You are on page 1of 262

i".:!.;;i!'.;miiii!iii!

ii>ii'i;:ii

;iii.n;ii)ii!:;inii

|il!!liiii'',MI!li!'':!'iK!!'il'!11lli'MI!l!lii!l',ililllin

!illlll!IH!l!llin!'l!!!ll

Gop>'iiglitl^^.

COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT.

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

THE

JOLLY BOOK OF
t

BOXCRAFT
BY

PATTEN BEARD
U^t'iA

Models

Sixty-ei^ht Photographic Illustrations by G. S. North from Made and Arranged by the Author and with Twenty-three Diagrams by E. D. Patiee

NEW YORK

FREDERICK

A.

STOKES COMPANY

PUBLISHERS

TT\eo

Copyright, 19 14, by

FREDERICK

A.

STOKES COMPANY

All rights reserved

September,

1^14

OCT 19 1914

G!,A380917

IS

THIS BOOK DEDICATED TO

ALL LITTLE CHILDREN


AND TO

"NIMBLEFINGERS," "HAPPY THOUGHT"

AND "PLAY"

AUTHOR'S NOTE
^'The Jolly

and rewritten

Book of Boxcraft" has been enlarged from work started in May, 1909. This

work was purchased by St. Nicholas, Little Folks, Good Housekeeping, The Congregationalist and Christian World, The Designer, Holland's Magazine, The Housekeeper, The Ladies' Home Journal, The New York Herald, and The New York Tribune. Thanks are due to them for the courtesy of using material which was included in their articles.

The author

feels that it

is

only right

to

acknowl-

edge her indebtedness

to the children

themselves
little

who

have lent their toys and helped


their

in

many

ways of
Special

own toward
Henry

the

making

of this book.

thanks are due to Elizabeth Hendricks,


Guthrie,
Jarrett, Stanley

Raymon

Hoyt, and Wesley

Meehan, playfellows.

Vll

CONTENTS
FAGS

Introduction (Verse)

xv
i

boxcraft

The The The The The

Little

White Cottage

of Boxville

9
i6 19

Boxville Store
District School of Boxville

Little

Church

of Boxville

27

Boxville Railway Station

34
.
.

B. R. R. Freight Station

and Shoe-box Tunnel


It

40
43

Hotel Bandbox and How to Furnish The Shoe-box Apartment House

50
53

Boxville Residence Boxville Garage or Stable

The

58

Making a Boxville Garden


Boxville Boat-house or Yacht Club

60
65

The Houseboat "Box Craft"


Camp Box on Mirror Lake

68 70
73
77
81

The The

Gipsy Cart of Boxville Highway

Shepherd's

Hut and the

Sheepfold

Building a Box Bridge Building a Toy Windmill Boxville Barn and Farmyard

83

86

Box Brothers' Animal Show


ix

89

CONTENTS
PAGE

Circus

Tent and Circus Grounds

92

BoxTOWN Zoo Garden BoxTOWN Hose House

96
98
100
102
.

How

to

Make

Wigwam

Fort Box

How TO

Build A Toy Castle AND A Fairyland House

105

Boxes Used as Blocks


. .

no
.

Making a Noah's Ark for Cracker Animals .114 Box Savings-bank for Pennies 117 How TO Make a Toy Wagon and Sled or Sleigh .119 The China Doll's Crib, Go-cart, and May Basket 122 The Toy Dog Kennel for a Toy Dog 127 How to Make a Teddy Bear's Wheelbarrow .129
. .

Office Furniture for Little Dolls

131

How How How

TO

to
TO

Make a Dolls' Hammock Make a Theater or Punch Show Make a Toy Merry-go-round

134
.

.136
140
143 147

Making A BoxcRAFT Automobile

How to Furnish a Doll-house How to Make the Boxcraft Game, "Ringfling" The Game of "Shoot the Chutes" The Boxcraft Game "One-Two-I-Catch-You" The Funny Game of "Mister Box" How to Make a Magic Box
.

.154
157

.159
161

163

NOTE
In view of the large number of illustrations
in this

volume and of the


it is

necessity for grouping

them,

necessary for an occasional illustration

to appear at the

end of

its

chapter, or at the end


It
is

of the preceding chapter.


fore that the
list

desirable there-

of

illustrations

be consulted fre-

quently.

XI

ILLUSTRATIONS
BoxviLLE, A

Toy Town Made with Shoe Boxes

Frontispiece
FACING PAGE

BoxviLLE Cottage {Outside View) {Inside View)

Boxville

Cottage
4
.

BoxcRAFT Materials ^An Unfinished Boxcraft Toy The Village Store {Outside View) The Village Store

{Inside

View)

The

District School {Outside View) School {Inside View)

The

18

District
19

Boxville

Church

{Outside View)

{Inside View) Boxville Railway Station Railway Station {Inside View) B. R. R. Freight Station Shoe-Box Tunnel Bandbox Hotel {Outside View) Bandbox Hotel {Inside View) Boxville Apartment House Box Furniture for the

Boxville Church {Outside View) Boxville

32

...

33

42
43 52

^The Garage for Boxville Residence The Greenhouse for Boxville Garden The Pergola FOR the Garden The Boat-House or Yacht Club The Houseboat, "Boxcraft" Camp Box on Mirror LakeThe Boxville Gipsy Cart Shepherd's Hut and Sheepfold^The Box Bridge
A
Boxville Residence
.

Apartment House

53

64
65

70
78

xiii

ILLUSTRATIONS
The Toy Windmill Boxville Barn and Farmyard The Boxcraft Animal Show
FACING PAGE
.

Box Brothers' Circus Tent Circus Cages and Booth BoxTOWN Zoo Boxtown's Hose House Indian Wigwam Fort Box The Fairyland Castle ^The Fairy House Box Building with Box Blocks A Box Animal and Box Man A Toy Train Built of Boxes Boxes as Standards for Cut-Outs A Noah's Ark with Cracker Animals A Penny Sav-

84 90
91

....

96 100
108 109
112

ings-Bank

Wagon and

Toy Wheelbarrow 128 Office Furniture for Dolls A Doll's Couch Hammock 132 Dolls' TheaterThe Toy Merry-Go-Round .138 Boxcraft Toy Automobile (With Top) Boxcraft Automobile {Without Top) 144 Doll-House Furniture: Bedroom Tables and Chairs 148 Doll-House Furniture: Mantel and Settle Piano AND Clock 149 Doll-House Furniture: Dining-room Kitchen .152 The Game, "Ringfling" The Game, "Shoot the
Toy Dog Kennel
.

Sled Crib, Go-Cart, Doll's Sled

Sleigh
May
Basket

113

Express

120

Wagon and
121

Chutes"

154
160

The Game. "Mr. Box"The Game, "One-Two-ICatch-You"

XIV

DIAGRAM

One

DIAGRAMS
DIAGRAM
PAGE

Six, E, Six,

Seven

Eight

Nine

How How How How How

to
to

to to to

Make Make Make Make Make Make Make


Make

a School Desk and a Piano 179


a Fireplace and a

Mantel

180
181

a Pergola a

Zoo

or Circus Cage

.182
183

a Dolls' Theater or

Punch

Show

Ten
Eleven

How How
How

to to

a Sleigh or a Sled
the Boxcraft

.184
185

Game, "Ring-

fling"

Twelve
Thirteen

to

the Boxcraft

Game, "One186
.

Two-I-Catch-You"

How

to

Make a Magic Box

.187

XVI

INTRODUCTION
THE BOXCRAFT ROAD
Near Jollyplay in Boxland, on Boxcraft Road to Fun, There lies a children's village a very happy one.
Its

buildings are

all

boxes

the hotel and the store,

The school-house and the station, and many others more! The name of it is Boxville. Its villagers are toys. And those who build in Boxville are merry girls and boj'^s. You, too, may go to Boxland to make a house for play
Look!
Here, you'll see the guide-post!
Before you
lies

the way.

Take cardboard boxes with you

A
It

pencil,

and a paint-box,
all

I'll tell

you

about

it.

maybe, some and take your turning's here We'll


scissors too.

paste or glue,

start

the

was a

fairy told

me

about this village, dear


xvii

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

The

Jolly

Book

of Boxcraft

BOXCRAFT
Material

Required

to

Make

Boxcraft: card-

board boxes,

paste, scissors, crayons or water-color

paints; perhaps a ruler, and pencil will help.

Do

you believe

in fairies?
as

I do.

know

three of

them, and they are quite


fairy godmother.

wonderful

as Cinderella's

She could make a coach and pair


all

out of nothing at

but a pumpkin and some mice,

but the fairies that I


that!

know can do even


a

better than
full of toys

They can make


at all

whole toy shop

from nothing

but some cardboard boxes.

The

fairies that I

know

are called

Nimblefingers, and Play.

Happy Thought, They have so much magic


and make
to see

that they can transform even dull days

them

jolly ones.

All three of them came


sat

me

one very rainy day, and each of them

upon a card-

board box while they


fairy art of boxcraft.

all

told

me

in chorus about the

[I]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


"Have you
ever noticed
little

how much

an ordinary
flat

shoe-box looks like a

building with a

roof?"

Happy Thought
"All you have

inquired.
to

do

to

make

it

a house,"

Nimblein
its

fingers put in, "is to cut doors


sides."

and windows

"And
have
all

then,

when you have made


it,"

the house,

you

kinds of fun with

laughed Play.
for

"Boxes will make

chimneys

your house,"

Happy Thought
ture

pursued.

"Boxes will make furnibenches

beds,

tables, chairs, mantels, pianos,

everything!"

"You need only

to cut the

box rims

to

make them,"

Nimblefingers interrupted.

"And when

they are

made

oh, think of the things


made

you can use them for!" chuckled Play.

"A whole
store,

village can be

cottages,
on.

school,

church,

railway

station,

bridges,

tunnels

everything,"

Happy Thought went


you need
to

"And
I'll

all that

do

It

will be a pair of
paste.

scissors, a pencil,

some

paints,

and maybe some

show you how," Nimblefingers volunteered.


the village
is

"When
in
it!

made,

all

your toys can play


toys,

Haven't you some roly-poly tumble


[2]

and

BOXCRAFT
some penny
"I
dolls,

and toy animals?" Play demanded.


have."
is

know you must


at all

''And the village nothing

not all that you can

make from

but some cardboard boxes.


of a toy:

You may

make almost any kind


games, and

a theater for dolls, a

merry-go-round, an Indian wigwam, and games, and

GAMES!"
Happy Thought, Nimblefingers, me how to make all these magic toys
but cardboard boxes, and they
children about
it,

So, the fairies,

and Play, told

from nothing
asked

at all

me

to tell the

so that they

might know how

to

change dull days into bright and


of the magic.

happy ones when they had learned


Cardboard boxes are
to

be found everywhere.
in everybody's

They
gists,

are in your

home and

home.

Butchers, bakers, candlestick makers, milliners, drugjewelers, stationers,


grocers,

drygoods firms,
all

shoe stores, book stores, toy stores,

keep them.

Everywhere, everywhere there are cardboard boxes


big boxes,
boxes,
little

boxes, middling-sized boxes;

wide

narrow boxes, deep boxes, shallow boxes;


I

round boxes, oblong boxes, square boxes


boxes,

Boxes,
to

BOXES
them.

everywhere!

All you need

do

is

to ask for

[3]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


People
butchers,
at

home

are throwing
the

them away.
makers,

The
the

the

bakers,

candlestick

milliners, the druggists, the jewelers, the stationers,

the grocers, and the dry goods firms, as well as


the others, are constantly sending boxes
to

all

your home.

The
away

shoe stores, and the book stores, and the toy

stores,

and ever
just

so

many

others, are

throwing boxes
to

because nobody seems


lies in

realize

what

magic there

them for

the children.

When Happy
fi:rst

Thought, Nimblefingers, and Play

told

me

about boxcraft, I did not find any trouble

in securing the kind of

box that

needed for the

toy-making.

found that the merchants were very


boxes

when I asked for them. They smiled when I asked. They did not know that a toy circus tent could be made from a round hat-box. They did not know that a whole village might be
glad
to

give

me

erected out of six shoe-boxes!

Among
ones.
milliner's.

the boxes given

me were
wide.
It

three very large

One was deep and


It

came from

the
to

was not
in.

bandbox, but a box used


it

pack hats away

In

kept

all

the boxes that

came

to

me.
It

The

small ones I packed inside the


after that, to find

large ones.

was a simple matter,


[4]

Boxville Cottage

is

made from

a shoe-box.

Boxville Cottage

is

furnished with boxcraft furniture.

Boxcraft Materials.

An

unfinished Boxcraft Toy.

BOXCRAFT
what
I

needed when

wished

to

make

a table, or a

chair, or a

punch show, or
pretty

a school-house.

Another box that was given


Into
it

put

all

me was wide and flat. papers that came my way


waxed
sandcovers, crape paper,
lie
till

lace paper, pinwheel paper, sheets of

wich paper and glacine book


spools,
flat

cotton,

pencils.

Everything that could

went

into this wide, flat box, to be stored

needed.

This box packed into the


third box
I

first

box

easily.

The
Into
it

was broad, and square, and deep.


I

packed the playthings

had made

after I

had

finished playing with them.


first

It fitted into the


flat

side of the

box above the wide and

one.

All

these could be put out of sight in

my play-closet when
I

night came and

it

was time

to

pick up.
treasure boxes.

These boxes
you will
materials

I called

my

hope

find three like


as
I

them and keep your boxcraft


for

kept mine,

Happy Thought,
about the plan, and

Nimblefingers, and Play told


I think
it is

me

a splendid one.

If

you have some pretty samples of wall-paper,


easily cover

you can

your treasure boxes with them.


like that in

There might be some wall-paper


play-room.
If so, this

your

would be

the very thing.

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Then, the boxes may be placed anywhere you choose
in

your room.

These treasure boxes are not meant


toys.

to

hold large

It

is

the

little toys

that

you will

like best to use

in boxcraft play.

The

toy figures

and the animals

will pack into very small space.

The

corrugated

cardboard for

roofs, the

green crape paper for grass,

the pretty shells, pebbles, and artificial flowers for

garden building, take but small space.

The
too.

tools for

your boxcraft,

scissors,

and

paste,

and box

paint-box,

may go

into the large, deep treasure

Here
fairies

in this

book you will

find the toys that the


to

have shown

many, many more.

me how You can

make.

There are
craft of

try the

magic

the fairies for yourself in your

boxes are not always exactly

own way. If your like mine, make them


to the
to

answer by adapting the general plan of the toy

box which you have.


little.
is

Learn

make much out

of

That

is

the motto of boxcraft play.


fairy

THAT
That
is

what Cinderella's changed a pumpkin


fairies

godmother did when she

into a golden coach.

what
things

always do!

They
it

find
I

magic

in little

so

suppose you try

too

[6]

BOXCRAFT
Sing a song of boxes and busy fingers
too,

Some

scissors,

and a paint-box, and just a

bit of glue!

Sing a song of playtime for happy


A-snipping with their
scissors,

girls

and boys,

a-making boxcraft toys!

List of Materials

which May Be Used

IN Boxcraft

Cardboard boxes.
toys.)

(To make buildings and (To make


roofs

Corrugated cardboard.
fences.)

and

Plain cardboard.
roofs,

(To use

in cutting side walls,

wheels for carriages.)

Glacine paper book-covers.

(To use

in

making
(To
and

window-glass for buildings.)

Colored pinwheel papers and


use in decorating houses.)
Spools.

tissue papers.

(To make standards


cannon,
stools,

for

trees

bushes in landscape building, to


stands,
tables,

make

flowerdolls'

legs for

beds,

men

for playing boxcraft games.)


of
brass.

Round-headed paper-fasteners

(To

make door-knobs and


[7]

door-latches for build-

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


ings.

To

fasten handles to baskets.

To

fasten

wheels
Pencils.

to vehicles.)

(To use

for pillars for buildings.

To

use for

making game-boards.)

Tools Used in Boxcraft Play


Just a pair of scissors, some paste, and a box of

crayons or water-color paints.

[8]

THE LITTLE WHITE COTTAGE OF


BOXVILLE
Material Required for
one shoe-box with
its

Making a

Little Cottage:

cover, a twelve-inch square of

cardboard, three small boxes, and a bit of glacine

paper

to

make window-glass.
of Boxville.
in a
I

Here is the little Cottage The Old Woman Who Lived


have chosen
to live in a

think
better

Shoe might
this

shoe-box like

than to
cottage

have made her home


certainly seems cozy,
a shoe

in

an old boot!

The

and far more comfortable than

would

be.

know

that her children


like this.
I

would

have preferred a dwelling


like
it

am

sure you

better yourself, so I

am
it.

going

to tell

you how

you may build one

just like

Find

a shoe-box

and take

its

cover

off.

Set the box

upon
This

its
is

side with the

bottom of the box facing you.

to

be the front of the cottage.

Upon

the front

you will need


ruler
[9]

and a door.

Take your

draw two windows and a pencil. Measure


to

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


a

window

space two inches from either end of the

box.

Make

each

window

space two inches wide and


these,

two inches high.


door space with
the door space
a half tall.
its

Half-way between

draw a

base at the base of the box.

Make

two inches wide and three inches and

Down
into

the center of each

window
a line

space from top


it

to base of the square,

draw

which divides

half.

This forms the window-blinds, which


to cut

you will need


blinds, see

open.

(To make window with


166.)

Diagram One, B, page


Fold the
sections of

Cut top

line.

Cut down
the square.

the center line and cut across the base of

cardboard outward

against the sides of your box, and you will have


a

made

window with

blinds.
is

Half-way between windows

the

door space.

(To cut door,


across the top

Diagram Two, A, page 167.) Cut line of your square, down one side and
see

across the base.

Fold the cardboard outward, and


a door that

you will have made


close at will.

you can open and

If

you happen

to

have a round-headed paper-

fastener that has two pointed prongs that are


to press

meant

through papers

to

keep them together, take

[lO]

THE LITTLE WHITE COTTAGE


it

and press

its

prongs through the

little

door where

a door-knob should be.

Bend

the prongs together to

one side and you will have


the round knob,
as

a door-latch.

By

turning

you may

fasten the door or

open

it,

you

like.

The
(See

roof of the cottage

is fit

supported upon two


each end of the box.
168.)

pieces of cardboard cut to

Diagram Three, A^ page

To make

these,

take your cardboard and cut a piece the width of one

end of your box and four inches higher.


second piece of cardboard like
of your box.
it

Make

to

fit

the other end

Glue both on the box, one on each end.


scissors,

Then, with

cut each piece

ofif

diagonally

downward from
front of the box.

the top at the rear of the

box

to the

This cuts

off a

corner and makes a

sloping rest for each end of the cottage.


the cover of the shoe-box a sloping roof.
is

Upon
make

these

slipped to

half of

Diagram Three, AA^ page 168, showing box cover placed upon side-wall pieces.)
(See
Slip your box cover over the two points,

when

both are thoroughly dry.

See,

it

makes the

best kind

of a roof for your cottage!


If

you wish
is

to

add

a chimney, any long,

narrow

box

that

small enough to form the right proportion


[II]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


to the roof

may

be used.

Measure

its

base upon the


of the
it

cottage roof near the top.

Cut the cardboard

roof so that the box end

may

be slipped through
a

and stand
use a box
its

erect,

and you have

chimney.

If

you

which has
off bricks

a sliding cover like a drawer,


little

outside will be like a real

chimney.

You

may mark
it

upon

it

with a pencil, and color

bright red.

wad

of cotton will

form the smoke

for a chimney.
I painted blinds

and door of the cottage that you


Blinds were green and the door

see in the picture.

was brown.

You may use almost any kind of paint The colors from your water-color paintto do this. ing-box will answer. You may use crayons too, if
like.

you
It
is

Other paint takes somewhat longer

to dry.

not so well adapted to the building.

In front of

my cottage,

made

garden with some

artificial flowers that

had once been on

my summer
for

hat in a wreath.

your cottage,
one

You may easily make a garden or you may have tubs of flowers like
It
is

the

in the picture.

the lower half of a pill-box

filled

with forget-me-nots.
cottage
is

The

furnished with furniture cut from

small boxes.

These may be three inches long or


[12]

THE LITTLE WHITE COTTAGE


smaller.

My

furniture

is

all

painted, but you need


to

not paint yours unless you care

do

so.

The bed is made from a box and its cover. To make it, first take the lower half of your box and turn
it

over so that

its

rims are below instead of on top.


for the bed,

At each corner cut a leg

and remove cardit

board from between these

cuttings, so that
leg.

leaves at

each corner of the rim a two-sided

(To cut bench

form, see Diagram Six, A, page 175.)

When

you

have cut
of

this

lower half of the bed, take the cover


it

your box and turn

so that

its

rims

instead of

downward.

Remove

the

come upward rims from each


head and
foot-

long

side,

and you will have

left the

board of the bed.

Glue

this piece to the

lower half
Sheets

you

first cut,

and the bed will be


tissue

finished.

and pillow may be cut from

or lace paper.

A
box.

chair

is

made from
ofif

the lower half of any small

Beginning

at the center of

one long rim of the

box, cut the rim

half-way around.

The

part with

rim removed will be the back of the chair. The other


will be the seat and legs.
left of

Legs are cut

to right
is

and

each forward corner.

Cardboard

evenly

removed from between them.

Rear

legs are cut in

each rim at the side of the box in the same way,


[13]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


except that these rear legs have but one cut needed.

They

are not cornered as the front legs are.

(For

cutting a chair, see

Diagram
Is

Six, C,

page

177.)

made from a spool bystanding the spool on end. Over its top Is placed the half of a small round box. (A square box cover may answer quite as vv^ell.) The table may be made from
table for the cottage

an ordinary spool, or two twist spools glued end


end.

to

(For

table, see

Diagram

Six,

DD,

p^ge

178.)

A mantel with fireplace for the cottage may be cut


from
a small

box three inches high.


its

Stand the box

on end and cut from

rear,

near the base, an opening


a

like that of a fireplace.


fireplace, see

(For cutting
Six,

mantel with

Diagram
as it
it

G, page 180.)

Use the
it.

back of the box, your box


not show
is

has no printing upon

If

painted,

will not matter whether or not


in the front, as the print will

you make your cutting

when

cleverly painted over.

