlikely near term,”
Annalisa Piazza of Newedge Strategy
said in a research note.
Home building dipped 16 percent in
January from December, the Commerce
Department said this week. Signed
contracts to buy homes plunged in
December, foreshadowing the January
drop-off, the Realtors said in a sepa-
rate report.
The weather has kept would-be buy-
ers from venturing to open houses,
while construction crews have endured
work stoppages.
But sales also declined in parts of the
country where weather was less of a
factor. This suggested that price pres-
sures and tight inventories are also
weighing on the real estate market.
Buying fell 7.3 percent in Western
states, the region less affected by win-
ter storms and where average prices are
the highest. That decline was signifi-
cantly larger than in the Northeast,
South and Midwest. The median price
of homes in the West is $273,500,
almost double the median price in the
Midwest.
Home sales plunged 5.1 percent in January
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Federal
Reserve agonized in 2008 over how far
to go to stop a financial crisis that
threatened to cause a recession and at
times struggled to recognize its speed
and magnitude.
“We’re crossing certain lines. We’re
doing things we haven’t done before,”
Chairman Ben Bernanke said as Fed
officials met in an emergency session
March 10 and launched never-before-
taken steps to lend to teetering Wall
Street firms, among a series of
unorthodox moves that year to calm
investors and aid the economy.
“On the other hand, this financial
crisis is now in its eighth month, and
the economic outlook has worsened
quite significantly. ”
The Fed on Friday released hundreds
of pages of transcripts covering its 14
meetings during 2008 — eight regular-
ly scheduled meetings and six emer-
gency sessions. The Fed releases full
transcripts of each year’s policy meet-
ings after a five-year lag.
The 2008 transcripts cover the most
tumultuous period of the crisis, includ-
ing the collapse and rescue of invest-
ment bank Bear Stearns, the govern-
ment takeover of mortgage giants
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the fate-
ful decision to let investment bank
Lehman Brothers fold in the largest
bankruptcy in U.S. history and the
bailout of insurer American
International Group.
For all its aggressive steps in 2008,
the transcripts show the Fed failing at
times to grasp the size of the catastro-
phe they were dealing with. Bernanke
and his top lieutenants often expressed
puzzlement that they weren’t manag-
ing to calm panicky investors.
As late as Sept. 16, a day after
Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy,
Bernanke declared, “I think that our
policy is looking actually pretty
good.”
Transcripts show Fed at times slow to grasp crisis
<<< Page 13, American teen
makes Olympic history slalom
DENIED AGAIN: FOR THE SECOND DAY IN A ROW, TEAM CANADA DEFEATED TEAM USA IN OLYMPIC HOCKEY >> PAGE 12
Weekend, Feb. 22-23, 2014
PAL tournament finals set
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Mills boys’ basketball team convert-
ed on 7 of 8 free throws and then played
lock-down defense to upset Half Moon Bay
53-48 in overtime in a semifinal game at the
Peninsula Athletic League Tournament at
Capuchino High Friday night.
Robert Noland, who scored a team-high
12 points, was 4 of 4 from the line, with
Daniel Yu knocking down a pair and Tyler
Wright hitting 1 of 2 from the free throw
line in overtime, outscoring Half Moon Bay
8-2 in the extra period. The Vikings then
limited the Cougars to just a layup to move
into the championship game against
Burlingame, which beat Aragon 66-51 in
the other semifinal.
The championship game is slated for a
7:45 tip at Capuchino Saturday night.
Mills led for most of the game, forcing
Half Moon Bay to rally in the fourth quarter
to force overtime. The Vikings led 10-8
after one quarter of play and 25-22 at half.
Half Moon Bay tied the score at 35 heading
into the fourth quarter and then rallied from
a five-point deficit over the final eight min-
utes to force overtime. The Cougars had a
chance to win it in regulation, but center
Rico Nuño’s desperation 3-point attempt at
the buzzer fell short.
In addition to Noland’s 12 points,
Marquez Bura and Wright added 10 points
Burlingame tops the Dons, Mills upsets HMB North teams Westmoor, South City to meet
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The South City girls’ basketball team
showed that the Peninsula Athletic League’s
North Division is no slouch.
The Warriors stunned Carlmont, the No. 1
team from the PALSouth, 50-42, to advance to
the championship game of the PAL
Tournament.
They will face Westmoor, the top seed from
the North, which buried Terra Nova, 73-42, in
the other semifinal game.
The championship game is scheduled for a 6
p.m. tip Saturday at Capuchino High.
“South City did a great job of taking us out
of the thing we like to do,” said Carlmont
coach Dan Mori.
The biggest of which was holding
Carlmont’s Anisah Smith in check. The senior
guard came into the game averaging over 20
points per game, but after a lackluster per-
formance in the tournament opener against
Half Moon Bay, during which Smith was held
to just nine points, she struggled against a
quick, physical South City defense, scoring
13 points on 4 of 17 shooting from the field.
“We knew we had to take out Smith,” said
South City coach Paul Carion. “Make her as
uncomfortable as possible.”
Carion assigned that task to junior Mira
Avila, who shadowed Smith all over the court
and forced her to work for every dribble, every
pass, every shot. Avila’s quickness bothered
See BOYS, Page 16
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Mills’ Marquis Adkins looks for room to maneuver during the Vikings’ 53-48 win over Half
MoonBay in a PAL Tournament semifinal game Friday night at Capuchino.
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
South City’s LindseyEto drives the baseline during the Warriors’50-42 upset win over Carlmont
in a PAL Tournament semifinal game Friday night.
See GIRLS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOCHI, Russia — For the rematch, Canada
skipped the overtime and shelved the the-
atrics.
One slick goal and 60 minutes of stifling
defensive hockey kept the Canadians firmly
on top of the U.S. and moved them to the
brink of gold again.
Jamie Benn scored in the second period,
Carey Price made 31 saves, and Canada beat
the United States 1-0 Friday night in the
semifinals of the Olympic men’s hockey
tournament.
Canada advanced to the gold-medal match
Sunday against Sweden, which beat Finland
2-1 in the earlier semifinal at Bolshoy Ice
Dome.
With an unbeaten run through Sochi, the
Canadians are a win away from their third
gold medal in four Olympics, and they’re
guaranteed their first medals outside North
America in 20 years.
Although it was fast-paced and well-
played, this win had none of the flair of
Sidney Crosby’s overtime goal to beat the
U.S. four years ago. The Canadians didn’t
care.
“We didn’t score a lot of goals, but we did-
n’t have to,” Canada forward Jonathan Toews
said. “The next game will follow that work
ethic. We can check, we can work our tails
off, and we can make things real tough for
the other team.”
After its first loss in Sochi, the U.S. will
face Finland for bronze on Saturday. The
Americans were hoping for redemption from
their gut-wrenching defeat in 2010, but they
only got a businesslike reminder of
Canada’s clout.
“We didn’t show up to play,” U.S. defense-
man Ryan Suter said. “It’s too bad. ... We sat
back. We were passive. You can’t play
scared. I thought we sat on our heels and just
didn’t take it to them at all.”
Indeed, the defending Olympic champions
left little doubt about their North American
hockey dominance in a rematch of the finale
of the Vancouver Games. Although the
Canadians had no signature moments and
never pulled away, they also never appeared
seriously threatened.
From faceoff to final buzzer, Canada was in
control thanks to Price, Benn and defense-
man Jay Bouwmeester, whose pass created
Benn’s goal. All three players weren’t on the
Canadian team in Vancouver, but they’re a
win away from earning their own gold
medals.
“Obviously we knew it was going to be a
tight match going in,” Benn said. “We found
a way to get one, our team played great team
defense, and our goalie shut the door. ”
The Canadians haven’t even trailed in the
Sochi Olympics, and they coolly main-
tained border supremacy on the U.S. by
defending their blue line with authority.
Their stifling defense has allowed just
three goals in five games, and they clamped
down on an American offense that had scored
19 goals in Sochi for every minute of a
slightly anti-climactic evening.
“We didn’t really create much offense,”
U.S. forward Patrick Kane said. “It’s a little
disappointing. ... I think everyone expected
a tight-checking game, but to say we would
have gotten shut out, I don’t think anyone
would have thought that.”
Jonathan Quick stopped 36 shots in a
strong performance for the Americans, who
had trailed for just 7:19 in Sochi before
Benn’s goal put them in a hole they never
escaped.
Canada scored early in the second period
during a shift by Benn and Anaheim Ducks
teammates Corey Perry and Ryan Getzlaf.
Benn got the puck outside to Bouwmeester,
who threaded a pass into the slot for Benn’s
deflection past Quick, whose aggression
sometimes makes him vulnerable to such
shots.
Benn, the Dallas Stars captain, didn’t get
an invitation to Canada’s summer Olympic
orientation camp and was one of the last
players added to the roster. But he’s had a
great tournament and his goal was all the
offense needed by Price, the Montreal goalie
who easily handled the Americans’ few good
chances, including their clunky power
plays.
The Americans still haven’t won Olympic
gold since the Miracle on Ice in a drought
that will be at 38 years by the next
Olympics, no matter who’s wearing the U.S.
uniform there.
U.S. hockey 0 for 2 versus Canada
REUTERS
Canada's Corey Perry, left, and Jamie Benn celebrate Benn’s second-period goal during the
Canadians’ 1-0 win over TeamUSA in the Olympic hockey semifinal inSochi Friday.
Biathlon
Ukraine’s team of twins Vita and Valj
Semerenko, Juliya Dzhyma, and Olena
Pidhrushna missed five targets but avoided
penalty loops to finish in 1 hour, 10 min-
utes, 2.5 seconds. Russia was 26.4 seconds
behind to take silver, and Norway trailed by
37.6 to win bronze.
Freestyle skiing
Marielle Thompson and Kelsey Serwa
gave Canada its third 1-2 finish in freestyle
skiing events in Sochi. The others came in
men’s and women’s moguls. Canada also
won gold and bronze in women’s slopestyle
skiing, and picked up a silver in the men’s
halfpipe, for a total of nine freestyle
medals. In the skicross final, Ophelie David
of France wiped out about two-thirds down
the course, giving the bronze to Sweden’s
Anna Holmlund.
Curling
Canada’s championship gave the country
a sweep of the curling titles in Sochi. The
Canadian women won their first-ever curl-
ing title on Thursday. Sweden won the
bronze in men’s curling, taking an extra end
to defeat China 6-4.
Speedskating
Viktor Ahn, who was born in South Korea
and became a Russian citizen in 2011, now
has a career record eight short track medals.
In addition to winning the 500, he anchored
the Russian 5,000 relay team. He also
became the first skater to win all four indi-
vidual short track events at the Olympics.
The U.S. team won silver in the relay, end-
ing a medal drought for the American speed-
skaters. The long track team failed to get on
the podium in 12 events, and the U.S. had
been shut out in the first seven events at
short track.
Olympics roundup
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Graham Dunbar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KRASNAYAPOLYANA, Russia — Mikaela
Shiffrin made Alpine skiing history Friday as
the youngest ever winner of an Olympic
slalom gold medal after making an astonish-
ing recovery midway through her second run.
The 18-year-old American showed impres-
sive balance and agility to protect her lead
from a near-flawless first run to win in 1
minute, 44.54 seconds.
Shiffrin hesitated to celebrate as she com-
pleted her run, and only seemed sure she had
won when the other medalists, Austrian team-
mates Marlies Schild and Kathrin Zettel, came
across the finish area to raise her arms in tri-
umph.
She finished 0.53 seconds faster than
Schild, one of Shiffrin’s childhood favorites.
At 32, Schild has now won a slalom medal at
three straight Olympics without winning
gold.
Zettel took bronze, trailing 0.81 behind
Shiffrin, and cried after securing her first
Olympic medal following a series of near-
misses at the past two Winter Games.
Shiffrin claimed the record for youngest
Olympic slalom champion, male or female,
from Paoletta Magoni of Italy, who won gold
at the 1984 Sarajevo Games when she was 19.
The Vail, Co. native completed a full set of
slalom honors — Olympic and world champi-
onship gold medals and a season-long World
Cup discipline title — before her 19th birth-
day next month.
This time, however, she won from the front
instead of her usual aggressive second-run
tactics to overhaul other racers.
Shiffrin had built a 0.49 advantage over
Maria Hoefl-Riesch of Germany in late after-
noon, using nimble footwork to deal with
soft snow and a tight gate-setting on the
steep course.
Schild had been only sixth-fastest, trailing
Shiffrin by 1.34.
