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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Virtual reality (VR):


Virtual reality is a term that applies to computer-simulated environments that can simulate physical presence in places in the real world, as well as in imaginary worlds. It covers remote communication environments which provide virtual presence of users with the concepts of telepresence and telexistence or a virtual artifact (VA). experience. Virtual reality is often used to descri!e a wide variety of applications commonly associated with immersive, highly visual, #$ environments. miniaturi&ation. he development of %A$ software, graphics hardware acceleration, head mounted displays, data!ase gloves, and he simulated environment can !e similar to the real world in order to create a life li"e

1.2 Augmented reality (AR):


Augmented reality is a live, direct or indirect, view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented !y generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or '() data. It is related to a more general concept called mediated reality, in which a view of reality is modified (possi!ly even diminished rather than augmented), !y a computer. As a result, the technology functions !y enhancing one*s current perception of reality. +y contrast, virtual reality replaces the real world with a simulated one. Augmentation is conventionally in real-time and in semantic context with environmental elements.

1. Pr!"e#t $la%%&
(ro,ect 'lass is a research and development program !y 'oogle to develop an augmented reality head-mounted display (-.$). It is part of the 'oogle / 0a!, which wor"s on other futuristic technologies. he intended purpose of (ro,ect 'lass products would !e the hands-free displaying of information currently availa!le to most smart phone users, and allowing for interaction with the Internet via natural language voice commands. he functionality and physical

appearance (minimalist design of the aluminum strip with 2 nose pads) has !een compared to )teve .ann3s 4ye ap, which was also referred to as 5'lass5 (54ye ap $igital 4ye 'lass5, i.e. uses of the word 5'lass5 in singular rather than plural form 5'lasses5). he operating system software used in the glass will !e 'oogle3s Android.

CHAPTER 2 OVERVIE'
As per many reports, 'oogle is expected to start selling eyeglasses that will pro,ect information, entertainment and, this !eing a 'oogle product, advertisements onto the lenses. hese glasses will have the com!ined features of virtual reality and augmented reality. he 'oogle 'lasses can use a 6' cell connection to pull in information from 'oogle*s mountain of data and display info a!out the real world in augmented reality on the lens in front of your eye. As you turn your head you*ll get information a!out your surroundings and near!y o!,ects from 'oogle 'oggles, info on !uildings and esta!lishments from 'oogle .aps, even your friends* near!y chec"-ins from 0atitude. he company has no plans to sell ads into your newly augmented view of the world, !ut will consider it if the product really catches on.

(igure 2.1 O)er)ie* !+ $!!gle $la%%


he glasses are not !eing designed to !e worn constantly 7 although 'oogle engineers expect some users will wear them a lot 7 !ut will !e more li"e smart phones, used when needed, with the lenses serving as a "ind of see-through computer monitor. 'oogle glasses are !asically weara!le computers that will use the same Android software that powers Android smart phones and ta!lets. 0i"e smart phones and ta!lets, the glasses will !e e8uipped with '() and motion sensors. hey will also contain a camera and audio inputs and outputs.

)everal people who have seen the glasses, !ut who are not allowed to spea" pu!licly a!out them, said that the location information was a ma,or feature of the glasses. hrough the !uilt-in camera on the glasses, 'oogle will !e a!le to stream images to its rac" computers and return augmented reality information to the person wearing them. 9or instance, a person loo"ing at a landmar" could see detailed historical information and comments a!out it left !y friends. If facial recognition software !ecomes accurate enough, the glasses could remind a wearer of when and how he met the vaguely familiar person standing in front of him at a party. hey might also !e used for virtual reality games that use the real world as the playground.

CHAPTER TECHNO,O$IE- U-ED


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.1 'eara.le C!m/uting&
:eara!le computers, also "nown as !ody-!orne computers are miniature electronic devices that are worn !y the !earer under, with or on top of clothing. his class of weara!le technology has !een developed for general or special purpose information technologies and media development. :eara!le computers are especially useful for applications that re8uire more complex computational support than ,ust hardware coded logics.