In

my

cottage there lived a tumble toy lady.

Her

name was Polly Ann. You can


with her china dog.
toys

see her in the picture

You may

use roly-poly tumble

or penny dolls to play with in the cottage.


to use,

Figures cut from magazine pictures are fun


too.

Color them with your paints or crayons.


[14]

THE LITTLE WHITE COTTAGE


Besides tumble toys, Noah's
ture people cut
ville cottages

Ark

figures,

and picBoxone

from magazines,
be found
at

villagers for

may

any penny store where


dolls,

children trade.
cent apiece!

These are small dressed

In candy shops where party favors are sold,

all

manner
odd

of small figures

may

be bought.

These are
to use in

little

men

or

women

just the

very ones

playing Boxville plays.

At every holiday
always find them.

season,

new

ones appear

You can

I built

a tiny cottage with two windows and a door,


Boxville Cottage and I placed
it

I called It

on the

floor:

All 'round about


I'll tell

my
to

cottage, a cardboard village


it,

you

how

make

so that

grew you can make one too!

[15]

THE BOXVILLE STORE


Material Required for

Making a

Boxville Store:

one shoe-box with two shoe-box covers, two long


pencils,

two

spools,

waxed paper, and small


is

boxes.
a shoeit

The
box.

village store of Boxville

made from

One shoe-box
you wish
to
its

cover makes the porch


the roof of the store.

rests

upon.
If

Another forms

make
side,

a village store, also, place a

shoe-box upon

and then the bottom of the


of

box will become the front

your

store.

You
front.

will need to have a large shop

window

in

Make

this first.

Two

inches

from the
pencil a

right-

hand end

of the box,
five

mark with your


four sides.

wide
this

oblong space

inches by three.
all

Cut out

window window
Cut

space on
space, see

(For cutting a
166.)

Diagram One, A, page

a piece of

waxed paper

a little larger than

the size of your

window.

Paste this inside the box

building over the


strips of

window

space to

make

glass.

Cut

pinwheel paper and paste them around the


[i6]

THE BOXVILLE STORE


window on
casings.

the outside of the box to

make windowstore.

Now
Draw Make
box.

you are ready

to

make

door for your

a door space on your


it

box with your

pencil.

two inches from the left-hand end of the


it

Make

four inches high and two inches wide.

(To cut single door, Cut across the top

Diagram Two, A^ page 167.) line, down the side line that is
see

next the window, and across the base.

When

you

bend the cardboard you have


door that will open and
close.

cut,

you will have a


if

Color the door,

you

like.

It
this,

may

be painted brown.
to

After

you are ready

place the roof on your


its

store; but

first,

lay one of the

box covers upon


little store

rims
it,

on your work-table and put the

upon

well back, so there will be a porch in front.


take your other shoe-box cover and
of the box building so that
in front.
it
fit it

Then,

over the top

projects over the porch

Two

long pencils, with ends run into the

openings of two spools,


corner of the porch.

make
is

pillars to place at either

The
have.

step

up

to the

porch

any small box you

may
a

Inside

the

store,

long hat-pin box makes


[17]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


counter.
little toys

Flowers, leaves, pretty pebbles,

shells,

and

such

as

you may

find

among your own

play-

things

may

be displayed upon the counter.

roly-poly tumble toy will

make

a clerk for the

store, or, if

you

like,

you may find both clerk and and cut them

customers in magazine pictures, and you can mount

them on
no end
is

thin cardboard

out.

There

is

to the plays

you can invent

when your

store

finished.

Polly

Ann

of shoe-box cottage, Boxville,

has just

come

to the store to

buy

a loaf of bread.

There

it is

that pretty brown pebble!


The beads
shells are little cakes!

Those green
box are

leaves are vegetables!

in that

apples!

The
To

To

Boxville!

Boxville!

To

have a
to

lot of

fun!

I'm going to the general store

buy a penny bun!


perhaps,

The bun is just a pebble on the And the penny's made of paper,

counter of the store,


so,
I'll

make some more!

[i8]

The

Village Store

made

of a shoe-box and two slioe-box covers.

Inside view of the Village Store.

The counter

is

a hatpin box.

The

District School of Boxville.

Tt is

made from

a shoe-box.

Inside view of the Boxville School.

The desks
;

oblong boxes. The benches are boxes also with a pencil for a stove-pipe.

are all cut from small and the stove is a spool

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL OF BOXVILLE


Material Required for Building a

Toy

School:

one shoe-box with

its

cover, a half-sheet of cardboard,

three small boxes about three inches long, the cover

of

some narrow

little

box which has an inner drawer, box two inches long.


see a toy school-house? like I

a pencil, a spool, and a

Did you ever before


don't believe
ville School, so I

you have ever seen anything

Box-

am

going

to tell

you how you may

build one like


First,
itself.

it.

you will need


Its

a shoe-box to

form the house


either end

cover

is

the roof.

To

this, at

of the box, are glued two side walls

which hold the

roof in place, slanting.

The

cover of some tiny nar-

row box which


chimney.

is

Inside,

made with an inner drawer is the the desks are made from the lower
Their
the benches.

parts of three boxes about three inches long.

three covers

make

A teacher's desk may


Its

be

made from any

small box you have.


[19]

cover

is

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT teacher's chair. A spool forms the stove, and a
cil is

pen-

the stovepipe.

Begin by taking the cover from your shoe-box.


Place the box upon the table before you so that
stands
it

upon one long

side,

with

its

bottom part facing

you, open at the back.

The

base of your box,

which which

now

faces you, will be the part of the school

will need to have

windows made

in

it.

These

two

windows must have

blinds.

The

window
cut.

spaces must be located on the face of the

box, which fronts you.

From
faces

these the blinds are

Two

inches from either end of your box,

mark
a ver-

upon
tical

the part

which

you two oblongs, each

three inches high and two inches wide.


line

Mark

down

the center of each

window

space.
to cut.

This forms the blinds, which you will need

(For cutting blinds, see Diagram One, B, page 166.)

Cut

the top line,

down

the center line, and across

the base line.

Press the two sections of cardboard


sides of the

outward against the

box building, and


blinds.

you will have made the window with


these blinds,
if

Color

you choose.

Use crayons or waterthe cardboard side

color paints.

Next, you will need

to

make

[20]

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL OF BOXVILLE


walls

which support

the box-cover roof.

Take your

sheet of cardboard and measure with pencil outline

upon

it

the shape of one end of your box.

Add

to this

four inches at the top, and cut this piece from the

cardboard with

its

added height.
cardboard identical with
one end of the box upright.

Make
the
first.

a second piece of

Glue each

to

Cut from each

the front

upper corner

point.

(See

Diagram Three, A^ page 168, which shows of the side walls when cut.)
Cut
a
tral part,

the shape

door in one of these side walls, near

its

cen-

where you

see the

door in the picture of


take pencil and

Boxville School.
ruler

To make

this, first

and make an oblong four inches high and two

inches wide.

(To cut door,


line,

see

Diagram Two, A,
line,

page

167.)

Cut top

down one side

and across

the base line.

Fold the door outward.

The
this,

card-

board under the door in the side wall


the shape of the door space.
If

may

be cut out

you do

your

door will bend open more


If

easily.

you happen
its

to

have a round-headed paper-faslittle

tener, press

pointed prongs through the

door
of

where

a door-knob should go.

The round head

the paper-fastener will

form
[21]

a door-knob. Its prongs,

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


bent to one side, form the latch.
It will catch the
is

door securely when the "door-knob"

turned.
is

Now
finished,

that the lower part of the school building

you may begin upon the


Place
it

roof.

This

is

the

box cover.
so that

upon

the points of the side walls

it fits
is.

down upon them. You


(For placing a roof on
a

will readily see

how this
ing, see

shoe-box build-

Diagram Three, AA, page


the roof
is

168.)

When

placed, you will be able to judge


in the box-

where the chimney-hole should be cut


cover roof.
the box that
It
is

should go near the top at the end of


opposite the door.

The

cover of

some narrow box which has


will

a sliding inner

drawer

make
off

the chimney.

It will be just the right

shape, square and hollow.

Mark

upon

the sides of this


red, if

box the bricks of


you
like.

the chimney.

Color them

If

you

use a ruler, the

do not need

to

work is easily and quickly mark the bricks unless you

done.
like.

You
Your
out of

box may be painted merely.

To

place

it

on the roof, you will need

to cut

the school-house roof a piece of cardboard the size of the end of your box.

Decide where the chimney


it

should go.

Mark

the end of

with pencil upon the

[22]

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL OF BOXVILLE


roof at this point.

Cut

the cardboard out.

(For

cutting hole for chimney in a box-cover roof, see Dia-

gram Three, AA^ page 168.) Press the end of the chimney down through this hole. Press the chimney backward to make it stand straight, and glue it. Some tiny bit of cotton stuffed into the upper hole
of the

chimney box will form smoke.


course,

Of

you will be anxious

to

furnish your
it

school-house inside.
district school

You may make


and
a

like a real It will

such as you see in the country.

have

desks, benches, a stove,

blackboard

to

say nothing of a teacher's desk and chair!

The lower
desks.
It
is

halves of the three small boxes form


really a simple matter to

make

these.

They are the kind that have a shelf beneath the top. They are open. Take the lower half of one of these boxes. Place it upon one of its long rims. The upper rim will be the top of the desk. The ends of the box will need to
be cut the shape of the sides of a desk.
a desk

(For cutting

out of a small oblong cardboard box, see DiaSix,

gram

E, page 179.)

Fit a bit of box rim beneath the top of the desk

where the

shelf should go,

and glue

its

ends to the box

[23]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


desk.

The

desk

may

be painted black,

if

you choose.

Make

the two other desks like this one.

The benches are next To make a bench, make


box rim
each
at the center of
as far as the

cut from the box covers.


a cut

with

scissors in

each

each end of the box.


of the cover.

Cut

upper part

Half the

box will be the back of the bench.


seat

Half will be the


the other half of

and

legs.

First, cut the legs.

Then bend

the box upward, cut off the side piece at either end

of the box, bend the long rim upward.

This will
legs

make
of
176.)

bench with high back.


its

(For cutting the


Six,

bench and

high back, see Diagram

B, page

In following diagrams, always cut where you

see the

heavy black

line.

Bend where you


first

see a

dotted
desks.

line.

The bench may be


is

painted to match the


one.

Make

other benches like the

The

teacher's desk

made from

the lower half of


It
is

another box

one about two inches long.


a
Six,
like.
is

made
end

like a table, except that

no legs are cut in

its

rims.

(For cutting

bench form for the teacher's

desk, see

Diagram
if

A, page

175.)

The

desk

may

be painted,

you

The

chair for this desk

cut from the cover of

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL OF BOXVILLE


the

same box

that

made

the desk.

Cut

the cover's rim

half off the box, beginning at the center on one long


side.

The

part of the cover left without rim will be

the back of the chair.

Cut

legs at the corners of the

other half of the cover and at each side on the rim.

Remove
(To cut

the surplus cardboard


chair, see

from between them.


page
177.)

Diagram

Six, C,

Color

the chair to

match desks and benches.


is

Your
to

school

almost done.

The

stove will need

be put up

I'm quite sure that you never heard of


without a stove!
It
is

a district school-house

as

much
is

a part of a district school as the

dipper and the waterjust

pail used to be.

The

stove of this toy school

a spool painted black.

Place

it

under the chimney,


its

with the point of a long pencil run into


to

upper hole
is

represent a stovepipe.

There!

That

easy to

do, I

am

sure!
is

The blackboard

a piece of black

pinwheel paper
If

cut oblong and pasted between the windows.

you

have some old time-table


will find in
it

in

your home, perhaps you


that

a small

map

may

be cut out and

pasted to the walls of the school.

You

can

make

text-books

by folding pieces

of

paper together.

These can be placed inside the


[25]

desks.

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT Penny dolls make excellent scholars. A tumble
toy figure

may make

a schoolmistress or a school-

master.

In the picture of Boxville School, you can see three

penny
board.

dolls

and

my

tumble toy schoolmistress.


is

The
at the

dolls are at recess.

Violet

trying to do a
to

sum

Pansy

is

pretending

be ''teacher."

Lily

has just finished her luncheon.

When

does your school open?

Now The scholars


I

will have to hurry or they'll be late!

made a

little

Boxville School, and


dolls,

now

in

it

each day

I'm educating penny


I teach

and

it

is

splendid play!

them

all

my

lessons every day

when

am

through

They have

finished

with

my

reader,

and can divide by two.

[26]

THE LITTLE CHURCH OF BOXVILLE


Material

Required

for

Making
its

Boxville

Church: one shoe-box with


box about
six

cover, one

narrow

or seven inches long, one oblong box

cover three or four inches long, three small box


covers of

about the same size

(three

inches),

twelve-inch square of cardboard, and some colored


tissue-paper, with a spool.

Ding! Ding! Can you hear the


of the Boxville

bell in the steeple


It does not ring
bell,

Church ringing?
it is

very loud, because


ring beautifully!
that

such a small

but

it

does

You

can try

it

yourself.
this

Suppose
for your

you make a

little

church like

village!

Take a shoe-box. Remove its cover. Lay the shoebox upon one long side rim. The bottom of the box will become the side of the church. It will need to have three long windows cut in it. "Draw these window spaces long and narrow, about
[27]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


one inch wide and three inches high.
box, and

Cut the two

end windows equally distant from the ends of the

draw

the outline of the center

window mid(For cutting

way between these top of the window


If

two.

Cut

the cardboard at the

spaces to a point.

windows, see Diagram One, A, page


cut three pieces the same shape as the

166.)

you have some colored tissue-paper, you may

window

spaces

you have cut


the open
glass

out.

Let them be a

little

wider and

longer, however.

Paste each inside the box right over


will

window spaces. This windows. You can paint

make

stained-

the window-casings

with black ink, or paint on the outside of the box

around the windows.


If

you prefer, you can make the window-casings


strips of

by pasting narrow

pinwheel paper around

the windows, instead of using the paint.

The
roof.

Boxville Church, as you can

see,

has a sloping

This roof

is

the cover of the shoe-box supported

made of cardboard and glued to each end of the box. You will need to cut these side walls. (See Diagram Three, A^ page 168.)
on two
side walls,

which

are

Measure

the exact width

and height of your box

on the twelve-inch square of cardboard.


[28]

Measure

THE LITTLE CHURCH OF BOXVILLE


one end only, and place the end of the box so that
it

comes

at the

edge of your cardboard.

At
it.

the top,

add

four inches to the height, and cut out this oblong piece

you have drawn.

Make

another like

Next, cut

off

the two front upper corners diagonally

down

to the

mark you
building

first

made, showing the height of your box


your box.
one of these
sides.

at the front of

Cut

church door

in

Make

it

rather high

about the height of the church windows.


at the

Let the base of the door come


side wall.

lower edge of the


vertically

Cut up through the cardboard

for about three inches.

Then

cut the arch of the door

and bend

as if

it

were on

a hinge.

(See

Diagram

Two, A^ page

167, for cutting door.)

Paste each side wall in place on the box building


so that the points of

each come

at the rear of the box.

When
The
will

the side walls are firmly dry, cut out the cardis

board that
roof
first
is

under the door space of the side wall.

not quite ready to go on yet, however.


to

You

need

arrange for the steeple or bell tower.

Take
a long

the cover of your shoe-box and also the oblong


to use for a steeple.
as

box you intend

This

may be

either

candy box, such

chocolate peppermints
it

are often sold in in drug stores, or

may

be a box

[29]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


such
as jewelers use for hat-pins.

church should come over the

The tower of door. Near the


is

the

top

corner of the shoe-box cover which


of the church,

to

be the roof

mark
is

ofif

the shape of one end of the

oblong box which

to

be the tower.

Cut out

this

square from the shoe-box roof, and cut out about a


quarter of an inch more at the bottom, otherwise your
steeple will not stand exactly straight.

Now,

slip the roof


is

over the points of the side walls.


next, slip the

Seel that

it!

And,

tower in place
in the roof

down through
over the door.

the opening

which comes
a bell,

{See Diagram Three,


is

AA^ page

168.)

If your tower
at

to

have

you can buy

a bell

almost any toy

store.

It will

probably cost you a

penny.

You
it

will need to cut openings in the

upper

part of the bell-tower box.

Cut one on each

side, as

you

see

in the picture of

my

Boxville Church.

The

belfry

windows

will be cut like ordinary square win-

dows, except for a point at the top.


plain windows, see

(For cutting
166.)

Diagram One, A^ page


to a

The

bell

is

next tied like a locket

double cord
is is

or bit of string.

One end

of this string

used

to

fasten the bell to the top of the tower.

It

sewed,

with the help of a large darning-needle,


[30]

to the card-

THE LITTLE CHURCH OF BOXVILLE


board top of the belfry.

The

other end of the cord

will be the bell-rope, and this goes

down through

the

cardboard

at the base of

your tower box and through


It

the cardboard at the top of the shoe-box building.

can be threaded

to the

darning-needle and pressed


till its

through the holes made by the needle

end hangs
it

down

into the

church vestibule,
let

as

you see

in the

picture.

When you

the sexton pull this bell-rope,


it

ding, ding goes the bell, and the noise that


is

makes
your

just the right size for a Boxville

Church!

Now
church.
is

you are ready

to furnish the inside of

Begin with the platform for the pulpit. This

the

box cover you have


Place
it

the

one about three or

four inches long.

where the platform should


spool will be the pulpit.

go, opposite the door.

The

Paste a
at

little

round cardboard disk over the opening


this will

one end of the spool, and

be the top of the

pulpit.

Paint the spool black.


a long,

Use
(See

narrow box cover for the pulpit


Six, C,

chair.

Diagram
till

page

177.)

Cut the rim from


side.

box cover, beginning near the center on one long

Cut

you have reached the point opposite.

The

part of the cover from

which

the rim has been re-

moved

will be the back of the chair.

Bend

it

forward.

[31]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


The
chair.

other half of the cover will be the seat of the

Legs are cut

in the front

rim and in the side


part which

rims that remain.

To make
up

front legs, keep the corto the


is

ners of the box, and cut


seat, the

the

upper part of the cover.

Remove

the card-

board from between these two

cuttings.

Then, make

the back legs of the chair in the box rims at side.

Place the
if

little

chair back of the pulpit, and color

it,

you wish,

to

match.

At least three pews will be needed for the church. They are to be made from the three small box covers. (See Diagram Six, 5, page 176, for making highbacked benches.)

With

a pencil or pin-point,

mark

the center of each

short rim on these box covers.

Then, taking one


till

cover, cut through the rim at the two points

you

have reached the top of the cover.


division

Half of the

made

will be for the back of the bench and

half for the seat and the legs.


as

Cut

the legs in one half

you cut the

legs for the pulpit chair.

Remove
end
to

from the other half of


rim.

the cover the remaining


is

Bend

the rim that

left at the top

upward,

make
to

the high back of the bench,


chair.

and color the bench

match the pulpit and

[32]

Boxville Church
box.
It

is

made from a shoe-box. Its IjcU-tovvcr is an oblong has stained glass windows of red tissue-paper.

Boxville Church has a pulpit, reading desk, and pews that are boxcraft style from boxes and a spool.

made

in

THE LITTLE CHURCH OF BOXVILLE


Place the benches one behind the other inside the
church.

Let the sexton ring the bell for Sunday-

school to begin.

What was

the lesson
it?

you had

last

Sunday?
might not
taught
ville
it

Do

you remember about

Perhaps you

so easily forget next Sunday's lesson, if

you

yourself to a class of penny dolls in a Boxlike this.

Church

Anyway, you can

try!

Boxville dolls on Sunday go

To

this

Boxville Church, just so!

Two

by two, as couples should,

Boxville dolls are always good


Little Boxville, as you see, Is as good as
Little girls
it

can be:
little

and

boys.

Learn

this text

from Boxville toys!

[33]

THE BOXVILLE RAILWAY STATION


Material Required for

Making a Boxville

Rail-

way
ers,

Station: one shoe-box and four shoe-box cov-

one small box about four inches square and with-

out a cover, the shallow covers of two small boxes


three inches long, two long pencils, and a small square
of

waxed paper.
Boxville's

Railway Station

is

a real railway station.

It

is

not a tin thing such as you buy ready-made in a

toy shop.

Boxville Station has a waiting-room with

a real ticket booth and benches. the

You
you

can

make

just

same kind of
It
is

little station as

see in this pic-

ture.

easy to make.
itself,

The

building

you
its

see, is the

lower half of a
is

shoe-box placed upon

side.

The platform
is

made

of two shoe-box covers placed end to end


floor,

upon the

and the roof of the

station
is

one shoe-box cover.

The
and

other shoe-box cover


this
is

the roof of the platform,

supported by two long lead-pencils.


to

Do

you want

make

a Boxville Station?

To

[34]

THE BOXVILLE RAILWAY STATION


begin,

you must make two doors and


is

window on

the part of your box that

the front of the station.

About an inch and a half from either end of your box, mark a door space four inches high and two
inches wide.
so that
it

Use

a pencil

and ruler for the work,


an oblong

will be even.

Half-way between the door

spaces you have drawn,

mark

off

space two inches high and three inches

window wide. Now,


in the

you can take your


box.
167.)

scissors

and cut the doors

(To cut Cut

doors, see

Diagram Two, A^ page


Cut the
to the

the top line of each door space.

bottom

line also.

The

doors must open toward each

other, so cut each

door space down the side next


little

window
on
all

space.

Push each

door inward.

Next, cut out the

window

space.

Cut

it

around

four sides, and keep to the line you have drawn

with pencil.

page

166.)

(To cut window, see Diagram One, A, When you have finished this, take a piece

of the

waxed paper you have and paste it inside the station building over the window space to make window-glass. The waxed paper should be cut a bit
longer and wider than the opening of the window.

You
from

can measure
the box.

it

by the cardboard piece you cut

[35]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


If

you wish, you may color the doors of your


brown. Use whatever colors

station building green or

you have, but

if

you use your water-colors, keep the


can.

work

as

dry

as

you

If

you do

not, the doors will

not be straight.

They

will curl.
to

Place two shoe-box covers end

end upon the floor

or table, for you can put the building upon them now.
See,
it is

placed far back, so that there will be a plat-

form

in front.

Place the building

at the left of the

platform made of the shoe-box covers.