Hoefl-Riesch faded on her second time
down to finish fourth in what is likely her
Olympic farewell race, 1.19 behind Shiffrin
and 0.38 outside the medals.
“It’s really emotional. No matter what’s
going to happen, I had a great Olympic
career,” Hoefl-Riesch said after her first run.
The German has been the subject of specu-
lation that she will retire when the season
ends next month.
Shiffrin is the first American woman to get
a slalom medal of any color since Barbara
Cochran won gold at the 1972 Sapporo
Olympics.
She showed her patriotic colors wearing a
stars-and-stripes design on her race helmet
and a small painted flag with USAwritten into
it on the right side of her neck.
Shiffrin lifted the American Alpine team’s
tally to five medals, including two golds, at
the Sochi Olympics.
Like giant slalom winner Ted Ligety,
Shiffrin delivered under pressure as the strong
pre-race favorite and first-run leader. But she
needed to match the famous recovery skills of
teammate Bode Miller to make her way
through a series of gates on the steep, flood-
lit course.
American teen takes gold in women’s slalom
REUTERS
American Mikaela Shiffrin,at the age of 18,made Olympic history by becoming the youngest
skier to ever win a gold medal in slalom.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Sam Fuld has
never backed down from a challenge and
that’s been a major reason he’s still playing
professional baseball. He’s facing his latest
test trying to make the roster of the Oakland
Athletics as a reserve outfielder.
Fuld said it’s all about perseverance and
the willingness to do the little things that
help win a ballgame. It’s an attitude respect-
ed by A’s manager Bob Melvin, who
watched Fuld from the opposing bench the
past two years.
Fuld, a non-roster player, was drawn to
Oakland because he felt the A’s shared simi-
lar characteristics.
“It’s exciting any time you’re in a new
environment,” Fuld said Friday. “The play-
ers make it easier to transition to a place
like this. I’ve always admired what this
team has been about over the years.”
Fuld returns to the Bay Area, where he
attended Stanford and was a teammate of A’s
shortstop Jed Lowrie there. Fellow outfield-
er Michael Taylor is also a former Cardinal
player.
Challenges are nothing new for the 32-
year-old outfielder, who appeared in 268
games with the Tampa Bay Rays the previ-
ous three seasons, batting .230 with 21
doubles, five home runs and 49 RBIs.
Fuld was diagnosed with childhood dia-
betes when he was 10 and continues to
struggle with the disease. He was raised in
New Hampshire, not exactly a gold mine for
major league baseball players — he’s one of
37 from the state to have reached the big
leagues.
He called the move from New Hampshire
to Stanford his biggest adjustment.
“It was a huge change for me,” said Fuld,
who left the school four years later as its all-
time runs scored leader. “I wanted to chal-
lenge myself and that was definitely a chal-
lenge.”
Fuld set a school single-season record for
hits and finished with 356 overall, second
only to John Gall, who played with the St.
Louis Cardinals and played for Team USAat
the 2008 Olympics.
He also tops the school charts in at-bats
with 1,071, one of two players, with Gall,
to reach 1,000 at-bats.
Melvin called him “a pest” as an oppos-
ing manager.
“He’s a smart player who knows how to
play as a role player,” Melvin said. “He
plays defense all-out and to bring in new
guys who fit our style can only add to our
success.”
Fuld can play all four outfield spots and
can be used as a defensive replacement, a
pinch hitter or pinch runner and showed,
with the Rays, he could be an everyday
player, too.
A’s outfielder ready for another challenge
See FULD, Page 17
SPORTS 14
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Smith and when it came to crunch time, the
Warriors’ team defense suffocated the Scots.
Actually, it was more than just crunch time.
South City got into the passing lanes and
tipped a lot of Carlmont passes — or simply
stripped the Scots of the ball.
“They did a good job with quick hands,”
Mori said. “For some reason … we tried to
dribble through everyone.”
Westmoor came up with 17 steals and forced
Carlmont into eight turnovers.
“Our main thing was basic basketball,”
Carion said. “Protect the ball and play good
defense.”
Avila’s defense on Smith did not affect her
offense. Avila scored a game-high 22 points,
draining four 3-pointers in the process.
South City got off to a quick start, jumping
out to a 5-1 lead to start the game, but
Carlmont responded with a 8-0 run as the
Warriors went nearly two minutes without a
point.
After one quarter, Carlmont led 10-7.
South City did not do itself any favors by
missing its first 13 free throws and 15 of 18 in
the first half. Yet somehow the Warriors man-
aged to keep the game close and trailed by one
at the half, 21-20.
In the third quarter, there were eight lead
changes or ties as Avila hit a pair of free
throws early in the period to give the Warriors
their first lead since the first quarter.
The Warriors got a spike of momentum at
the end of the third when Charlene Halal
drained a 3-pointer two steps behind the arc
just before the quarter buzzer to give South
City a 30-29 lead going into the final eight
minutes.
The Warriors would not trail again the rest of
the way.
Avila opened the final period with a 3 and
another basket, followed by a third unan-
swered bucket as South City opened up a 37-29
advantage with 6:36 to play. Carlmont got a
pair of free throws from Sabrina Miller and a
layup from Cam Kondo to slow South City’s
momentum, but it was only briefly, as the
Scots would get no closer than five points the
rest of the way.
Free-throw shooting woes nearly came back
to haunt the Warriors as they missed four
straight down the stretch, but Carlmont could
not take advantage. The Warriors finally hit 2
of 4 in the final few seconds for the final mar-
gin of victory.
“[The Warriors] did what they needed to do to
win,” Mori said.
Westmoor 73, Terra Nova 42
In the first round of the PAL Tournament
Wednesday, the Tigers put a 40-point beating
on Mills, crushing the Vikings 60-20.
Now Terra Nova knows how it feels.
Westmoor, the top seed from the North, beat
the Tigers for the third time this season and it
wasn’t even close. After lead 16-7 after the
first quarter, the Rams blitzed the Tigers in the
second period, connecting on 12 of 19 shots
as they outscored Terra Nova 33-7 to lead 41-
13 at halftime and cruised to the victory.
Westmoor didn’t have one player light up
the Tigers. Tiara Cobbs led the way with 13
points, Roni Niveria added 11 and Kasey
Liang finished with 10. Instead, the Rams used
nearly their entire roster to hand the Tigers
one of their worst beatings in recent memory.
Ten of the 14 players on the Westmoor roster
scored and the Rams played most of the fourth
quarter with their reserves.
Terra Nova was led by Alynna Vega, who fin-
ished with 17 points, but most of those came
after the game was well decided. Arianna
Sheehy was the only other Tiger to score in
double figures, finishing with 12.
The Rams also dominated on the glass, lim-
iting Terra Nova to one-and-done more often
than not. Westmoor pulled down 18 rebounds
in the first quarter alone and finished the game
by outrebounding the Tigers 56-27.
Continued from page 11
GIRLS
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Westmoor’s Tiara Cobbs splits a pair of Terra Nova defenders during the Rams’73-42 win over
the Tigers in the semifinals of the PAL Tournament.
SPORTS 15
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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FEBRUARY 1 – MARCH 31, 2014
39876
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EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 30 25 .545 —
Brooklyn 25 27 .481 3 1/2
New York 21 34 .382 9
Boston 19 37 .339 11 1/2
Philadelphia 15 41 .268 15 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 39 14 .736 —
Washington 26 28 .481 13 1/2
Charlotte 26 30 .464 14 1/2
Atlanta 25 29 .463 14 1/2
Orlando 17 40 .298 24
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 41 13 .759 —
Chicago 29 25 .537 12
Detroit 23 32 .418 18 1/2
Cleveland 22 34 .393 20
Milwaukee 10 44 .185 31
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 40 16 .714 —
Houston 37 18 .673 2 1/2
Dallas 33 23 .589 7
Memphis 31 23 .574 8
New Orleans 23 31 .426 16
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 43 13 .768 —
Portland 37 18 .673 5 1/2
Minnesota 26 28 .481 16
Denver 25 29 .463 17
Utah 19 35 .352 23
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 37 20 .649 —
Phoenix 33 21 .611 2 1/2
Golden State 33 22 .600 3
L.A. Lakers 19 36 .345 17
Sacramento 18 36 .333 17 1/2
Friday’sGames
Orlando 129, New York 121,2OT
Dallas 124, Philadelphia 112
Charlotte 90, New Orleans 87
Toronto 98, Cleveland 91
Detroit 115, Atlanta 107
Chicago 117, Denver 89
Memphis 102, L.A. Clippers 96
Phoenix 106, San Antonio 85
Portland 102, Utah 94
L.A. Lakers 101, Boston 92
Saturday’sGames
New Orleans at Washington, 4 p.m.
Memphis at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
Nation G S B Tot
UnitedStates 9 7 11 27
Russia 9 10 7 26
Canada 9 10 5 24
Norway 10 4 8 22
Netherlands 6 7 9 22
Germany 8 4 4 16
France 4 4 7 15
Sweden 2 6 6 14
Austria 2 7 3 12
Switzerland 6 3 2 11
China 3 4 2 9
Czech Republic 2 4 2 8
Japan 1 4 3 8
Italy 0 2 6 8
South Korea 3 2 2 7
Slovenia 2 1 4 7
Belarus 5 0 1 6
Poland 4 0 0 4
Finland 1 3 0 4
Britain 1 1 2 4
Australia 0 2 1 3
Latvia 0 1 2 3
Ukraine 1 0 1 2
Slovakia 1 0 0 1
Croatia 0 1 0 1
Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1
OLYMPICS TABLE
SATURDAY
Girls’ basketball
PALtournament
Championship game 6 p.m. at Capuchino
WCALtournament
Championship game 6 p.m. at Foothill College
WBALtournament
Championship game 5 p.m. at King’s Academy
Boys’ basketball
PALtournament
Championship game 7:30 p.m. at Capuchino
WCALtournament
Championship game 8 p.m. at Foothill College
Wrestling
PAL championships 9 a.m. at El Camino
WHAT’S ON TAP
By Mark Long
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — It’s
been a decade since Dale Earnhardt
Jr. ’s lone Daytona 500 victory.
He’s come close so many times
since, even finishing second three
of the last four years, but has yet
to make that
coveted drive
down pit road
and into
Victory Lane.
No one
should be sur-
prised to find
him back there
Sunday.
Forget that
Denny Hamlin
and Matt Kenseth have won the
first three Sprint Cup races during
Speedweeks. Disregard that
Richard Childress Racing has
pole-sitter Austin Dillon, who is
driving the No. 3 made famous by
Earnhardt’s late father, as well as
three other stout cars. Ignore that
anything can and often does hap-
pen at Daytona International
Speedway.
This just might be Junior’s year.
The 39-year-old driver seems
primed for his best season ever,
and it starts at the track forever
linked to his family name because
of triumph and tragedy.
“I’m excited about getting back
out there,” Earnhardt said. “I’m
looking forward to seeing how we
can do and how our performance is
going to be right off the bat. It’s
going to be a fun year, I think. I
think we’re going to enjoy our-
selves. We did last year. We seem
to get better every year, and hope-
fully that trajectory is still the
same going into this season.”
Earnhardt was fifth in points last
season, his best showing since
finishing third in 2003. And had
NASCAR already switched to its
new points system, Earnhardt
would have won his first Cup
championship.
He had eight top-10 finishes in
the 10-race Chase, hitting his
stride just a few weeks too late to
catch Hendrick Motorsports team-
mate Jimmie Johnson. Johnson
edged Kenseth for his sixth title in
the last eight seasons.
Earnhardt was nearly as hot as
those two down the stretch, and
he’s hoping to find some carry-
over into “The Great American
Race.”
He won the 2004 Daytona 500,
the first of his six victories that
season. But he has just four victo-
ries since and no multi-win sea-
sons.
“It doesn’t seem like it’s been
that long, but time goes by pretty
fast,” Earnhardt said. “It seems
like these last several years have
really flown by, especially when
you enjoy yourself. They seemed
to grind out when you’re not run-
ning too well, but the last couple
of years have flown by pretty
fast.”
Earnhardt made the Chase the
last three years, becoming
increasingly comfortably at
Hendrick while working with crew
chief Steve Letarte. Together, they
turned around the No. 88
Chevrolet and made it a contender.
But Letarte announced last
month he will step down after this
season, leaving to become a race
analyst for NBC Sports in 2015.
So this year could be the ultra-pop-
ular driver’s best chance to win his
first Cup championship.
“The biggest thing that stands
out is just how well he and Junior
connect,” said fellow Hendrick
driver Jeff Gordon, who previous-
ly worked with Letarte. “You want
to be able to have that experience
as well as knowledge. He’s a smart
guy, and you want to have that on
your side in any shape or form,
whether as a crew chief or in
another role at Hendrick.”
