STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE

LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 1.a. – Students know how to relate the position of an element in the periodic table to its atomic number and atomic mass. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 1.a. Show the representation of Mendeleev’s original periodic table of elements. Compare and contrast this arrangement with that of the modern periodic table. 1.b. Visual Strategy— Discuss with students all the main regions and classification on the periodic table. 1.c. Video—Comparing Reactivities of Alkali Metals and Alkaline-Earth Metals. Chemical Activity of Metals Lab 1.d. Lecture or class discussion on valence electrons. Brainstorming. Conductivity of molecular and ionic compounds (lab). 1.e. Draw and explain the atomic structure. . Bingo activity to learn the elements. 1.d. Journal entries. Homework and lab report. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 1.a. Quiz on the differences and similarities between Mendeleev’s periodic table and the modern periodic table 1.b. Worksheet assessment

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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1.b. – Students know how to use the periodic table to identify metals, semimetals, non-metals, and halogens. 1.c. – Students know how to use the periodic table to identify alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metals, trends in ionization energy, electronegativity, and the relative sizes of ions and atoms. 1.d. – Students know how to use the periodic table to determine the number of electrons available for bonding. 1.e. – Students know the nucleus of the atom is much smaller than the atom yet contains most of its mass.

1.c. Class discussion and oral presentation and lab report.

1.e. Classroom presentation on the atomic models

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 1.f. – Students know how to use the periodic table to identify the lanthanide, actinide, and transactinide elements and know that the transuranium elements were synthesized and identified in laboratory experiments through the use of nuclear accelerators. 1.g. – Students know how to relate the position of an element in the periodic table to its quantum electron configuration and to its reactivity with other elements in the table. 1.h. – Students know the experimental basis for Thomson’s discovery of the electron, Rutherford’s nuclear atom, Millikan’s oil drop experiment, and Einstein’s explanation of the photoelectric effect. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 1.f. Worksheet activities and Video. Compare and contrast transuranium elements and nontransuranium elements. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 1.f. Quiz 1.f. Research paper.

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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1.g. Teach and explain the electron configuration pattern (orbital notation). Flame test demonstration.

1.g. Group activity – identity the s,p,d,f block in the periodic table. Lab report

1.h. Application— Discuss and analyse Thomson’s Experiment, The Photoelectric Effect, Rutherford’s Foil Experiment, and Einstein contributions to the modern atomic theory.

1.h. Journal entries. Test.

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 1.i. – Students know the experimental basis for the development of the quantum theory of atomic structure and the historical importance of the Bohr model of the atom 1.j. – Students know that spectral lines are the result of transitions of electrons between energy levels and that these lines correspond to photons with a frequency related to the energy spacing between levels by using Planck’s relationship (E=hv). Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 1.i. Review and reinforcement of the Quantum Theory; Explain Bohr’s model Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 1.i. Oral Presentation Quiz

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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1.j.—Explain the electromagnetic spectrum and the significance of wavelength and frequency. Laboratory Investigation Spectral Analysis of Fluorescent Lights.

1.j. Group discussion Lab report

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR CHEMICAL BONDS LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 2. a. Students know atoms combine to form molecules by sharing electrons to form covalent or metallic bonds or by exchanging electrons to form ionic bonds. 2.b. Students know chemical bonds between atoms in molecules such as H 2 , CH 4 , NH 3 , H 2 CCH 2 , N 2 , Cl 2 , and many large biological molecules are covalent. 2.c. Students know salt crystals, such as NaCl, are repeating patterns of positive and negative ions held together by electrostatic attraction. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 2.a. Explain covalent bonding and the characteristics of covalent bonding. KWL Activity 2.b. Explain chemical bonding and why most atoms form chemical bonds. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 2.a. Oral presentation; Worksheet on Covalent Bonding

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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2.b. Teacher-directed questions

2.c. Lab Activity— Students identify electrolytes from a group of compounds (ionic and molecular compounds).