(igure .1 'eara.le #!m/uting


;ne of the main features of a weara!le computer is consistency. here is a constant interaction !etween the computer and user, i.e. there is no need to turn the device on or off. Another feature is the a!ility to multi-tas". It is not necessary to stop what you are doing to use the device< it is augmented into all other actions. hese devices can !e incorporated !y the user to act li"e a prosthetic. It can therefore !e an extension of the user*s mind and=or !ody.

.2 Am.ient Intelligen#e& >

Am!ient Intelligence (AmI) refers to electronic environments that are sensitive and responsive to the presence of people. Am!ient intelligence is a vision on the future of consumer electronics, telecommunications and computing.

(igure .2 Am.ient Intelligen#e En)ir!nment%


In an am!ient intelligence world, devices wor" in concert to support people in carrying out their everyday life activities, tas"s and rituals in easy, natural way using information and intelligence that is hidden in the networ" connecting these devices.

As these devices grow smaller, more connected and more integrated into our environment, the technology disappears into our surroundings until only the user interface remains perceiva!le !y users.

. -mart Cl!t0ing&
)mart clothing is the next generation of apparel. It is a com!ination of new fa!ric technology and digital technology, which means that the clothing is made with new signaltransfer fa!ric technology installed with digital devices. )ince this smart clothing is still under development, many pro!lems have occurred due to the a!sence of the standardi&ation of technology. herefore, the efficiency of technology development can !e strengthened through his study consists of three phases. he first phase is selecting industrial standardi&ation.

standardi&ation factors to propose a standardi&ation road map. he second phase is to research and collect related test evaluation methods of smart clothing. 9or this, we selected two categories, which are clothing and electricity=electron properties. he third phase is esta!lishing a standardi&ation road map for smart clothing. In this study, test evaluations have not yet !een conducted and proved. -owever, this study shows how to approach standardi&ation. :e expect that it will !e valua!le for developing smart clothing technology and standardi&ation in the future.

(igure . -mart Cl!t0ing

.1 Eye Ta/ Te#0n!l!gy&


An 4ye ap is a device that is worn in front of the eye that acts as a camera to record the scene availa!le to the eye as well as a display to superimpose a computer-generated imagery on the original scene availa!le to the eye. his structure allows the user3s eye to operate as !oth a monitor and a camera as the 4ye ap inta"es the world around it and augments the image the user sees allowing it to overlay computer-generated data over top of the normal world the user would perceive. he 4ye ap is a hard technology to categori&e under the three main headers for

weara!le computing (%onstancy, Augmentation, .ediation) for while it is in theory a constancy technology in nature it also has the a!ility to augment and mediate the reality the user perceives.

(igure .1 Eye Ta/ Te#0n!l!gy

.2 -mart $rid Te#0n!l!gy&


A smart grid is an electrical grid that uses information and communications technology to gather and act on information, such as information a!out the !ehaviors of suppliers and consumers, in an automated fashion to improve the efficiency, relia!ility, economics, and sustaina!ility of the production and distri!ution of electricity.

.3 1$ Te#0n!l!gy&
6' is the fourth generation of cell phone mo!ile communications standards. It is a successor of the third generation (#') standards. A 6' system provides mo!ile ultra!road!and Internet access, for example to laptops with A)+ wireless modems, to smart phones, and to other mo!ile devices.

Andr!id O/erating -y%tem&

(igure .2 Andr!id O/erating -y%tem


Android is a 0inux-!ased operating system for mo!ile devices such as smart

phones and ta!let computers, developed !y 'oogle in con,unction with the ;pen -andset Alliance. Android is open source and 'oogle releases the code under the Apache 0icense. his open source code and permissive licensing allows the software to !e freely modified and distri!uted !y device manufacturers, wireless carriers and enthusiast developers. Additionally, Android has a large community of developers writing applications (5apps5) that extend the functionality of devices, written primarily in a customi&ed version of the Cava programming language. In ;cto!er 2D12, there were approximately @DD,DDD apps availa!le for Android, and the estimated num!er of applications downloaded from 'oogle (lay, Android3s primary app store, was 2> !illion.