That connection led Earnhardt to
finish second to Jamie McMurray
(2010), Kenseth (2012) and
Johnson (2013) in recent years at
Daytona.
“They’ve all been close,” he
said. “In none of those races did I
have a situation where I went, ‘I let
it slip by. I messed up right there.’
Most of the time, we run our guts
out and come to the finish line and
we just never had a chance to make
a move on the guy leading the
race.
“When you make that move or
have a chance and you don’t do the
right thing and you lose, that’s
difficult to swallow. Haven’t been
in that situation even though
we’ve run second.”
Recalling how those unfolded,
Earnhardt already knows where he
wants to be on the final lap Sunday
— up front.
“As far as trying to win one of
these races — or not run second
again — I think we need to be up
front,” Earnhardt said. “We’re not
far enough toward the front. When
we’ve run second, we’ve come
from third or fourth or fifth or
sixth those last few laps.
“You’re not going to win the
race from back there. You might
run second, but you aren’t going to
win. You need to be leading the
race. I would much rather be lead-
ing the Daytona 500 inside of five
laps to go than be anywhere else.”
And if he in that position, he
just might wind up in Daytona’s
Victory Lane again.
“You never forget exactly what
that day is like,” he said. “It all
floods back to you as soon as you
come back for Speedweeks each
season. It’s very fresh, and you’re
constantly reminded I think by
just what goes on during
Speedweeks how important that
victory is and how much you would
like to get it again. It’s definitely
fresh.”
‘Little E’ is primed for
another banner season
Dale
Earnhardt Jr.
Boyd, No. 18 Cal women
endure UCLA 77-72
LOS ANGELES — Brittany Boyd
stole the ball with 4 seconds left
and made two free throws to seal
No. 18 California’s 77-72 win and
season sweep of UCLA on Friday
night.
Boyd aggravated an ankle injury
in the final minutes but played
through and finished with 14
points, six rebounds, six assists
and four steals.
Cal (18-7, 10-4 Pac-12) trailed
72-71 when Afure Jemerigbe made
two free throws to give the Golden
Bears the lead for good with 1:48
left. She made two more to put Cal
up 75-72 with 14.8 seconds left.
Jemerigbe led Cal with 15
points, Reshanda Gray had 13
points and 15 rebounds, and
Gennifer Brandon had 14 points
and 11 rebounds.
Nirra Fields led UCLA(12-14, 6-
8) with 30 points in a game with
16 lead changes. Atonye Nyingifa
added 22 points and Thea
Lemberger 17. Fields. Those three
accounted for 69 of the Bruins’ 72
points.
Sports brief
16
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
apiece. Wright also had four blocks.
Half Moon Bay was led by Rico Nuño,
who scored a game-high 21 points.
Shooting guard Corey Cilia added 17, but
they were the only two to score in double
digits for the Cougars.
Half Moon Bay started well, with Cilia
draining a 3 to open the game and added a
steal and a layup to put the Cougars up 5-2
early. Mills responded with a 3 from Bura to
tie the score at 5 and closed the quarter with
a 5-3 run to hold a two-point lead after eight
minutes.
The teams traded baskets in the second
quarter and when Mike McWhirter hit a
bucket for the Vikings, they led 25-18 with
1:35 left in the half. But Half Moon Bay's
Brody Menzies hit a pair of baskets to close
the Cougars’ deficit to three at the half.
The third quarter was much like the sec-
ond, with the teams trading buckets. Tommy
Nuño’s putback with 3:04 left in the third
tied the score at 32 for Half Moon Bay, but
Mills’ Jeremy Gibbs drained a 3 to put the
Vikings back on top, 35-32. Rico Nuño
responded with three straight points to tie
the game at 35 going into the final eight
minutes.
Mills quickly regained the lead with
Noland driving the lane and getting a shot
to go down over Rico Nuño. Bura then
nailed a 3 to put Mills up 40-35. The
Cougars responded with a 3 from Cilia, who
then stole the ball and went in for a layup to
tie the score again, this time at 40.
Gibbs’ third 3 of the game with 2:35 left
in regulation put Mills up 44-42, but Rico
Nuño tied it a 44. He then put the Cougars
ahead, 46-44, with 1:42 left in regulation,
but Bura tied it at 46 with 1:23 to go.
The Cougars misfired on a shot that would
have given them the lead with less than a
minute to play, but with Mills trying to set
up one final play, Cilia stole the ball from
Noland. The two chased after the ball, crash-
ing into each other along the sideline, with
the referees ruling Half Moon Bay when it
went out of bounds with 26 seconds left.
The Cougars could not take advantage,
however, and the game went into overtime,
with the Vikings prevailing.
Burlingame 66, Aragon 51
There was no question Ferrari was going to
factor into the Panthers’win, but it may not be
the Ferrari with which most are familiar.
Vinny Ferrari, a sophomore and younger
brother of senior star Frankie Ferrari, came in
and did an admirable job guarding Aragon
points guard Alex Manu.
“When we put him (Vinny Ferrari) on Manu,
it took him out of his game a little bit,” said
Burlingame coach Pete Harames.
After Frankie Ferrari picked up two first-
quarter fouls while guarding Manu, Harames
went to the younger Ferrari to shadow Manu.
He still finished with a team-high 21 points,
but he certainly had to work a lot harder to get
them.
That allowed Frankie Ferrari to concentrate
more on running the Burlingame offense,
while also finding his scoring rhythm. He fin-
ished with 21 points, seven rebounds and
seven assists.
Aragon had no answer for Burlingame’s 6-7
post Nick Loew, who scored a game-high 22
points and pulled down 13 rebounds.
The third member of Burlingame’s “Big
Three,” Justin Gutang, also had a strong
game. He scored 13 points with 11 coming in
the first half.
“He came out ready to play tonight,”
Harames said.
Aragon was at a definite disadvantage with-
out the services of shooting guard Toby
Liebergesell, who sat out the game with an ill-
ness.
“We just didn’t have the firepower today,”
said Aragon coach Sam Manu. “Not having
Toby hurt us. We didn’t match up very well.”
Aragon kept the game close in the first quar-
ter, trailing 21-19. In the second quarter,
Burlingame turned up the pressure defensive-
l y, holding the Dons to just six points while
scoring 19 of its own to take a 15-point lead
at halftime, 40-25.
Aragon got as close as 47-35 in the third
quarter following an Alex Manu three-point
play, followed by a steal and layup with 2:38
to play in the quarter, but the Panthers ended
the quarter on a 7-0 run to push their lead to
19, 54-35, going into the final quarter.
The Dons outscored Burlingame 18-12 over
the final eight minutes, but it came mostly
against the Panthers’ reserves.
Despite the relatively easy win, Harames
believes his team can do more.
“I don’t think we played our best,” Harames
said.
Continued from page 11
BOYS
SPORTS 17
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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“The only way to get to this level is to persevere,” Fuld
said. “Everybody here plays with confidence. You have to
work hard and do the little things to help a team win. You
can overcome anything with enough confidence.”
Fuld was originally drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the
24th round of the 2003 first-year player draft but returned
to Stanford for his senior year. Drafted in the 10th round
in 2004, Fuld worked his way to the majors in 2007. He
played 98 total games with Chicago in a four-year span.
“I’ve always had to overcome long odds,” he said.
NOTES: OF Craig Gentry (lower back tightness) did
not participate in any baseball activity. .. RHP Ryan
Cook (shoulder) was also given the day off. . The A’s set
up batting cages side by side on one field and used pitch-
ing machines to double the action, a trick the team
learned from Japanese baseball. “Chalk it up to Chip
Hale and the coaching staff,” Melvin said. “We’d thought
about it with coaches throwing but decided on pitching
machines and no one in the field to avoid someone get-
ting hurt.”
Continued from page 13
FULD
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Chiney Ogwumike is strolling across
Stanford’s campus on a spectacular sunny morning when two
16-year-old girls from the Seattle area on a college visit recog-
nize her at the landmark spot of Hoover Tower.
“Aren’t you the basketball player?” a giddy Lola Oyetuga
asks, standing alongside friend Constance Hosannah.
Yes, that’s her — the Pac-12’s leading scorer and one of the
biggest stars in women’s basketball. The girls’ lucky day,
indeed, as Ogwumike walks right up and spends some 10 min-
utes chatting.
They happened to be at the Feb. 9 game in Seattle against
Washington, a rare Stanford loss. Ogwumike greets them with
the same enthusiasm she shows both strangers and friends
everywhere she goes, reaching out her hand for a high-five and
asking them to pose for a picture. She promises to stay in
touch on Twitter and Instagram, and she truly means it —
reminding them Stanford will be back in the Pacific Northwest
for the Pac-12 tournament next month.
“OK, I wish we played at Washington again, I would have left
you tickets,” she says.
With Ogwumike’s record-setting collegiate basketball career
on its final countdown, and her graduation date approaching,
she is cherishing every moment of student life — moments
like these special chance meetings that can make a difference
in someone else’s life just because Ogwumike is being herself.
“I have a megawatt smile, it’s huge,” she says. “My mom’s
like, ‘Tone it down.”’
With the fifth-ranked Cardinal on the cusp of a 14th consec-
utive regular-season conference championship this week,
Ogwumike offers a glimpse of her memorable four-year stretch
on The Farm. From the famous Ike’s Place sandwich shop on
campus where she once sent an opposing team on the lookout
for a good meal, to her preferred library because “the focus lev-
els are so much higher.” There’s her newfound preference for
Thai cuisine — yellow curry with chicken is a regular pick at
her spot in History Corner — when it used to be only Chinese
food. She points to the different buildings where a professor,
mentor or adviser works — such as her academic adviser, for-
mer Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.
This is it for Ogwumike. She is doing some reflecting along
the way while keeping her attention on the moment and the
goals she hopes to achieve before she’s through.
“Everything’s coming full circle,” she says. “It’s the last 10
games or so, all of the work has been put in, athletically and
academically.”
Ogwumike will play her final two Pac-12 home games next
week against Washington and Washington State, then she
hopes the Cardinal will be back at Maples Pavilion for the
NCAAStanford regional from March 29-April 1.
“Six games,” she says of the remaining schedule at Maples,
before quickly correcting herself. “No, four. Oh my goodness,
it’s on one hand. It’s sort of sad. It is what it is.”
Ogwumike certainly expects to lead her team on one last
memorable March run, especially after Stanford’s streak of five
straight Final Four trips ended last spring.
Her thought about that? “Oh, snap!”
Hall of Fame Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer and her pro-
gram are preparing to move on without an Ogwumike sister for
the first time in seven years, a transition VanDerveer knows
will be among the hardest she has faced in her 35-year career
with players heading to the next level of women’s basketball
or into the working world.
Ogwumike cherishing last hurrah
18
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
FLESH AND METAL: BODY AND MACHINE IN EARLY 20TH-CENTURY ART IS JOINTLY
ORGANIZED BY THE CANTOR ARTS CENTER AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY AND
THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART.
FERNAND LÉGER, DEUX FEMMES SUR FOND BLEU (TWO WOMEN ON A BLUE
BACKGROUND), 1927; SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, FRACTIONAL
GIFT OF HELEN AND CHARLES SCHWAB; © ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS),
NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS; PHOTO: BEN BLACKWELL.
NOV 13

MAR 16
museum.stanford.edu
F L E S H
AND
M E T A L
Body and Machine in Early 20th-Century Art
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever been
entrusted to make
final arrangements
for a funeral?
Those of you
who’ve had this
experience know
that important decisions are required and
must be made in a timely manner. The next
of kin is many times required to search for
information about the deceased which may
not be easily accessible, and must answer
questions without the time to think things
out. Even though your Funeral Director is
trained to guide you every step of the way, it
is still best for you to be prepared with the
proper information if the need should arise.
Ask your Funeral Director what info is
needed before you meet with him/her.
Making funeral arrangements can be very
simple, or can become difficult at times if
you are not prepared. A good Funeral
Director is experienced in leading you with
the necessary requirements, and will offer
details that you may not have thought about
or previously considered as an option.
Allowing him/her to guide you will make
the arrangements go by quickly and easily.
A number of items should be considered
in preparation for the future:
1. Talk to your loved ones about the
inevitable. Give them an indication on what
your wishes are regarding the type of funeral
you want, burial or cremation, etc., and ask
them their feelings about plans for their own
funeral. This is only conversation, but it is
an important topic which will help break the
ice and prevent any type of confusion when
the time comes.