2.c. Lab report, quiz, and journal writing

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR CHEMICAL BONDS LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 2.d. Students know the atoms and molecules in liquids move in a random pattern relative to one another because the intermolecular forces are too weak to hold the atoms or molecules in a solid form. 2.e. Students know how to draw Lewis dot structures. 2.g.* Students know how electronegativity and ionization energy relate to bond formation. 2.f.* Students know how to predict the shape of simple molecules and their polarity from Lewis dot structures. 2.h.* Students know how to identify solids and liquids held together by Van der Waals forces or hydrogen bonding and relate these forces to volatility and boiling/melting point temperatures. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 2.d. Teacher-directed discussion. Explain the heating curve for phase changes from ice to water vapor. 2.e. Explain the six basic steps in drawing Lewis dot structures. 2.g. Classify bonding type according to electro negativity differences. 2.f. Student activities using molecular models 2.h.Laboratory Investigation— Properties of Ionic and Covalent Bonds How many drops of water could you pile on a panny? Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 2.d.. Response from students Lab report

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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2.e. Assess students’ drawings . 2.g. Worksheet and group activity 2.f. Outcome of student activities 2.h. Lab report

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR CONSERVATION OF MATTER AND STOICHIOMETRY LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 3.a. Students know how to describe chemical reactions by writing balanced equations. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 3.a. Describe five basic types of chemical reactions—synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, double replacement, and combustion. 3.a. Steps in writing balanced chemical equations 3.b. Explain the mole concept. 3.b. Lab Activity—Moles and Mass in a Reaction 3.c. Explain the mole concept. 3.c. Lab Activity—Moles and Mass in a Reaction 3.d. Solving stoichiometric problems; peer tutoring 3.d. Lab Activity—Moles of Iron and Copper Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 3.a. Journal writing Class practice Work sheet Test

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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3.b. Students know the quantity one mole is set by defining one mole of carbon 12 atoms to have a mass of exactly 12 grams. 3.c.Students know one mole equals 6.02 X 10 23 particles (atoms or molecules).

3.b. Lab assessment

3.c. Group activity in calculation moles. Lab assessment

3.d. Students know how to determine the molar mass of a molecule from its chemical formula and a table of atomic masses and how to convert the mass of a molecular substance to moles, number of particles, or volume of gas at standard temperature and

3.d. Homework, classwork, quiz, and lab report

pressure.

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR CONSERVATION OF MATTER AND STOICHIOMETRY LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 3.e. Students know how to calculate the masses of reactants and products in a chemical reaction from the mass of one of the reactants or products and the relevant atomic masses. 3.f.* Students know how to calculate percent yield in a chemical reaction. 3.g.* Students know how to identify reactions that involve oxidation and reduction and how to balance oxidation-reduction reactions. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 3.e. Solving stoichiometric problems; peer tutoring 3.e. Lab Activity—Moles of Iron and Copper 3.f. Solving stoichiometric problems; peer tutoring 3.f. Lab Activity—Moles of Iron and Copper 3.g. Experiment— Explore the effect of adding oxygen to a solution of methylene blue and glucose 3.g. Explore how different metals react with a weak acid. 3.f. Homework, classwork, quiz, and lab report Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 3.e. Homework, classwork, quiz, and lab report

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
Exceeds Achieves Approaches

3.g. Lab report

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR GASES AND THEIR PROPERTIES LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 4.a. Students know the random motion of molecules and their collisions with a surface create the observable pressure on that surface. 4.b. Students know the random motion of molecules explains the diffusion of gases. 4.c. Students know how to apply the gas laws to relations between the pressure, temperature, and volume of any amount of an ideal gas or any mixture of ideal gases. 4.d. Students know the values and meanings of standard temperature and pressure (STP). Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 4.a. Lecture and transparencies on Kinetic Molecular Theory. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 4.a. Students write a comparison of the pressure, temperature, volume relationships. 4.b. Journal entry requiring students to explain the process of diffusion. 4.c. Test

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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4.b. Diffusion experience using bottles of perfumes placed in one area of the room. 4.c. Practice problems in calculating gas laws including the Ideal Gas Law. Molar Volume of a Gas (Lab) 4.d. Use visual (cube) to explain the STP conditions of gases, including temperature, pressure, volume, moles and Avogadro’s number. Same as 4c lab. 4.e. Practice problems

Lab activity and lab report. 4.d. Quiz.

