20 0 8 W O R L D O F C O R N

Helping raise the bar for the nation’s corn producers.
The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) is the largest national nonprofit organization representing the interests of U.S. corn growers. Through the state checkoff investments of nearly 300,000 corn producers and the commitment of dedicated grower leaders, NCGA and its state-affiliated organizations are redefining the role of corn in the world’s future through research, market development, production and education. You can join more than 32,000 NCGA grower members in 48 states, making a difference in public policy. With your help, we can continue the remarkable achievements of America’s corn industry—and accelerate the pace of success for U.S. corn growers. Visit www.ncga.com for more details and updates on the corn industry. National Headquarters • 632 Cepi Drive • Chesterfield, MO 63005 • 636.733.9004 Washington, DC Office • 122 C St. NW, #510 • Washington, DC 20001 • 202.628.7001

Clearing the Bar

13.1 Billion Bushels

10.5 Billion Bushels

State Organizations & Grower Members Grower Members

©2008 National Corn Growers Association

20 0 8 W O R L D O F C O R N

Now, perhaps more than any other time in history, our country’s corn producers are in the national and global spotlight. The glare of public scrutiny and the pressure to perform at record levels have never been greater.

U.S. corn growers continue their track record of performance.
And they have responded to these challenges in championship fashion— because they have trained for this moment for decades. In many ways, their journey has been like a marathon—a long grueling race requiring a deliberate pace and an unwavering commitment to achieving a difficult goal. For example, the renewable fuels standard took years of hard work before we crossed the finish line—only to discover the race has only entered its first mile in helping America seize control of its energy future. There are also similarities to a sprint—as rapid changes in the ethanol and corn markets have required farmers to ramp up quickly to change their businesses to meet demand. In other ways, it’s been a relay—as corn producers have formed coalitions among themselves and with other like-minded organizations to create an environment for success. From seed genetics companies to conservation groups, from commodity organizations to policy makers—this teamwork has been essential for the corn industry to continue carrying the baton for the nation’s food, fuel, feed and fiber supply. Like a decathlete, an American corn producer is expected to excel in a variety of competitive venues—providing high quality food for the world, supplying feed for the livestock industry, generating the feedstock for the burgeoning ethanol industry and finding new ways for corn to solve new challenges while, at the same time, protecting the environment. One thing is clear: U.S. corn producers aren’t simply clearing the bar. They are flying over it with room to spare.
Rick Tolman
CEO

Ron Litterer
President

And they continue to challenge themselves by setting the standard ever higher.

1

SET FOR SUCCESS

20 0 8 W O R L D O F C O R N

Running through the grocery tape.
From feeding the livestock that becomes nutritious meat to providing dozens of ingredients in thousands of food products, corn is an important part of the human diet. But the effect of increased corn prices on the nation’s grocery bill is greatly exaggerated: A $1-per-gallon increase in the price of gasoline has three times the impact on food prices as does a $1-per-bushel increase in the price of corn. (LECG, LLC) If the price of corn doubles from $2 per bushel to $4 per bushel, the cost of corn in a typical box of corn flakes still accounts for less than 5 cents investment by the food processor. (National
Corn Growers Association)

Actual food inputs account for only about 19 cents of every dollar of processed food. The remaining 81 cents is wrapped up in processing, packaging, transportation, marketing and other costs. (USDA)

If you’re counting the cost of calories, don’t forget the BTUs.
There is no shortage of safe, affordable foods on America’s grocery shelves, even as irresponsible and false headlines warn of skyrocketing food prices due to corn demand. In fact, recent studies have shown that energy prices have a significantly greater impact on food prices than does the price of corn. In other words, the cost of driving to the store has increased at a much greater rate than the cost of the food once you get there. In spite of the increased demand for corn used in ethanol production, Americans still spend less than 10 percent of U.S. household income on food—the lowest percentage in the world—and well below the figure for other nations such as Japan, Mexico and France. Only a small percentage of corn grown in the United States is actually consumed by humans. The highest percentage is fed to livestock to produce meat, milk and eggs for consumption here and abroad. Ethanol fuel production only uses the starch in the corn kernel. The protein, fat and other nutrients are used for other food and feed products. For example, ethanol plants also produce distillers grains, a high-value feed that is replacing corn in traditional beef, pork, poultry and dairy rations. Bottom line: We are getting more out of a kernel of corn by creating not only more fuel, but more food for animals and people around the world.