2. Talk to your Funeral Director. Write
down a list of questions and make a phone
call to your Funeral Director asking how to
be prepared. He/she will gladly provide
detailed information and can mail this
information to you for your reference.
Asking questions doesn’t cost anything and
will help you with being organized.
3. Make an appointment and Pre-plan a
Funeral. Many more people are following
through with this step by making Pre-Need
Arrangements. Completing arrangements
ahead of time makes this process more
relaxed, and putting these details behind you
will take a weight off your shoulders. Your
wishes will be finalized and kept on file at
the Mortuary. Your Funeral Director will
even help you set aside funding now as to
cover costs at the time of death. Families
who meet with us at the CHAPEL OF THE
HIGHLANDS are grateful for the chance to
make Pre-Need Arrangements. With their
final details in place it helps to make matters
more calming for surviving loved-ones.
4. Enjoy Life. There are those who dwell
on situations that can’t be controlled.
Taking time to stop and look around at
beauty in the world and appreciate good
things can be therapeutic. If you need to use
a negative statement, try re-wording it into a
positive. Change “I had a lousy day today”
into “Today was demanding, but it made me
appreciate my better days.” As the song
goes: “Accentuate the positive; Eliminate
the negative; Latch on to the affirmative.”
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Accentuating The Positive
Can Eliminate The Negative
ADVERTISEMENT
Burlingame Avenue Caltrain Station on the
residential stretch of Burlingame Avenue.
The first would be a 30,200-square-foot
building closer to Caltrain, the second
would be the popular 35,500-square-foot
building located where the current commu-
nity center is and the last would be a
41,900-square-foot structure a little farther
down the street. The current structure is
25,000 square feet. At this point, the city is
wrapping up the needs assessment, site
analysis and program options.
Hillsborough resident Peggy McLaughlin
said she would like a new center to be tradi-
tional in style, matching a building like the
main library.
“[It should] take advantage of the visible
setting,” she said. “I do yoga here, so I want
to make sure we have those kinds of nice
rooms. I’d like a welcome, friendly atmos-
phere.”
Fittingly, having a really functional exer-
cise room was another front-runner in the
city’s community survey of about 200 peo-
ple.
Back in January 2013, the Parks and
Recreation Department began work with
Group 4 Architects on a master design plan
for the community center. A project man-
agement team formed out of city staff and
the architectural team, as well as a commu-
nity advisory committee composed of lead-
ers and community stakeholders. There were
focus group meetings with seniors; the
Lions Club; teens; neighbors; families with
preschool-aged children; and school-aged
parents, parent teacher associations and
teachers. A community meeting was also
held on Sept. 18, 2013.
The project management group is devel-
oping design concepts and coming up with
an implementation plan, which it will refine
and present a recommendation, said archi-
tect Dawn Merkes, the principal for Group
4. At this time, there is no funding allocat-
ed for the project, so securing funding would
also be part of the process.
Other needs for the building include func-
tional improvements and getting the struc-
ture up to American with Disabilities Act
standards. Adding additional classrooms
was also popular, according to public feed-
back received. Merkes said some site goals
include a better building and site relation-
ship, connecting the center to the park; safe
and convenient access by car, pedestrian or
bike; visibility from downtown and the
Caltrain station; complementing the resi-
dential neighborhood, especially when it
comes to existing and proposed community
uses; minimizing the traffic and parking
impact to the surrounding neighborhood;
easy access to and from outdoor activity
areas; and providing improved safety for the
playground.
Having a sustainable building is a key
thing to resident Jeff Londer.
“I would like to see the building and park-
ing have as small a footprint as possible;
it’s essentially a park,” he said.
The community also seemed in support of
a two-story building to accommodate a larg-
er building program on a smaller footprint
of 25,000 square feet, according to the sur-
vey.
In terms of parking, the city would have
to provide 143 parking spaces for both
Washington Park and the new community
center per the Institute of Transportation
Engineers parking rate of 3.2 cars per 1,000
square feet of building area. The city is look-
ing into providing a combination of surface
and underground parking to meet minimum
parking requirements and, if funding is
available, utilize under-building parking to
minimize surface parking within the park
and utilize off-site parking strategies for
large events and peak use.
Parks and Recreation Commissioner
Donna Colson brought up concerns that
underground parking could be difficult to
maintain with Burlingame’s water table lev-
els.
Merkes said the main library has base-
ment parking and is designed waterproof
like a bathtub. Rising sea level is also
being considered, Merkes said.
“There’s ways to mitigate it,” she said.
“There definitely is a cost implication;
underground parking is significantly more
expensive.”
Meanwhile, other residents would like to
see a preschool brought back to the build-
ing, including Nancy Dobson who taught
preschool at the center when there was one
on site. She supports keeping the center at
the same site it is now, but making it two
stories and having underground parking by
the tennis courts.
“There’s less impact on the trees by not
moving the whole building,” she said.
Dobson noted having a preschool at the
center makes it easier for neighbors who
don’t want to have to drive their children
across town to preschool at Village Park
Preschool.
Pictorial kiosks with information and sur-
veys were provided at events throughout the
summer and at the Fresh Market this fall.
Future opportunities for community input
will be available at an upcoming Planning
Commission meeting, a Fresh Market and a
City Council meeting. Other possible meet-
ing locations are being discussed.
For updates on the project go to
burlingame.org/index.aspx?page=3294.
Continued from page 1
CENTER
and snowboarding courses. It currently
sponsors the U.S. Ski and Snowboard
Association and champion snowboarder
Shaun White.
And now GoPro is preparing to enter the
high-profile area of public companies.
Earlier this month, it announced plans for
an initial public offering of common stock.
The company’s cameras, which sell for
between $200 and $400, are small, light,
water resistant and extremely durable. The
highest-end GoPro model shoots video in
ultra-high-definition, or 4K. With a variety
of related accessories such as helmet attach-
ments, bike mounts and harnesses, the cam-
eras can be mounted to everything from a
bike helmet to the side of a half pipe.
Those attributes make GoPro a favorite of
extreme athletes. The company was founded
more than a decade ago by avid surfer and
CEO Nicholas Woodman. The cameras’ most
popular use: the ultimate selfie, a one-of-a-
kind first-person point of view, even if the
person starring in the video happens to be
hang-gliding off a cliff or parachuting from
a giant helium balloon.
During this year’s Super Bowl, the com-
pany aired a commercial featuring footage
shot with a GoPro in 2012 as supersonic
Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner para-
chuted from 24 miles up and became the first
human being to break the sound barrier with
only his body.
Through its sponsorships, GoPro gets
one-of-a-kind content. Its YouTube channel
has about 1.7 million subscribers and fea-
tures hundreds of eye-popping videos star-
ring everyday users and famous people like
GoPro-sponsored surfing legend Kelly
Slater.
Citing legal restrictions related to the
IPO, company officials declined to comment
for this story.
One challenge for GoPro as a public com-
pany will be to broaden the appeal of its
cameras. Extreme sports athletes —and
people who think they are— are GoPro’s
main consumers at the moment.
There is potential, however, to attract
more consumers given the current consumer
craze surrounding wearable technologies,
says Whitney Fishman, senior director of
innovation and consumer technology at
media agency MEC.
It’s also possible, Fishman believes, that
the cameras could find commercial use in
fields such as medicine.
“Is everybody going to run out and buy
one? Probably not, but it definitely has
value outside of the amateur athlete circuit,”
Fishman says. “The Olympics and all the
crazy footage really helps.”
Continued from page 1
GOPRO
By Annika Ulrich
W
hen Facebook’s Chief Operating
Officer, Sheryl Sandberg,
released her best-selling book,
“Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to
Lead,” a year ago, I was offended and upset.
In a nutshell, “Lean In” is a book meant
to empower women and
start a larger conversa-
tion about gender in the
workforce and home.
Like the title suggests,
it’s a book encouraging
women of all genera-
tions to seek leadership
positions and reach their
full potential, even if
that means missing out on some experi-
ences with their families. In all, it is a
respectable book written by an expert who
has succeeded professionally while also
making some of life’s more difficult deci-
sions regarding family.
I was vaguely familiar with Sandberg’s
background, but had never actually read the
book, which led me to misinterpret its
message for almost a whole year. While
critics and women’s rights advocates were
hyping it as the motivation many women
need to take control of their lives and
careers, I saw it as an attack on my
lifestyle.
Like Sandberg, my mom has a master’s in
business administration and was often the
only woman in her workplace. However,
unlike Sandberg, my mom left her career
after I was born in 1996 and has since dedi-
cated her time to our family and our commu-
nity.
Reflecting on the last 17 years, I can say
with certainty that my mom’s decision
greatly benefited my childhood and helped
define the person I am today. Even though
she was over-qualified to coach my middle
school tennis team, help me with my book
reports or assist me in studying for
spelling tests, my mom chose to do so
because it mattered to her.
And I realized after reading “Lean In” that
Sandberg is not decrying stay-at-home
moms. She is not labeling women who
choose to raise their children full time as
ungrateful for the generations who fought
for gender equality. Instead, she is advocat-
ing for men and women to reconsider gen-
Sheryl Sandberg, my
mom and me: How I
understand ‘Lean In’
‘The
Wind Rises’
Miyazaki explores
ambition, dreams
SEE PAGE 20
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
For a documentary subject as forceful as
Elaine Stritch, filmmakers may need to turn
to nature — a typhoon might do it — to find
anything approximate. Even the camera
must warily keep its distance in “Elaine
Stritch: Shoot Me.” She warns its operator
when he gets too close: “I don’t know
whether this is a skin commercial, or what.”
Stritch captivates just walking down the
street: greeting fans, chastising cabs,
swaying to the music of the sidewalk. “I
wish I could f---ing drive,” she says at the
opening of the documentary. “Then I’d real-
ly be a menace.”
The strong types usually seen in movies
— caped men with powers, action heroes
with six-packs — have nothing on this
long-legged, 89-year-old New York broad.
Stritch, who has long eschewed pants of
any sort, has the kind of ferocious voice
that old age can’t quiet.
Chiemi Karasawa’s “Elaine Stritch: Shoot
Stritch undimmed in documentary
See STUDENT, Page 22
See STRITCH, Page 22 Elaine Stritch is the focus of a new documentary.
‘3 Days’
lacks any
real punch
By Geoff Berkshire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Even
international spies have trou-
ble balancing work and fami-
ly life, according to “3 Days
to Kill,” the latest lightweight
action pic from writer-pro-
ducer Luc Besson, here form-
ing an unlikely (or perhaps
unholy) trinity with director
McG and star Kevin Costner.
Surely the goal of the result-
ing tonal mishmash was to
reignite Costner’s career a la
what happened for Liam
Neeson after Besson’s
“Taken,” but any possibility
of sleeper-hit status has been
fatally compromised by
watered-down fight scenes
and misguided family man
dramatics.
The setup plays as if some-
one (presumably Besson,
who is credited with the story
and co-wrote the script)
decided to graft the central
father-daughter relationship
from “The Descendants”
onto a Eurotrashy action
framework. Superstar CIA
field agent Ethan Renner
(Costner) spends so much
time on the job that he’s com-
pletely missed watching his
daughter, Zooey (Hailee
Steinfeld), blossom into a
sophisticated teenager.
After he’s diagnosed with a
fatal illness, Ethan retires and
resolves to spend more time
with his family in Paris,
offering to watch Zooey for a
weekend while his estranged
wife, Christine (Connie
Nielsen), is away. But retire-
ment isn’t so easy for a man
of Ethan’s skills, and he’s
promptly recruited by the
mysterious Vivi (Amber
Heard), who needs his help in
the hunt for a terrorist mas-
termind in exchange for
experimental drugs that
could give Ethan a second
lease on life.
The conflict between the
finesse Ethan demonstrates in
his professional duties and
the complete incompetence
with which he approaches
parenting is meant to be
comedic, although the film
doesn’t have the light touch
of similar spy-family action-
laffers like “Mr. and Mrs.
Smith,” “True Lies” or
McG’s own “This Means
War.”
Instead, “3 Days to Kill”
proves surprisingly po-faced
about trying to build the bond
between Ethan and Zooey,
even in the midst of moments
as goofy as Dad consoling
his daughter on a bad hair
day, teaching her to dance or
buying her a purple bicycle
just because that was her
favorite color as a kid. The
sentimental approach almost
works, thanks to the best
efforts of Costner and the
naturally spunky Steinfeld,
who may have made a
See 3 DAYS, Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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respectable pair given better material to work with.