4.e. Students know how to

4.e. Homework in solving

convert between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales.

Temperature vs. Time Lab (involving conversions of temperature units and graphing)

temperature conversions. Oral Presentation. Lab report.

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR GASES AND THEIR PROPERTIES LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 4.f. Students know there is no temperature lower than 0 Kelvin. 4.g.* Students know the kinetic theory of gases relates the absolute temperature of a gas to the average kinetic energy of its molecules or atoms. 4.h.* Students know how to solve problems by using the ideal gas law in the form PV = nRT. 4.i.* Students know how to apply Dalton’s law of partial pressures to describe the composition of gases and Graham’s law to predict diffusion of gases. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 4.f. Class discussion. Use transparency to show the value of absolute zero (0 Kelvin) 4.g. Analyze and interpret graph showing the absolute temperature. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 4.f. Journal entry

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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4.g. Group discussion and oral pressentation

4.h. Practice problems

4.h. Quiz/Test

4.i. Analyzing situations and solving problems that require the Dalton’s Law, Graham’s law of diffusion, and relate these concepts to real life situations. Diffusion of Gas Lab

4.i. Lab Report

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR ACIDS AND BASES LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 5.a. Students know the observable properties of acids, bases, and salt solutions. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 5.a. Lecture, discussion, and transparencies showing properties of acids and bases Explore; Class demonstration using acids, bases, and salts. Determining the strengths of acids and bases. 5.a. Lab activity:The pH Lab 5.b. Lecture, discussion, and transparencies showing properties of acids and bases Explore; Class demonstration using acids, bases, and salts. 5.c. Lecture, discussion, and transparencies showing properties of acids and bases. Explore; Conductivity of Acids and Bases 5.c. Lab activity: CBL (computer based lab) 5.d. Same as 5a and 5c Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 5.a. pH scale using household solutions or substances. Lab report.

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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5.b. Students know acids are hydrogen-ion-donating and bases are hydrogenion-accepting substances. 5.c. Students know strong acids and bases fully dissociate and weak acids and bases partially dissociate.

5.b. Quiz

5.c. Review and Reinforcement Defining acids and bases Determining the strengths of acids and bases. 5.c. Comparing Acid/Base Strength Lab Report 5.d Same as 5a and 5c

5.d. Students know how to

use the pH scale to characterize acid and base solutions. 5.e.* Students know the Arrhenius, Brønsted-Lowry, and Lewis acid–base definitions. 5.f.* Students know how to calculate pH from the hydrogen-ion concentration. 5.g.* Students know buffers stabilize pH in acid–base reactions.

5.e. Lectures. Use of transparencies. 5.f. Lectures and demonstration measuring different acids’ strength Titration 5.g. Lectures Demonstration using buffer solutions to explain the role of the buffer.

5.e. pH lab report Problems, calculations, and completion items. 5.f. Quiz. Titration Lab 5.g. Written response to demonstration.

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR SOLUTIONS LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 6a. Students know the definitions of solute and solvent. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 6.a. Lecture, Discussion, and transparencies 6.a. Explore; Solutions of gases, liquids and solids. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 6.a. Review and Reinforcement; Nature of Solutions, Concentration of Solutions, Formation of Solutions, Colligative Properties. Test items to show recognition response. 6.b. Review and Reinforcement; Nature of Solutions, Concentration of Solutions, Formation of Solutions, Colligative Properties. Test items to show recognition response.

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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6.b. Students know how to describe the dissolving process at the molecular level by using the concept of random molecular motion.

6.b. Lecture, Discussion, and transparencies 6.b. Apply; Electrolytes

6.c. Students know temperature, pressure, and surface area affect the dissolving process.