The
If

third shoe-box cover

is

the roof of the station

building, and you must

fit it

down over

the station.

you wish

to

have a roof over your station platform,


to

you will need the fourth shoe-box cover

make

this.

To

secure

It

in place, just cut

two end corners on

the box rim as far as the top of the cover.

Then,

turn this end rim

hand rim

of the

upward and slip it under the rightcover which forms the roof of the

station building itself.

You

will need

two

pillars at

the right-hand end of your platform to keep the long

roof up.

These

pillars are long lead-pencils.

Press

the point of a pencil

down through each right-hand


them
into stan-

top corner of the long station platform's top, and secure the points below by running
[36]

THE BOXVILLE RAILWAY STATION


dards

made

of spools.

The

pencil point will be firm

when run into the upper hole of a standing spool, and when both pillars are so fixed, the roof will be quite firm. (See Diagram Three, G, page 172.) Next, make a signboard for your station, and glue
it

to the roof.

You

will need to have a bench or

two and

a ticket

office in

your station building.


office.

little

doll can be

placed in the ticket


of

If

you look

at the picture

my
The

Boxville Station, you will see a lady buying

her ticket of the ticket agent.


ticket

booth

is

the lower half of a

box that

is

about four inches wide and an inch or so deep.


will need to stand
the part of the
it

You

on

its
is

rim and cut a window in

box that

the front of the ticket office.

You do
station,

this just as

you cut the window for your

only you must

make

the ticket-booth

window
with
cut

smaller.

Draw
see

the outline of the

window
cut
it

first

help of pencil and ruler.

Then

out.

To

Diagram One, A, page 166.) When window is cut, paste some waxed paper over the window opening on the inside of the box. Cut a round
window,
opening
In this, near the bottom.

The

ticket agent
is

will need this,

you

see.

Now,
[37]

the ticket booth

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


finished!
go-

Place

it

between the doors where

it

should

You

will need a bench at either end of the station

waiting-room.

Cut

these

from covers

of two boxes

three inches long.


Six, B,

(For cutting benches, see Diagram

page 176.)

With

pencil or pin-point

mark

a dot at the center of each short end rim of the covers,

and cut through each rim thus marked


reached the top of the cover.
so

till

you have

Half

of each division

made

will be the high back of the bench.


seat

Half
rim of

will

form the

and

legs.

Cut

legs in the

one end.

Leave the corners

at the front of the bench


is

and remove the cardboard that

between them,

making your
front corner.
rims.
is

cutting to the right and left of each

Then

cut the rear legs in both side

Bend

the other half of each box upward.

This

to

be the high back.


left

Cut

off the little pieces of

cardboard that are

on the narrow end rims. Bend


rim upward
to

what

is

left of the cover's

make

the

rest of

the high back for each bench.

Color the

benches black or brown.


Toot-too!
train?

Don't you hear the whistle of the toy


that
is

The baggage,

made up

of boxes,

is

[38]

THE BOXVILLE RAILWAY STATION


waiting on the station platform, and the
are ready to start on their travels.
little dolls

Miss Doll

is

waiting on the station platform.

She

has just purchased her return ticket to Boxtown.

Boxtown
on Circus

is

the next stop.

Day

Everybody goes there

Mr.

Doll,

Mr. Mulligan, Mr.


all

Swartzenheimer, Polly Ann, Susan Smith,

the

Noahs!

The

station platform
the sky

is

crowded!

When
I

all

is

dark with storm,

Then with my

train I play.

build a Boxville Station,

And
It
Is

stay Indoors all day.

always pleasant weather


you're happy as can be;

When

And when

I'm playing BoxvlIIe,

There's no storm that / can see!

[39]

B.

R. R.

FREIGHT STATION AND SHOEBOX TUNNEL


Make
a Boxville Freight

Material Required to

Station: one shoe-box cover, one shallow cover of


a

box about eight or nine inches long and seven or


five inches

eight inches wide, and the lower half of a deep box

about six inches long and four or

wide.

Material Required to
B. V. R. R.
:

Make

a Dark Tunnel for

the lower half of an ordinary shoe-box.

After you have built your Boxville Railway Station, I

am sure you will

like to build a

Freight Station

for your railway system. freight to go


little

You

will have so
is

much
to the

from Boxville!
It will take

There

no end

boxes!

you about
It

five minutes,
is

or

less, to

build the freight station.


see

so

simple that

you can almost

how from
is is

looking at the picture.

The shoe-box
of the deep

cover

the platform.

The lower

half

box you have


left

turned upside-down and

placed upon the

end of the shoe-box cover.


[40]

FREIGHT STATION AND TUNNEL


double door
box.
door.)
is

outlined with pencil at one end of this


167, for

(See

Diagram Two, B, page


a square three inches

double

Mark

wide on the end

of the box where the door should come.

Draw down
This
line

the center of this from top line to lower line.


gives the two divisions of the door.
of the door space.

Cut the top


it

Cut down

the center line of

and

across the lower line.

Bend

the two doors of the


if

doorway outward.

Color them,
flat roof,

you

like.

To make
and place
it

the square

take the box cover

down over the freight building at the That is an easy way to make a roof, isn't it? top. And now that the freight office is made, I am sure
you will agree that
it it is

very fine one indeed.

Isn't

fun

to

build your
to

own?
have

Do
way

you want

me

tell

you how

to

make

tunnel too?
system.

It will

be fine

to

have one for your

rail-

To make
is

one you will need a box

almost any that

deep, like a shoe-box, will answer.

How

high

is

the smoke-stack of your train?

Two

inches? Well,

Then, the

how high is it from the ground? Five? holes made for the tunnel opening in either
to

end of the box will need


or a half-inch.

be higher

still

by an inch

(For cutting a tunnel,


[41]

see

Diagram

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Four, Bf page 173.)
half
is

Turn your box

over.

The lower
put

the only part

you will need

to use, so

aside the cover.

In either end of the box cut out a


train to

round opening large enough for your toy


pass through at a sixty-miles-a-minute rate.
is

There

your tunnel
If

you have any crape paper, you can cover the


and top of your box
hill.

sides

so that

it

will look like a

big square

The ends
to

of the

box should be painted

with black paint


Let's see

look like stone masonry.

how
saw?

well your train goes through the

tunnel

toot-tool
For

Here

it

goes!

Isn't that the nicest

toy you ever

Little bits of boxes

make

a pile of freight
It
is

my

Boxville Railway.

simply great/

Just a cardboard shoe-box makes a tunnel too

Very black

an' spooky

when my

train goes through!

[42]

HOTEL BANDBOX AND HOW TO


FURNISH
Material Required to

IT
a Hotel

Make

Bandbox:

one large bandbox with


square bandbox that
is

its

cover, the cover of another

larger.

These make the build-

ing and

its

roof.

A shallow box cover will


Two
is

make

the

roof over the front door.


pillars.

long pencils are

The

hotel

furnished with furniture cut

from small boxes. Spools, lace-paper, pinwheel paper,


bits of

wall-paper, and the glacine paper covers from

books

may

all

be used.

Did you
one that

ever before hear of a dolls' hotel? If you

look at the picture of Hotel Bandbox, you will see

may

be

made from

a square hat-box.

Its
is

porch

is

a large hat-box cover.

hat-box, smaller than this cover.


hotel
is

The building The roof of

the

the cover of the hat-box

itself.

Windows and
bandbox.

front door are cut in the rims of the

[43]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


In starting

windows.

make a hotel, begin by marking off Each window must be two inches wide
to

and three inches high. It will help you to place windows evenly if you mark a horizontal line around
three sides of your
the top of the box.
as light as possible.

bandbox about three inches from

Use

a ruler, and

make

all

marks

They

are only intended to guide

you, and must be rubbed out after you have cut out
the

window spaces. Below the line you have drawn, make another, three inches farther down the sides of the box. This
forms the base of windows.
Next, make the windows that come nearest each
corner of the box.
corner.

line

Measure two inches from each


line at

This gives the right spacing from the corner.

Measure two inches more on your horizontal


of a

the top of the building, and this will give the width

window.

Make

the end

windows

first.

Then

make the ones that come between. Space evenly, so Cut that windows may come at regular intervals. (For cutting a out each window on all four sides. window, see Diagram One, A, page 166.) Arrange
your lower story windows
as

you have the upper

ones.

At

the center

upon

the front of your building out-

[44]

HOTEL BANDBOX
line a large

double door four inches square. It should


very base of bandbox.

come
line.

at the

(To cut double

door, see

Diagram Two, B, page 167.) Cut its top Cut its base line. Cut the cardboard between
lines in half vertically to

these

two

make

the door.

When windows
paste

and door are made, then you may

some three-inch squares of glacine paper back

of each
is

window
this

inside the box.


If

made

way.

you

like,

The window-glass you may leave some


upon
the

windows open.

The
larger

building

is

ready, now, to stand

bandbox

cover.

As you

see, this

makes

a porch.

Place the smaller bandbox cover over the upper


part of your hat-box to

make

a flat roof.

Over the front door you may make a fiat roof. (See Diagram Three, G, page 172.) Use for it a narrow
box cover.

Glue one long rim of

this

cover to the

cardboard over your doorway.

Press a pencil point

downward through each forward corner of the cover The pencil points may be secured to make a pillar.
in the holes of

two spools and thus keep the roof

upright.

If

you wish, you may glue the spools where


of cardboard

they should go.

Cut

narrow

strip

and write the

[45]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


name
way.
Flower-stands for the hotel veranda are simple
things to make.
flower-stand.
of your hotel

upon

it.

Glue

this

over the door-

One

spool will be needed for each

Press the stems of some artificial flowers


If

into the hole of the spool.

you have

gilt paint,

you

can gild the stands.


color paint.

painted mine with black water-

Penny
and
dress

dolls

make
like

guests for the hotel.

They come

already dressed, but you can take one or two of yours

them

men
to

dolls.

inked mine.

You
If

can see them in the picture.

How
see that
at the

are

you going

play inside the hotel?

you look

at the

second picture of the hotel, you will

it is

the back of the box, and that each corner


cut.

back of the box has been


lets

When

this

is

done, the back

down.

You

can cut your hotel

building
again,

this

way.

As you

see, it

may

be closed up

when you

are not playing Inside.

Partitions for downstairs rooms are

made with two


used.

shoe-boxes

just their

lower half

is

Cut the
This

ends

ofif

each box.

Place each lengthwise inside the


is

hotel so that there

a space

between them.

space forms the hotel hallway.


[46]

HOTEL BANDBOX
Cut
put
it

a piece of

cardboard

to fit into

your box and


It

over the top of these two shoe-boxes.

forms

the floor for the second-story rooms.

Another shoepartitions

box

or

two,

if

you prefer

makes

for

second-story rooms.

Doors may be cut


a single

in these partitions.

(For cutting

door space, see Diagram Two, A^ page 167.)


of wall-paper

Samples
hotel.

make good

carpet for the

You may

cut

it

into squares to

make

rugs.

Window
The

curtains may be made from tissue-paper

or lace-paper.
furniture,
itself, is

cut from very small boxes.

Tables are made with spools.

The lower
to

half of a small oblong box

may

be cut

form

a chair

by removing

its

rim, half-way around

beginning
moved
is

to cut the

rim

at the center of

one long
is

side of the box.

The

part from which the rim


Press
left
its

re-

the back of the chair.

cardboard
it is

upward. The part that has the rim


seat of the chair,

upon
its

the

and

legs are cut at

two front

corners and in each side at the rear.


Six, C,

(See

Diagram

page

177, for

making

a chair.)
to

Place a pill-box over an upright spool


table.

make

Round

pill-boxes

make round
[47]

tables.

Square

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


boxes

make square
178.)

tables.

(See

Diagram
its

Six,

DD,

page

An
doll's

oblong pill-box rested on


bureau.

side will

form a
front,
rear.

Mark

off the

drawers upon

its

and glue a

strip of

cardboard, upright, at

its

Paint a mirror frame on the strip of cardboard.

Beds for the hotel chambers may be made of small


oblong boxes and their covers.

To make

the

upper

part of the bed, cut off the long rims on each side of
the cover.

This leaves headboard and footboard


to the

to

be glued

lower half of the box when


to rest

this

has
cor-

been turned over

upon

its

rims.

At each

ner of the lower half of the box, cut a leg for the bed
to stand

upon.

Remove
see

the cardboard

from between

each.

(To cut bed,

Little dolls
at

Diagram Six, AA, page 175.) touring through Hatbox County stop

the hotel overnight.

Drummer
at

dolls,

on their

business trips to Boxville General Store, find comfortable

accommodations

Bandbox Hotel

too.

As

soon
see

as the toy train stops at

Boxville Station, you

may

them making

a bee-line for the hotel.


at

There are splendid accommodations


Bandbox.
need
to

Hotel
only
it

The meals

are always good.

You

pretend what the dolls want and then give


[48]

HOTEL BANDBOX
to

them.

Some want
is

their steak well


it,

done and are

very particular about


right

but the waiter always does


satisfied.

and everybody

always
to

After dinner

the guests take a


the

walk over

Mirror Lake and watch

man who

is

fishing on the bridge there.

Or

else,

perhaps, they

sit

on the hotel piazza and watch the


square to get water at the

people come

to the village

town pump.
Hurry, hurr}^ with the
scissors!

Bring the glue-pot or some paste:

We

must make a Hotel Bandbox,


proprietor's in haste!

The

Touring through the Boxlan5 Country, Penny dolls may wish to stay In this splendid Hotel Bandbox

That we're

building here to-day!

[49]

THE SHOE-BOX APARTMENT HOUSE


Material Required to

Make

a Shoe-box Apartthe

ment House: one shoe-box with


cover, one small

whole

of

its

box about two inches long, and small

boxes and spools for furnishing the apartment house.

You may make

whole row of apartment houses.

They are shoe-boxes that are placed to stand on end. Windows are drawn upon the fronts of the boxes as they stand. Each apartment house must have a porch
and front door
as well.

Would you
Take
you.
its

like to erect an

apartment house?

Find

a shoe-box, then.

cover

off.

Stand your box on end with

the opening at back.

Let the bottom of the box face


it

Mark
its

ofif

upon

three

window

spaces, each

with

base five inches from the top of your box.

See that end windows are equally distant from the


sides of

your box.

Make

each

window two

inches

high and one inch wide.

Arrange second-story windows evenly between top


[50]

THE SHOE-BOX APARTMENT HOUSE


and base of your box, and place below them the firstLeave a place for a door just above story window.
the base of your

box

at the left, as the picture of

Shoe-

box Apartment will show you.


little

Make
spaces

the door a

larger than your

window

about
to
it,

three
a

inches high and two inches wide.

Next

draw

window space for the first-floor window. The windows may be cut out, if you like. (For windows, see Diagram One, A, page 166.) Cut out
the squares you have
base.

drawn on
to

top, side lines,

and

Back

of each

window

opening, paste a bit of


glass.

waxed sandwich paper


the front of the
sashes.
this

form

Outline on

box around the windows, the windowpaints to do

Use black ink or water-color

work.

Paste tissue- or lace-paper curtains over


the apartment house to

the

the

waxed paper inside windows trim.

make
(For
top
the

Cut
line,

the door of the apartment house out.

door, see

Diagram Two, A, page 167.) Cut the down the side next to the window, and across
roof
half of a small
itself is

base line.

The porch
the doorway.

is

box glued over

The porch

the half of a box

glued below the doorway.


[SI]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Now,
adding
put the finishing touch
a flat roof.
to the

building by

Take

the cover of your shoe-box.

Cut

off all its rims except at

one end,

a third of the
it ofif

way

around.
fit

This end
it

is

the roof.

Cut

with
it

rims and
place.

down over

the building.

Paste

in

The

floors of the

apartment are made by pasting

the rest of the cover into the inside of the box, horizontally.
half.

Cut the remaining part of the cover

in

Fit each section into the box where the floors

should be.
box.

Glue the edges

that are fitted into the

Let them dry thoroughly.

Then, you may

furnish the interior with boxcraft furniture such as


is

used in arranging Hotel Bandbox.

Penny

dolls

and Noah's Ark ladies will surely take

up

light housekeeping there, if their husbands ap-

prove.
Jinks.

In the picture, you will see the janitor, Mr.

The Noah's Ark

ladies

have come

to

look at

the rooms.
There is a fine apartment "To Let" in Shoe-box FlatBut those who wish to rent it may not own a dog or cat! When Mrs. Noah came there, the Janitor said, "No!

We cannot

take your animals!

We cannot
[S2]

have you

go!"

Boxville Apartment House.


large
cover.

This
roof
is

is

made from

shoe-box.

Its

the

end of the

Here

is

furniture for the Apartment

House and

for

Bandbox Hotel.

Boxville Residence which

is

made from a deep


its

letter-paper

box and

cover.

The Garage

is

made from

a deep square letter-paper box.

The cover

of

the

box

is

its

roof.

A BOXVILLE RESIDENCE
Material Required for

Making a Boxville
its

Resicover,

dence: a deep, square letter-paper box with


the cover of a
flat

letter-paper box about ten inches

long, the cover of a drawer-like pill-box,

some glacine

waxed paper, some artificial flowers, lace-paper cut from candy boxes, and some box rims.
or

See what a darling


Boxville Residence!

little

house

have made for a


of

The husband

Mrs. Doll,
to

who owns
You

the house, goes in his

motor car

Boxville

Station every morning.

He commutes

to

Boxtown.

can see Mrs. Doll and her


to

sister in the picture.

Mr. Doll has gone


you will
see

Boxtown, but in the picture

of the garage that goes with the Boxville Residence

Mr.
it

Doll's motor and the chauffeur.

Don't you think

would be fun
you will have

to

make

a Boxville
to

Residence like mine?


First, of course,

I will tell

you how

do

it.

to

hunt for

a deep,

square letter-paper box, and the other materials that


are needed to use in building.

When you

have found

[53]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


your box, turn
it

over so that

it

stands upside-down.

Take

off the cover.

That

will be the roof, but

you are

not ready yet to put the roof on to the building.

Upon two opposite sides of the box, mark off two window spaces. (For windows, see Diagram One, A, page 166.) Each window space measured off, with
help of ruler and pencil, must be an inch and a half
square.

Have the bases of the windows, as well as their tops, made a uniform distance from the base of the box building. Each window should be an
equal distance from the corner of the box nearest
it.

When
window
house.

the two sides of the


spaces,

box are marked out with

you can begin upon the front of the


door space about four inches high
let it

Draw

and two inches broad, and

come an inch from

the right-hand side of the box building that faces

you.
167.)

(For front door, see Diagram Two, C, page


Let the base of your door space come on the

very outer rim of the front of the box.

When
its

you

have outlined the door, draw

a square in

upper
is

part to indicate where the plate-glass

window

to

be in the door.

Cut the top

line of

your door and

down made

its

right side.

for the

Then cut out the square you window in it. There, the door will
[S4]

A BOXVILLE RESIDENCE
open and
close,

you

see,

when you bend

it

on the side
pasted

where

the hinge should be!

Waxed paper

in a square

under the window opening will make


Lace-paper makes curtains.
its

the glass

window.

round-headed paper-fastener with

prongs pushed
to

through the cardboard door and bent

one side will

make

door-knob with a

latch.

By
draw

turning the knob

you can open or

fasten the front door tight.


is

After the door

finished,

window

space

half-way between the door and the corner of the


building on the front of the house.

Now, you

can

begin

to

cut out

all

the windows.

Cut each one

evenly, and paste a square of

paper back of each, inside


glass.

waxed paper or glacine the box, to make window-

You

can outline the window-frames on the

outside, using black ink or paint.

Doesn't the box begin to look like a real house?

Yes

But

it

has no roof yet!


Slip
it

Where

is

the cover of

your box?

down over

the building.

There

you are!
will

The cover
a fine

of a small drawer-like pill-box

make

chimney.

Glue

it

on end

to the top

of the roof at the center.

Where

is

the

flat
it

letter-box cover?

That

is

to

be

the porch.

Place

on the
[SS]

floor or table,

and then

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


brush the rims of the box that
is

your Boxville
it

Resi-

dence with paste or glue

so that

will stand well

back upon

this

veranda.

Be

careful not to have any


is

paste under the door.

See, there
just a

the front porch.


a

The veranda
and pasted

railing

is

box rim cut from

box

to the

edge of the veranda on the cover

of the letter-paper box.


If

you wish

to

have

a step

up

to the front
this.

porch, a

small box or

its

cover will

make
is

My
is

Boxville Residence has a garden.

Mrs. Doll
also.

very fond of gardens, and so


the garden

Mr. Doll
It

made
to

from
hat.

a
I

wreath of flowers that was

on an old summer

made
is

an arbor.

was easy
ends and

make
is

that.

The arbor

cut from a candy box.


it

It

just half the rim.


it

I stood

up on
course,

its

trimmed
have

with the flowers.

Of

if

you play

out-of-doors with your Boxville Residence, you can


real flowers to play with.

You

can lay out walks


in the

with pebbles and gravel when you do not play


house.
I

made

a fountain or a pool for the

garden

At almost any penny store you can buy a little round mirror that will make a garden pool. You can make a sun-dial also. It Is a spool
from
a hand-glass.

with a pill-box placed over one end of


[56]

it.

You

will

A BOXVILLE RESIDENCE
have
to

mark

off the face of the sun-dial


this

with pencil.

Don't you think that

makes
I

a comfortable

home

for a Boxville resident?


a little doll, so that I

I do.

almost wish I were

might open the front door and

begin furnishing the inside of the house with box


furniture and spools.
'Mid
There
pleasures and palaces where'er you
is

no place

like Boxville for a little doll's

may roam, home

A charm from the fairies seems magic play there, Which, seek through the world, is ne'er met elsewhere.

[57]

THE BOXVILLE GARAGE OR STABLE


Material Required to

Make

a Boxville Garage
its

or Stable: one deep letter-paper box with

cover.

Here
of
a

is

a toy garage.

It belongs to the residence

Mr. Doll
garage like

of Boxville.
it?

Would you

like to

make

The box you


standing upon
will

will need to use for

making
it

garage

must be deep and square.


its

Place

upon

the table

rims.

Then, the bottom of the box

become

the top of your building,


it

and you may


to

place the cover over this and glue


roof.

make

a flat

Upon

the front of your box,


size.

draw

a large square

four inches in

Let the base of


of the box.

this

square come
is

upon the outer rim


door, see
line.