As it is, the lukewarm family dynamics sit awkwardly
alongside equally underwhelming action sequences. Recent
supporting turns in “Man of Steel” and “Jack Ryan: Shadow
Recruit” aside, Costner isn’t generally associated with the
action genre — he’s more of a “Waterworld”-“Robin Hood:
Prince of Thieves” epic-adventure guy — and the rote hero-
ics he undertakes here won’t do much to change that.
On multiple occasions, the audience simply witnesses the
aftermath of Ethan’s handiwork as repped by bodies lying
motionless on the floor. The notable exceptions arrive in a
brief but slickly executed one-on-one skirmish in a grocery
store’s deli section (complete with resourceful use of the
meat grinder and panini press) and a bracingly staged car
chase in the middle of a Parisian neighborhood inspired by
Claude Lelouch’s “Rendezvous” and John Frankenheimer’s
“Ronin.”
That chase makes a lovely pairing with McG’s other
standout sequence: a montage of Ethan riding the bike he
bought for Zooey through the city streets and parking near
the Eiffel Tower. It’s a sweet divertissement for the typical-
ly boisterous director, who overall reins in the bombastic
giddiness of his “Charlie’s Angels” pictures and abandons
the soulless spectacle of “Terminator: Salvation” to make
an action film that’s downright restrained by his standards.
Unfortunately, in this case the restraint reads as overly
safe. “3 Days to Kill” is quite literally bloodless — the fight
sequences in “Taken” packed a far more potent punch even
with the same PG-13 rating — which seems like a missed
opportunity. The juxtaposition of Ethan’s violent work and
gentler paternal side might have added some desperately
needed intrigue to the banal story.
“3 Days to Kill,” a Relativity release, is rated PG-13 by
the Motion Picture Association of America for “for intense
sequences of violence and action, some sensuality and lan-
guage.” Running time: 113 minutes.
Continued from page 19
3 DAYS
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
They say beauty is in the eye of the
beholder, but few could justifiably
question the beauty of a Hayao
Miyazaki film. Arevered master of ani-
mation, the Oscar-winning
director/writer makes something as
simple as a hazy sky so ravishing, it
can take your breath away.
Miyazaki’s latest film, “The Wind
Rises,” nominated for the animated
feature Oscar, happens to take that
concept of the subjectivity of beauty
and address it in a way that’s touching,
troubling, and above all, totally
unique. If this is indeed Miyazaki’s
swan song — he’s announced his
retirement, but not everyone believes
it — then it’s a worthy one, if perhaps
not his most satisfying work, and cer-
tainly not his simplest.
What IS beauty? Jiro, whom we first
meet as a country boy in Japan, finds
beauty in the design of an airplane. He
yearns to be a pilot, but is nearsighted.
In a dream, he encounters the famous
Italian aeronautical engineer Giovanni
Caproni, who tells him not to worry —
it’s even better to build planes than to
fly them.
Caproni is not a fictional character
— and neither is Jiro. The film is based
on Jiro Horikoshi, the engineer who
designed the Zero fighter plane used in
the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in
World War II. That’s where the film gets
complicated. Some have asked why
Miyazaki would focus on a man
whose creation was ultimately used
to kill so many.
One could also see
the film as a pacifist
statement — show-
ing how a thing of
beauty was turned
into a killing
machine. But
Miyazaki has said
he didn’t mean to be
political, wanting
simply to portray
the story of someone who pursued his
huge dream with talent and drive.
The film, produced by Miyazaki’s
acclaimed Studio Ghibli, presents Jiro
(voiced by Joseph Gordon-Levitt in
the English-language version, leading
an all-star cast) as a gentle soul.
Heading to Tokyo to begin studies in
engineering, he encounters a pretty
girl on the train. She shares his knowl-
edge of a French poem, and the line:
“The wind is rising, we must try to
live.”
They forge a connection, and then
their train is caught up in a catastrophe
— the Great Kanto Earthquake that
rocked Japan in 1923. (Miyazaki is at
his very best in depicting this natural
devastation.) Jiro helps the girl make
it home.
After university, Jiro is hired by
Mitsubishi to design planes (his boss-
es are voiced by Martin Short and
Mandy Patinkin, and even Ronan
Farrow has a small role as an employ-
ee.) He and his friend, Honjo (John
Krasinski) travel to Germany to study
what engineers are doing there. The
two have long talks about the state of
their country. Here, the film’s pacing
sags somewhat.
Back in Japan, at a hotel in the
mountains, Jiro again encounters the
girl he met on the train. (This entire
relationship is fictional). The two fall
in love; the scenes of Jiro wooing
Nahoko (Emily Blunt) by sending a
paper plane to her balcony inject a
welcome dose of charm and whimsy. Of
course, the depiction of nature is
exquisite — bright blue skies, purple
haze, and green fields that resemble an
Impressionist painting.
Nahoko, though, is suffering from
tuberculosis, and their love story will
be a sad one. Also sad, and clearly an
important part of the story, is how
Jiro’s passion for his work will take
him away from his doomed lover for
many hours, even when she most
needs him. (One oddity: there’s a lot of
smoking here, and it’s particularly jar-
ring when Jiro smokes in a bedroom
with the very ill Nahoko.)
The ending doesn’t shy away from
the results of Jiro’s passionate design
efforts. “Not a single one returned,” he
says in a mournful dream sequence at
the end to Caproni (Stanley Tucci.)
All he wanted, Jiro ruminates in this
film, was to create something beauti-
ful. Which is, at least, a feat that direc-
tor Miyazaki has achieved. Once
again.
“The Wind Rises,” a Walt Disney
Studios release, is rated PG-13 by the
Motion Picture Association of America
“for some disturbing images and
smoking.” Running time: 126 min-
utes. Three stars out of four.
Miyazaki explores ambition, dreams
Hayao
Miyazaki
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
NAPOLI! AMERICAN
CONSERVATORY THEATER
VISITS A COUNTRY AT WAR
AND A FAMILY IN CRISIS.
In Naples during World War II, an
enterprising woman sets up a
small-time black market busi-
ness in her home to keep her
family afloat. She prospers, but
maybe a bit too much — com-
pelling her husband to ask hard
questions about morality, civili-
ty and the state of their society.
Two hours with a 15-minute
intermission. Directed by Mark
Rucker. Through March 9.
AN ASIDE: A.C.T. Artistic
Director Carey Perloff said: “A
play filled with the rich bitter-
sweet comedy of postwar Italy,
Napoli! introduces a gallery of
indelible characters each trying
to find a way to survive a ravaged
economy and fulfill their dreams.
As we contemplate the issue of
income inequality in contempo-
rary America, it is fascinating to
watch what lengths a family will
go to to make a living, even if it
means profiteering off one’s
neighbors and selling illegal
goods.”
TICKETS: Tickets, starting at
$20, can be purchased from the
A.C.T. box office at 405 Geary
St., by phone at (415) 749-
2228, or online at www.act-
sf.org.
STAGE DIRECTIONS:
A.C.T. ’s Geary Theater is located
at 415 Geary St., just off Union
Square in the heart of downtown
San Francisco. Parking is avail-
able one block away at the
Mason/O’Farrell Garage, 325
Mason St. The theater is a rela-
tively level four-block walk from
the BART-Powell Street Station
(Market Street).
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW?
The Jovine family at the center
of Napoli! earns money by serv-
ing coffee made with illegally
gotten coffee beans. Wiki says:
Naples is known worldwide for
Neapolitan coffee made with the
historical Neapolitan flip coffee
pot, which then led to the cre-
ation of the espresso coffee
machine and Moka Express cof-
fee pot. There are still some lit-
tle industries roasting coffee
beans and producing ground cof-
fee to be used with Neapolitan
coffee machines.
***
JULIA JACKSON’S SOLO
SHOW TELLS A FAMILY
TALE. The small-scale Stage
Werx Theatre (fewer than 100
seats) is perfect for comedienne
and solo artist Julia Jackson’s
deeply personal autobiographi-
cal work, Children Are Forever.
(All Sales Are Final!). Speaking
directly to the audience, and deft-
ly morphing into a half-dozen
characters, Jackson begins her
narrative with a startling admis-
sion about how she once went
about buying a baby. Okay, as
she explains, she was adopting,
but the agency sure made her feel
like she was buying a baby. Did
you know some kids are dis-
counted? Ablack baby — which
is what Jackson and her wife
sought — costs half of a white
baby. The one saving grace was
that the waiting time for adopt-
ing a black child was six months
instead of the two years it takes
for a white baby. But five days
after signing the contract at the
adoption agency, a birth mother,
in labor, chose them to raise her
baby. What happened next, and
what had happened to bring them
all to that point, makes for an
engrossing evening. Two hours
with a 15-minute intermission. 8
p.m. Friday and Saturday through
March 22. Stage Werx Theatre,
446 Valencia St. (at 16th Street).
San Francisco. And there’s more:
Solo Sunday at Stage Werx. 7
p.m. Feb. 23. Asampling of vet-
eran actors and emerging talent.
Beyond stand-up and story-
telling, solo theater creates casts
of thousands — plus special
effects — all bursting from a sin-
gle performer. With Peter L.
Stein, Candace Roberts and Xiao
Juan Shu.
***
SPEND A NIGHT WITH
JOAN COLLINS. Legendary
actress Joan Collins comes to
Feinstein’s at the Nikko for two
performances only — 8 p.m.
Thursday, April 10 and 8 p.m.
Friday, April 11. Collins shares
stories and secrets with the same
engaging wit and frankness that
turned her two memoirs, “Past
Imperfect” and “Second Act,”
into bestsellers. Her latest mem-
oir, “Passion for Life,” has just
been published. Tickets $60 -
$75 at (866) 663-1063 or
www.ticketweb.com. Located
within the Hotel Nikko, 222
Mason St. San Francisco.
***
36 STORIES BY SAM
SHEPARD. Word for Word’s “36
Stories by Sam Shepard,” about
the denizens of roadside diners
along lonely stretches of
American Southwest highways,
runs May 24 through June 22 at
Z Below. 470 Florida St. San
Francisco. Arranged for the stage
and directed by Amy Kossow. 7
p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 8
p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m.
Sunday. (866) 811-4111 or
www.zspace.org.
Susan Cohn is a member of the San
Francisco Bay Area Theatre Critics
Circle and the American Theatre
Critics Association. She may be
reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
KEVIN BERNE
ENJOY A CUP OF COFFEE IN NAPOLI! The special coffee of Naples draws family and friends to the Jovine home
as American Conservatory Theater travels to 1940s Italy with Napoli!,Eduardo De Filippo’s comedy set during the
chaotic days of World War II. At the Geary Theater in San Francisco through March 9.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Me” is an irresistibly entertaining
documentary that captures Stritch dur-
ing what she unsentimentally calls
“almost post-time.” After seven
decades performing in New York — on
Broadway, in countless cabaret nights
at the Cafe Carlyle — Stritch’s enor-
mous energy has been knocked by the
increasing years, diabetes, and surger-
ies on her hip and eyes.
But “Shoot Me,” made over the last
few years, is a document not of
Stritch’s dwindling, but of her feisty
persistence. As the film shows, she has
trouble remembering lyrics and some-
times struggles to get out of bed. At
home and during rehearsals, it chroni-
cles her grand exit from New York, her
home since she was 17, and her deci-
sion to retire back to Michigan.
Stritch is a paragon of old-fashioned
show business: Abrassy and blunt sur-
vivor of New York theater life. More
than a decade ago, the New York
Landmarks Conservancy named her a
living landmark.
“I like the courage of age,” she
declares.
Karasawa shoots Stritch in intimate,
unglamorous situations, most notably
one night in a hospital bed with curlers
in her hair, chastened by a health
scare: “It’s time for me,” she says. “I
can feel it everywhere.”
Atheatrical being down to her soul,
Stritch is often a fascinating compan-
ion, throwing off such candid reflec-
tions, joining an elevator operator in
song, or miming a limp to avoid a
parking ticket in the Hamptons. But
she is also, unquestionably, a handful.
Her needs are many, which her musi-
cal director Rob Bowman patiently
tries to meet. She repeatedly criticizes
the documentary’s very own camera-
man, ordering him to more aggressive-
ly shoot her unpacking a box of her
cherished English muffins.
The question of how taxing it is to
work with Stritch is unavoidable. D.A.
Pennebaker’s 1970 documentary on
the cast recording of “Company”
showed her sparring with Stephen
Sondheim. In “Shoot Me,” we glimpse
a letter from Woody Allen before they
shot the film “September,” warning
her of overly dramatic behavior and
requesting that she “keep the question-
ing to a rock-bottom minimum.” Tina
Fey, who cast Stritch in a recurring
role on her sitcom “30 Rock,” says:
“It’s a bear. And it’s always worth it.”