2

3

B U I L D I N G S T R E N G T H A N D S TA M I N A
How corn producers will keep pace.
In a time of record demand for their product, America’s corn producers have proved they can stay ahead of the pack: Corn yields have increased an average of 3.5 bushels per acre per year over the last 10 years. For 2007, the estimated yield was 151.1 bushels per acre. Using the 10-year historical trend, corn yield could reach 180 bushels per acre by 2015. In 1970, the average yield was about 72 bushels per acre. New hybrids will improve drought resistance, nutrient utilization, disease and pest resistance, and more—all of which will combine to increase yields and total U.S. production. Thanks to emerging economies and the availability of new technologies, more corn is being grown around the world—generating a greater global supply, helping other nations become more self-sufficient. Nearly 3 gallons of ethanol can be made from a bushel of corn—up from 2.5 gallons just a few years ago.

20 0 8 W O R L D O F C O R N

America’s corn industry has pumped up the nation’s economy —and will continue to do so over the long run.
Dozens of rural communities are being revitalized by the economic impact of ethanol production and increased farm income. The ethanol industry has added tens of thousands of new jobs to the economy, generated billions of dollars in tax revenue and capital investment—and created opportunities for entrepreneurship and the return of young people to rural communities. Higher corn prices have increased farm income, which translates into reduced farm program payments (saving tax dollars for all Americans), increased farm spending (generating income for all sectors of the economy) and debt retirement and increased net worth for farmers (strengthening sustainability of rural communities). According to a recent study, the production of ethanolgenerated economic activity put an additional $6.7 billion in the pockets of American consumers. Additionally, the operation and construction of ethanol plants led to $2.7 billion in tax revenue for the federal government and another $2.2 billion for state and local governments. Compare these benefits with the negative impact of writing billions of dollars in checks to foreign nations for barrels of oil—money going out of the country that could be invested here at home.

4

5

T H E W I L L TO W I N

20 0 8 W O R L D O F C O R N

Oil: Plenty of pain, with little to gain.
Our nation’s addiction to imported oil is costing us dearly. While corn ethanol is not the only solution, it’s one that is here—now. And it’s saving us some serious money and resources: The United States produced more than 6 billion gallons of ethanol in 2007, reducing foreign oil imports by more than 200 million barrels. That equates to a $13 billion reduction in the trade deficit. The United States imported 67 percent of its crude oil supplies in 2006 at a cost of more than $300 billion—accounting for some 40 percent of the record trade deficit. Thanks to new technologies and improved efficiency, it takes about 2.7 gallons of water to make 1gallon of ethanol, down from more than 4 gallons just a few years ago. By contrast, it takes 92.5 gallons of water to refine 1 gallon of gasoline. (U.S. Geological Survey)

From cleaner air to energy security, corn is helping America clear some major hurdles.
As one of America’s most versatile and abundant commodities, corn is positioned as a strategic solution to some of the most critical challenges facing our nation. The United States already competes for global oil supplies with emerging nations such as China and India. This competition will only heat up—making supplies tighter and driving prices even higher. More ethanol in our fuel supply means less reliance on expensive and volatile imported oil. Some believe toxic emissions from internal combustion engines continue to be a grave threat to our environment. As the world becomes more focused on climate change, the role of clean-burning fuels such as corn-based ethanol are becoming even more vital. As petroleum costs have risen, corn-based plastics have become even more economically viable—encouraging food processors, manufacturers and retailers to adopt these biodegradable, eco-friendly products for packaging, containers and other uses. Corn producers and ethanol producers are embracing new technologies that further improve environmental stewardship and protect our natural resources. The responsible management of new corn hybrids reduces the use of crop protection products—lowering environmental impact while increasing yields. Ethanol plants recycle most of the water used in the production process. And new technologies are extracting even more value from a single kernel of corn.

6

7

Together we are building the tradition of agriculture.
Monsanto understands the importance of keeping agriculture strong for future generations. Our technology is focused on advancing your way of life for the years to come. Monsanto shares your dedication to the future of agriculture.

Monsanto Imagine® and the vine design are registered trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC. ©2008 Monsanto Company. (32308-gc-Spread 1/08)

FOR THE RECORD World of Corn - Production

20 0 8 W O R L D O F C O R N

Important statistics regarding the production, processing and progress of corn. One Bushel of Corn (56 lb.) Provides:
31.5 lb. of starch
OR
U.S. Corn at a Glance, 2007
Acres Planted

U.S. Corn Production by State, 2007
Acres Average Total Acres Harvested Yield Production Planted for Grain
1000s 1000s Bushels/acre 1000 Bushels

93.6 million
Acres Harvested

State Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Total U.S.
Soybeans

33 lb. of sweetener
OR

86.5 million
Production

2.8 gal. of fuel ethanol
OR

22.4 lb. of PLA fiber/polymer

13.1 billion bushels
Average Yield

Plus
17 lb. of distillers dried grains .5 with solubles* 13.5 lb. of gluten feed** 2.6 lb. of gluten meal**

151.1 bushels per acre
Corn Crop Value

$52.3 billion
Average Price

A closer look at the composition of a corn kernel.
THE PERICARP is the outer covering that protects the kernel and preserves the nutrient value inside. It resists water and water vapor—and is undesirable to insects and microorganisms.