The

square

to

be

the large double door of the garage.

(To cut the


top
cut

Diagram Two, B, page 167.) Cut the Cut the base line. From top to base line
[58]

THE BOXVILLE GARAGE OR STABLE


another line dividing the doorway into halves
the doors.
to

form

The

doors will

fold

outward when you have


if

finished cutting them.

Paint them green,

you wish.
a

On

each side of your box, you

may draw

window
inches

with blinds.

The window should be two


a line vertically

square, and should be placed in the center of each


side.

Draw

from top

to base of the

window
This
halves.

space to

make

the divisions for the blinds.

line should divide the

window

space evenly into

(To cut window with


out.

blinds, see

One, B, page 166.) Cut across the top of

Diagram each window

you have marked


cut
its

Cut down

its

center line, and

base line. Press the cardboard outward against


little

the sides of the


the blinds to

building
the door.
is

to

make

blinds.

Color

match

There!

The garage

finished.

Wind up
it

your

toy automobile, and let us see

how

nicely

runs right

through the doorway!


Here is Boxville Garage just the very toy For an automobile owned by a small boy! Takes a half a second just to cut a door And two little windows. There is nothing more! Anyone can make it, for the garage here
Is a

box of cardboard.

Isn't

it

just dear/

[59]

MAKING A BOXVILLE GARDEN


Material Required to
half of

Make

a Greenhouse: the
seven inches long
as

some deep box from


five inches

five to

and about
is

deep (the half of a box such

usually to be found at a hardware store), about

twelve square inches of cardboard from which to cut


a roof,

and a sheet of waxed sandwich paper.

Material Required to

Make

a Pergola: half of an

ordinary white shoe-box, and a strip of cardboard

about thirteen inches long and seven inches wide.

Material Required to
artificial flowers,

Make

the Garden Itself:

some spools for flower-stands, sanda

paper for roadway and gravel walks,


crape paper for grass, a long box

penny mirror
a hedge,

for a sunken-garden pool, boxes for benches, green


to

make

moss, pebbles, shells, and pretty twigs from out-ofdoors.

It

is

such fun to play in a garden that I


It belongs to

made one

for Boxville.

Mr, Penny

Doll's resi-

[60]

MAKING A BOXVILLE GARDEN


dence.
It has a pergola

and

a greenhouse, a

sunken

pool, flower-stands, gravel walks, benches, and every-

thing that a garden should have.

Green crape paper placed upon


the garden lawn.

the floor will


in strips

make

Sandpaper cut

and laid

upon

it

forms the garden paths.


If

roadway may be

made from sandpaper too.


brown paper
will answer.

you have none, ordinary


long box covered over

with green crape paper looks

just like a

garden hedge.

The paper should


quite
flat.

be pasted over the sides of the box


stands are

Garden

made by
it

gilding spools

and then poking

into each spool, as

stands upright,

some

artificial flowers.
is

Greenhouse for the garden

made from

the deep

half of some box about seven inches long and five

inches deep.

If

you

like,

your greenhouse

may be

made smaller, but this size is an easy one to handle. The box itself forms the greenhouse building. Its roof is of bent cardboard, and the glass in it is waxed
sandwich paper.
Shall I
tell

you how

to

make

the greenhouse so that

you may make one


the

like it?
to use

First, take the half of


it

box you intend


at base.

and place

upon

its

rims,

open

[6i]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Next, one inch above the base, on each corner make
a pencil dot.

Cut

the top off the rims of your box.

On
sides

each

eiid rim, at center,

make

a pencil dot to

indicate the middle top of each box end.

(Leave

without marks.)
the center top point on each end cut
left, to

From

down

diagonally to right and


of the building

form the peaked part


(See

under the

roof.

Diagram Three,
to

CC, page

170.)
sides of the

Then, cut the long


lengthwise.

box

meet

these,

Remove

the cardboard at the top of

each long

side.

Now,
to
fit

in the point at

one end of the lower half of

the greenhouse building, cut out windows.

Cut them

your box building.

page 166, for windows.)


transparent
cut a

Diagram One, A, Back of each, paste some


(See
If

waxed sandwich paper. triangular window in the point


is

you

like,

of the building

which

to

be under the roof.


a door to

Between the lower two windows, cut


fit

one inch wide and two


size.

inches high should be a

good

(For cutting

a door, see

Diagram Two,

A, page

167.)

[62]

MAKING A BOXVILLE GARDEN


You may make
Cut
this roof

the roof two inches longer and four

inches wider than the size of the base of your box.

from your cardboard.


its

Fold

it

through
(See

the center of

long sides

to

make

a gable roof.

Diagram Three,

C, page 170.)
this roof, cut

In each side of

out windows.

Paste

back of their openings some waxed sandwich paper.

Glue the roof

to the

lower half of the building.

Any
boxes

small boxes that you have will form flowerfilled

when

with small

artificial flowers.

They

may go into the greenhouse. To make the pergola, you will need
of a white shoe-box.
its

the lower half


it

Take

the

box and stand

upon

rims, base at top,

opening below.
that

Cut out the cardboard


ners on the side that

was the bottom

of the

box, leaving a narrow rim around this between cor-

was

this

box bottom.

Then, cut

off

each end of the box, leaving the


like this first cut-

margin around corners and top rim


ting in the box.

In the two long rims of the box cut pillars on each


side.

(See

Diagram Seven, page


strips

181.)

Cut two long cardboard


board

from some

Bristol-

each

two inches longer than the length of


[63]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


your box.

Glue one
inch-wide

strip

each over the top of the

pergola, lengthwise, over the long sides of the box.

Cut

five

strips of

cardboard two inches

longer than the width of your box, and glue each


across the opening

pergola box.

made by cutting the top from the Each strip should be evenly crossed
pillars.
artificial flowers left

between opposite
If

you have any pretty

from

your garden and greenhouse, twine them around the


pillars of

your finished pergola.

have a gardener for

Shepherd.
I

my garden. His name is Karl He came to me in a box of toy lambs that


him Karl Perhaps, among your
I called

bought

at the ten-cent store.

because he looked so German.


playthings, you have a
little

figure like him.

Look

and

see.

am

sure you will find a gardener.


Boxville Garden,

Here's the

little

Just as cunning as can be;

Bring your
It
is

scissors

and the paste jar!

made with boxes

see!

There shall be There shall

a pretty greenhouse, be an arbor, too;

Paths and flower-beds we'll lay out

Oh,

there will be fun for you!

[64]

Boxville Greenhouse

is

cut

from the half of


It

a deep

box such as hardware

merchants use on their shelves.

has a roof

made from cardboard.

The

glass

is

waxed

paper.

The Pergola

is made from the lower half of a white shoe-box. white cardboard are glued across the top.

Strips of

The Boat-house
The

or.

Yacht Club

is

made from

the

half

of a

deep box

about eight inches long.


flagstaff is a pencil.

Its

roof and floor are shoe-box covers.

Boxcraft Houseboat

is

made from

the lower half of a plain shoe-box.


rest of the boat.

Two

shoe-box covers make the

BOXVILLE BOAT-HOUSE OR YACHT CLUB


Material Required to

Make

a Boxville Boatsix inches

house: the lower half of a deep box about


long,

and

also

two shoe-box covers.


is

Boxville Boat-house

made from
roof
is

an oblong box
Its

about two-thirds the size of a shoe-box.


a shoe-box cover,

wharf

is

and

its

another shoe-box

cover.
If

you wish

to cut a lake

from

a sheet of silver
is

paper, the boat-house or yacht club


for this play.

the very thing

Any water toys, such as swans, ducks, fish, or frogs, may swim on Silver Paper Lake, and from your yacht club, parties of fishermen may angle for magnetized fish. The boat-house may be a part
of the

summer attractions of Hotel Bandbox To make a boat-house building, you will


your box over upon
its
its

in season.
first

need

to turn

rims so that

its

bottom

becomes

top.

Draw
box.

a three-inch square
its

on one short end of your

Let

base

come

to the

extreme edge of the

[65]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


box rim.
This square
is

to

be the door you see in

the picture.
of this square.

Draw

a vertical line

down

the center

This gives two doors for the doorway.


see

(To cut double door,


167.)

Cut

across the top

Diagram Two, B, page line and down the center to


the two halves of the

the outer rim.

Bend outward
is

doorway.

The dow is

boat-house
to

to

have windows, and each winit.

have an awning over


first

To make windows
side of

with awnings,

draw on each long


a half

your

box, two one-inch squares.

Each square should be


from
a corner of the

drawn about an inch and


box.

Each square should be half-way between

top

and bottom of the building. (For windows with awnings, see

Diagram One, C, page


and across the base
to

166.)

Cut down both


the cut card-

side lines

line.

Bend

board outward and upward


this

form an awning. Color


using your crayons or

awning with red

stripes,

water-color paints.

When
your

all

windows

are cut, then you

may

place

little

building at the rear of the shoe-box cover

which forms the wharf.

Over

the top of your building,

fit

another shoe-box

cover to form a projecting roof over the wharf.


[66]

BOAT-HOUSE OR YACHT CLUB

long pencil will be a

fine flagstaff.

Run

its

point through the front of the boat-house roof, and

glue to the top of the pencil a triangular piece of


colored paper to

make
little

the pennant.

My

Boxville people

Have

a club-house
to

where they go
do some
fishing,

When they want Or they want

to take a row.

It stands beside a paper lake,

Upon my play-room
It has

floor;

some pretty awnings,


a dock, beside a door!

And
Upon
I

the lake float water toys.

put moss by the shore


pebbles: they
I'll

And

make

splendid rocks!

Some day

find

some more!

[67]

THE HOUSEBOAT ''BOXCRAFT"


Material Required to

Make

a Houseboat:

the

covers of two large shoe-boxes, and the lower half of


a child's shoe-box.

Here

is

a jolly houseboat, the

very thing

to sail

on

Silver Paper Lake.

Little

dolls

may spend
make

their

vacation upon

it.

Would you
It
is

like to

a house-

boat

to

play with?

not difficult.

First, take the

two shoe-box covers and glue them


flat.

top to top.

Place them on the floor

There

is

the

lower half of the houseboat.

Upon
of the

both long sides of your small shoe-box, draw

three one-inch squares, keeping the two at either end

same

side equally distant

from the nearest

corner of the box, and making the third

window on

each side half-way between them.

with awnings, see


the

(To cut windows Diagram One, C, page 166.) Cut


outward and upward
to

window

squares at both sides and along their base


the cardboard

lines.

Bend

make

the awnings.

Color these with red

stripes,

using either chalks or water-color paints.


[68]

THE HOUSEBOAT "BOX CRAFT"


On
the front and rear ends of the houseboat,

you

will need a door

and window.

Make
it

an upright

oblong space for the door.

Mark

out with pencil

about three inches high from the rim of the box.

window beside each door. (To cut door Cut top line space, see Diagram Two, A, page 167.) and down one side. Bend the door outward on the
a

Make

third side as

if it

were on

a hinge.
is

flagstaff for the

houseboat

made by

pressing

the point of a long pencil


the houseboat in front.

down through

the top of

paper pennant

may

be

glued

to the side of the pencil.

piece of string will

make
little

a tow-line for the

houseboat.

Fasten
start

it

to

any

donkey or toy horse


on a voyage around
is

you have, and


the

penny

dolls

play-room
to sail

floor.

The

houseboat, of course,
It

not

meant

upon dangerous water.

might be

safely anchored on the shore of

Mirror Lake or Silver

Paper Lake.
a litde houseboat with some windows and a door, made an inland voyage all around the play-room floor! At last I moored my houseboat beside my little chair: There was a carpet hassock that was an island there.
I built I

And

[69]

CAMP BOX ON MIRROR LAKE


Material Required to

Make Camp Box:


to

yard

or two of green crape paper for grass and foliage of


trees,

two or three clodies-plns

make

tree-trunks,
to

a sheet of silver

paper or a cheap ten-cent mirror

form a "lake," the halves of shallow letter-paper


boxes to

make tents, and any pebbles, you have among your treasures.
It
is

moss, or shells

great fun to
as

make

Mirror Lake

Camp

much fun as being in a real camp! Mirror Lake Camp may be made on the play-room floor.
almost
First, if
flat

you have some green crape paper, lay


floor.

it

on the
if

This

is

the grass.
silver paper, cut out a circle

Next,
of
it,

you have some


it

and paste

to the

crape paper

to

form

a lake.

Instead of the silver paper, you

may

substitute a

cheap mirror.

Place

this
it.

under the crape paper and

cut out a circle above

You

will need a grove of trees near the shore of

[70]

Camp Box

on Mirror Lake. Its tents are made from the halves of shallow boxes. Trees are made of clothespins.

The Boxville

Gips}- Cart

is

made from

a correspondence-card box.

CAMP BOX ON MIRROR LAKE


your
lake.

These

trees are

made by

standing some
air.

clothes-pins on end with forks in the

Cut some
forks.
It

green paper and press

it

in

between the

makes the foliage of

trees.

The
box

tents are

made from

the half of a shallow white

like a letter-paper box.

To make
may

a tent, cut

through each long side rim of your box


top or bottom of the cover, as the case
the box

as far as the

be.

Bend
(For

downward

to

each side of

this cutting,

making

a tent roof, slanting to each side

downward.

cutting a tent, see

Diagram Three, , page 171.) You may have as many tents in your camp as you
Perhaps your
tin soldiers

like.

might

like an

encamp-

ment on

the shores of

Mirror Lake.

Small oblong

box covers will make smaller


it is

tents for these.

When

summer, maybe

it

would be

nice,

on some warm,

sunny day,

to take the tents

outdoors under the trees

on the lawn and make a really true camp on the really


true grass, with real

growing things for

trees in a

woods.

Perhaps

so!

Cut
that

bits of twigs

and use these for

trees.

Pebbles

will help to
is

make

a rocky shore for a real

water lake
Its sides

a shallow pie-plate filled

with water.

should be covered with moss or short grass.


[71]

Of

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


course,
after playing out-of-doors with

the

camp
if

buildings, you will have to pick

them up, when playI

time

is

over, for the cardboard tents will be spoiled

you

let

them
it!

stay out over night.

know

it

because
I let

I tried

had

a really darling little doll

and

her stay out in a tent after

my

play was finished.


all

It
I

rained in the night and she was

spoiled

and
is

had

to

make

new

tent, too.

I think you'll like to

know about
ter to

this so

you won't

try

it.

It really

bet-

pick up after play, I think!


I

made

a grove of clothes-pin trees,

And had

a splendid time with these!

My
I

china rabbits ran in play


trees the

Beneath the

whole long day!


too

made some little camp tents, was a jolly thing to do Some penny dolls a picnic laid
It
I

Beneath the green crape-paper shade.

[72]

THE GIPSY CART OF BOXVILLE HIGH-

WAY
Material Required to
a

Make
as

Toy Gipsy

Cart:

deep oblong box such


in, also five

correspondence cards are

packed

square inches of cardboard, four

round-headed paper-fasteners, and two small boxes.

Do

you think
like the

it

would be fun

to

make
is

a gipsy

wagon

one

in the picture?

It

a very simple

thing to make.
First, find a

box such

as

correspondence cards come

in

from the stationery

store.

Take

its

high cover

ofif,

and cut from the lower part of the box almost

all

of

the deep inner rim, leaving only about a half-inch

of

it all

around.

Put the cover back over

this,

and
is

glue the two parts of the box together.


to

The box
to

be the gipsy wagon now.

door will need

be

cut at one end of the box, and

windows
rim.
its

will need to be

made on the sides of the box Turn the box over so that
L73]

base becomes the top

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


of your wagon.

Make

the outline of a door with

pencil on one end of the box.

To make
base

it,

mark

off

an upright oblong space an inch wide and two inches

and a half high.

come at the very edge of box rim. (To cut door, see Diagram Two, A, page 167.) Cut one side line from the base of
its

Have

the

box up

to the top line,

and cut along the top

line of the upright figure

you have drawn.


a little door.

Bend
See,
it

the cardboard

outward

to

make

will open or close as

you bend

it.

Next, make the windows on the sides of the

cart.

You may make


to cut

these with or without shutters.


shutters,
in

If

you make them without

you will only need

two one-inch squares

each side of your box.

Each should be evenly distant from a corner. (To cut plain windows, see Diagram One, A, page 166.)
If,

however, you wish


of your

to

have shutters on the


at top

windows
base.

wagon, cut these squares


This gives you the

and

Then

cut a line through each center, vertically,


shutters.

from top

to base.

Press

them back against

the outside of the cart.

(For

making

blinds, see

Diagram One, 5, page

166.)

Window-shutters and door may be painted.

Dry
Color

them while you make wheels for the


[74]

cart.

GIPSY CART OF BOXVILLE


them with water-color
red.

HIGHWAY
green or

paints.

Make them
from
stiff

The wheels

are circles cut


to

cardboard.
If

Find your compass

help draw them round.


a small

you

have no compass, use the outline of

round

saucer about two inches and a half in diameter to

guide you in drawing the four wheels in outline.

Draw

hub and spokes on

each,

if

you

like.

When

you have drawn them, cut each

out,

and

press through the axle of each one a round-headed

paper-fastener.

Bend

its

prongs

to either side after

you have pressed the wheel

into place
if

on the

cart.

The wheels may

be glued,

you have no paper-

fasteners to use for

making

axles.

Your cart will need made from the lower


rims,

a seat for the driver.

This

is

half of a small,

narrow box
end

about two inches in length.

Cut
to

off the short

and glue one long rim


it

your wagon

in front,

so that

makes the dashboard and


under the
the seat
seat.

floor of the front

of the cart
this to

Paste a small pill-box on

make

itself.

At

the rear of your cart, you


strip of

may make some

steps
it

by folding a

box rim twice and fastening

under the door with mucilage.


[7S]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Shafts for the cart are two narrow strips of card-

board pasted

to the

forward part of the wagon.


is

There!

The

gipsy cart

finished.

Penny

dolls

or tumble toys will be the gipsies.


Here come
the gipsies a-jogging up the road!

They're going up

to Boxville. The horse has quite a load! Good fortune's coming to you, and it isn't far away: We're going with the penny dolls a-gipsying in play!

[76]

THE SHEPHERD'S HUT AND THE


SHEEPFOLD
Material Required for

Making the Shepherd's

Hut:

yard or two of green crape paper, some cor-

rugated cardboard, half a small square box about four


inches high, and,
a lake.
if

you have

it,

silver

paper

to

make

Here
[

in the picture

you

see the shepherd's cottage.

had

a little flock of
in a box,

white woolly lambs given me.

They came

with a shepherd boy and his dog

to tend them.

One

day, I decided to build a cottage for the shep-

herd and

make

a sheepfold for his flock.


if

You
you

can

make one
will tell

for your toy lambs, too, and,


to

like, I

you how

do

it.

First, lay

some green crape paper upon the

floor

to

make
to

grass.

There must be

grass,

you know.

Of

course,

if

you have no green crape paper, you will


is

need

pretend that the carpet of the floor


[77]

grass.

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Perhaps
it

will answer just as well.

But,

if

you have

the paper, you can

make

a hill or
It

two behind the


is

place where you intend to build.


ting

made by

put-

some blocks or books under the paper.


strips.

Next, I made a long fence by cutting some corrugated cardboard into long

Three rows made

the width of this long fence.

After you have cut


rim.

your fence, stand


strip at

it

upon

its

one end, you can make a

By bending the gate. The fence is


things.

made

of very heavy corrugated cardboard, such as

comes wrapped around very heavy


a lighter kind that
I

There

is

you may
It

also use.

From

this kind,

made my

sheep-pen.
jar.

came wrapped around

small glass

To make

the sheep-pen, cut a long strip of the

corrugated cardboard.

Cut

it

crosswise instead of

lengthwise, and slip through each undulation in the

cardboard the end of a toothpick.


efifect

This gives the

of a picket fence.

The

shepherd's hut
Its

is

made from
is

the lower half

of a deep box.

roof

a piece of corrugated

cardboard cut long and bent through the middle

downward.

To make

the house, turn your [78]

box over

so that the

Sheepfold and Shepherd's Cote. Corrugated cardboard and fences.

is

used for roof

The Bridge over Mirror Lake.

It

is

made from

a long shallow

box with

a cover.

SHEPHERD'S HUT AND THE SHEEPFOLD


bottom becomes the top and the box
rims.
rests

upon

its

Measure the
Glue each
page
to

size of

its
fit

ends,

and cut two triangular


(For- cutting

pieces of cardboard to

over them and form gables.

an end of the house.

triangular roof supports, see


169.) a

Diagram Three, BB,

Cut

door and a window in the front of your house.


first

Both must

be outlined on the box in pencil.

Mark

the door an inch

wide and two inches high, an


edge of the box rim.

oblong with base


door, see

at the

(For

Diagram Two, A, page 167.) Cut the top line and down one long side. Bend the door outward One-inch squares may be as if it were on a hinge. cut in the box rim to make windows. (For cutting a window, see Diagram One, A, page 166.) Cut the
square on
all

four sides.
the roof in the point of the

Place a
gable,
if

window under
like.

you

The
this

roof of the cottage

is

made by measuring,

first,

the size of the building you wish to cover.

Measure

on your corrugated cardboard, and add three


its

inches to

length and breadth.


to

Fold the corrugated


(See

cardboard together

make
[79]

a pointed roof.

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Diagram Three,
ing,

C, page 170.)

Glue
is

this to the build-

and the

little

shepherd's hut
a

finished.
it,

You may make


where
the sheep

landscape of mountains behind


to graze.

may go
this.

These are blocks

or boxes covered with crape paper. or paste in doing

Do
is

not use glue

The paper
be

merely folded

over them.

pretty stream

cut strip of silver

drink at a stream,
I

made from an irregularly paper. The woolly sheep love to You can see the lake I am sure.
It

may

made

for

my

landscape.

was

a mirror.

A
is

rocky

ledge on the mountain-side or by the lake

made
in the

with pretty pebbles such


country.

as

you may find

Mary had

little

lamb,

its
it

fleece

was white

as

snow;
in play

little

shepherd guarded

in sheepfold, don't
it

you know!