Stritch is worth it not just because of
her talent, but for her inspiring perse-
verance. She’s a born entertainer, and a
spirited remnant of a disappeared New
York. She sings from “Follies”:
“Good times and bum times, I’ve
seen them all/ And, my dear, I’m still
here.”
“Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me,” a
Sundance Selects release, is not rated
by the Motion Picture Association of
America. Contains expletives.
Running time: 82 minutes. Three and a
half stars out of four.
Continued from page 19
STRITCH
der stereotypes and define their roles
on their own terms.
While it would be impossible to
summarize her well thought-out book
in a single column, “Lean In” also
left me pondering two large ideas that
apply to men and women alike.
The first idea Sandberg promotes in
“Lean In” is the importance of
respecting the decisions of others.
While my mom and Sandberg may
have made different choices regarding
their roles in their families, it does
not mean that one was right while the
other was wrong. And that extends
beyond the debate of women staying
at home. Every person has a different
life situation with varying factors
that affects how he or she makes deci-
sions. If choosing to do one thing
works best for the individual and his
or her family, it should not matter
what others have to say.
The other main idea Sandberg dis-
cusses is confidence. Looking at her
poised smile on the cover of “Lean
In” and glancing at her resume (she
worked at McKinsey & Company, the
U.S. Treasury Department and Google
prior to her current role at Facebook),
I would never have expected that con-
fidence was something Sandberg was
lacking. Yet, after reading her
poignant anecdotes from high
school, college and work, I found
Sandberg to be much more relatable
than I could have predicted. While she
has faced her share of struggles to
speak up and express her views, she
shares advice that it can never hurt to
hear: you cannot stand in your own
way. As I am looking forward to start-
ing college in the near future and
entering the workforce after that, few
pieces of advice could be more valu-
able. Reading “Lean In” didn’t make
me more confident or give me the
secret to success, but it did give me
the motivation to empower myself.
While the cover of “Lean In” touts
the book as being about women, it
really does convey important mes-
sages for everyone. We can’t all be
the COO of Facebook, but we all can
take up the conversation about equali-
ty and confidence.
Annika Ulrich is a senior at Aragon High
School in San Mateo. Student News appears
in the weekend edition. You can email
Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
President George W. Bush
NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
National Security Adviser Susan Rice
CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Govs. Bobby Jindal, R-La., and
Martin O’Malley, D-Md.
CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Govs. Rick Perry, R-Texas, Mike Pence, R-Ind., Dannel Malloy,
D-Conn., Jay Nixon D-Mo.
‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H.; Govs.
Scott Walker, R-Wis., and Peter Shumlin, D-Vt.
Sunday news shows
WEEKEND OURNAL 23
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, FEB. 22
Sublimity. NanHai Art, 510
Broadway, Millbrae. Exposition runs
through March 29. For more infor-
mation call 259-2100.
Special Needs and Autism
Conference and Expo. 8 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. Register at
http://wingslearningcenter.org/ne
ws_5/news5.html#Resource%20Fair
or email: jmurray@gatepath.com.
Registration starts at $25. For more
information email
jmurray@gatepath.com.
Community Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. to
11 a.m. The American Legion San
Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. There will be eggs,
pancakes, bacon, French toast,
omelets, juice and coffee. $8 per
person, $5 for children under 10.
Enjoy the friendship and service
from American Legion members.
11th Annual Tree Pruning
Workshop. 9 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.
Redwood City Public Works, 1400
Broadway, Redwood City. Space is
limited, so RSVP by emailing
info@citytrees.org. Coffee and
bagels will be served. $10 suggested
donation.
Preschool Open House. 10 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. Calvary Preschool, 401
Santa Lucia Ave., Millbrae. For chil-
dren 2.5-years-old to 5-years-old.
Full and part time schedule.
Summer session available. For more
information go to www.cal-
varypreschoolmillbrae.com or call
588-8030.
NFL 88 Plan Brunch. 10 a.m. to
Noon. Silverado Belmont Hills, 1301
Ralston Ave., Belmont. RSVP to
kstromgren@silveradocare.com by
Saturday, Feb. 15. For more informa-
tion call 226-4150.
Four-Wheel Auto Parts Jeep and
Truck Fest. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San
Mateo County Event Center, Expo
Hall, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San
Mateo. Free admission. For more
information go to www.4wheel-
parts.com/info/san-mateo-truck-
jeep-fest.aspx.
Quilt, Craft and Sewing Festival.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. San Mateo County
Event Center, Fiesta Hall, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo.
Admission is $10. For free admission
visit www.quiltcraftsew.com for a
coupon. For more information call
(775) 971-9266.
Self-Help for the Elderly and
Downtown San Mateo
Association Fifth Annual Lion
Dance. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. San Mateo
Central Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San
Mateo. For more information call
342-0822.
Family Resources Fair. 11 a.m. to 5
p.m., Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60
31st Ave., San Mateo. Meet and
greet more than 30 family-related
businesses at this fourth annual
event. San Mateo police cadets will
do free child fingerprinting, meet
Mateo the Fair Bear and enjoy free
facepainting. Sponsored by Health
Plan of San Mateo and the Daily
Journal. Free. For more information
call 344-5200.
E2 Fitness and Breakfast: Tabata
with Kelly Miller-Bailey. 11 a.m.
Whole Foods Market, 1010 Park
Place, San Mateo. Join for an hour of
kick-start cardio fitness followed by
a delicious and healthy breakfast.
For more information contact hsu-
lien.rivera@wholefoods.com.
International Order of Rainbow
for Girls membership event. 1 p.m.
Redwood City Roller Rink, 1303
Main St., Redwood City. Come learn
more about Rainbow Girls, a non-
profit service and leadership organ-
ization for young girls between the
ages of 11 and 20. Free. For more
information contact Ms. Letty Juarez
at 224-6212.
Healthy Parks/Healthy People cel-
ebrates Black History Month. 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. Ravenswood Open
Space Preserve, Menlo Park. Includes
kids activities, snacks and a guided
hike. Free and open to the public.
For more information go to
www.openspace.org/blackhistory.
Last Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance
with the Bob Gutierrez Band. 1
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road.
$5. For more information call 616-
7150.
The Commonwealth Club pres-
ents: Anna Quindlen, author of
‘Still Life with Bread Crumbs.’ 1:30
p.m. Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. General
admission is $12 for members and
$20 for non-members. For tickets
call (800) 847-7730 or register
online at www.commonwealth-
club.org. For more information con-
tact Georgette Gehue at
ggehue@commonwealthclub.org.
Opening reception for NanHai
Art’s Sublimity exhibit. 2 p.m. to 4
p.m. NanHai Art, 510 Broadway,
Suite 301, Millbrae. Sublimity is a
solo exhibition of recent works by
97-year-old artist Hou Beiren. For
more information call 259-2100.
Village Rhythms. 2 p.m. San Mateo
Main Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Sing-a-long Sound of Music. 6 p.m.
Central Middle School, Mustang
Hall, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
Sing along with the Von Trapps and
interact with the film using crazy
sound effects and fun props. Hosted
by San Carlos Children’s Theater
Youth Advisory Board. Costumes
optional. $5 donation appreciated.
For more information email Eve
Dutton at evedutton@aol.com.
The 25th Annual Gospel Festival.
6:30 p.m. Los Altos United
Methodist Church, 655 Magdalena
Ave., Los Altos. $15. For more infor-
mation email
dvancerobinson@gmail.com.
‘Little Women.’ 7:30 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University Theatre,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. $25
general, $15 students/seniors. For
more information go to
www.brownpapertickets.com.
Redwood Symphony Presents
Brahams’s First Symphony. 8 p.m.
Main Theatre of Cañada College,
4200 Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City.
Redwood Symphony will open 2014
with Brahms’s First Symphony, one
of the most emotionally powerful
and cathartic musical statements
ever. Additional music includes
Hungarian-born Gyorgy Ligeti’s
Concert Romanesc and
Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto. $10
to $30. For more information call
591-2732.
SUNDAY, FEB. 23
Four-Wheel Auto Parts Jeep &
Truck Fest. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. San
Mateo County Event Center, Expo
Hall, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San
Mateo. Free admission. For more
information go to www.4wheel-
parts.com/info/san-mateo-truck-
jeep-fest.aspx
‘Little Women.’ 2 p.m. Notre Dame
de Namur University Theatre, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. $25 general,
$15 students/seniors. For more
information go to www.brownpa-
pertickets.com.
The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music Student Recital. 3 p.m. The
Crestmont Conservatory of Music,
2575 Flores St., San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 574-4633.
Helen Sung Quintet. 4:30 p.m. The
Bach Dancing and Dynamite
Society, Douglas Beach House, 307
Miranda Road, Half Moon Bay. This
pianist/composer from New York
will debut her album. $40. For more
information call 726-2020.
MONDAY, FEB. 24
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
The San Bruno Lions Club Crab
Feast and Dance. 5:30 p.m. to mid-
night. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Dancing to the live music of West
Bay Rhythm. $55 per person. RSVP
by Feb. 24. For more information call
952-4021.
TUESDAY, FEB. 25
Mission Hospice and Home Care
Informational Meeting. Noon to 1
p.m, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 1670 S.
Amphlett Blvd., Suite 300, San
Mateo. For more information call
554-1000.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 per-
cent your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals.
For more information call 342-7755.
Local Authors’ Book Night. 7 p.m.
Kohl Mansion, 2750 Adeline Drive,
Burlingame. Engage with Liz Dossa,
Joanne Garrison and Kay Johnson.
$15. For more information call 762-
1134.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more
information call 430-6500.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 per-
cent your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals.
For more information call 342-7755.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
The causes of the two fires at 699
Seaport Blvd. are still under investiga-
tion but Redwood City police recently
called the second “suspicious” and
asked the public for help determining
if it was deliberately set. The two-
alarm Dec. 17 fire, about five weeks
after the first, was reported about 1
a.m. by an on-duty employee who
heard a loud explosion followed by the
ignition of a metal stockpile which
police later said contained nothing
that would self combust.
Mayor Jeff Gee said that the possi-
bility of arson being behind the sec-
ond fire doesn’t deter the city from
increasing safety at the facility.
“We feel they have a responsibility
to manage their operations in a safer,
more secure manner and do a better job
of preventing fires both accidental and
suspicious,” Gee said in a prepared
statement.
Safety recommendations
The recommendations issued in a
Feb. 20 letter to Sims include high-
definition cameras located around
debris piles and approaches to the
piles, a better perimeter security sys-
tem, locked games at all times, motion
sensors, a minimum of two security
guards with special machinery train-
ing, better lighting around debris piles
and a key card system or similar con-
trol to track who comes in and out of
the facility.
Sims’ president is hoping to set up a
meeting with City Manager Bob Bell
and other city officials next week and
in the interim will continue to operate
as it has the last 60 days, Rodby said.
Bell is optimistic about Sims’ par-
ticipation going forward.
“We believe Sims will find that it is
in their best interest to implement all
measures that the city has identified as
increasing fire safety for this facility,
and the good of our community and
broader region,” Bell said in a prepared
statement.
The earlier safety measures imposed
in December include allowing unan-
nounced inspections, pushing up
delivery times to avoid stockpiles of
unprocessed scrap metal and ensuring
three qualified operators are present 24
hours a day, seven days a week. At the
time of the after-hours fire, Sims had
only a security guard at the facility
because it was not operating. The com-
pany is to halt operations if staffing
levels fall short.
The city’s letter requests the “shred-
ding to the ground” practice continue
and that Sims hire a fire safety and
operational consultant for recommen-
dations on fire prevention and industry
best practices.
Sims has complied with all the man-
dates and recently held a community
meeting to answer public concerns.
Separately, Redwood City has ongo-
ing discussions with investigating
governmental agencies like the
Environmental Protection Agency,
California Department of Toxic
Substances Control and Bay Area Air
Quality Management District.
State legislation
As Redwood City works to keep its
community secure from future fires like
those at Sims, Hill is tackling safety
through state regulation. His bill pro-
poses elimination exemptions from
hazardous waste handling and disposal
laws for facilities that handle vehicle
shredder waste. Hill also proposes the
Department of Toxic Substances
Control develop regulations regarding
treatment, transport and disposal to
avoid contamination, explosion or
other potential hazards.
“This bill allows California’s toxics
regulators to do their job and protect
public health,” Hill said in a prepared
statement. “We shouldn’t be exempt-
ing waste from regulation if it con-
tains known carcinogens.”