6.c. Lecture, Discussion, and transparencies 6.c. Demonstrations; Factors affecting solubility. Explore; Sweet Solutions Apply; The Bends Enrich; Coming up for Air 6.d. Lecture, Discussion, and transparencies 6.d. Explore; How much will dissolve? Practice Problems

6.c. Review and Reinforcement; Nature of Solutions, Concentration of Solutions, Formation of Solutions, Colligative Properties. Test items to show recognition response.

6.d. Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition.

6.d. Review and Reinforcement; Nature of Solutions, Concentration of Solutions, Formation of Solutions, Colligative Properties. Test items to show recognition response.

6.e.* Students know the relationship between the molality of a solute in a solution and the solution’s depressed freezing point or elevated boiling point. 6.f.* Students know how molecules in a solution are separated or purified by the methods of chromatography and distillation.

6.e. Explore; Colder than Ice Water Practice Problems Enrich; Artificial Kidneys 6.f. Lab; Chromatography and distillation. 6.f. Lab Report ; Distillation

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 7.a. Students know how to describe temperature and heat flow in terms of the motion of molecules (or atoms). Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 7.a. Based on the Kinetic Molecular theory, explain the motion – behavior of molecules/atoms with change of temperature. Demonstration on exothermic and endothermic systems. 7.b.c Use graphs to show reaction path and energy changes on exo-endothermic processes. 7.b. Lab Activity: Demonstration on exothermic and endothermic systems. 7.c. Lab Activity: Calorimeter Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 7.a. Multiple choice and constructed response items to demonstrate student understanding.

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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7.b. Students know chemical processes can either release (exothermic) or absorb (en-dothermic) thermal energy.

7.b. Lab report Journal writing

7.c. Students know energy is released when a material condenses or freezes and is absorbed when a material evaporates or melts. 7.d. Students know how to

7.c. Lab Report: Calorimetry.

7.d.

Explain and

7.d

solve problems involving heat flow and temperature changes, using known values of specific heat and latent heat of phase change 7.e.* Students know how to apply Hess’s law to calculate enthalpy change in a reaction. 7.f.* Students know how to use the Gibbs free energy equation to determine whether a reaction would be spontaneous.

demonstrate solution process in solving specific heat problems. Get students to master appendix tables where specific heat values are given. 7.e. Lecture and practice problems for applying Hess’s law and Gibbs Free Energy. 7.f. Lecture and practice problems for applying Hess’s law and Gibbs Free Energy. Determine if the reaction would be spontaneous or not.

Quiz Journal writing.

7.e. Work problems using Hess’s law and Gibbs Free Energy. 7.f. Work problems using Hess’s law and Gibbs Free Energy to determine spontaneity (occurrence) of reactions.

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR REACTION RATES LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 8.a. Students know the rate of reaction is the decrease in concentration of reactants or the increase in concentration of products with time. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 8.a. Lecture, discussion, and transparencies; Energy Diagrams and Effect of Temperature on Reaction Rate. Practice Problems Apply; Graphing Changes in Concentration 8.b. Lecture, discussion, transparencies and notes Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 8.a. Quiz; Reaction process and chemical kinetics

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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8.b. Students know how reaction rates depend on such factors as concentration, temperature, and pressure. 8.c. Students know the role a catalyst plays in

8.b. Journal: List factors affecting rate of reaction and explain each of them. 8.c-d. Students label and identify on different

8.c-d. Energy Diagrams and Effect of catalyst on

increasing the reaction rate.

8.d.* Students know the definition and role of activation energy in a chemical reaction.

Reaction Rate. Identify homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis systems Explain how catalyst affects directly the activation energy. Lab Activity: Enzyme Reaction: Catalase Refer to 8c

graphs the effects of using a catalyst on reaction activation energy. Lab report on Enzyme Reaction

Refer to 8c

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 9. a. Students know how to use LeChatelier’s principle to predict the effect of changes in concentration, temperature, and pressure Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 9.a. Lecture, and use of transparencies to demonstrate the effects of pressure, temperature and concentration on equilibrium position. LAB: LeChatelier’s principle. 9.b. Define chemical equilibrium & give several examples. 9.c. Lecture and practice problems involving equilibrium constants. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 9.a. Lab Report on LeChatelier’s principle.