It didn't

go to Boxville School,

grazed about

Upon

the green crape-paper field that

Mary made one

day.

rso]

BUILDING A BOX BRIDGE


Material Required to Make a Box Bridge: a long cardboard box with cover, a strip of cardboard
about ten inches long.

When
used in

you look

at the picture of

Box Bridge, you


It

will easily see, I think,

how

it is

made.

may be
and

many ways

for play.

Your

toy railway system

may have
tunnel.

a bridge as well as a freight station

box bridge may connect opposite shores

of Silver

Paper Lake, and the delivery wagon from

Boxville's General Store

may
fish

jog happily over the

bridge

to deliver

goods

at Boxville Cottage.

Guests
I

from Hotel Bandbox may

from the bridge.

am

many other things to play with it, so I will tell you how to make one, even though it does seem as if you might almost make one without
sure you will find
directions!

Take the box that you wish Remove its cover.


[8i]

to use for a bridge.

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Turn
the lower half of the box over so that the
top.

bottom of the box becomes

Cut

a semicircular

piece from each long rim. This makes the long arch
of the bridge.

(See

Diagram Four, A^ page


it

173.)
its

Next, take the box cover and turn


is

so that

top

next to the top of the bridge.

The
and

lengthwise rims
it.

of the

box will be

a railing for the

roadway over
let these

Cut each end rim


be pasted each

at the corner,

end rims
to
fit

to a strip of

cardboard cut

the

width of the box, and join the bridge roadway to the road along the floor where you are playing. Each
strip of

cardboard glued
five inches long. to

to

an end of the bridge

may

be about
If

make more than one bridge, you may easily do so. The shape of your box, whether deep or shallow, will make a different kind of bridge. The landscape of your Boxville may be as full of
you wish
silver

paper

streams

and

foot-bridges,

railway

bridges, covered bridges, toll-bridges, as

you please!

London Bridge may fall down, But my Box Bridge stands true!
I'd rather

own

a Boxville Bridge

That

stands up

wouldn't you?

[82]

BUILDING A TOY WINDMILL


Material Required for Making a Windmill:
a

box made

with curved sides about

five inches deep,

a half-sheet of cardboard, and

a long pencil.

From any
make
the box.

deep box with round

sides,

you may

a windmill.

You
it,

will not need the cover of

Remove
to stand
its

and turn the lower half of the


its

box over
becomes

upon

upper rim

so that

its

top

base.

Cut
of

a small

door about an inch high in the edge


just as

of the lower

box rim,

you

see

it

in the picture

my On
The

box windmill.
its

rim, farther up, cut a

narrow window.

A'

half-inch square cut out in the box rim will


roof of the windmill
is

make

this.

round and pointed.

It

is

to

be

made from

cardboard.

To make
Cut

it,

take your

compass and draw


base of your box

a circle twice the size of the


that.
it

round
out

or about
from

this circle

of the cardboard, and

remove a quarter piece

[83]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


like
a large slice cut

from

a pie.

(See

Diagram

Three, D, page 171.)

Next, lap one edge of your three-quarter circle


over
its

opposite side.

Glue
it,

it so.

This gives the


v^ith

round, pointed roof.


paints.

Paint

if

you wish,

your

Color

it

bright red or brown.


to

Sails for

windmill need

be cut from a paper


soft

pattern.

This pattern must be made from


be folded easily.

paper

that

may

Pad paper
that
is

will answer.

Cut

a square of

pad paper
Fold
to
this

half the height of

your windmill.
halves

square together to
quarter-sections.

make
Cut
in

then again

make
(See

the folded quarter-section the figure

shown

for shap-

ing windmill
174.)

sails.

Diagram
its

Five, Z, page
it

Then unfold your


all

paper, and, placing

upon

cardboard, outline

around

edge with pencil.


the sail piece for

Then, cut the outline


your windmill.
sails,

out.

This

is

(For shape of pattern for windmill


Five, ZZ,')
its

see

Diagram
a hole

Make

through

center.

Press through

it

the point of a long pencil.

Make two
the roof

holes in your box, near the top,


other.

below

one hole exactly opposite the


[84]

the pencil point through these holes.


sails are in place!

Run There! The

The Windmill

is

made from

round box.

Its

roof and sails are

cardboard.

The Boxville Barn and Farmyard. The roof of shoe-box covers. The fence for the Barnyard

the barn
is

is

made

of

two

made

of a box rim.

BUILDING A TOY WINDMILL


Where
is

your toy cart?

Shall

it

go cantering over

Box Bridge to Farm? What

the mill with


a

some corn from Boxville


must be when the wind-

windy day

it

mill sails turn so fast!


I built a little windmill,
Its sails

went round

an'

round;

The miller was a tumble toy, The mill, a box I found.

The roof is made of paper, The sails are paper, too:


It
is

easy

work

to

make

one.

And

it's

lots of

fun to do!

[85]

BOXVILLE BARN AND FARMYARD


Material Required to

Make

a Barn and Farm-

yard: the lower half of a large shoe-box and two


shoe-box covers that
fit it,

a ten-inch square of card-

board, and the rims cut from a shallow box.

Farms

are such very interesting places that I

am

sure you will enjoy

knowing how

to

make one with

a big barn and a farmyard

where your toy animals


like the
a

may be kept. You may easily make a barn picture. You will need to have
the building.
roof.

one in the

shoe-box to

make
to cut

Two

shoe-box covers
is

make

its

gabled

Some cardboard

needed from which

supports for the roof.

Begin by turning your box over upon


that
its

its

rim

so

top becomes the base of the barn.

In one end of the barn, cut a double door.


this, first

To make

mark

a three-inch square

upon an end of

your box.

Draw

a line

down
[86]

its

center, vertically.

BOXVILLE BARN AND FARMYARD


(For double door,
see

Diagram Two, B, page


line.

167.)

Cut the top

line

and down the center

The

base

of your door should be at the edge of the

box rim.

The two

sections cut in the

cardboard make the doors.

Press each outward.

Next, you will need

to

make

the two triangular

supports for the box-cover roof. These supports must

be cut from cardboard, and each must be the width


of an end of your box, and be

made

as

high
a

as

your

box

Is

wide.

(For cutting these supports for


169.)

gabled

roof, see
to

Diagram Three, BB, page


is

Glue one

each end of your box, at the upper part.

The

roof

made from your two box


to

covers lapped

one rim under the other, lengthwise,


roof shape.

form

a gabled

The upper

part

is

glued rim under rim.

(See Diagram Three, B.)


slip
it

Let the roof dry, and then

over the triangular supports pasted at each end

of the box building to hold the roof in place.

Cut
if

a little weather-vane
like,

from a

strip of

cardboard,

you

and paste
is

it

to the front of the

barn roof.

The farmyard
stand
if

made from box

rims cut from any

shallow cardboard box you have.

you cut them with

corners.

The box rims They make a

good

enclosure.

[87]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

A
The

small box, placed on end, will

cover of a small box will


Little boxes

make a shed. make a drinking-

trough.

make
lives

chicken-coops.

Mrs. Tumble Toy


in the picture.

on

my

farm.

You
Bill.

see her

chasing the pig.

Her husband's name is You can see him, too.


toys that

He

is

Have you some


farm?

would

like to live

on your

Cock-a-doodle-doo
Just run and fetch some glue,

Some

scissors,

and a shoe-box:

We'll make a farm for you!


Cock-a-doodle-doo

When
With

all

the

work
little

is

through,

We'll have a

farmyard
it,

a fence around

too!

[88]

BOX BROTHERS' ANIMAL SHOW


Material Required to
small boxes of
all

Make an Animal Show:


sizes, spools,

shapes and

and candya circus

box favors,
ring.

round bandbox cover

to

make

The

cover of a round bandbox

v^ill

make

a splendid

circus ring.

Any

small boxes and spools you

may
to

have can be the benches for your trained animals

perform upon.
with Noah's
favors that

A
to

really

good circus may be made


Christmas and other holi-

Ark

animals, or with the candy-box

come

one

at

day

times.
tell

Shall I

you how
it.

made my

circus?

You

can

make one
First of

like

all, I

collected animals.

At

a small

candy

shop, I found a polar bear, a rhinoceros, a fox, and a


pig.

Each came with


to

loose head, because the

animals were supposed

be

filled

with candy, but I

glued the heads on

tight.

bought these animals

because they were so cheap.


[89]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


They could
circus ring.

stand
I

upon spools

to

make

acts for the

painted each spool red, and pasted

over

its

hole a disk of colored cardboard.


I

From round box covers


square ones I cut benches.

made pyramids, and from


(To cut bench
for animal

show, see Diagram Six, A^ page 175.)


at

Cut

a leg

each corner of the box-cover's rim.

Remove

the

cardboard from between cuttings.

Swartzenheimer and Mulligan were


trainers.

my

animal

Each came
little

to

me

as a

dinner favor.

They
a a

were both

figures of toy

cake of sweet chocolate.

men that stood upon You can easily see what


all

splendid clown Mulligan made.

The

animals performed

kinds of tricks.
I

They
splen-

could stand upon each other's backs.


three tumble toys, besides.
didly.
I

had two or

They performed

am

sure you will have a


It
is

good time making

circus.

ever and ever so


that

much

fun, I think.
to

You can use any animals among your playthings.

you happen

have

At some toy shops, you will find celluloid animals. At Japanese shops, you will find cotton animals. In your own Noah's Ark there will be wooden ani[90]

This

is

Box

Brothers' Circus.

It is

made from

the lower part of a round

white bandbox.

view taken inside the Circus Grounds. The walls are corrugated cardboard. The cages are boxes with covers and the booth is the lower half of a candy box.
;

BOX BROTHERS' ANIMAL SHOW


mals and your Boxville people
dolls,

tumble

toys, jointed

Halloween

figures,

and favors will form the

trainers

and performers for the ''Show."

Wild animals and domestic animals may be bought at candy stores as favors. They also come in boxes at
the shops

where

toys are found.

These animals should

be small

never over four or


My
They do

five inches in length.

animals are very good


their tricks just as they should!

When What

have trained them

all,

you'll see

a fine

show

this

one will be!


it

I'm making benches And, if you like, I'll

for
tell

now,

you how.

[91]

CIRCUS TENT AND CIRCUS GROUNDS


Material Required to

Make

a Circus Tent:

round bandbox and

a sheet of

cardboard.

Material Required to

Make

Circus Cages: three

or four hardware boxes from three to five inches long.

A booth
box.
bars.

may be made from half of a flat Some cotton mosquito-netting will

letter-paper

be the cage

A circus tent
of a

is

a very easy thing to

make.

It needs

nothing but a sheet of cardboard and the lower half

round bandbox

to

make

it.

The lower
to stand
tent.

half of the
its

bandbox must be turned over

upon

rims.
is

This forms the sides of the circus

The

roof

cut from a large circle of cardboard.


First,

arrange the box to


roof.

make

sides for the tent.

Then, cut the

In the edge of the bandbox rim, cut out a piece of

cardboard the shape of tent canvas looped back

to

make an

entrance.

Draw some
[92]

folds

upon

this

with

CIRCUS TENT
blue pencil.
paints instead.
If

AND CIRCUS GROUNDS

you prefer, use your water-color

When

this is done,

glue across the top of your band-

box some
made.

strips of string to

form

tent ropes.

The

roof of the tent, round and pointed,

may

next be

Take

a large sheet of
is

cardboard and draw upon

it

a circle that

half again as large around as the base

of your bandbox.

Cut

this out.

Cut from
(See

the circle

a quarter piece like the slice of a pie.

Diagram

Three, D, page 171.)

Lap

the cut sides of this

three-quarter circle, and glue together to

make

pointed roof like that of a circus


roof
is

tent.

When

the

dry, slip
tent

it
is

upon the top of


done.

the hat-box, and

your circus
If

you find some corrugated cardboard,


and pressed
so that
it

it

may

be
its

slightly curled

will stand on

rim, to

make

board fence for the circus enclosure.


1

Of course, you must have a fence! Of course Hardware boxes that come with covers double and close telescope fashion make very good circus cages. To make these cages, you will need to cut top and bottom from the boxes, leaving rims only. You may,
if

you wish, keep

very narrow margin of rim around


[93]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


the top and bottom cutting of your box.

Paste strips

of coarse netting, like cotton mosquito netting, over

each opening of the box.


the

It should be

glued inside

box from side

to side.

This makes bars for the


to

cages.

(For cutting

box

make

a cage, see

Dia-

gram Eight, page 182.) Wheels may be added


animals

to

the cages, so that the

may go

out on parade.

The wheels

are

small circles cut from cardboard.

There should be
they are cut out
its

four for each cage, of course.

When

from the cardboard,


to the base of a

fasten each through

center

cage by a round-headed paper-fasof the paper-fastener should be

tener.

The prongs

bent to right and

left inside the

covers of the box.

This holds wheels


ers,

firm.
to

If

you have no paper-fastenraffia,

sew the wheels


to

your box with

or glue

them
a

your box.
grounds

A booth for the circus


box on
its
is

may

be

made from
Stand the

box about three or four inches


long
side.
first

in size.

Cut

in

its

back an awning. The

awning
the

made

by drawing an oblong space upon


this outline

back of the box, cutting

down

at

each

side line

pressed

The cardboard is then outward and upward to make the awning.


and across
its

base.

[94]

CIRCUS TENT
(See

AND CIRCUS GROUNDS


C, page 166, for cutting awning.)
stripes.

Diagram One,

Color the awning with red


Side-show
the tents of

tents for circus

grounds are made like

Camp
make

Box.

(See Diagram Three, E,

page

171, for cutting the


it

rim of a shallow box and

bending

to

a tent.)

All toy figures that you can muster

tumble
Box

toys,

wooden

dolls,

penny

dolls,

Noah's Ark

ladies, shep-

herds and shepherdesses, should go to

Brothers'

Circus on the play-room

floor.

If

you look among


circus,
I

your

toys,

you will find animals for the


cut

know.

They may even be animals


pictures.

from old

magazine

One day I made a (A bandbox was


But
it

circus

the tent),

I advertised in Boxville,
didn't cost a cent!

The penny
I

dolls of Boxville

Turned out on Circus Day! made pretend sell peanuts,

And

I tell

you,

it

was gay

[9S]

BOXTOWN ZOO GARDEN


Material Required to

Make

Boxtown Zoo:

some shoe-boxes,
toothpicks to

their covers, strips of cardboard or

make

bars for cages.

A zoo
cage
all

is

really a splendid thing to

make.

You

can

your wild animals

Noah's

Ark

animals,

or whatever other ones you

may happen

to have.

The

cotton animals that are bought in Japanese stores,

"three for five," are just right for zoo animals.

You

can buy chenille monkeys, one for a penny, at the toy


shops.

When
be

you

start to

build your zoo, the cages will

made from

boxes.

Cut out

a large square

from

each side of the rim. Toothpicks make bars for cages.

They

will need to be pressed

down through
in the

the top
If

of the box over openings

you cut

box

rims.

you have no toothpicks, you may make bars for the


cages by pasting very narrow strips of paper or card-

board inside the box cages over the openings


[96]

in the

^^^H

BOXTOWN ZOO GARDEN


box rims.

(For cutting a zoo cage,

see

Diagram

Eight, page 182.)

Dens
taken

for animals are boxes that have their covers

off.

These boxes must be turned over

to stand

on their upper rims.

Doors are cut

in the

edge of

box rims,

as

you

see

them

in the picture.

Rims
closures. Little

cut from box covers

make

fences for en-

box covers make feeding-troughs.

"Do

not

worry the animals!"


I

This

is

the rule of

all zoos.

have a Hon, and a bear,


I

have a

tiger, too!

A monkey,
And
I

and a "nelephant,"

so I

made
in

a zoo!

put a tiger
An',
if

a cage,

you're good to-day,


I

I'll

show you how


it's

made

it,

For

lots of

fun to play.

[97]

BOXTOWN HOSE HOUSE


Material Required for
a

Making a Hose House:


six or seven inches long,

box deep and square, about

and the shallow square cover of some larger box.


If

you own
is

a toy fire-engine or a

hook and ladder,

there

every reason
that

why
you

it

should have a home.


is

The engine-house
from
ting a square

see in the picture


It
is

made
cut-

a deep, square box.

quickly

made by

doorway

in one side of the

box rim

and by adding

a flat roof.

Turn your box over


its

so that

it rests

inverted

upon

rims.

Outline a three- or four-inch square on one


Its

end of your box.

base must

come

at the

edge of

your cardboard box rim.

Draw
tically.

a line

down

the center of this square, ver-

Cut with

scissors

up

this line

and across the

top line.

This gives two doors, that should be pressed


sides of

outward against the

your box.

See

Diagram

Two, B, page

167, for

making

the double doorway.)

Place over the top of the box the cover of a larger


[98]

BOXTOWN HOSE HOUSE


box, and the hose house will be finished.

Why,
I

it

took you no time at

all to

do

that,
its

did

it?

Let's see

how

the toy engine looks inside


I

new building

have a

little

engine,

And

it

clangs across the floor

Right into Boxville Hose House,

Where

they've opened wide

its

door.

[99]

HOW TO MAKE A WIGWAM


Material Required to
a

Make
a

the

Wigwam:

half

round bandbox cover and

few small

sticks or

pencils.

Why,
one

of course,

you may make an Indian wigwam!


two minutes
to

It will take about


in the picture.

make one

like this
all

With

it,

you may play


help

kinds

of Indian plays.

It will

be ever such fun!


to

need half an old bandbox cover

You will make the

wigwam. The cover must be a round one. One bandbox cover will make two wigwams. Cut the cover into halves. Take one of these and lap its
edges
to

form

a cone.

Glue or sew these edges

to-

gether.

Cut

off the point of the cone. at top of the

This makes the

opening

wigwam.
flap,
tent.

In the rim of the bent bandbox cone, cut a

and bend

this

back against the outer side of the


its

Stand the tent up upon

broad base, and there will

[lool

The Indian Wigwam

is

cut

from

half of a

round bandbox cover.

This

is

Fort Box.

It is

made from

a deep

box and

its

cover.

HOW
be
its

TO MAKE A WIGWAM
Small
sticks or thin pencils

entrance.

may

be

thrust through the top to

make

tent sticks.

Indian
tent.

symbols
I

may

be painted on the sides of the


doll,

had an Indian
in a

Big Chief Ten Cent


of wood.
I

Store.

He came
woods
home.
for
a silver

canoe

made

made

a green

him out

of crape paper,

and he lived near


floor in his

paper spring upon

my
I

play-room

All the toy animals that

have played

in

the

woods and Big Chief Ten Cent Store hunted them.


There was
ought
a deer that

came

off

our Christmas

tree,

and a whole family of china bunnies, and


just
to see

and you
mats
at

him on

the trail of

Noah's Ark

animals!

And

and you ought

to see the lovely

that are inside the Indian's tent.

made them

Kindergarten myself.
By By
the shores of Abigmirror,
the shining of
its

water,

Stood the

wigwam
it

of Big

Box

Chief,

Builded from a half a bandbox.

Dark behind

rose a

mountain

Made

of paper-covered boxes:
it,

There were pebble rocks upon

Caverns where Big Box Chief hunted.

[lOl]

FORT BOX
Material Required to
square box with
a spool will
its

Make

Box
fort.

Fort: a deep,

cover.

A round hair-pin box and


a fort for
to

make

cannon for the

Would you
soldiers?

like to
tell

make

your leaden
it?

Shall I

you how

do

If

your

soldiers are small, a

box three inches deep may answer


Its

for the building.


fort.

cover forms ramparts of the

To

start the
its

building of your
rims so that
its

fort,

turn your box

over upon

base becomes the top


off

of the building.
aside.

Take

the

box cover

and lay

it

Find

a pencil

and mark the openings for guns.


like

They

are

made

windows upon

the

box

front.

Draw
out, if

each about a half-inch square, and use your

ruler to

make each opening even. Cut these squares you wish. They may also be painted black,
to cut

should you prefer not

them

out.

[102]

FORT BOX
To add
of your

ramparts to the building, take the cover


its

box and make a pencil mark upon


all

rim

every half-inch

the

way

around.

Cut

sections

from the rim,


the box with
of your box.

as
its

marked, every other half-inch. Turn

rim upward and glue

it

to the

top

(For making ramparts,

see

Diagram

Three, F, page 172.)

At

the back of the fort, you

may

easily devise a

sallyport

by cutting the cardboard door shaped. (For

cutting a door, see

toy

hair-pin

Diagram Two, A, page 167.) cannon may be made with a small round box by pasting it upon the side of a spool

between the wheels of the spool.

thumb-tack
it

pressed beneath one wheel of the cannon will keep

upright and prevent rolling.


black.
If

I painted

my

guns

you

like,

you may

easily do this with water-

color paints.

An encampment
to the top of the

of tents

white box covers cut

made from small through each long side rim up


be
to

may

cover and bent,


(See

each side of the

center

downward.

Diagram Three, , page


flag, it

171, for

making

a tent.)
to

If

you happen

have a penny

will be just

the very thing to

wave over Fort Box.


[103]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


You
can arrange your fort upon a sheet of crape
all

paper and make streams and woods

about

it.

The

streams will be strips of silver paper pasted onto the

green crape paper.

The woods

will be bits of twigs

pressed into the holes of spools so that the trees stand


upright.
laid

Bushes are
flat.

down

may be Rocks and mountains may be made


just bits of twigs that

from

stones.
I

had a leaden

soldier,

His name was Tommie Tin! Oh, he was brave in battle.

And
I

always fought

to

win!

made him
is

into general,
in

And he Of all my At Box

command

Boxville

Army

Fort in Boxland.

'[104]

HOW TO

BUILD A TOY CASTLE AND A

FAIRYLAND HOUSE
Material Required to
either round or square

Make

a Castle: any box,


six

one

at least

or seven

inches deep

is

best.

Material Required to

Make
little

a Fairyland House:

an oblong box deep enough for door and windows


to

be cut in

its

sides, a

few

crackers or ''goodies"
these.

possibly some
Have you
have not been

gilt or silver

paper in place of
Well,

ever played in fairyland?


there,

if

you

you can very well make


floor,

a fairy-

land upon the play-room


gather together
all

and

in

it

you may
and Blue,

the people of your Red,

and Green, and Yellow Fairy Books. These people


will be Knights, and Princesses, Witches, Goblins,
Fairies.