AND

1.5 lb. of corn oil**
*In dry grind ethanol process. **In wet mill ethanol process. Gluten feed is 20 percent protein and gluten meal is 60 percent protein.

$4 per bushel

Components of Yellow Dent Corn
Wet Weight

U.S. Select Crop Value, 2007
$52.30
Billions of Dollars (U.S.)

3.8% Corn Oil

THE ENDOSPERM accounts for about 82 percent of the kernel’s dry weight and is the source of energy (starch) and protein for the germinating seed. Starch is the most widely used part of the kernel and is used as a starch in foods—or as the key component in fuel, sweeteners, bioplastics and other products.

16% Water 19.2% Protein & Fiber 61% Starch

Cracked Corn: 90% TDN
THE TIP CAP is the attachment point of the kernel to the cob, through which water and nutrients flow—and is the only area of the kernel not covered by the pericarp.

$0.23

$0.87

$1.97

THE GERM is the only living part of the corn kernel. The germ contains the essential genetic information, enzymes, vitamins and minerals for the kernel to grow into a corn plant. About 25 percent of the germ is corn oil—the most valuable part of the kernel, which is high in polyunsaturated fats and has a mild taste.

Total Digestible Nutrients (TDN)

340 55 610 650 1,200 26 195 75 510 310 13,200 6,500 14,200 3,900 1,450 740 28 540 18 2,650 8,400 960 3,450 84 9,400 5 14 95 135 1,050 1,100 2,550 3,850 320 60 1,410 2 400 5,000 870 2,150 70 92 550 195 46 4,050 95 93,600

280 23 590 200 1,060 185 35 450 105 13,050 6,370 13,850 3,700 1,360 730 455 2,350 7,800 940 3,250 38 9,200 82 55 550 1,020 2,350 3,610 270 35 980 370 4,500 785 2,000 22 405 120 27 3,280 60 86,542

79 185 168 180 142 97 95 130 165 175 155 171 140 129 165 103 124 146 150 142 145 160 125 175 127 100 116 150 145 195 128 100 121 106 148 148 85 210 111 135 129

22,120 4,255 99,120 36,000 150,520 17,945 3,325 58,500 17,325 2,283,750 987,350 2,368,350 518,000 175,440 120,450 46,865 291,400 1,138,800 141,000 461,500 5,510 1,472,000 10,250 9,625 69,850 102,000 272,600 541,500 39,150 6,825 125,440 37,000 544,500 83,210 296,000 3,256 34,425 25,200 2,997 442,800 7,740

$13.74

$26.88

151.1 13,073,893

Sorghum

Wheat

Barley

Corn

Oats

Shelled Corn: 88% TDN Ear Corn: 78-80% TDN

Source: USDA, NASS, Crop Production 2007 Summary, January 2008

Source: USDA, NASS, Crop Production 2007 Summary, January 2008

10

1 1

U.S. All Crop Acres Harvested, 2007
Other 3.4% Oats 0.5% Sunflower 0.7% Rice 0.9% Barley 1.1% Corn (silage) 2.0% Sorghum (grain) 2.2% Cotton 3.4%

U.S. Average Corn Yields, 1937-2007
Bushels per Acre

World Corn Production, 2007-08*
Others 13.2% Ukraine 1.0% South Africa 1.3% Canada 1.5% India 2.1% Argentina 2.9% Mexico 3.0% EU 6.2% U.S. 43.3%
Million Bushels United States China Brazil EU Mexico Argentina India Canada South Africa Ukraine Others Total 149.1 151.1

160.4

142.2

148.0

Wheat 16.7%

Corn (grain) 28.3%

Hay 20.2%

Soybeans 20.6%

Brazil 6.5% China 18.9%

13,074 5,708 1,968 1,865 913 886 642 459 394 291 3,984 30,184

134.4

133.8

136.9 ‘00

138.2 ‘01

28.9

‘37

‘47

28.6

‘57

48.3

‘67

80.1

‘77

90.8

‘87

119.8

‘97

126.7

‘98

‘99

‘02

129.3

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

Source: USDA, NASS, Crop Production 2007 Summary, January 2008.