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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9.b. Students know equilibrium is established when forward and reverse reaction rates are equal. 9.c.* Students know how to write and calculate an equilibrium constant expression for a reaction.

9.b. Questions/Answers session. Oral responses. 9.c. Develop a poster board demonstrating equilibrium and how to calculate the equilibrium constant.

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR ORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 10.a. Students know large molecules (polymers), such as proteins, nucleic acids, and starch, are formed by repetitive combinations of simple subunits. 10.b. Students know the bonding characteristics of carbon that result in the formation of a large variety of structures ranging from simple hydrocarbons to complex polymers and biological molecules. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 10.a.c. f. Video Presentation “Proteins” Lab: Analysis of biomolecules (glucose, protein and lipids). Lecture and Discussion 10.b. Lecture and use of visuals to represent hydrocarbon structures & derivates. Discussion on the uniqueness of carbon . Use molecular model to demonstrate structures of single, double and triple bonds. 10.c Visual aids to show the structure of proteins. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 10.a. written report on video presentation. Answer to questions from video. Lab Report on “Analysis of Biomolecules”. 10.b. Students produce model-structures independently or in groups

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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10.c. Students know amino acids are the building blocks of proteins.

10.c Article appreciation on amino acids and proteins.

10.d.* Students know the system for naming the ten simplest linear hydrocarbons and isomers that contain single bonds, simple hydrocarbons with double and triple bonds, and simple molecules that contain a benzene ring.

10.d Lecture, transparencies, and practice problems. Practice on molecular building on alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes.

10.d. Test on hydrocarbons nomenclature and molecular building.

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR ORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 10.e.* Students know how to identify the functional groups that form the basis of alcohols, ketones, ethers, amines, esters, aldehydes, and organic acids. 10.f.* Students know the Rgroup structure of amino acids and know how they combine to form the polypeptide backbone structure of proteins. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 10.e. Group Activity: Students develop a project-presentation on biomolecules and functional groups. 10.f Teacher directed discussion. Webquest on protein structures Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. Oral Presentation

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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Portfolio

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR PROCESSES LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 11.a. Students know protons and neutrons in the nucleus are held together by nuclear forces that overcome the electromagnetic repulsion between the protons. 11.b. Students know the energy release per gram of material is much larger in nuclear fusion or fission reactions than in chemical reactions. The change in mass (calculated by E = Ê mc 2 ) is small but significant in nuclear reactions. 11.c. Students knows some naturally occurring isotopes of elements are radioactive, Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 11.a. Use Bohr model to demonstrate the relative position and forces of the subatomic particles. Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 11.a. Have students draw elements applying the Bohr model as a guide.

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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11.b. Lecture and discussion using visuals and transparencies to show nuclear reaction pathways.

Journal entry

11.c. Lecture on Radioactivity and its relationship to nuclear

11.c. Students can give examples of radioactive isotopes.

as are isotopes formed in nuclear reactions. 11.d. Students knows the three most common forms of radioactive decay (alpha, beta, and gamma) and know how the nucleus changes in each type of decay.

chemistry. 11.d. Identify all radioactive particles/emission, provide their chemical symbols and solve problems. 11.d. Quiz on Radioactivity Decay.

STANDARDS- BASED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR CHEMISTRY CONTENT STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR PROCESSES LEARNING EXPECTATION
State Content Standard 11.e. Students know alpha, beta, and gamma radiation produce different amounts and kinds of damage in matter and have different penetrations. 11.f.* Students know how to calculate the amount of a radioactive substance remaining after an integral number of half lives have passed. 11. g.* Students know protons and neutrons have substructures and consist of particles called quarks. Instructional activities enabling students to achieve the standard. 11.e. Use visuals to show size and penetrating characteristics of different particles and emissions on different materials 11.f. Overview of types of radiation and sub atomic particles. Students will work sample problems calculating half-life. 11.g Use visuals to show the existence of quarks Assessment activities to measure achievement of the standard. 11.e.f.g. Research Paper and oral presentation on nuclear chemistry.

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
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11.f. Refer to 11e

11.g. Refer to 11e

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