The 1988 variance for auto waste
recyclers was based on the argument
that treated waste does not release con-
taminants into the environment but in
2002 DTSC found it exceeded state
thresholds for lead, zinc and cadmium,
according to Hill’s office.
Approximately 700,00 tons of this
waste, also known as fluff, end up in
state landfills annually.
Specific to the Peninsula, Hill’s
office said that in 2011 the EPAdiscov-
ered PCBs, mercury, lead, copper and
zinc in Redwood Creek and around the
Sims plant. PCB levels were 10,000
times greater than expected while lead
and copper were 10 to 15 times higher
than acceptable, according to Hill’s
data.
The bill also notes that Sims was
cited by the Bay Area Air Quality
Management District after a 2007 fire
and was accused by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service in 2011 of allowing
fibrous automobile shredder residue to
blow downwind into wetlands around
Bair Island.
Further investigation found no link
between the material and Sims, Rodby
said.
She also said many of Hill’s other
contentions about Sims are inaccurate.
The company is unaware of any sam-
pling by the EPA in Redwood Creek
and Bay in 2011 or directly related to
the operator and the PCB level claim
based on a prior erroneous report that
listed parts per million rather than
parts per billion, Rodby said.
She said Sims supports an ongoing
study by DTSC of the waste treatment
process and development of consistent
statewide standards for shredder
residue.
AHill spokesman said they stand by
the information the office released.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
SIMS
while patrolling in the area of El
Camino Real and Taylor Boulevard.
Harper followed the black Acura 2.4 TL
northbound and eventually onto dead-
end Poplar Avenue while waiting for
confirmation it was stolen. Harper
stopped his car behind the Acura,
between two parked cars on each side
of the narrow street, and approached
the vehicle demanding the two men
inside show their hands. Tialavea com-
plied but Solanga revved the engine,
U-turned, backed onto a residential
lawn and accelerated toward Harper
who fired 14 times. The Acura reversed
into the Poplar Avenue home’s porch.
Backup officers arrested Tialavea and
found Salonga presumably dead at the
scene.
An autopsy later showed Salonga
had methamphetamine and ampheta-
mine in his system.
During the investigation, Tialavea
told authorities he ran into Salonga
that night and had been driving around
for several hours in the car which he
assumed to be stolen because that was
Salonga’s “hustle.” Tialavea also said
the men knew the officer was follow-
ing them and heard his commands to
turn off the car and put up their hands.
Witness corroborated Harper’s state-
ment that Salonga failed to obey his
orders and purposely drove the Acura
toward the officer, Wagstaffe wrote in
the letter to Telford.
Prior to the fatal encounter,
Wagstaffe said that Salonga has previ-
ously driven recklessly and endangered
police officers multiple times while
trying to evade apprehension for driv-
ing stolen vehicles. The assumption is
he would have done the same to Harper,
according to Wagstaffe.
Salonga’s death was San Mateo
County’s only officer-involved fatali-
ty of 2013.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
OFFICER
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
COMICS/GAMES
2-22-14
FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Rustic lodgings
5 Top digit
9 Drop the ball
12 Verse units
13 Tel —
14 Zodiac sign
15 Warm up for a bout
16 Detours
18 Westerns
20 Gauges
21 Be an also-ran
22 Notice
23 Dieter’s no-no
26 Cargo haulers
30 Youth org.
33 Cartoon chipmunk
34 “En garde” weapon
35 Kind of radio
37 Grab a cab
39 Fall mo.
40 Ballet costume
41 Listlessness
43 In style
45 Delhi nursemaid
48 Tots of whiskey
51 Henson creation
53 Like polyester (hyph.)
56 Ocean-going bird
57 Slumber party attire
58 Declare
59 Eat elegantly
60 Edge a doily
61 Soldiers in gray
62 Vitality
DOWN
1 In that case (2 wds.)
2 Sherpa’s home
3 Groovy
4 Pressure
5 Collars
6 Wall climber
7 Touch of frost
8 Steer clear of
9 “Born Free” lioness
10 Fishing gear
11 Mr. Perot
17 Kitchen strainer
19 Tear apart
22 Ball of yarn
24 Oohed and —
25 Plaid wearers
27 PFC mail drop
28 Toshiba competitor
29 Adjust a watch
30 Go to — for
31 Dallas campus
32 Fore opposite
36 Pharaoh, now
38 Feast with poi
42 Obstruct
44 Golden statuette
46 Showery time
47 Redhead’s tint
48 Cabinet div.
49 Hindu prince
50 Sec’y
51 Kitty cries
52 Freshman, usually
54 Broad st.
55 Steal from
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2014
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Consider your
current position. Keep up to date with job
opportunities through social media or newspapers.
Carefully review your qualifications and update your
resume to suit the job market.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Fix things you’ve
been putting off. By freeing your time, you’ll be able
to take on a project that interests you and could
increase your earning potential.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Don’t get involved in
any new ventures. Stay close to home and nurture
personal relationships. Elderly relatives would enjoy
hearing from you. Your concern will be appreciated
and could bring rewards.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You need a change of
scenery. Don’t feel that it’s necessary to embark on
a major excursion. Instead, make positive changes
to your surroundings to add to your entertainment
or sense of security.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You will be given
extra assignments. Rather than get upset, make
the commitment to do the best job possible,
and keep your complaints to yourself. Your
professionalism will pay of f.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Your generous nature
is upsetting your budget. You cannot buy love, so
stop paying for everything and everyone. Chances
are someone has ulterior motives and is taking
advantage of you.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Someone you deal with
is not living up to a promise. An angry confrontation
will only make matters worse. Do your best to find a
diplomatic way of resolving the situation.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Your mind is brimming
with innovative ideas. Share your plans with close
friends. You will accomplish a lot if everyone directs
his or her energies to the same goal.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Keep your cash in
your pocket. Don’t let others involve you in unfamiliar
causes. There are lots of unscrupulous people trying
to convince you to part with your money.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — You will meet
with people who have different beliefs and values.
Respect their opinions, and don’t try to change their
views. An open mind will also help you gain freedom.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Consider and
reflect upon a personal situation. Someone with
whom you have dealings may feel you have been
too demanding. You need to decide whether to back
away or repair the damage.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Your intuitive
and thoughtful nature will result in an interesting
and rewarding friendship. While this is a positive
development, don’t divulge too much private
information too quickly.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 200
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
IN-HOME
CARE Staffng
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
AUTHENTIC THAI CHEFS WANTED
A new Thai restaurant in Half Moon Bay,
open May 2014, requires 2 authentic
Thai chefs.
Please send resume to
spicemehmb@outlook.com
BASHAMICHI STEAK & SEAFOOD
is looking to hire charismatic servers.
1390 El Camino Real, Millbrae, CA
94030
Our restaurant serves imported wagyu
beef along with authentic Japanese
cuisine.
Our ideal applicants have:
Energetic, positive attitudes and are
Team players, Knowledge of Japanese
Language and food helpful, Food service
experience, Serve Safe/Food Handler's
Card, Availability for lunch and dinner
shifts.
Please e-mail your resume to:
sakima-kisaku.2006@hotmail.com or
mail to the restaurant.
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed per Month. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRIVER WANTED Northern Peninsula,
Your car or mine (650)868-2334
after 7pm
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
RESTAURANTS -
Managers, Servers, Bussers, Bartend-
ers, wanted. New Downtown San Mateo
Restaurant, Call (650)340-7684
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 526451
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Daniel Alger, Jessica Clements
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Daniel Alger, Jessica Clem-
ents filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Malcolm Jovan Alger
Propsed Name: Malcolm Patrick Alger
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 14,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/28/ 2014
/s/ George A. Miram /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/28/2014
(Published, 02/01/14, 02/08/2014,
02/15/2014, 02/22/2014)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259386
The following person is doing business
as: RMD Auto Body, LLC, 1229 Mont-
gomery Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
RMD Auto Body, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on 12-
19-13.
/s/ Dominic Borg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259340
The following person is doing business
as: Golden Key Locksmith, 740 Bounty
Dr., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jona-
than Dray, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Jonathan Dray /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259432
The following person is doing business
as: St. Francis Animal Hosiptal, 871 Sier-
ra St., MOSS BEACH, CA 94038 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Amy L de Lorimier, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Amy L de Lorimier /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259448
The following person is doing business
as: UNAlliance, 1349 El Camino Real,
#2, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: United
Alliance For Economic Development,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Gimbler Escobedo Aliaga /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/31/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
26 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the SAN MATEO COUNTY
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES DIVISION will be
conducting a public informational meeting regarding the follow-
ing project for a Solid Waste Facilities Permit revision for a
material recovery facility and transfer station:
Blue Line Material Recovery Facility and Transfer Station
500 East Jamie Court
South San Francisco, CA 94080
The site has been operating as a fully permitted material re-
covery facility and transfer station as the Blue Line Material
Recovery Facility since 2001. The addition of food waste proc-
essing equipment, an anaerobic digestion facility, and a CNG
fueling station has necessitated the revision of the Solid Waste
Facility Permit. There are no other changes to the permit. The
City of South San Francisco adopted a Mitigated Negative
Declaration (SCH#2012092007) and Conditional Use Permit
on December 6, 2012, with appropriate mitigation measures
for potential project impacts.
This meeting will be conducted on Tuesday March 4th, 2014,
at 6:00 PM, in the Meeting Room (2nd floor) of the Blue
Line Material Recovery Facility and Transfer Station locat-
ed at 500 East Jamie Court, South San Francisco, 94080.
Comments by non-English speaking participants will be re-
corded for proper translation and consideration.
Any comments on this project, from those who are unable to
attend this meeting can be forwarded to Mr. Greg Schirle at
(650-372-6297), via e-mail to gschirle@smcgov.org, or post
mail to County of San Mateo Environmental Health Services
Division, 2000 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 100, San Mateo,
CA 94403, or fax (650-627-8244) prior to close of business on
March 8, 2014.
THE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday,
March 4, 2014 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno, CA and hold a public workshop on
the following item. No action is required for this item. All inter-
ested persons are invited to attend.
San Bruno Housing Element Update. Staff presentation,
discussion and opportunity for public input on the City’s Hous-
ing Element update for the 2014-2022 planning period. To
comply with State housing law, the City must adopt and the
California Department of Housing and Community Develop-
ment (HCD) must certify the updated Housing Element before
January 31, 2015. The Housing Element includes a housing
needs assessment, identifies housing constraints, identifies
sites to meet the City’s regional fair share housing obligation,
and develop goals and policies for upcoming planning period.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259176
The following person is doing business
as: In Stride Bookkeeping, 515 Madison
Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Nicole Redman, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Nicole Redman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/01/14, 02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259180
The following person is doing business
as: Scissors X T-Shirt Hand Paint & Cut-
ting Design, 1329 El Camino Real #3,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Sandra
Sanchez, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Sandra Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259538
The following person is doing business
as: MSF Decorations, 374 Alberta Way,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Melinda
Gayle Slatt-Friedeberg. same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on 01/01/02.
/s/ Melinda Gayle Slatt-Friedeberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/08/14, 02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259611
The following person is doing business
as: G.E.S, 180 A Utah Ave., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Ground Express Services, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/1998.
/s /Kapo Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259610
The following person is doing business
as: Air & Ground World Transport, 180 A
Utah Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: AG World Transport, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/1998.
/s /Kapo Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259468
The following person is doing business
as: Abcam Burlingame, 863 Mitten Rd.,
Ste. 103, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Epitomics, Inc, DE. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s / Michael Hadjisavas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259275
The following person is doing business
as: Lindserella, 1646 Virginia Ave., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Lindsay
Joan Brugioni Peterson, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Lindsay Joan Brugioni Peterson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259588
The following person is doing business
as: Bullseye Translation, LLC, 274 Red-
wood Shores Pkwy., #528, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94065 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Bullseye Transla-
tion, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/26/2010.
/s/ Nadezhada Mcleod /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259694
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Custom Cabinet Refacing, 2) Cus-
tom Refacing 475 Flibert St., HALF
MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: David Mi-
chael Furtado, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ David Michael Furtado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259593
The following person is doing business
as: South City Smile, 2288 Westborough
Blvd., Ste. 106, SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: William C.K. Ho,
2210 Gellert Blvd., #5303, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ William C.K. Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/12/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259592
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Family Smile Center, 1828
El Camino Real, Ste 603, Burlingame,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: William Ho, DDS, APDC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ William C.K. Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/12/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259634
The following person is doing business
as: Dream Graphic Design, 5 Aragon
Blvd. #6, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Catherine Kirchner, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Catherine Kirchner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259666
The following person is doing business
as: Darin Boville Gallery, 501 San Mateo
Rd. Units 8 & 9, HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Darin Boville, 1128 Birch St.,
#370120, Montara, CA 94037. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 02/02/14.