Source: USDA, NASS, Crop Production 2007 Summary, January 2008

2,108

Total

305,712

2,349

Thousand Acres Corn (grain) 86,542 6,071 Corn (silage) Soybeans 62,820 Hay 61,625 Wheat 51,011 Cotton 10,492 Sorghum (grain) 6,805 Barley 3,508 Rice 2,748 Sunflower 2,010 Oats 1,505

U.S. Corn Production, 1937-2007
Dry Edible Beans 1,479 Sugar Beets 1,247 Peanuts 1,195 Canola 1,163 Potatoes 1,129 Sugar Cane 884 Dry Edible Peas 811 Proso Millet 515 Sorghum (silage) 399 Tobacco 356 Flaxseed 349 Lentils Rye Safflower Sweet Potatoes Peppermint Oil Mustard Seed Hops Other 295 289 172 97 73 53 31 39
Million Bushels

‘07

*October Through September Marketing Year Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service, Grain: World Markets and Trade, January 2008

11,807

11,114

9,759

9,915

9,207

9,431

9,503

8,967

10,089

10,535

13,074

4,860

6,505

7,131

World Corn Exports, 2007-08*
Others 2.8% South Africa 0.8% China 1.1% Ukraine 1.6% Paraguay 1.7%

Top World Corn Importers, 2007-08*
Algeria 2.4% Iran 2.9% Malaysia 2.9% Colombia 3.7% Taiwan 4.6% Egypt 4.8% Other 30.3%

3,045

‘37

‘47

‘57

‘67

‘77

‘87

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

Source: USDA, NASS, Crop Production 2007 Summary, January 2008.

‘07

Brazil 9.6%

Argentina 16.1%

South Korea 9.4% U.S. 66.3% Japan 17.4% EU-27 10.7% Mexico 10.9%

U.S. Corn Acres Planted, 1937-2007
Thousand Acres

U.S. Corn Prices, 1957-2007
$4.00 $2.32 $2.42 $2.06 $2.00 $3.04
Dollars per Bushel (U.S.)

97,174

85,038

84,328

79,537

80,165

80,930

81,779

77,386

79,551

78,894

73,180

75,702

78,603

78,327

93,600

71,156

66,200

$2.43

Million Bushels United States Argentina Brazil Paraguay Ukraine **’07 *‘06

2,441 591 354 63 59

China South Africa India Canada Others Total

39 31 20 16 67 3,681

Million Bushels Japan Mexico EU-27 South Korea Egypt Taiwan

$1.94

$1.94

$2.02

$1.82

$1.85

$1.97

642 402 394 346 177 169

Colombia Malaysia Iran Algeria Others Total

138 106 106 87 1,115 3,681

$1.11 ‘57

‘67

$1.03

‘77

‘87

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘37

‘47

‘57

‘67

‘77

‘87

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

‘07

‘04

‘05

Source: USDA, NASS, Crop Production 2007 Summary, January 2008.

* Estimated ** Projected for crop year September 2007-August 2008 Source: USDA, ERS, World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate, January 2008

*October Through September Marketing Year Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service, Grain: World Markets and Trade, January 2008

*October through September marketing year Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service, Grain: World Markets and Trade, January 2008

U.S. Corn Acres Harvested, 1937-2007
Thousand Acres

U.S. Corn Crop Value, 1957-2007
Billions of Dollars (U.S.)

World Corn Consumption, 2007-2008*
10,505
Million Bushels

Leading U.S. Corn Export Markets (Since 2004)
Million Bushels

73,802

71,614

72,589

72,671

72,440

70,944

73,632

75,117

70,487

68,768

63,065

60,694

69,330

70,648

Total = 30,420 5,826

Canada

South Africa

Mexico

‘37

‘47

‘57

‘67

‘77

‘87

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

‘07

‘57

‘67

‘77

‘87

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

**’07

*‘06

Others

Japan Mexico South Korea Taiwan Egypt Colombia Canada Syria Dominican Rep Algeria Other Total

2004-’05 611 232 83 171 152 80 93 51 39 42 307 1,818

2005-’06 628 249 220 183 159 106 74 33 41 49 440 2,134

2006-’07 597 345 159 170 130 128 81 58 47 34 376 2,125

81,222

86,542

$52.30

59,505

$22.35

$24.48

$24.32

$20.88

$22.22

$32.03

$18.92

$17.10

$18.50

$18.88

$14.11

$13.11

$3.39

$5.04

362

421

500

606

Japan

650

1,311

1,673

EU-27

Egypt

India

2,425

China

Source: USDA, NASS, Crop Production 2007 Summary, January 2008.

* Estimates for marketing year ending Aug. 31, 2007 ** Projections for marketing year ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: USDA, NASS, Crop Production 2007 Summary, January 2008

*October Through September Marketing Year Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service, Grain: World Markets and Trade, January 2008

Brazil

U.S.