All are

toys,

and

it is

an easy matter
is

to get

them together
land
castle.

quite

as easy as it

to

make

a fairy-

[05]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


I will tell

you how.
is

First,

you may

like to build

the castle, for that

all-important.

There never yet


It really

was

a fairyland

without that!
its
is

Find some deep box with


ters little

cover.

mat-

whether the box

round or square-sided.
castle

round box will make a high tower-like

similar to the one in the picture.

square one will

make one more like a fortress. It scarcely matters which you choose. Take the cover from your box. This is to form the castle ramparts later. High up
in the

box rim cut one or two long tower windows.

Cut

a door at the base of the rim.

Next

cut the ram-

parts in the

box cover.

(For cutting ramparts, see


172.)

Diagram Three, F, page


of your castle box

Glue these
is

to the top

and the
It
is

castle

made!
is

The

Princess

who

lives in the Castle

a
.

penny

doll

dressed in a silver robe


cess has

(made

of tinfoil)

My PrinYou
a bit

golden hair.
it

long and beautiful.

can see

in the picture.
is

The Knight
of wire.
shining.

a leaden soldier.
is

His spear

is

His shield

a brass button, polished

and

You
a
little

can easily find the proper kind of dragon

at

Japanese shop.

Mine was made


[io6]

of crockery

A TOY CASTLE AND A FAIRYLAND HOUSE


and
cost ten cents, but

you will surely find among the


crockery dragon.

cotton animals that are sold three for five cents some-

thing far better than

my

There are

the most dragon-like of cotton animals at the Japanese


stores

where

buy penny

toys.

Sometimes they

are spidery and sometimes they are like crocodiles

only they aren't crocodiles but

DRAGONS. When
mean.

you go

to a

Japanese shop and look for penny animals


I

you will know exactly what


queer, and will

They

are all

work
to

into

any fanciful fairy


castle.

tale that

you wish

to

play with your

Don't forget

make
It

the dragon a lair,

when you

have bought him.


in
it

may

be just a box with a hole


if

for the

mouth

of a den, but

you have some


lair

pretty stones and pebbles,

you can build a real


these.

on the play-room

floor

with

Almost any

fairy tale

may may

be acted out with the

Knight and the Princess.

Little toys

which you have


I

among your
will have a
I built

playthings

help out.

know you
I did.
too.

good time playing


a

at fairyland.

me

Hansel and Gretel house,

This

was

to help with

my

fairyland play.

Hansel and Gretel were two tumble toys

boy

and a

girl.

Their home was


[107]

in a Boxville Cottage.

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


When
like
I

they went to the woods and found the Witch's


I

House,

made that. It was in a forest of clothes-pins the trees made for Camp Box. made the fairyland house of the Witch from a
I cut

deep oblong box.

two windows

in

one rim and

a door between them, as

you

see

it

in the picture of the

fairyland house.

To

the sides of the house, I pasted

some

little

crackers and goodies.


crackers.
I

The
fairy.

roof of the house

was of

It

was very

used some pretzels for a fence around


dolls

it.

There were some small celluloid


playthings, and I

one that
off

is

made fairies of Daisy. Her dress is am

among my them. You can see


artificial

flower

my

old hat.

I took the center out of the daisy

and made

a skirt of the petals.

were cut from white


to the

tissue-paper.

The fairy's wings They were glued


little

back of her body.

All kinds of Hallowe'en figures that are

favors will answer splendidly for this fairy boxcraft


play.

You

can easily find dwarfs, gnomes, goblins,

witches, elves.

Oh,

it

will be fun, I

know!

summer you can go out into the garden and gather hollyhocks. The flowers make real little flowIn
[io8]

Fairyland Castle

made from

round box and

its

cover.

Fairy House

made of

box covered

witli goodies.

A TOY CASTLE AND A FAIRYLAND HOUSE


er ladies

just like fairies dressed


to

up

in red,

and pink,
of the
just

and white dresses


hollyhocks
stick a pin

go

to a party.

The buds
down

make

the heads for the ladies, and


it

you

through these and press

at the base

of the full

blown flower

to

make

the fairy lady.

Acorns make fairy dishes too


to

did you ever happen

know

that!

Once

there lived a dolly princess, with soft, flaxen, curly hair,

By a cruel spell imprisoned near a Chinese dragon's lair. Day and night her pasteboard tower, dragon-guarded, you'll agree, Offered ill to those in Toyland who would set the Princess free. Many little dolls essayed it in a truly frightful way They were gobbled by the dragon one and all, I hate to say!

But

there

came a leaden
his steed

soldier, all in tinfoil

armor dressed;
chosen quest.

Bravely on

he bore him, valiant,

in his

At

his blow, the green tin

dragon toppled over, vanquished quite.

And
And

the rescued dolly princess

King and Queen, they

reign In

was set free, then, by her Knight. Playtown even to this very day,

they live forever happy, as the fairy stories say

[109]

BOXES USED AS BLOCKS


Material Required for Block Building: an
sortment of boxes varied in size and shape.
as-

Building with blocks

is

always fun,

as

you know.
with boxes

You have
in the

tried

it

with cubes, and with dominoes, and


try to build

with cards

but did you ever


to

same way?
be glued.

The boxes do not need may or may not be used.


and box covers form
building in the picture.
drug-store boxes.
in

Their covers

Small boxes make walls,

roofs.

You
It

will see a tall block

was made from small


no end
to the

There

is

really

ways

which you may build with

these.

From
heads.

boxes of uneven

size,

men and

animals

may

be made.

Round boxes or small oblong boxes form Larger boxes make bodies. Legs and arms
drawn with pencil upon
is

are boxes of equal size.

The

faces are

the back

of boxes

where there

no

print.

wire hair-pin

[no]

BOXES USED AS BLOCKS


will keep the arms in place.
It will

need

to

be

pressed through the box sides and bent so that the

arm boxes may be slipped upon

it.

Men

of all sorts

may
If

be made.

There

is

great variety, as forms vary


use.

with the shape and size of boxes that you

you are playing with some other


it is

child,

you will

find that

amusing

to

divide your store of boxes,

each choosing one


hausted.

at a

time

till

the supply

is

ex-

Then, you may each

see

how many

different

things you can build.

It will be a

game, and the

winner will be the one who can make the most with
his store.
It
is

entertaining to play with box animals and box

men when you have to spend a day in bed. They may be placed upon a table near the bedside. They
are light to handle, and they require no cutting or

pasting to muss you up.

If

you decide

to

have measles

or

mumps,

the

little

boxes

may

be disposed of easily

after

you have played with them.

find

new

ones to take their place

You can always when you are well

again.

You may make


box and
a

puzzle for yourself out of a large


of smaller boxes of varied size.

number
as

Try

to

pack

many

boxes

as

you can into the large

[III]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


box.
ing.

Make them come

as

evenly

as

you can

in

pack-

There will be some space

at sides,

but with care

and thought you will be surprised


a space they

to see

how

small

may

be packed

into.

Try them

in various

forms,
to

till

you are sure you have reached the best way


Then, give the box puzzle
to

arrange them.
if

some

friend to see

he can do with one or Uvo attempts

what you have accomplished. When you give some person this puzzle, mix your boxes well so there is
no clue
box.
to their

proper arrangement inside the larger

Toys

like trains

may

be built with
a

little

more than
round box.
Its

a long cracker

box for

coach and some oblong box


is

for engine.
Its coal-car

The
is

engine's smoke-stack

cover taken from a candy box.

wheels are buttons or button molds placed on the


ends of wire hair-pins that have been pressed through
the sides of the cardboard boxes.

bit of

wax

or

plasticine will keep the wheels in place.

Paste boxes to the back of your cut-outs

buy

these sheets at the

penny

store.

when you The Indians,

cowboys, soldiers, and animals will then stand erect

by themselves.

You

will have an interesting time, I

am

sure, in

[112]

A Toy

Train that

is

built

from boxes.

Its

wheels are button molds.

BOXES USED AS BLOCKS


finding
play.

new ways
It
is

to use

your boxes

in this

kind of

always new, for you

may

always find

different kinds of boxes to adapt to the building.

And

the nice thing about

it is

that

you can make almost

anything you choose.


knew before did you? How much a cardboard box could do! I can make buildings, now and then I make some animals and men!
I

never

Indeed,

it's

wonderful

to play

With

little

boxes in this way!

["3]

MAKING A NOAH'S ARK FOR CRACKER ANIMALS


Material Required for
a child's

Making a Noah's Ark:


ten

shoe-box without a cover, the cover of a large

shoe-box, and

some shallow box with cover about

inches by four.

Next time that you have cracker animals with, build them an ark! It is splendid fun.
tell

to

play

I will

you how

to

do

it.

Find the materials needed


box cover, the lower half of
the

to

build with

a shoeand

a child's shoe-box,

whole

of

some very shallow box about


Noah's
rims
is

ten inches

long and at least four inches wide.

To make
pointed.

the base of the

ark, use the large

shoe-box cover.

Cut

its

off.

Cut each end


this.

The
upon
door

ark building
is

placed on

The
Place

ark building
it
its

made from
its

the small shoe-box.


top.

rims so that

bottom becomes

Cut

in

one end of the box on the edge of the


[114]

A NOAH'S ARK FOR CRACKER ANIMALS


box rim.

To make

this,

cut

up from the edge

of the

rim two inches near the center of the box end.

Then
After

cut horizontally across the box two inches more.

(To cut door,


cutting,

see

Diagram Two, A, page


as if it

167.)

bend the door

were on

a hinge.

round-headed paper-fastener will make


and
latch.

door-knob

Press the points of the fastener through

the cardboard door and


to

bend the prongs, or


this

points,

one side together.

In

way, animals

may

be

securely locked into the ark.

Cut two triangular supports for the roof


ark.

of the

They should be cut in heavy cardboard and made equal-sided. The width of one end of your box will give you the dimensions to make these. (See Diagram Three, 55, page 169.) Paste one of these
cardboard pieces
to

each end of the ark building near

the top part of the box.

Let both dry well before

attempting to put a roof upon them.

The roof is made of box. Lap the long rim


of the other.
other.

the two parts of the shallow


of one part over the long rim

Glue the two rims


a gable

together, one over the

(For making

roof from two box

covers or from the halves of a shallow box, see Dia-

gram Three, 5, page

169.)

When the glue is

dry, slip

["S]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


the roof over the gabled points of the ark building.

Now, when
there
is

the rains descend

and floods come and


just

RAINY DAY
Find
a doll for

ahead of you,

summon

the cracker animals


in'

from the pantry.

Arrange them
a piece of

pairs.
to

Mr. Noah and

paper

make

the dove.

footstool will be
all

Mount
out,

Ararat, and the ark

may voyage
floor.

the

whole day
comes

upon the play-room


you will have been

When
all

the sun

so

busy

day that you will have

quite forgotten about the rain.

Two

by two!

Two

by two!

Elephant and kangaroo!

Box and box

covers to-day

Make

a Noah's
later,

Ark

for play.
feast

Maybe,

you may

On an unpaired cracker beast! Two by two! Two by two!


Elephant and kangaroo!

[ii6]

A BOX SAVINGS-BANK FOR PENNIES


Material Required to

Make

a Savings-bank:

box

in

which correspondence cards have been packed,


box with
a sliding cover,

a small
to
it.

and another similar

When I began to make boxcraft toys, I used to save my pennies to buy pinwheel paper, cotton animals,
and
little

figures to use in Boxville.


I

Then, when

found that

should need crape paper or silver paper,


I

or a mirror for a pool,

had money

to

buy

it.

Perhaps you would

like to

know how

to

make

Savings-Dank for pennies too?

You
stores.

will need

some small box


cards

like that in
at

which

correspondence
It has a

come packed

stationery

double cover.
so that the printing

Turn
is

the

box over

on

its

top

hidden.
it

Make
over.

the top of your

box the bottom by

turning

Draw two windows and


box.

door on one side of the

Paint them,

if

you

like.

Paste over the door a porch roof

made from

half

[17]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


of one small box.

The

floor of the

porch

is

pasted

under

it.

Remove the drawer from the little box with sliding The outside of the box, as you may have cover.
noticed,
is

like a tall

chimney.
it

Take
remove
lines

this

and stand

on end

at the top of

your box.

Draw its

outline with pencil on the cardboard.

Then

the

box and cut out the outline

just inside the

you made.
this is done,

When

you must glue the chimney over


it

the open hole.

Glue

tight

and

let it

dry well.

The
this

pennies, dimes, and nickels

may be dropped down

chimney

into the bank.


is

There
count
in

one rule which governs


cents
I

this savings ac-

my bank five

must always stay

in the

bank

to

be "a nest egg."


I

made

this rule myself.

made

a litde penny bank,

I'm saving pennies now!


It takes a lot of patience,

But I'm doing

it,

somehow!

My

bank has a

tall

chimney,

The And

pennies drop

down through:

It's really

fun to drop them

hear them jingle, too!

[1,8]

HOW TO MAKE A TOY WAGON AND


SLED OR SLEIGH
Material Required to

Make

Toy Wagon:

the

half of any oblong cardboard box.

few square

inches of cardboard will be required, from

which

to

cut cardboard disks for the wheels of the cart.

Material Required to
long cardboard box with

Make
its

a Sleigh: one ob-

cover.

sled

may

be

made from
If

the cover or lower half of any long box.

you wish

to

make

a toy

wagon, find the half of


this
if

some cardboard box.


cover.

Turn

upward
the

if

it is

the
is,

Keep

the lower half,

you use
is

that, as it

upright, open at the top.

This

body

of the

wagon.

Take your compass and with


board four
four
circles of the

it

draw on some cardThese are the

same

size.

wagon

wheels.

Cut each

out.

Find two small

sticks in the garden.

They must

[i'9J

THE JOIXY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


each be a
trifle

longer than the width of your box.

Press each through the end of the box where wheels

should come
of your box.
stick,

press clear through both opposite rims


Then
press a

wheel upon each end of a


or some glue where the

and put a

bit of

wax

linchpin should come.

Let the glue dry thoroughly


toy.

before you attempt to play with your

strip of

cardboard cut
its

to fit the

width of the cart

and glued across


the driver's seat.

upper forward rims will make


strips of

The

shafts are

two

cardboard pasted

to

the forward sides of the cart.

Cut each about half the

length of your box.

Whoa

there!

Back up

back!

There

is

your toy
to tie his

horse in the shafts.


string harness.
trot

He

is

waiting for you

He
floor.

will be ready then to go on a

round the

If
a

you wish

to
it

make
over.

a sled, take the


Its

lower half of

box and turn

long side rims will become


off the box.

the runners of the sled.

Cut the end rims

Then, cut

off

each corner of the side rims of the box,

slanting your corner cuttings in the

same

direction.

There you have

the runners of your sled!


184.)

(See

Diagram Ten, A, page

[120]

Toy Wagon made from


half of a

half of an oblong box. the runners are

Sled cut from the lower


the

box

made from

box rims.

Sleigh

made from

the cover and the lower half of a box.


painted.

It

has been

Doll's Crib

made from
cut

the lower half of a box, with pill-box legs.


half of an oblong box.

The

Go-cart

is

from

The Basket

is

half a box.

The Express Wagon

Its handle and its is the cover of a candy box. wheels are cut from cardboard. The Little Doll may have a sled cut from a candy box.

A TOY WAGON AND SLED OR SLEIGH


To make
of your box.
the sleigh, you will need to use the cover

Turn

it

so that

it

opens at top.

Cut

the

side rims the shape of the

upper portion of

a sleigh,

and glue the cover

to the runners.

small box will

make two
part.
sleigh.

seats for the sleigh.

Fit the cover into the

back of the sleigh and the low.er half into the forward
(See

Diagram Ten, page


top.)

184,

for

making

A, runners; B,
it is

When

winter in Boxville, cotton-batting makes


horse, harnessed to the sleigh, with a

snow, and

my

sleigh-bell on his neck, goes jingling


Street.

through Main back

The boy

dolls catch their sleds to the

of the sleigh.

My Teddy Bear, he likes to play With little toys I make this way: The cover of a box may be A wagon like the one you see. Or, maybe, I may make a sled For little Teddy Bear, instead!

[I2ll

THE CHINA

DOLL'S CRIB, GO-CART,

AND MAY BASKET


Material Required to
the lower half of

Make

a China Doll's Crib:

some oblong box, and four small


to

oblong pill-boxes of equal size


the bed.

make

the legs of

Material Required to

Make

a Doll's Go-cart:

the lower half of an oblong box about seven inches


in

length,

and some cardboard


also

to

make

wheels.

Wheels may

be made from top and base of a

small round box three inches in diameter.

Material Required to

Make

a Doll's

May
may

Bashave;

ket: the cover or top of any small box you


also a small strip of

cardboard and two round-headed

paper-fasteners.
See, here
is

a china doll's crib in the picture.


It is

You

can see
tell

how

easy

to

make

it.

hardly need to

you.

Just take the cover or the lower half of the [122]

DOLL'S CRIB, GO-CART,


box you wish
rim
to use,

MAY BASKET
each long
its

and cut

off a part of

there

is

the top of the crib with

head and

foot.

To

each corner below

its

base glue the end of a


Isn't that

small oblong pill-box.

There!

an easy

and quick way


If

to

you wish

to

make make

a toy crib for a doll? a cradle, cut the

box

in the
as the

same way, and cut

a circle

once again
this circle

as

wide

width of your box.

Cut

into half,

and

each half will be a rocker for the cradle.


to

Glue one

each end of the box.

That

is

all!

To make

a doll's go-cart like the

one in the picture,

take the cover or the lower half of any oblong box

similar to a candy box, one-pound size.

Cut

the rim

from

it

half-way around, beginning in the center of


side.

one long

Next, cut from the part that

is

with-

out rim the handle of the cart, as you see the box cut
in the picture.

Next, cut two circles from cardboard


wheels of the go-cart.
size.

to

make

the

Each

circle

must be

of equal

Make

each about three inches in diameter,


is

unless your

box

more than eight inches

long.

In

this case cut

your cardboard

circles to correspond,

larger.

[123]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Run
of the
a stick or a

long pencil through one circle, and

press the point of the stick through a lower corner

box through

to the

other side, where you put

on the other cardboard circle for the other wheel.

Your

stick or pencil

must be one inch longer than the


Place a blob of glue over each
let it

width of your box.


end of the axle and
on.

dry well,

to

keep the wheels


little

When
done.

you have

fitted the

end of a
to

box

into the
all is

lower half of the go-cart

make

a seat,

You may
if

use a piece of folded cardboard


I painted the

to

make

the seat,

you prefer.
it is

handle
this.

of

my

go-cart, but
is

not at

all

necessary to do

The

go-cart

great fun to use

when you play house


take your doll
tie

and go out marketing.

Then you can

baby with you baby

in the go-cart.

You

can

the doll

into the cart

with

a piece of string.
Is

The
to

basket that you see in the picture

very easy
different

construct.

You
long

can use
as

it

for

many

things,

and

as

you have small boxes

or even
You

large ones
will need
to

you may make baskets out of them.

some round-headed paper-fasteners or glue


paper-fasteners are stronger

help

make them. (The

and better than the glue.)

Take

the lower half of a box, or the

upper

half,

[124]

DOLL'S CRIB, GO-CART,


as
as

MAY BASKET
This
is

you
long

like,

and cut

a strip of

cardboard twice again


the basket's

as the

width of your box.


it

handle.

Glue

inside the inner rim on either side


still,

of the box, or, better

run the prongs of a paper-

fastener through the side of your

box and through

the end of the cardboard strip on both sides of the

box.

There

is

the handle

just see

what

cunning

basket you have made!

In spring.

May

baskets can be

made

this

way.

Filled with wild flowers, they are very cunning


the thing for a
If

just

May Day

gift.

you have some pretty

shells that

you have picked


box basket
will love

up

at the shore, they


to

may go
little

into a little

and be given
to

some

sick child,

who

handle them and keep them in their basket by his

bedside.

At

Easter,

fill

box baskets with moss or green

raffia

cut to represent grass.

Glue

the raffia to the box.

Then

ask cook

if

she will give you

some white beans


in a pot.

like those that are

baked with pork

Place

three or four of these in the moss or raffia cuttings,

and you will have made


to give as

a cute little basket of eggs

an Easter
is

gift.

When

your water-color

paint-brush

moistened with blue or brown paint,

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


make
like

tiny specks on the beans


little birds'

and they will look

wee

eggs.

The box
tions, too.

baskets

make good Christmas-tree decoraThey may be suspended from branches


raffia

by colored paper chains, or be tied on with


tinsel.

or

Each basket may be

filled

with candies or with

pretty berries you have found out-of-doors, holly or

bright wintergreen.

They may be used as place favors for party when filled with red paper hearts.
Little cardboard boxes

a Valentine

Are

useful every day.

They make 'most any kind of That you can use in play.
I

toy

made

a little go-cart,

A
And
I

basket,

and a bed,

there are

many

other toys

might have made, instead!

[126]

A TOY DOG KENNEL FOR A TOY DOG


Material Required to Construct a
small box without
its

Toy Kennel

cover, the cover of

some larger

box that

is

square, and cardboard.

Here is a picture of Fido, my little him a kennel so that he could stay near
at night

dog.

made

the doll house

and be a w^atch-dog. Perhaps your dog would


he
is

like one, if

a play dog.
to

If

you do want

make

one, I will tell

you how.
is

Take

the lower half of your box.

This

to

be the

building.

Turn
to it

it

over and stand

it

on end upon the


the shape of this

piece of cardboard you have.


end.

Draw
it.

Add

about four inches

in height.

Cut
to

this

piece out and cut another like

Glue one
is

each

end of your box.

Be

sure your box


rest

inverted before

you begin.

It

should

upon

its

rim.

Next, cut each end piece glued


at the top.

to the

box

to a

point

This makes the point of each gable side


roof.

under the

These are the points that come under


it.

the roof to support

[127]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Cut an opening under one
the box.
It

of these at one

end of

should be shaped like the door of a dog

kennel.

Where
roof.

is

a large flat
to

box cover?

It

is

to

be the

It

ought

be about four inches wider than


first

the width of your


roof, see

box.

(For making the kennel

Diagram Three, , page 171.) Fold this cover downward in equal halves
and place
it

to

make
little

a slanting roof,

over the points of the

dog kennel that come front and back of the


building.
to

There

is

the kennel all finished!