CHAPTER 1
E

DE-I$N
1.1 Vide! Di%/lay&
Its features with the small video display that is used to display the pop up hands free information.

(igure 1.1 Vide! di%/lay !+ $!!gle $la%% 1.2 Camera&


It also has the front facing video camera with which photos and videos can !e ta"en in a glimpse.

(igure 1.2 Camera !+ $!!gle $la%% 1. -/ea4er&

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'oogle glasses are designed to !e hands free weara!le device that can !e used to ma"e or receive calls too. )o a spea"er is also designed !y the ear.

(igure 1. -/ea4er !+ $!!gle $la%%

1.1 5utt!n&
A single !utton on the side of the frame sophisticates the glasses to wor" with the physical touch input.

(igure 1.1 5utt!n !+ $!!gle $la%%

1.2 6i#r!/0!ne& 11

A microphone is also put in, that can ta"e the voice commands of the wearer of user. his microphone is also used for having telephonic communication.

CHAPTER 2
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'OR7IN$
H!* D!e% It '!r489
he device will pro!a!ly communicate with mo!ile phones through :i-9i and display contents on the video screen as well as respond to the voice commands of the user.

(igure 2.1

T0e !)erall *!r4ing !+ $!!gle gla%%e%

'oogle put together a short video demonstrating the features and apps of 'oogle glasses. It mainly concentrates on the social networ"ing, navigation and communication.

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he video camera senses the environment and recogni&es the o!,ects and people around. he whole wor"ing of the 'oogle glasses depends upon the user voice commands itself.

CHAPTER 3 ADVANTA$E- : DI-ADVANTA$E16

ADVANTA$E 4asy to wear and use. )ensitive and responsive to the presence of people. 9ast access of maps, documents, videos, chats and much more. A new trend for fashion lovers together !eing an innovative technology. A spectacle !ased computer to reside directly on your eyes rather than in your pouch or poc"et. A useful technology for all "inds of handicapped=disa!led people.

DI-ADVANTA$E %an !e easily !ro"en or damaged. hough 'oogle wants these glasses to !e as modest as achieva!le, they seem to !e extremely !rea"a!le. Asers will have a tough time ta"ing care of it. hese glasses show the retrieved data in front of users eyes so it will !e a tough experience for them since they will focus on that data and will eventually miss the surroundings that may lead to accidents while driving. he resource for running these glasses is still un"nown. :ill there !e a !attery or it will run using solar energyF (rivacy of people may !reach with new glasses.

CHAPTER ; (UTURE -COPE


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'oogle 'lass is as futuristic a gadget we*ve seen in recent times. It*s limited in scope right now, !ut the future, 'oogle !elieves, is !right and the device itself is Gincredi!ly compellingH. 'oogle is trying their hardest to push the (ro,ect 'lass through the 9%% this year. Ieports show that 'oogle is trying to get the approval !y the 9%% this year !ut there are already several hundred glasses made for testing internally.

(igure ;.1 (uture %#!/e !+ $!!gle $la%%e%

CONC,U-ION
1?

'oogle glasses are !asically weara!le computers that use the evolving familiar technologies that !rings the sophistication and ease of communication and information access even for the physically challenged class of people those literally could not use general way of palmtops and mo!iles.

(igure <.1 C!n#lu%i!n !+ $!!gle gla%%

RE(ERENCE-

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http:==en.wi"ipedia.org=wi"i=(ro,ectJ'lass http:==www.smart-glasses.org=!enefits-smart-glasses= http:==en.wi"ipedia.org=wi"i=4ye ap http:==www.techpar".net=2D12=D2=2E=google-glasses-with-virtual-and-augmentedreality= http:==en.wi"ipedia.org=wi"i=AndroidJ(operatingJsystem) http:==www.we!md.!oots.com=eye-health=news=2D12D611=will-google-glasses-!e-safe http:==www.thenewstri!e.com=2D12=D6=DB=google-pro,ect-glasses-success-or-anotherfailure=K.A9.c0@0iaAA http:==www.redmondpie.com=google-pro,ect-glass-gets-an-awesome-s"ydiving-demoat-io-explorer-edition-up-for-pre-order-video=

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