6,141

Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service, Grain: World Markets and Trade, January 2008

12

13

Corn Consumption
U.S. Corn Usage by Segment, 2007*
226 218 HFCS 3.9%

Starch Usage, 1987-2007
Million Bushels

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Production, 1997-2007
4,855 275 272 270 6,500
Millions of Gallons

Biotech Share of U.S. Corn Acres Planted, 2007

251

247

234

240

246

256

272

278

2,130

Other 6.6% 1,770 1,300 1,400 1,470 1,630

2,800

3,400

3,904

Stacked Traits 28%

Non-Biotech 27%

Ethanol 24.7%

*‘07

Feed/Residual 45.9% Export 18.9%

*‘07

‘04

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘87

‘92

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

‘05

‘06

*Marketing Year Ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: USDA, ERS, Feed Outlook, January 2008

*Estimate for Calendar Year 2007 Source: Renewable Fuels Association, NCGA

Bt 21%

Herbicide Tolerant 24%

279

Total Use

12,955

426

481

526

*Marketing year ending Aug 31, 2008 Source: USDA, ERS, World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate, January 2008

566

628

706

996

Million Bushels Feed/Residual 5,950 Export 2,450 Food, Seed, Industrial Ethanol 3,200 HFCS 500 Starch 270 Sweeteners 235 Cereal/Other 193 Alcohol 135 Seed 23

Sweetener Usage, 1987-2007
Million Bushels

Corn Used for Ethanol Production, 1987-2007
3,200 2,117
Million Bushels

245

239

222

228

219

214

218

217

219

222

229

235

Thousand Acres Non-Biotech Bt Herbicide Tolerant Stacked Traits Total

25,272 19,656 22,464 26,208 93,600

173

1,168

1,323

1,603

Source: USDA, NASS, Acreage Report, June 2007

Food, Seed & Industrial (FSI) Usage, 1997-2007
4,555
Million Bushels

*‘07

*Marketing Year Ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: USDA, ERS, Feed Outlook, January 2008

*Marketing Year Ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: USDA, ERS, World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate, January 2008

3,488

2,340

2,537

2,686

2,981

U.S. Corn Usage by Segment, 1994-2007
Million Bushels

2,046

1,556

1,782

1,846

1,913

1,957

1,252

7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 ‘94 ‘95 ‘96 ‘97 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03
Carry-out Food, Seed & Industrial Exports Feed & Residual

U.S. Ethanol Fuel Production Facilities, 2007
Millions of Gallons

*‘07

‘87

‘92

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘87

‘92

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

‘06

Percentage of Biotech Acreage, 2005-2007
Million Bushels

State Iowa Nebraska Illinois South Dakota Minnesota Wisconsin Indiana Michigan Kansas Missouri North Dakota Texas Colorado California Tennessee Arizona New York Kentucky Oregon New Mexico Wyoming Georgia Total

Number of Plants 28 18 7 13 16 7 4 4 8 5 3 1 3 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 130

Production Capacity 1,862.5 1,017.5 881.0 607.0 604.6 408.0 292.0 214.0 212.5 186.0 123.0 110.0 85.0 68.0 67.0 55.0 50.0 35.4 35.0 30.0 5.0 0.4 6,948.9
Source: Renewable Fuels Association

Bt State IL IN IA KS MI MN MO NE ND OH SD TX WI Other U.S. ‘05 ’06 ‘07 25 11 35 23 15 33 37 39 21 9 28 21 22 19 24 13 32 23 16 28 38 37 29 8 20 27 22 20 19 12 22 25 19 26 30 31 29 9 16 22 19 20

Herbicide Tolerant ’05 ‘06 ’07 6 11 14 30 20 22 12 18 39 7 31 42 18 25 12 15 14 33 18 29 14 24 34 13 32 37 18 25 15 17 19 36 22 32 19 23 37 12 34 37 23 33

Stacked Traits ‘05 ’06 ‘07 5 4 11 10 5 11 6 12 20 2 22 13 6 7 9 19 12 18 12 10 16 7 15 20 5 34 13 10 10 40 30 37 21 19 28 13 25 22 20 43 20 22 14

All Biotech Hybrids ’05 ‘06 ’07 36 26 60 63 40 66 55 69 75 18 83 72 46 52 55 40 64 68 44 73 59 76 83 26 86 77 50 55 74 59 78 82 60 86 62 79 88 41 93 79 64 67

‘87

‘92

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

*Marketing year ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: USDA, ERS, World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate, January 2008

*‘07

‘04

‘05
2,125

‘06
2,450

High-Fructose Corn Syrup Usage, 1987-2007
Million Bushels

*Marketing Year Ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: USDA, ERS, World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate, January 2008

541

540

530

531

532

530

532

521

529

U.S. Corn Exports, 1992-2007
510 500
Million Bushels

415

1,979

1,937

1,941

358

1,905

1,900

1,660

1,818

2,134

*‘07

1,503

1,588

26 25 21

17 21 24

15 28

52 61 73

Source: USDA, NASS, Acreage Report, June 2007

*‘07

‘04

‘87

‘92

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘05

‘06

‘92

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

*Marketing Year Ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: USDA, ERS, Feed Outlook, January 2008

*Projections Source: USDA, ERS, World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate, January 2008