Whistle

Fidol

Come
to

here, Fido, to see the nice kennel


it

made
dog?

for you.

Don't you think that


a smaller

would be fun
little

some day

make

one for the

china

Oh
I

where, oh where has my little dog gone! Oh, he hasn't gone far, for you see built him a kennel from out of a box, And now he stays home here with me!

[1281

Toy Dog Kennel with cardboard end


box cover roof

pieces glued to
in place.

it

to hold a bent

HOW TO MAKE A TEDDY


WHEELBARROW
Material Required for

BEAR'S

Making a Toy Wheela

barrow: the lower half of

candy box or a similar

shaped box, one round pill-box for the barrow's


wheel.

The Teddy Bear's wheelbarrow that you see In the picture was made from half of a candy box; some strips of cardboard made the legs and wheel supports, and a round pill-box made the wheel. Do you wish to make a wheelbarrow to play with? Perhaps your Teddy would like one. I will tell you how to make it, shall I?
First, take the

lower half of your box and take one

end rim

off.

Then, from the upper part of the rim

next to this side, cut out the handles of the barrow.

Nextj cut out the cardboard half-way around the

lower part of the box between the handles.


the frame of the wheelbarrow.

This

is

Cut two short cardboard


[129]

strips

each a half-inch

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


wide and each three inches high. These are the rear
legs.

Glue them
this,

to the toy at either side at the back.

After

cut two strips of cardboard a half-inch

wide and

five inches long.

Glue

these to the

forward

part of the wheelbarrow's frame.

When

all

are well dry, press the point of a pin

through one of these wheel supports, through the


cover of a round pill-box, on through
its

other side,

through the other


if

strip of

cardboard

in front.

Then,

you

like,

you may put

a toothpick in place of the


at either end, after

pin,

with a small blob of glue

you

have cut the hub of the wheelbarrow


a correct size.

Let the glue dry well,

make it and then Teddy


off to

may have his toy to play with. My Teddy and I play at gardening with artificial flowers on the floor. Sometimes, I make flowers from
tissue-paper to use. Can't you

make them,

too?

One

day I cut for Teddy Bear


care.

A
It

wheelbarrow with greatest


is

a box, as

you can

see:

It made a 'barrow splendidly! Some artificial flowers made

A little
It

garden that
a very

we

laid

was

happy day
this

The

time

we made

garden play.

[130]

OFFICE FURNITURE FOR DOLLS


Material Required to

Make

the Office Furniture

the end of the lower half of a shoe-box


desk, a spool with a
stool, a

makes the

round box cover makes the desk

high round box four inches high makes a

flower-stand, the cover of a

box nine inches long

makes

a chair.

My dolls thought
I

had

a little

would be fun favor that was made


it

to

have an

office.

like a tiny typeas

writer,

and

a telephone that

came

a favor, too.

You can buy these at any caterer's or at a candy store. One of my dolls was a stenographer. You can see her in the picture. Her name is Dosia Miss Dosia. The other doll is the bell boy or errand boy. To make a desk for the office, take the half of your

shoe-box.
corner.

Cut

legs in

its

forward rim, leaving each

From

the side rims cut the two rear legs.

(To cut
page

table or flat office desk, see

Diagram

Six,
it

D,

178.)

Paint the desk with India ink and


[131]

will

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCIIAFT


look like the one in the picture.
If

you

prefer, use

paint, but be careful not to use the paint too moist.

The

spool makes the desk-stool.


it

Paint

it

to

match

the desk, and stand

on end. Over the


also.

top, glue a

round pill-box.
cunning

Paint this

It

makes a very

stool for a doll eight inches in height.


is

The
high.

stand

easy to make.

The

plant on

it

was

favor, too.
It
is

The

stand

is

just a

box about

five inches

put on end and painted.


all to cut.

The

chair takes no time at

Just find

the cover of a box about eight or nine inches long.

Cut the rim

off

from

it

half-way around, starting

at

Bend the part that has no rim left on it upward to make the back of the chair, and cut the legs from the lower rim of the rest (To cut of the cover as you cut legs for the desk. It is fun to a chair, see Diagram Six, C, page 177.)
the center of one long side.

have a

doll's office.
is

With

It

you can play


to

at business.
to

What

your business going

be?

Are you going

be a lawyer, or the principal of a

little doll's

school?

Maybe You
on, so

yours will be a real estate office for Boxvillel

can see

my
to

office

boy

In

the picture.
it

His

hat ought to be taken off his head, but

was glued

he had

be impolite
[132]

though

made him

Office Furniture for Dolls.

This is made fmni boxes, box covers, a spool and a wooden box.

The

Doll's

Couch Hammock.

It is

cut

from the cover of a hardware box.

OFFICE FURNITURE FOR DOLLS


say,

"Excuse me!" for doing


office boy,

it.

hope when you

engage an
hat
boy,
iiDill

you will get the kind whose


is

come off! and his name


I

But mine
is

really quite a nice

Bobbie. (He'd rather be called

Bob.)

wish that

his hat

would come

off!

I make believe, when I'm at play, There is an office far away, And Mister China Doll goes there

And
I

sits

and dictates

in his chair.

made

the office by the door.

It's right

upon

my

play-room

floor.

[133]

HOW TO MAKE A DOLLS' HAMMOCK


Material

Required to

Make

Dolls'

Couch
box that

Hammock:
is

the lower half of any oblong

One seven or eight inches long will make a hammock for a doll the same length. Larger boxes may also be used. Some string is needed to make
deep.
ropes.

The

dolls'

couch

hammock
as

in the picture

is

easily

made. Your large dolls

well as the very small ones


tell

may have hammocks.


one?

Shall I

you how

to

make

Take

the lower half

that
it

is

usually the deeper


it

half of a

box

and

turn

so that

opens

at top.

From

the front rim, cut out a long lengthwise section

of the rim.

At each end of the box, run a string through a corner. Knot the two end strings that come on the ends of the box. Knot them together or tie them, so that
the
to

hammock may
it.

be suspended wherever you wish

place

[134]

HOW TO MAKE
You may make
tissue-paper over
of your box.

A DOLLS'

HAMMOCK
by folding
the shape
fit

a mattress for the couch

brown paper
still,

cut to

Better

you may make


cloth.

a real little

mattress from

some canvas or

Cut

the cloth

a little larger than twice the size of


it

your box.
with

Fold
bits of

and sew

it.

Then

stuff the mattress

paper torn
be

to shreds.

Pillows for the

hammock may

made in the same way, using smaller dimensions. You can hang the hammock under the railing on the porch, or fasten it to the rungs of a chair when
you play Indoors with
be delighted
to
it.

am

sure your dolls will

have you make

this for

them.

If

you

are a boy, you can

make one
to use

for your sister.

Boys

ought

to

know how

needle and thread as well

as girls.

Soldiers and sailors

know how
boy ought
is

to sew.

(I

know
that
is

man who

can do embroidery, but, of course,


far.)

going pretty

A
It

to

be able

to

sew

a mattress,

anyhow.

as easy as

making

marble-bag.
made
It's

a dollie's

hammock,

an easy thing to do: can make one, too

Just find an oblong cardboard box

And you

[135]

HOW TO MAKE A THEATER OR PUNCH


SHOW
Material Required to

Make

a Theater or

Punch
cover,

Show:

a deep, square letter-paper

box and

its

and some postal cards with colored views.

Would you like to make Show to play with? Shall

a toy theater or
I tell

Punch you how to make

one out of some deep, square box about eight inches


square and eight inches high?
First, take the

cover off your box and lay


it

it

aside.
its

Next, turn your box over so that


four rims and the bottom of the box

rests

upon

is

made

the top.
top, out-

Upon
line an

the

upper part of the box, near the


with your
ruler.

oblong about two inches from each corner of

the box.

Measure

it

Its

top should

be two inches from the top rim of the box.

The

whole should be about


inches
tall.

five

inches wide and three


in

(To guide you

drawing

this,

refer to

Diagram Nine, A^ page 183.) Cut this oblong you have drawn
[136]

at

both sides and

A DOLLS' THEATER OR PUNCH


along
its

SHOW

top line.

Bend

the cardboard inward to-

ward

the center of the box.

This will make the

"stage."

(See Diagram Nine, A, page 183.)

Just over the stage, in the upper rim of the box,


cut a two-inch wide opening the same length as you cut for the length of the stage below.
entirely, so that the little dolls

Cut

this

out

you intend

to use for

actors

may

be dropped on black strings through the


to

opening and made


(See

walk and dance on


183.)

the stage.

Diagram Nine, 5, page

Behind the opening over the


rim of the box long enough
postal card.
it,

stage, cut a slit in the

to slip

through a fancy

Slip

some pretty colored view through


stage.

and there will be the scenery for your


(See

You

may have
page 183.)

pictures of interiors as well as views, of

out-of-doors and houses.

Diagram Nine, C,

Now,
board.

cut a piece of cardboard the right size for a


its

sign for your theater, and print

name on
you

the cardsee
it

Glue

the sign over the stage as


It will serve to

in

the picture.

hide the

little

dolls'

entrance to the stage on their strings.

Last of

all,

place the cover of your letter-paper


its

box, face down, on

rim on the table or


[137]

floor,

and

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


put the theater or Punch
that there
front.
is

Show

well back upon

it

so

place for an audience of

little dolls in

(See

Diagram Nine, D, page


little

183.) dolls

Benches for the audience of

may
long,

be cut

from covers of boxes two and three inches


cutting benches, see

(For

Diagram

Six,

A^ page

175.)

Your wooden
I

actors

may

be penny

dolls, or

any jointed

dolls such as

you will find

in toy row-boats

at the ten-cent store.

used

to collect

fancy postal card views of

all

kinds of interesting places and give lectures on them


at

my theater.
There
is

It

was most fun of


to the

all, I

think.

had

performing Noah's Ark animals


too.

in vaudeville there,

no end

games you can play with

the theater.
I If

made

a lovely theater for


like, I'll tell

little dolls to-day.

you would

you how.

You. make

it

in this

way:

Right on the bottom of a box

a pasteboard box,
that's

you know

You draw

a square

with space each side;

where the stage


each side.

should go.

Now cut
Upon
Some

the square right at the top, and cut


it

it

down

the base, you bend

in.

It
!

cannot be denied

This makes a "really truly" stage

pretty colored postal cards of houses, and


in,

For scenery you use some views.


top.

To
And

put these

you cut a

slit

upon the box's

through a wider one,

in front, the dolls

on threads you drop.

[138]

The Punch and Judy


paper box and
the actor
is

or Little Dolls' Theater


its

is

made from

a deep letter-

cover.

The scenery

is

a fancy postal card

and

a doll.

The Merry-go-Round
a cardboard

is

roll

made from the covers of two round bandboxes, and penny cut-outs purchased at the children's

"penny store."

A DOLLS' THEATER OR PUNCH


This must be
just above the stage,

SHOW
see,

and wide and long, you


easily.

The actor You move

dolls, held in the

wings, can enter

the thread and

walk them round.

Mine

act all kinds

of things:

The fairy stories that I know; my sailor doll, here, And you can use the theater for fun in lots of ways
Give
lectures

sings.

on the postal views as well as acting plays.

[139]

HOW TO MAKE A TOY MERRY-GO-ROUND


Material Required to

Make

Toy Merry-gopenny cut-out

round: two round bandbox covers, or the two halves


of

some large round box,

a sheet of

pictures of horses or animals, and a cardboard mail-

ing-tube or a hoop-stick.

Everyone may own

a merry-go-round.

It

is

made

from two large round bandbox covers and


tube.

a mailing-

You

will also need

some pictures

of animals
five

or horses to use on the merry-go-round.

Four or

animals are enough


less.

to use.

A small

box will require

Cut-out pictures of Indians or cowboys


used on the merry-go-round.
these, horses cut

may

be

If

you cannot have

from cardboard will answer.

To

do

this, find a

clear outline of a horse in


it

some maga-

zine picture and trace

upon your cardboard. Then,


by drawing around

when it is you make


edge.

cut out, you will have a pattern to help


the other horses
its

[140]

HOW
out.

TO MAKE A TOY MERRY-GO-ROUND


as race-horses.

In the picture, the horses were each a penny cut-

They came

They

exactly fitted

the

bandbox merry-go-round
thin cardboard before

that I

made.

If

your cut-outs are upon thin paper, paste them

upon

you

start the

work

of

making
making

the toy

itself.

Let them dry while you are

the merry-go-round.
this, first

To

construct

take the cardboard mailingit

tube that you have (or the hoop-stick), and run

down through
Cut

the center of one


its

bandbox cover

as the

bandbox cover stands on


box cover, and press you

rims like a platform.

a small hole in the center of


this

your other bandthe cardboard


its

mailing-tube, a third of
as

down over the way down

length, just

see

it

in the picture.

Now,

take your animals


out.

mounted on

thin card-

board and cut each

Cut narrow half-inch


poles of the animals.

strips of

cardboard for the


at

Glue them

equal intervals
inside.

around the rim of the upper bandbox cover,

To

their bases, glue the animals.

When
Paper

you turn the top of the mailing-tube, the


twirl.

merry-go-round will
figures cut

from colored magazine pictures


[141]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


may
ride on the merry-go-round.

When

it is

made
and
the
to

in a smaller size, china dolls

wooden Noah's Ark animals cardboard strips to make very


With
I cut just

may ride on may be glued

it,

lifelike chargers.

two bandbox

covers,

I built a carousel;

some picture horses out

For chargers they did well!


I

gave some paper dolls a ride


I
tell

you,

it

is

fun!

make

believe a pleasure park

Is right here in the

sun!

[142]

MAKING A BOXCRAFT AUTOMOBILE


Material Required to Build a
a

Box Automobile:
a

one-pound candy box with cover,

sample candy

box

(oblong ten-cent size), one round box three

inches in diameter, about ten inches of cardboard

from which

to

cut wheels, four round-headed paper-

clips for wheel-hubs, a toothpick

and a round card-

board key-tag for steering gear, two metal buttons for


lamps.
It
is

not difficult to

make

box automobile, for


do
it.

nobody needs knowledge


scissors,

of mechanics to

Paste,

boxes

and

a pair of

hands

to

do the work,

these are all that

you will need. box forms the

The lower
body

half of the large oblong

of the car.

Take

the cover of the


if

box

off.

This
put

will be used later for the hood,

you care

to

one on.

Cut

off

each long inner side rim of


at

the

box

except for a corner

each end.
[143]

Leave the inner rim

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


of both ends
the
seat.

on the box untouched.


in front

This forms

windguard

and the back of the rear

Paste the cover tight on your small sample candy


box, and paste the box end to one end of the body of
the car

you are building.

This completes the shape

of the automobile.

Next, take your round box.

Remove

its

cover.

Cut

the cover in half.

This forms the wheel-guards

for rear wheels.

Paste each where the rear guards

should go.

Cut
to the

the lower half of the

box

in half also.

These

halves are wheel-guards for front wheels. Paste them

forward part of the automobile.


circles

Cut four
compass

from your cardboard.

Use your

to outline

them

in pencil

first.

Make

each

with a diameter of two inches.

When

these are cut, run the points of a round-

headed paper-fastener through the center of each,


and fasten the pointed prongs of the paper-fastener
to the

cardboard of the wheel-guards.


If

This secures

the wheels.
to.

you prefer, you may glue the wheels

the guards.
tires.

They should be
[i44l

painted with spokes

and

Boxcraft Automobile with hood made of a box cover.

Boxcraft Automobile made without hood.

MAKING A BOXCRAFT AUTOMOBILE

narrow box rim


to

is

glued between the wheel-

guards

make
to

the running-board.
to the front of the

Two

metal buttons are fastened

automobile

form the lamps.


is

A
itself

toothpick

pressed into the front of the box to

make

the rod of the wheel for steering.


is

The wheel
upon
the

round cardboard key-tag

fitted

other end of the toothpick.

The
of

front seat of the automobile


that
is

is

the end corner

some small box


of the car

fitted

crosswise into the

body
is

and glued

in place.

The

rear seat

an end of a small box

fitted in the

same manner

into the

body

of the car behind.


are.

Boxcraft automobiles are the best there

They

do not cost you a single penny!


very easy to make,
If
too.

Repairs are always

you care

to

add

hood

to the

automobile,

it

may

be made from the cover of your large box.

Cut the

front rim of the box cover down, and slant the long
sides of the cover dow^n to the

uncut end.

Paste an upright piece of cardboard about four


inches high behind your rear seat.
the higher end of the

To
be

its

top, glue

box cover.

Two

small strips of cardboard


[I4S]

may

fitted

under

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


the

hood above the front

seat to hold the

hood up

in

front.
I

painted the automobile that you see in the picture


ink.

with India

made

out of a

You could scarcely tell box when it was finished.

that

it

was

Three cardboard boxes little Have made a car for me:


It
is

else

a boxcraft model,

And it's jolly as can be! The little Boxville people


Can go
touring
in

this car;

The)' have splendid

picnic

parties

Where

the groves of clothes-pins are!

[146]

HOW TO FURNISH A
Material

DOLL-HOUSE
Furniture for a
all

Required to

Make

Doll-house: cardboard boxes of

kinds, especial-

ly flat letter-paper boxes, jeweler's boxes, correspond-

ence-card boxes.
in

Pencils and spools


of the furniture.
at the pictures of

may

be of help

making some

When

you look

my
all

boxcraft doll-

house, you will see

how

well

it

was furnished.

All

the chairs and tables, and the bed


are in the pictures

the things that

are

cut

from cardboard boxes.

You have just such boxes as I used, I am sure. Every home has them. Shall I tell you how the furniture is made? First, I will tell you how I made the bedroom, shall I? The old-fashioned canopy bedstead is made from a candy box and its cover. The four posts are long pencils. One pencil is run through each corner of the lower half of the box and glued tight. Then the
cover
is

placed upon the upper ends of the pencils

to

make

a canopy.

Lace-paper
[147]

is

pasted around the

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


rims of the cover.
a lace-paper pillow.
I I

made tissue-paper sheets and You can do that, too.

made a tall bureau from eight empty matchboxes. The match-boxes were safety-match boxes with tiny drawers that are made to slide in and
out.
I

saved

till

had eight boxes.


these

Then,

I I

glued
glued

four, one on top of the other,


in the

and four others

same way.

When
legs,

were

dry, I pasted

my
a

two

sets together.

This made the upper part of the


I cut a

bureau.

To make
Diagram

low bench from


its

small box cover and pasted the boxes to

top.

(For

bench, see

Six, yf

page 175.)

sewed shoe-

buttons to each drawer to


is

make
it

a handle.

The mirror
at the

a piece of

cardboard cut oblong and pasted


so that
is

back of the bureau


a

upright.

I painted
to

frame around the

sides of the

cardboard
is

make

it

look like a mirror.


lace-paper.
a

The bureau cover

a strip of

The

candle and candlestick came off

birthday cake.

The wash-stand
about
a bench, only that
is

is

cut from the lower half of a box


It
is

five inches long.


its

cut almost as

if it

were

legs are shorter.

The

"splasher"

a piece of

cardboard pasted upright

at the

back of

the box.

[148]

Boxcraft Bedroom furniture.

Boxcraft Table and Chairs.

Mantel and

Settle

made from cardboard

boxes.

Piano and Grandfather's Clock made from boxes.

HOW
Almost

TO FURNISH A DOLL-HOUSE
all

chairs

made were
Each

cut

from narrow

box covers and jewelers' hat-pin boxes.

One

hat-pin
one.

box will make two


(For
chair, see

chairs.

half

makes

Diagram

Six, C,

page 177.)
chairs.

Hat-pin

boxes will
covers

make high-backed
other kinds.

Other box

make

When you

cut an ordinary

chair with a low back, begin to cut the rim from the
side of

your box near the center on one long

side.

When
rim

you make

a chair

from

a hat-pin box, cut the

off

your box two thirds of the way around,

leaving one end only with the rim on.

The

part

without rim

is

the back of the chair.

Press that up-

ward, and cut the legs of the chair from the end that
has a rim left
I

upon

it.

made

a grandfather's clock
I

by standing
spend

a hat-pin

box on end.
of a

glued

to its

upper front part the face


to

penny watch. You do not need

penny.
it

Just

mark

the face of a clock in pencil and glue

to

the front of your clock.

Really, I

am

very proud of the piano.

It

is

not

every doll-house that can have a piano

but you can


as fountain

make

one, for

it

is

easy.

You

will need a shallow

letter-paper box and a

narrow box such

pens come in from the store where they are bought.


[149]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Paste one long side of the narrow box across the front
or back of the letter-paper box after you have stood
the letter-paper

box upright. The narrow box should


Six, F,

be placed about where you think the keyboard belongs.

(See

Diagram

page

179, for

making a
a bit of

piano from two boxes.)

The

music-rest

is

folded box rim glued to the central part of the piano

above the keyboard. The keyboard

marked ofif with ink upon a strip of white paper and pasted upon the top of the narrow box. You can easily draw the first
is

part of some music that you know, and place


tiny sheet of white

it

on a

paper

to

make

a "piece" for the

piano's music-rest.

mantel for the living-room

may

be

made from
Cut from

a flat letter-paper box.

Stand the box upon one long

rim and place

its

printed side to the back.

the front a mantel opening like the opening for a

Diagram Six, G, page 180.) The Morris chair is made like any other chair. (See Diagram Six, C, page 177, for cutting a chair from a box.) It has two bent box rims glued to each side to make the arm rests, and the cardboard is cut
fireplace.

(See

rounding from the front rim of the box


legs.

in cutting

its

[150]

HOW TO
I

FURNISH A DOLL-HOUSE
little

made

very cute
It

cupboard for
easily

my

doll-

house dining-room.

was

made.
is

You

can

make one out


row margin

of any shallow
all

box that

like a spool

box, by cutting out

of

its

front rim excepting a narits

left all the

way around

front cover. I

cut some strips of cardboard and fitted


inside of this

them

across the
shelves.

box and glued them

to

make

Lace-paper made the shelf-paper.


bottles

Metal corks from


silver-

and cold-cream tubes made mugs and

ware.

Plates for the dining-room were circles cut

from cardboard.

sideboard

may be made from


this in half
If

half of a letter-

paper box, cutting

lengthwise.

