Non Conventional Renewable Energy Development in Sri Lanka - Role of the CEB as a Facilitator

Noel Priyantha Chief Engineer (Renewable Energy)

Ceylon Electricity Board 20 February, 2014

Introduction
 

Sri Lanka Power Sector
Present Policies on Non Conventional Renewable

Energy (NCRE)
   

Conventional & Non Conventional power plants NCRE Development in Sri Lanka Limitations & Current Issues Future of NCRE

Sri Lanka Power Sector
 

 

Ministry of Power & Energy Ministry of P & E Ceylon Electricity Board (CEB) Lanka Electricity Company (LECO) Independent Power LECO CEB Producers (IPP) Regulator: Public Utilities Commission of Sri Lanka Gen. Tr. Dist. (PUCSL) Dist. Sri Lanka Sustainable Energy Authority (SEA)

PUCSL Regulator

SEA

IPP

Sri Lanka Power Sector
    

Country population – 21.4 million (July 2011 estimated) No. of electricity customers – 4.9 million Household Electrification Level – 94 % Gross Generation – 11,801 GWh Maximum Demand – 2146 MW (2012)

Sri Lanka electricity demand
Average Growth Rate: 6.5 % Year Demand (GWh) Gross* Losses (%) Generation (GWh) Peak (MW)

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025

11402 12149 12941 13773 14630 15530 16481 17489 18563 19708 20932 22242 23647

14.9 15.1 15.1 15.1 14.8 14.6 14.4 14.3 14.6 14.4 14.3 14.2 14.2

13402 14315 15238 16220 17168 18188 19257 20397 21741 23019 24436 25922 27559

2688 2853 3035 3211 3397 3604 3820 4051 4258 4513 4796 5092 5418

Ceylon Electricity Board (CEB)
 

CEB established by the Sri Lanka Act No. 17 of 1969
CEB is a Statutory Body responsible for Generation, Transmission & Distribution of electricity in Sri Lanka CEB is a vertically integrated power utility until 1997 with a monopoly on Generation, Transmission & Distribution

In 1997 Generation was opened for Private Sector (IPP) – This is based on the GOSL policy

Power Sector Policy Directions 1997
 

Hydro power generation potential of the country will be developed to its full potential All large scale hydro power generation facilities are to be remain under the governmental control (i.e CEB) Private sector financing will be utilized for power generation from renewable energy sources ( development of small power plants maximum capacity up to 10 MW per project)

Sri Lanka National Energy Policy

National Energy Policy Target: 10 % of grid electricity from the Non Conventional Renewable Energy (NCRE) by 2015

“Mahinda Chinthana – Future Vision” 20 % of grid electricity from NCRE by 2020

Conventional

Non Conventional

Hydro with Reservoir, Thermal Power Firm, Dispatchable

Mini Hydro, Wind, Solar Non Firm, Non Dispatchable

Installed capacity in MW (as at 31/12/2012) including IPP plants
Conventional power plants
CEB Hydro 1357

CEB Thermal - Oil CEB Thermal - Coal IPP Thermal TOTAL

544 300 784 2,985 MW

Source: CEB Statistical Digest 2012

Classification of Non Conventional Renewable Energy Plants

Grid Connected :
Connected to the integrated electricity distribution grid and deliver electricity exclusively to the grid

Off- Grid : Operate in isolation

NCRE Technologies

 

Mini Hydro Wind


 

Biomass (Dendro)
Municipal Solid Waste

Solar
Heat Recovery

Waste

CEB standard documents to the private sector investors
 

Guidelines for Private Sector Participation in NCRE projects Standardized Power Purchase Agreement (SPPA) for NCRE projects CEB Guide for Grid Interconnection of Embedded Generators (December 2000) – GRID CODE

CEB facilitation role as a energy purchaser
   


 

Issue of “Letter of Intent” to build up the confidence of the private sector investor Facilitate interconnection arrangements Sign SPPA - to attract investments (This is a bankable document) Facilitate to get Tax Exemptions introduced by the GOSL (Ex: VAT, NBT exemption) Allow developer to build the interconnection facilities under CEB supervision Witnessing the Testing & Commissioning Payments as per SPPA terms

Present Status of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy (NCRE) Sector as at 31st December 2013
No 1. Description Commissioned Projects Project Type Mini Hydro Power Biomass-Agricultural & Industrial Waste Power Biomass- Dendro Power Solar Power Wind Power Total - Commissioned 2. Standardized Power Purchase Agreements (SPPA) Signed Projects Mini Hydro Power Wind Power Biomass-Agricultural & Industrial Waste Power Biomass-Dendro Power Biomass-Municipal Waste No. of Projects 128 2 2 4 10 146 55 5 2 10 1 Capacity (MW) 270.932 11.000 5.500 1.378 78.450 367.260 134.640 41.100 4.000 56.770 10.000

Total – SPPA Signed

73

246.510

Annual Energy Contribution from NCRE
800

6.8% 6.3% 6.3%
700

600

Percentage from Total Generation
5.5%

500

Energy GWh

4.4%
400

3.7% 3.5%
300

3.2% 2.6%

200

1.5% 1.6%
100

1.0% 0.6%

0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Year

Daily Load Profile : 25 October 2013
2500

MW
2000

1500

1000

500

0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24

Hrs

Limitations of absorption of NCRE
 

NCRE absorption limit (considering the total power system and load profile) Grid substation absorption limit – 31.5 MVA transformer can absorb only 25 MW of NCRE projects Line limitations – need augmentation of lines & construction of long lines

Impacts on the Power System
– – – – Stability Issues Operational Issues Safety Issues Power Quality Issues

Electricity Network with Distributed Generation

What are the solutions ?
 Improvement of National Load Profile (may be with the current development program of the country)  Augmentation of grid substations to absorption of NCRE  Introduction of NCRE collector GSS ( already done in Puttalam to absorb wind power)  Construction of long lines to absorb NCRE (need a policy decision)

Future: Interconnection options India and Sri Lanka

Net Metering

Sri Lanka introduced the net metering system to electricity customers

Maximum capacity limit – 42 kVA (Good News – extended up to 1 MVA)
Difficult to promote due to high cost of Solar PV

CEB/SPPA.bst

Thank You
Ceylon Electricity Board
Web: www.ceb.lk

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