14

*‘07

15

20 0 8 W O R L D O F C O R N

U.S. Corn Fed by Animal Group, 1994-2007
Million Bushels

U.S. Meat Exports by Animal Group, 1994-2007
Thousand Metric Tons

U.S. Corn Fed by Region, 1994-2007
Million Bushels*

U.S. Corn Ending Stocks, 1937-2007
Million Bushels

Beef Poultry Pork Dairy

2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000

Poultry Non-Corn Belt

1,500 1,000 500 ‘94 ‘95 ‘96 ‘97 ‘98 ‘99

2,500
2,114 1,787 1,718 1,469 1,596
Beef Corn Belt

4,260

2,000

3,000

3,000

1,899

1,967 ‘05

1,169

1,308

1,087

Other

500 ‘94 ‘95 ‘96 ‘97 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 *‘07

Pork

‘47 124

1,500 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 *‘07 ‘00 ‘01 **‘07 ‘94 ‘95 ‘96 ‘97 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06
*Marketing Year Ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: ProExporter Network (PRX) *Estimates Source: PRX; USDA, FAS Livestock and Poultry: World Markets and Trade, November 2007.

361

958

1,304 ‘06

2,000

1,436

* ProExporter Network estimates the equivalent of 189, 253, 329, 342, 515, and 192 million bushels of corn fed to livestock was displaced by DDG, in the 02-03, 03-04, 04-05, 05-06, 06-07, and 07-08 crop years, respectively. ** Marketing Year Ending August 2008. Source: ProExporter Network (PRX)

*Estimates for crop year ending Aug. 31, 2008 Source: USDA World Agricultural Outlook Board