Then
the

cut this half the box as

you were making a high


in the at

bench.
legs.

Do

not cut far

up

box rim
front.

to

make

Cut them curving


It

the

Outline a

drawer and cupboard doors upon the


a plate-rack at back.
is

front,

and paste

the cover of a

narrow box

glued behind the

buffet.

Of
best.

all

my

doll-house furniture, I like the kitchen


If I

It looks so homelike.
I

were

a little doll,

know

should love to go Into that kitchen and


stove.
Is

make

candy on the

The

stove

would be such fun! made from an oblong candy box cut


It

[151]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


like a bench.

At two
knobs.

sides of

its

front, I cut

oven

doors and put round-headed paper-fasteners through

them

to

make

The prongs

of each paper-

fastener, bent,

make

latch for oven doors.

At

the

back of each oven door, right inside the box,


a small

I pasted

box and made a


it!

real little oven.

could put

dishes in

The
on
it.

boiler in the kitchen

is

the kind of round tin


in.

they use to pack blue-print paper


a spool after I

I stood
ofif

mine
from
you

washed the printed paper

You You

can use an old baking-powder

tin,

if

have no blue-print paper box.


can see

how

the kitchen sink


a

is

made

merely
At

box cover placed over the end of

deeper box.

the back of the

box paste an upright piece of card-

board.
a

The

faucets are

made from

the two ends of

kid

hair-curler
^

pressed

through the cardboard

downward.

The
long

kitchen table
It

is
is

the lower half of a correspond-

ence-card box.
legs.

cut as

if it

were
see

bench with
Six,

(For cutting the bench,

Diagram
in

A, page 175.)

You

will have a very


if

good time playing

your

doll-house,

you make one.

You

can make a four-

[52]

Boxcraft Doll-house Furniture.

The Dining-room.

Boxcraft Kitchen Furniture for

dolls.

Stove, table, and sink are

all

boxes.

The

boiler

is

a tin

box upon

a spool.

HOW
their sides.

TO FURNISH A DOLL-HOUSE
Put two upon the
floor

roomed house from four large bandboxes placed on


and glue the
other two
to their tops.

Of

course,

you will not need


will

to use the covers of the boxes.

Each bandbox

make a room. You can use strips of wall-paper for carpets and rugs. You can cut windows in the bandboxes. When
you have furnished the doll-house,
like a real little
I
it

will be quite

home.
furniture with ink.
If

painted

my

you paint

yours, be careful to put newspapers

down under your


your brush
as

work, and be very, very careful


dry
as

to use

you

can.

In

this

way your work


it.

will be evenly

colored.

Let the furniture dry thoroughly before


to

you attempt
paint
it

play with

If

you

like,

you may

with water-color paints.


Little boxes
I

make such fun!


dollies' bed,

can use each tiny one!

have made a

And
Oh, Oh,

a mantel, painted

red! too!

Bureaus, chairs,
I

a table,

have some work to do!


think that
it

is

gay,

Making

furniture this

way!

[53]

HOW TO MAKE THE BOXCRAFT


"RINGFLING"
Material Required to

GAME,
the deep

Make

"Ringfling"

lower half of

box over seven inches square, four

long pencils, and about twelve square inches of cardboard.

Ringfling

is

a jolly
it.

game.

am

sure you will


as

enjoy playing

As many children

can play
first

happily together
of the

may

play the game.

The

rule

"The more, the merrier!" It takes but a moment to collect materials with which to play the game. The game itself may be

game

is,

made in about ten minutes Take the deep lower half


and draw from corner
figure in
to

or
of

less.

some large square box


its

corner across

top.

(See
this

Diagram Eleven, A^ page


lines.

185.)

Do

with heavy pencil

Number

each section of the board but one, using


i, 2,

thenumerals,
section blank.

3 (one

numeral each).

Leave one

[>S4]

The Boxcraft Game

of "Ringfling."'

It

is

made with

the help of pencils

and cardboard cut from box covers.

THE BOXCRAFT GAME, "RINGFLING"


Cut
a ring

from cardboard, using


it first.

compass or
it

saucer to guide you in drawing


three inches in diameter.

Make

about

(See

Diagram Eleven, D,
a smaller ring just

page

185, for cutting ring.)

Make
it

like this larger one,

and cut

in the

very same way.

Take your pencils.


section

Press the point of one into each


at
its

of

the

game-board

center near the

numeral you have drawn.


pencils

Press the points of the


to

down

first,

and be careful

keep each hole

small, so that the pencil will not slip too far


in
it.

down

The

tops of all pencils should be of an even

height, as you see

them

in the picture.

Here

are the rules of the

game:

Players play in turn. Players count out


to see

who

will begin the

game and who


Each play

will follow.

consists of a turn to

throw the large

ring and the small ring.

The

object of play

is

to

have the ring tossed

fall so that it circles

about a pencil.
it

When
The

a ring circles a pencil,

gives the player


that section.

the count of the

number

that

is

upon

small circle doubles the count.

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Twelve counts win
obtain this wins.
to

the game.

The
it

first

to

You may make


rounds.

eighteen

make a longer game. The game is played in


it
is

To

avoid

dis-

pute,

best to keep the score of all players

with pencil and paper.

Each player must stand


the

five ruler lengths

from

game when he
When
I

flings the circles.

am
I

playing

little

games,

I like to

do what's right;
do not win the game,

And when
1 try to

be polite!

['56]

THE GAME OF "SHOOT THE CHUTES"


Material Required to

Make
its

the

Game

of "Shoot

the Chutes": a long box and

cover, and one high

box without a cover


This
little

some

spools.

game may be played by two players. It is an easy game to make, as you can see by looking at the picture. It is made of two parts of
boxcraft

one long box, with the lower half of another that


higher.
It
is

is

played with spools.


first

To make
long box
as

the game,

cut the lower half of your

you
its
it.

see

it

cut in the picture.

Make two

openings in
roll

rim, each

wide enough

to let a spool

through

Stand
it

this

part of the box upon the

floor as

you

see

placed

in the picture.

Now, you
cover's rim

are ready to

make
at

the chutes.
at

Cut

the

the rim of the long box


part of the long

each corner,

and press the cardboard out


Rest
this

each end.
in a slanting position

box

against your high box.

[57]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Paint four spools.

Make two
to

red and two blue.

Two
box.

of the

same color belong


is

each player.

The game
the chutes,
it

to try to get

your two spools into the

Every time you get

a spool in

by rolling

it

down

counts you one count.

Players play in turn, one spool at a time.

The

game

is

played in rounds.

The

first

player to reach

the score of seven wins.

made

this little

game

myself,

All on a rainy day!


It

made some

jolly fun for

me.

And

passed the time away.

[1^8]

THE BOXCRAFT GAME,


CATCH-YOU"
Material Required to

"ONE-TWO-I-

Make "One-Two-I-Catchis

You"

a square
light.

box cover and two buttons, one dark


counter
a

and one

The

round pill-box.

(A

square pill-box will do as well.)

This boxcraft game of "One-Two-I-Catch-You"


is

like a

board.

game of tag. As it is not so

It

is

a tag

game on

gameit

noisy a game, you can play

in the house.

To make
your
ruler.

the board to play on, take your pencil and

Rule a

line

from corner

to

corner across
a line that

the inside of the

box cover.

Then, rule

will cross the center of the box, and another that


crosses the center

from the other

side.

This makes
Paint the

the

triangular

divisions of the board.

triangles, alternating, black or blue.

Leave the ones


186.)

between, white.

(See

Diagram Twelve, page

Find your buttons now.

Two

players are to play

[159]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


this

game.
its

You

will need a pill-box for a counter.


tight,

Glue

cover on

and put
its

number one on
to see

its

top and a

number two on
and

base.

Play

in turn,

toss the

counter

how

far

you

can move.
that
is

When

the counter falls, take the

number

on

its

top and

move

as

many

triangles in either

direction as the counter indicates.

Each player
begin the game.

takes a different colored button to

Each button

is

placed in an opposite
try to catch

corner of the board.

Each player must


is

the other player by getting onto his triangle.


to

The

first

catch the other player three times

winner.

Throw

the counter,

Happily,

Who

is

winner.

Let us see!

Button here

And

button there,

I will catch

you!

Just take care!

[i6o]

'Funny Mr. Box," a Boxcraft Game, played with spools.

'One-Two-I-Catch-You," a Boxcraft Game of Tag.

THE FUNNY GAME OF "MISTER BOX"


Material Required to
:

Make

the

Funny Game

of

"Mister Box" one large box with a cover


lar to a shoe-box

one simi-

two or three
is

spools.

Allow me
Box.

to

introduce to you
jolly.

He
in.

is

funny and he
if

my friend Mister He likes to catch


as to

spools in his mouth,

you will be so kind

throw

them
him.

Mister Box

is

I will tell

You can make a game like you how. You will need an empty
game.
It

box about the


cover.

size of a shoe-box.

should have a

Two

or three players

may
to

play the game.

Each

will need an

empty spool
blue; one

play the game with.

Each player may color

his spool a different color.

One may be
if

there are three

may be players, may be


tight.

red; and the third,


green.

Now,

to

make Mister Box.


[i6i]

Place your box on

end and glue the cover

Next, take your pencil

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


and draw a big face on the back of the box.
the

Make

mouth

large and round.


to

Cut out

the cardboard

inside the

mouth
you

make

a big

round hole about four

inches wide.
crayons,
if

You
like.

can color Mister Box with your

His hair should be brown, and

his eyes too.

Now,

to

play the game, every player must stand,

in turn, in the

same place on the carpet or

floor rug,

four feet from the box.


to get this.

Measure four
player

ruler lengths

Each must

try to get his spool into

Mister

Box.
till all

Toss the spool.

No

may

touch his spool

have finished playing the round.

The

first

one

to get his spool into

Mister Box six times wins.


win a game
I

When
This
is

at play,

what

always say:

'You
If I

will

win another day!"

do not win to-day,


is

This

what

hope

I'll

say:

"I have had a splendid play!"

[162]

HOW TO MAKE A MAGIC BOX


Material Required to

Make

a Magic Box: two

small oblong boxes with covers that slide over an


inner drawer.
a half long.

Both boxes must be about an inch and

Both must be duplicates of each


of light twine are needed.

other.

About two yards

The magic box is truly a wonderful one. It will obey every command you give it yes, it will! There is a secret that you will have to learn, but when you know this secret the little box will have to do just as

you bid

it.

The magic box is on a string. As it descends, you cry, "Halt!" The box stops at once. "Go on!" you cry. The box continues down the string. "Faster, faster!" The box fairly flies in its haste to get down
to the floor!

Wonderful!

Wonderful!
to

Now,

let

me

tell

you how

do

it.

(It

is

a trick,

of course!)

Find a small
of a toothpick.

stick,

round and smooth like a half

[163]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT


Take
fit

the sliding cover

from one

of your boxes,
it,

and

inside the drawer, across the center of

the piece
it.

of

wood

so that there

is

space under
at

it

and above

Next, make a small hole


of your box,

each end of the drawer

and thread some string through both under the


stick of

holes, letting the string pass in the drawer. (See

wood
187.)

Diagram Thirteen, A, page

Place the sliding cover on the box and


pass through
it

let the string

at

both ends. (See Diagram Thirteen,

B.)

The SECRET of your magic box is wood in the drawer. Tell nobody about
you hold one end of the string
end and keep the string
slightly,

the piece of
this.

When

in

your right hand,

place the toe of your shoe on the floor over the other
taut.

Then, loosen your hold

and carefully bring the box upon the string


your hand.
to

up

as far as

When
it less

you loosen the hold upon the string you will notice that the box

make

tight,

slides rapidly

down
tising,

the string;

when you hold


in

the string absolutely

taut, the

box remains firmly


just

one place.

By

prac-

you will find

how much
to

to loosen

your

hold on the string in order


wish.

make

the

box do

a^

you

[164]

HOW

TO MAKE A iMAGIC BOX


sees the

Anyone who

box performing

so

wondermagic.
first,

fully will not readily guess the secret of

its

Here
comes
it

the second box, that


into the play.

is

a duplicate of the
this

Arrange

second box as

if

were

the trick

box

except

for the stick through


to

the drawer.

When

your friends ask


one.

examine the

magic box, give them the second


your pocket.
pocket, slide
its

Keep both
you can

in

In putting the trick box into your

drawer

a little, so that

easily

distinguish between the two boxes

by feeling

of them.

When
that

you give the duplicate, nobody will suspect


not the real box,
if

it is

you manage
say.

cleverly.

"Wonderful!

Wonderful!" they
you have!"

"What

MAGIC BOX
I

made a magic trick box! Oh, you may make one, But do not tell the secret That I am telling you
little

too,

The
It
is

box will mind you,

Do

everything you say!


a magic trick box

treasury of play.

[i6s]

THE JOLLY BOOK

BOXCRAFT

lED
WINDOWS
Diagram One.
box
as the

Cut

the cardboard sides of your

heavy black

limes indicate.

Fold outward

upon
A.

the dotted lines.

plain

window without
with blinds.

blinds or awning.

Cut
B.

the cardboard out on all four sides.

Window

Cut

the top line, the

center line, and the base.


lines.

Fold outward on the dotted

C.

Window with

awning. Cut side lines and base.


to

Bend cardboard outward and upward


awning over the window.

make

the

[1 66]

DIAGRAM

D
DOORS

Diagram Two.
sides as the

Cut

the cardboard of your

box

heavy black

lines indicate.
lines.

Fold outward

where there are dotted


A.
Single door.
at the base also).

Cut

at top

and side

(if

need be,
to

Fold the cardboard outward

make
B.
its

a door.

Double door.
Fold both

Cut

the square at top

and down

center.

(If need be, cut the base of the square


sections outward.
in
it.

also.)

C.

Door with window


Cut
it

Cut out

a square

from the single door.


Fold
outward.

the door at top

and

side.

[167]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

SIDE WALLS.

SLOPING ROOF. PLACE FOR OR TOWER

CHIMNEY

Diagram Three.

This shows the shape of the


to

cardboard pieces that are used

form

side walls

for a sloping roof; also the box cover roof placed in


position,

and the hole for

chimney.
to

A. Side walls of cardboard, glued

box ends.
Square cut
be inserted

AA. Box
through
its

cover placed on side walls.

out so that a box tower or chimney

may

opening.
[168]

DIAGRAM

GABLE ROOF.

TRIANGULAR SUPPORTS TO HOLD


Triangular cardboard

IT

Diagram Three.
roof

pieces

are cut and pasted to the upper part of a box to hold a

made from two interlapped box covers. B. Gable roof made from two box covers. BB. Triangular cardboard pieces cut to

fit

the

ends of a box and hold a gable roof.

[169]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

A SINGLE GABLE

ROOF.

BOX CUT GABLE ROOF

DOWN

TO HOLD

Diagram Three.
lengthwise, to

Gable

roof.

This

is

a piece of
its

cardboard cut oblong and folded through

center,

make
to

a slanting roof.
this roof

deep box
a

may

be cut

down

hold

and make

gabled

building.
C.

Cut where heavy black

lines indicate.

Roof cut from

a piece of plain

cardboard or

corrugated cardboard.

CC. Box cut down

to

make

the

low

sides

and

high-pointed gable ends of a small building.

[170]

DIAGRAM

ROUND-POINTED ROOF, TENT ROOF, INDIAN WIGWAM, AND CARDBOARD TENTS FOR CAMP

Diagram Three.
D.
edges X
to x.
is

Roofs.

Round-pointed roof cut from cardboard. Lap


This makes a tent
this
also.

The Indian
its

wigwam
center,
it

made
is

way.

E. This

wide box cover folded through


to the top

rim cut up

on each long

side.
is

Bent,

makes

a tent or tent-shaped roof.

This

like the

kennel roof.

[17']

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

^
RAMPARTS FOR A CASTLE OR
FORT.

A SMALL ROOF TO

PLACE OVER A PORCH

Diagram Three. Cut where


indicate.

the heavy black lines

F. Ramparts are cut from the rim of a box cover.

G.

porch roof

may

be

made by
it

taking the

cover of any shallow box and pasting

over the door-

way

of your building.

The porch

pillars are long

pencils run through holes cut in each forward corner

of the box cover.

[172]

DIAGRAM

BRIDGE

AND

R.R.

TUNNEL

Diagram Four.

By

cutting the ends or sides of

boxes, tunnels or bridges

may

be made.

Cut where

the heavy black line indicates.

A.

The bridge

is

made by

cutting a semicircle

from the long


cover, turned

sides of an inverted box.

upward, forms the bridge

The box railing. At


is

each end, cut the corners.


to

A cardboard strip

pasted

each end rim


B.

to

complete the bridge roadway.


is

The

tunnel

made by

cutting a circular open-

ing in the two ends of a deep box which has been


inverted.

[173]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

rTTU

PATTERN FOR WINDMILL SAILS

Diagram
Fold
to
it

Five.
its

Take

a square piece of paper.

through

center once.

Fold the two halves

make

quarters.

Draw

the outline

Z on

the piece
is

of paper folded into quarters, and cut this as

in-

dicated by the heavy black line.


pattern for the windmill
in cardboard.
sails,

This gives ZZ^ the


are cut

which

from

it

[174]

DIAGRAM

BENCH FORM AND BED


Diagram
A.
left of

Six.

Cut your box when


lines
is

it is

inverted

where the heavy black

show.
cutting to right and

bench form

made by

each corner of the lower half of an inverted

box.

Remove cardboard evenly from between these cuttings to make legs of the bench. AA. This is the cover of a box from which long
It
is

side rims are cut.

glued

to the

bench form

to

make head and

foot of a bed.

[>75]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

DIAGRAM

Diagram
its

Six, C.

To make

the chair, turn the


it

lower half or cover of your box so that


rims.

stands

upon

Cut where

the heavy black lines are

shown

in the diagram.

Fold the back of the chair upward


is

where

the dotted line

indicated.

[^77]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

TABLES

Diagram
legs in the

Six.

Tables are made from deep boxes

by inverting the lower half of the box and cutting


rim
as
is

shown by

the heavy black lines.

Small boxes, square or round, placed upon upright


spools will

form

tables, stools, stands.

D.

table cut

from

correspondence-card box.

Cut where
diagram.

the heavy black lines are

shown
and

in the

DD.
glued

round table made with

a spool

box

to its top.

[178]

DIAGRAM

SCHOOL DESK AND PIANO

Diagram
E.

Six.

Cut where the heavy black


at y.
is

lines

are indicated.

Glue

school desk

made by

standing the lower


of
its

half of a small oblong box

upon one
see a

long rims.
line

Cut

in the

box rim where you

heavy black
is

in the

diagram.

piece of box rim

fitted

below

the top of the desk inside the box to

make
to

a shelf.

F.

Glue

narrow box across


its

a larger

box that

is

placed upon one of

long sides at yy

make

a piano

with keyboard.
[179]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

FIREPLACE

AND MANTEL

Diagram

Six, G.

Stand any box you


its

may have
Cut
as

upright on one end or on one of

long rims.

from the front or back

of the

box an opening

shown by

the heavy black line in the diagram.

[.80]

DIAGRAM

PERGOLA

Diagram Seven.
inverted shoe-box.

The pergola The lower half


Cut

is

made from an
box
is

of the

used.

Cut

the bottom

from

the box, leaving a the ends as


lines.

narrow rim
in the

around the bottom.

shown

diagram by the heavy black

Mark

off pillars

upon
gram.

the long sides of

your box with pencil, and cut

these as

shown by

the heavy black lines of the diastrips are

Two

cardboard

glued lengthwise
left.

at

the top over the lengthwise edges

Strips of card-

board are crossed over the open top which was the
bottom of the box.

181I

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

ZOO OR CIRCUS CAGE

Diagram Eight. Cut

the cardboard box sides as

indicated by the heavy black line in the diagram.

Zoo

cages are cut on each side.

Circus cages are cut top


is

and bottom of the box, and the box

then placed
to
it.

upon one long rim

to

have wheels added

The

wheels for circus cages are cardboard

disks.

[182]

DIAGRAM

DOLLS'

THEATER OR PUNCH SHOW

Diagram Nine.
cover.

The

theater

is

made from
its

deep
its

square box placed to stand upon

rims,

upon

The opening

is

cut

upon one

side of the

box

and bent inward where the dotted line is shown. This B is the stage opening through which the is the stage.
dolls are let

down by black cord


Cut an opening
line.

to

walk upon

the

stage

and

act.

like this

shown

in the
slit

diagram by the heavy black


back of the stage opening.
scenery
is let

shows the

Through

this,

postal-card

down upon

the stage.

[183]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

SLEIGH AND SLED

Diagram Ten. A. A sled is made by


rims.

cutting the cover or lower

half of a box that has been placed to stand

upon

its

Rims

are cut

ofif

at

each end of the box or


the runners.

cover.

The

long rims

make

Cut the

rims where you see heavy black lines in the diagram.

B.

sleigh top

is

added

to a sled

by cutting the

cover of a box
sleigh.

to the

shape of the upper part of a

The lower

half of the

same box makes runto

ners for the sleigh.

Glue the cover

these.

In

cutting your box follow the heavy lines indicated in

diagram.
[184]

THE GAME-BOARD AND RINGS FOR A BOXCRAFT GAME


Diagram Eleven. A. This is the way
corner of the box upon

''RINGFLING/'

to

draw

the sections for the

game-board of "Ringfling."
its

top.

Draw from corner to Number one section


i

Number
B.

another

2.

Number

another

3.

Leave one
the one
is

section blank.

Cut two

rings

from cardboard

like

shown.
diagram.

Cut where

the heavy black line

in the

Make

one ring smaller than the other.


[185]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

N.

DIAGRAM

THE MAGIC BOX


Diagram
sliding cover

Thirteen. This shows a small box with

which draws over an inner drawer.

A
B
is

is

the drawer.

At

its

center, crosswise, there

is

piece of stick fitted into the box.


at either
is

Holes are pierced

end of the drawer.

the

box ready for

its

magic

play.

Its

drawer
is

replaced within the sliding cover.

The box

strung upon a yard or so of string.


[187]

THE JOLLY BOOK OF BOXCRAFT

Here's our

last

page!

We

say good-bye-

But we

To

some other day build within this Magic Land


will meet

And

be good comrades in our play.

THE END

[t88]

Related Interests