/s/ Darin Boville /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/18/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259708
The following person is doing business
as: Gods & Titans Tattoo, 3127 Jefferson
Ave., Unit #5, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Victor Martinez, 1221 Ruby
St., Redwood City, CA 94061. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Victor Martinez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/20/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
210 Lost & Found
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
Books
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3 each (650)341-1861
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
295 Art
5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”, signed
Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all. 650-345-
3277
6 CLASSIC landscape art pictures,
28”x38” glass frame. $15 each OBO.
Must see to appreciate. (650)345-5502
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC OMELET Maker quesadillas
& sandwich too $9 650-595-3933
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! SOLD!
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. SOLD!
STOVE AND HOOD, G.E. XL44, gas,
Good condition, clean, white.. $150.
(650)348-5169
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 SOLD!
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
19 TOTAL (15 different) UN postage-
stamp souvenir cards, $70 catalog value,
$5, (650)-366-1013.
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
255 US used postage-stamp blocks &
strips (1300 stamps) and more, mounted,
$20, (650)-366-1013.
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
27 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
HO TRAIN parts including engines, box-
cars, tankers, tracks, transformers, etc.
$75 Call 650-571-6295
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
RUSSIAN MEDAL Pins for sale, 68 in
lot, $99 (650)873-4030
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE DOLLS- 2002 Collection- Never
removed from box. Holiday Celebration &
Society Girl. $40.650-654-9252
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
VINTAGE 50'S JC Higgins toboggan, 74"
long & 18" wide. $35. 650-326-2235.
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
ATT 2WIRE Router, working condition,
for Ethernet, wireless, DSL, Internet.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. SOLD!
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65.
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
SOLD!
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
304 Furniture
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, (650)345-5502
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each (650)574-3229
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/ cover, washable $25.
(650)578-9208
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (3) stainless steel
21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. - $10 all
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty & case $25 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
308 Tools
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
WINCHESTER POCKETKNIFE scis-
sors, bade, sdriver file $10 650-595-3933
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
GREEN CERAMIC flower pot w/ 15
Different succulents, $20.(650)952-4354
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7, SOLD!
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
310 Misc. For Sale
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 (650)574-3229
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. (650)591-
1500
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WANTED SILVER Dollars
(650)492-1298
WANTED: HORSE DRAWN
EQUIPMENT
For restoration.
Condition is not critical.
Email location, photo, &
Telephone number. to:
rosekrans@pacbell.net or
call (650)851-7201
28 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Honolulu
memorial
11 Stroked
15 Approached
16 Quite
17 What “c” might
mean
18 Cold War capital
19 Befogged
20 Beginning for
metric
22 Hipster
23 Rat
26 Do maintenance
on, as a roof
28 Inlet
31 Adopted great-
nephew of
Claudius
33 Self-titled 1991
debut album
34 Fashionable ’40s
garb
37 Jumbles
38 Nervous
39 Honored, in a way
41 8 for O, e.g.
42 Lively dances
44 Apple Store tech
support station
46 Cram
48 Cheer
49 One wearing a
“Y” shirt, perhaps
50 Formal talk
52 Messenger
molecules
54 SS supplement
55 “Deputy __”: old
toon
57 “The King and I”
group
61 Nonsense
63 Don’t bother
66 2013 Zipcar
acquirer
67 Pinocchio, for
one
68 Composer
Rorem and
others
69 Pronunciation aid
DOWN
1 Pauley Pavilion
team
2 Fine cut
3 Soaks, in British
dialect
4 Fire proof
5 Hires to handle
the case
6 Names
7 Letter number
8 Spoiler of a
perfect semester
9 Musical
deficiency
10 Tenor Bocelli
11 Sound of
distress
12 Response to a
knock
13 Amer. citizen,
e.g.
14 Education
innovator
21 __ Accords: 1993
agreement
24 Huit follower
25 Composer who
incorporated
Norwegian folk
music into his
work
27 Singing syllables
28 Caspian Sea
republic
29 Haute couture
shopping area
30 Hexagram on the
Israeli flag
32 River player
35 Harrison’s
successor
36 Toledo title
40 “I Wonder Why”
lead singer
43 Took to court
45 St. George
residents
47 Job follow-up?
51 Part of Churchill’s
offer
53 Capital on the
Willamette
56 “Mr. Mom”
actress
58 Personnel list
59 Start of an
intermission?
60 Yielding
62 Winding path
64 Contend
65 Aurora, to the
Greeks
By Barry C. Silk
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
02/22/14
02/22/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, $10 (650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
316 Clothes
RAY BAN Aviator glasses - brand new in
case. Green lens-gold frames. 63mm.
$99. 650-654-9252
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BASEBALLS & softballs 6 in all for only
$5 650-595-3933
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50. (650)637-
0930
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. SOLD!
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
318 Sports Equipment
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE SALE
Menlo Park
Saturday-Sunday,
February 22 & 23
10 AM - 3 PM
340 San Mateo Dr., Menlo Park
(Cross street Middle Ave)
Home of former Japanese
antiques store owner, house is
completely packed!
• Japanese antiques, • Jewelry
• Mid-century furniture, • Books
• Garden decorations
• Kitchen overflowing
And more Unexpected Treasures
www.unexpectedtreasures.net
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER – Solaris Electric Cord-
less 21” self propelled. Excellent work-
ing condition.$85. 650-593-1261
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
CIMPLER
REAL ESTATE
Cimpler Real Estate - Reinventing
Home Buying
To Buy Smarter Call Artur Urbanski,
Broker/Owner
(650)401-7278
533 Airport Blvd, 4th Flr, Burlingame
www.cimpler.com
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
RENT
1 bedroom bath & kitchen
close to everything Redwood City $1375.
650-361-1200
452 Condos for Rent
2 BEDROOM 2 Bath Condo San Mateo,
New App, W/D hook-up, Garage, Pool,
Jacuzzi, Quiet $2975, (650)387-5998
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition SOLD!
620 Automobiles
‘99 DODGE Van, 391 Posi, 200 Hp V-6,
22” Wheels, 2 24’ Ladders, 2015 Tags,
$4500 OBO (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBILE ‘99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. $1,500.
(650)740-6007.
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2000 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
TOYOTA ‘05 TUNDRA, 4WD, Access
Cab, low mileage, $14,000. Call Joe
SOLD!
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
670 Auto Parts
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUNNING BOARDS – Dodge Ram fac-
tory chrome running boards. $99 (650)
995-4222
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & JANITORIAL
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
Spring Cleaning Special! $65
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
MARIN CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialists
* custom decks * Framing * remodel-
ing * foundation Rep.*Dry Rot * Ter-
mite Rep * And Much More
Ask about our 20% signing and
senior discounts
(650)486-1298
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels • Framing
• Carpentry Stucco • Siding
• Dryrot • Painting
• Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER’S CLEANING
• Roof and Gutter Repair
• Screening & Seal
• Replace & New Gutters
Free Est. Call Oscar
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
L.C PAINTING
(650)271-3955
Interior & Exterior
Sheetrock/Drywall Repair
Carpentry Repairs
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461
Painting
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
HAMZEH PLUMBING
Faucet Repair, Sewer lines, Un-
clog Drains, Water heater repair
and Repair Sewer inspection
People love me on Yelp!
(415)690-6540
30 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
Plumbing
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650)515-7792
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
President's Day Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
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1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
$29
ONE HOUR MASSAGE
(650)354-8010
1030 Curtis St #203,
Menlo Park
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
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RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP serving your mid-Peninsula
real estate needs since 1976.
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
BRE LIC# 1254368
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
WORLD 31
Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Angela Charlson
and Jim Heintz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KIEV, Ukraine — Under heavy
pressure from the West following a
deadly day of clashes and sniper
fire in the capital, President Viktor
Yanukovych and opposition lead-
ers struck a deal Friday aimed at
bringing Ukraine’s three-month
political crisis to an end. But radi-
cal protesters and some pro-
Russian factions rejected it, leav-
ing lingering doubts over whether
peace could be restored.
On a day of electrifying develop-
ments, the Ukrainian parliament
also opened a path for Yulia
Tymoshenko —Yanukovych’s
political nemesis — to be let out
of prison.
In spite of what looked like a
significant government retreat,
protesters booed opposition fig-
ures who took to a stage Friday
evening to present the deal, which
cuts Yanukovych’s powers and
calls for early elections but falls
short of demands for his immedi-
ate resignation.
“Death to the criminal!” some
chanted, referring to Yanukovych.
“Resign! Resign! Resign!”
shouted others as one radical
speaker threatened to go on an
armed offensive if the opposition
doesn’t demand the president’s res-
ignation by Saturday morning.
Addressing the crowd in Kiev’s
Independence Square, opposition
leader Vitali Klitschko tried to per-
suade them that Yanukovych had
likely given all he was willing to
give.
“He’s not going to resign. This
isn’t realistic. We have to think
about realistic steps,” Klitschko
said.
The agreement signed Friday
calls for presidential elections to
be moved up from March 2015 to
no later than December, but many
protesters said that is far too late.
And it does not address the issue
that set off the protests in
November — Yanukovych’s aban-
donment of closer ties with the
European Union in favor of a
bailout deal with longtime ruler
Russia.
The standoff between the gov-
ernment and protesters escalated
this week, as demonstrators
clashed with police and snipers
opened fire in the worst violence
the country has seen since the
breakup of the Soviet Union a
quarter-century ago. The Health
Ministry put the death toll at 77
and some opposition figures said
it’s even higher.
The U.S., Russia and the 28-
nation EU are deeply concerned
about the future of Ukraine, a
divided nation of 46 million. The
country’s western regions want to
be closer to the EU and have reject-
ed Yanukovych’s authority in
many cities, while eastern Ukraine
favors closer ties with Russia.
Ukraine agreement meets resistance
REUTERS
People attend the funeral of an anti-government protester who was killed
during Thursday’s clashes with riot police, in Kiev, Ukraine.
EARLY ELECTIONS
The agreement envisions early
presidential elections, but says they
can wait until December.That’s a sore
point with many of the demonstrators
who have occupied central Kiev;one of
their aims was the immediate
resignation of Yanukovych. The
country’s next presidential election
was scheduled to be held in March
2015, so even if Yanukovych is
defeated in early elections, he could
serve all but three months of his term.
CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM
After becoming president in 2010,
Yanukovych pushed through a
measure to abandon 2004
constitutional changes that reduced
the power of the president. The
agreement called for parliament to
reverse that move, which is seen by
many as having questionable legality,
and parliament did so hours later.
Among the powers the president lost
are the right to nominate the prime
minister and fire the Cabinet.
CLEAR THE CAMP
The agreement calls for “serious
efforts” to get life back to normal,
including the withdrawal of protesters
from streets and squares. Effectively,
that’s an order for the massive
encampment in Kiev’s Independence
Square to pack up. No deadline for
leaving has been set and many
protesters are likely to move out slowly
because of the solidarity the camp
fostered and doubts over whether the
agreement will actually be
implemented. In the 2004 Orange
Revolution protests, which paved the
way for Viktor Yushchenko to become
president,some demonstrators stayed
in their camp until his inauguration.
INVESTIGATE BLOODSHED
Even before this week’s bloodshed,
which saw demonstrators shot by
snipers, the police were facing sharp
criticism for their heavy-handed
approach. Police in turn faced peril
from protesters throwing stones,bricks
and firebombs. As a result, the
investigation into the violence that the
agreement calls for is likely to be one
of the most contentious issues in the
days and weeks ahead.The envisioned
investigation is to be done jointly by
representatives from the authorities,
the opposition and the Council of
Europe,the continent’s leading human
rights body.
STATE OF EMERGENCY
Throughout the past few months,
concerns were high that the
government would declare a state of
emergency to give police more
powers to deal with the
demonstrators. The agreement
stipulates that no state of emergency
will be imposed, but doesn’t state a
period for which that ban would be in
effect.
THE ORIGINAL ISSUE
The agreement does not address the
grievance that set off the protests in
the first place: Yanukovych’s shelving
of an agreement to deepen ties with
the European Union and his decision
to turn toward Russia for financial
assistance instead. The avid desire of
many Ukrainians to step out of Russia’s
long shadow and become more
integrated with the West remains a
serious, unresolved issue for Ukraine.
Many hurdles ahead
32 Weekend • Feb. 22-23, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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