Organizations that Support the Corn Industry
NCGA National Corn Growers Association 632 Cepi Drive, Chesterfield, MO 63005 P: 636-733-9004 • F: 636-733-9005 Mimi Ricketts, Director of Communications, Ext. 1 • www.ncga.com 12 NCGA Washington, DC Office 122 C St. NW, #510 Washington, DC 20001-2109 P: 202-628-7001 • F: 202-628-1933 Jacqueline Taylor, Communications Specialist Commodity Classic P: 636-677-4157 • srsi@swbell.net Peggy Findley Commodity Classic Show Director CORN PROCESSING Corn Refiners Association 1701 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Ste. 950 Washington, DC 20006 P: 202-331-1634 • F: 202-331-2054 info@corn.org Audrae Erickson, President North American Millers Association 600 Maryland Ave. SW, #825 W Washington, DC 20024 P: 202-484-2200 • F: 202-488-7416 generalinfo@namamillers.org Terri Long, Director of Communications & Meetings • tlong@namamillers.org CORN INPUT American Seed Trade Association 225 Reinekers Lane, Ste. #650 Alexandria, VA 22314 P: 703-837-8140 • F: 703-837-9365 Leslie Cahill, Communications Manager www.amseed.com CropLife America 1 15th St. NW #400 156 Washington, DC 20005 P: 202-296-1585 • F: 202-463-0474 Donna Uchida, VP of Communications duchida@croplifeamerica.org www.croplifeamerica.org The Fertilizer Institute Union Center Plaza 820 First Street NE #430 Washington, DC 20002 P: 202-515-2720 • F: 202-962-0572 Harriet Wegmeyer, Dir. of Communications hwegmeyer@tfi.org • www.tfi.org EXPORTS U.S. Grains Council 1400 K Street, NW, #1200 Washington, DC 20005 P: 202-789-0789 • F: 202-898-0522 grains@grains.org Mike Deering, Director of Communications mdeering@grains.com FOOD AND SNACK CORN Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association P.O. Box 948153, Maitland, Florida 32794 P: 321-214-5200 • F: 321-214-0210 information@ffva.com Danny Raulerson, Marketing Manager dannyraulerson@ffva.com Popcorn Board 401 N Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 6061 1-4267 P: 312-644-6610 • F: 312-321-5150 Genny Bertalmio, Marketing Manager gbertalmio@smithbucklin.com Snack Food Association 171 King Street, Ste. #218 1 Alexandria, VA 22314 P: 703-836-4500 (ext. 204) F: 703-836-8262 • cclark@sfa.org Christopher Clark, VP of Operations www.sfa.org Cereal Quality Lab, Texas A & M Soil & Crop Science Department 2474 TAMU College Stn, TX 77843-2474 P: 979-845-2925 • F: 979-845-0456 Lloyd Rooney, Prof of Food Sci & Tech Texas University A & M lrooney@tamu.edu CORN FUTURES Chicago Board of Trade Communications Department 141 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60604 P: 312-341-3257 • F: 312-341-3306 Marie Gemskie, Managing Dir. of Comm. maria.gemskie@cmegroup.com RENEWABLE FUELS Ethanol Promotion and Information Council 17220 Wright Street Suite 150 Omaha, NE 68130 P: 402-932-0567 • F: 402-932-1752 Joanna Schroeder, Director of Communications jschroeder@epicinfo.org • www.epicinfo.org Renewable Fuels Association One Massachusetts Ave, NW #820 Washington, DC 20001 P: 202-289-3835 • F: 202-289-7519 Matt Hartwig, Dir. of Communications mhartwig@ethanolrfa.org • www.ethanolrfa.org LIVESTOCK AND FEED American Feed Industry Association 2101 Wilson Blvd., #916 Arlington, VA 22201 P: 703-524-0810 • F: 703-524-1921 Rex Runyon, VP of PR rrunyon@afia.org • www.afia.org National Cattlemen’s Beef Association 91 E. Nichols Ave., Centennial, CO 801 10 12 P: 303-694-0305 • F: 303-694-2851 Kendall Frazier, VP of Public Opinion www.beef.org National Grain & Feed Association 1250 Eye St. NW, #1003 Washington, DC 20005 P: 202-289-0873 • F: 202-289-5388 Randy Gordon, VP of Communications & Government Relations • www.ngfa.org National Pork Board 1776 NW 1 14th St., Clive, Iowa 50325 P: 515-223-2600 • F: 515-223-2646 Jeff Hartz, Director, Marketing/Communications jhartz@pork.org • www.pork.org US Poultry & Egg Association 1530 Cooledge Road • Tucker, GA 30084-7303 P: 770-493-9401 • F: 770-493-9257 Sylvia Small, VP of Communications ssmall@poultryegg.org • www.poultryegg.org National Pork Producers Council 122 C Street NW, Suite #875 Washington, DC 20001 P: 202-347-3600 • F: 202-347-5265 Dave Warner, Dir. of Communications warnerd@nppc.org • www.nppc.org Alabama Soybean and Corn Growers Association P.O. Box 1069 • Madison, AL 35758 P: 256-882-3369 Mark Hall, Executive Director m53hall@yahoo.com Arkansas Corn and Grain Sorghum Board P.O. Box 31 • Little Rock, AR 72203-0031 P: 501-228-1297 • F: 501-228-1846 Matt King matt.king@arfb.com Colorado Corn Growers Association Colorado Corn Administrative Committee 127 22nd Street • Greeley, CO 80631 P: 970-351-8201 • F: 970-351-8203 info@coloradocorn.com Mark Sponsler, CEO msponsler@coloradocorn.com www.coloradocorn.com Georgia Corn Growers Association P.O. Box 768 • Tifton, GA 31793 P: 229-386-3006 • F: 229-386-7308 Dewey Lee, State Executive Coordinator deweylee@uga.edu Georgia Agricultural Commodity Commission 328 Agricultural Building Capitol Square • Atlanta, GA 30334 P: 404-656-3678 • F: 404-656-9380 Marcia Crowley, Agricultural Manager Illinois Corn Growers Association P.O. Box 1623 • Bloomington, IL 61702-1623 P: 309-557-3257 • F: 309-827-0916 ilcorn@ilcorn.org Rodney Weinzierl, Executive Director weinzier@ilcorn.org • www.ilcorn.org Illinois Corn Marketing Board P.O. Box 487 • Bloomington, IL 61702-0487 P: 309-827-0912 • F: 309-827-0916 Rodney Weinzierl, Executive Director weinzierl@ilcorn.org Indiana Corn Growers Association Indiana Corn Marketing Council 5757 W 74th St • Indianapolis, IN 46278 P: 800-735-0195 • F: 317-347-3626 Chris Novak, Executive Director cnovak@indianacorn.org • www.incorn.org Iowa Corn Growers Association Iowa Corn Promotion Board 5505 NW 88th Street Suite 100 Johnston, IA 50131-2948 P: 515-225-9242 • F: 515-225-0781 corninfo@iowacorn.org Craig Floss, Chief Executive Officer www.iowacorn.org Kansas Corn Growers Association Kansas Corn Commission P.O. Box 446 • Garnett, KS 66032 P: 785-448-6922 • F: 785-448-6932 Jere White, Executive Director jwhite@ksgrains.com • www.ksgrains.com/corn Kentucky Corn Growers Association Kentucky Corn Promotion Council P.O. Box 90 • Eastwood, KY 40018 P: 502-243-4150 • 800-326-0906 F: 502-243-4149 info@kycorn.org Todd Barlow, Executive Director barl6145@bellsouth.net • www.kycorn.org Louisiana Soybean and Grain Research and Promotion Board P.O. Box 95004 Baton Rouge, LA 70895-9004 P: 225-922-6200 • F: 225-922-6229 Kyle McCann, State Checkoff Manager kylem@lfbf.org Maryland Grain Producers Association Maryland Grain Producers Utilization Board 53 Slama Road • Edgewater, MD 21037 P: 410-956-5771 • F: 410-956-0161 mgp@marylandgrain.com Lynne Hoot, Executive Director lynnehoot@aol.com • www.marylandgrain.com Michigan Corn Growers Association Corn Marketing Program of Michigan 12800 Escanaba Drive Suite B DeWitt, MI 48820 P: 517-668-CORN (2676) • F: 517-668-2670 corninfo@micorn.org Jody Pollok-Newsom, Executive Director jpollok@micorn.org • www.micorn.org Minnesota Corn Growers Association Minnesota Corn Research and Promotion Council 738 First Avenue East • Shakopee, MN 55379 P: 952-233-0333 • F: 952-233-0420 info@mncorn.org Bruce Stockman, Executive Director stockman@mncorn.org • www.mncorn.org Mississippi Corn Growers Association Mississippi Corn Promotion Board P.O. Box 9555 • Mississippi State, MS 39762 P: 662-325-231 • F: 662-325-8742 1 Dr. Erick Larson • elarson@pss.msstate.edu Missouri Corn Growers Association Missouri Corn Merchandising Council 31 Emerald Lane • Jefferson City, MO 65109 18 P: 573-893-4181 • F: 573-893-4612 mcga@mocorn.org Gary Marshall, CEO gmarshall@mocorn.org • www.mocorn.org Nebraska Corn Growers Association 1327 H Street #305 • Lincoln, NE 68508 P: 402-438-6459 • 888-267-6479 F: 402-438-7241 info@necga.org Scott Merritt, Executive Director smerritt@necga.org • www.necga.org Nebraska Corn Development, Utilization and Marketing Board P.O. Box 95107 • Lincoln, NE 68509-5107 P: 402-471-2676 • 800-632-6761 F: 402-471-3345 Don Hutchens, Executive Director d.hutchens@necorn.state.ne.us www.nebraskacorn.org New York Corn Growers Association P.O. Box 334 • Honeoy Falls, NY 14472 P: 585-746-1542 Steven Van Voorhis svanvoo338@aol.com • www.nycorn.org Corn Growers Association of North Carolina Inc 7520-102 Leadmine Road Raleigh, NC 27615 P: 919-844-71 • F: 919-844-7260 16 Joyce Woodhouse, Executive Secretary jwoodhouse@earthlink.net North Dakota Corn Growers Association North Dakota Corn Utilization Council 141 32nd St. S., Ste. 2 • Fargo, ND 58103 1 P: 701-364-2250 • F: 701-298-7810 info@ndcorn.org Tom Lilja, Executive Director tom@ndcorn.org • www.ndcorn.org Ohio Corn Growers Association Ohio Corn Marketing Program 1 East Center Street • Marion, OH 43302 100 (OCGA) P: 740-383-2676 (OCMP) P: 740- 382-0483 • F: 740-387-0144 Dwayne Siekman, Executive Director dsiekman@ohiocorn.org • www.ohiocorn.org Oklahoma Corn Growers Association 6205 Park Lane • Guymon, OK 73942 P, F: 580-338-1568 Raylon Earls Pennsylvania Corn Growers Association P.O. Box 304 • State College, PA 16804 P: 814-863-1018 • F: 814-863-7043 info@pacorngrowers.org Greg Roth, Executive Secretary www.pacorngrowers.org South Carolina Corn and Soybean Association P.O. Box 1 1280 • Columbia, SC 2921 1 P: 803-734-1767 • F: 803-734 -9808 Aaron Wood, Executive Director awood@scda.sc.gov • www.scsoybeans.org South Dakota Corn Growers Association South Dakota Corn Utilization Council 5109 S. Crossings Place Suite 1 Sioux Falls, SD 57108 P: 605-334-0100 • F: 605-334-0505 Lisa Richardson, Executive Director lisal@sdcorn.org • www.sdcorn.org Tennessee Corn Growers Association 510 West Black Lane • Obion, TN 38240-3804 P: 731-536-6226 Polk Glover, Secretary/Treasurer polk@ken-tennwireless.com • www.tncorn.org Corn Producers Association of Texas Texas Corn Producers Board 4205 N Interstate 27 • Lubbock, TX 79403 P: 806-763-2676 • F: 806-762-2674 tcpb@texascorn.org David Gibson, Executive Vice President (CPAT) David Gibson, Executive Director (TCPB) dgibson@texascorn.org • www.texascorn.org Virginia Grain Producers Association P.O. Box 16402 • Chesapeake, VA 23328 P: 757-421-3038 • F: 757-421-2776 Molly Pugh, Executive Director mollypugh@cox.net Virginia Corn Board Virginia Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services 102 Governors Street Room 319 Richmond, VA 23219 P: 804-371-6157 • F: 804-371-7786 Phil Hickman, Program Director phil.hickman@vdacs.virginia.gov Wisconsin Corn Growers Association (WCGA) Wisconsin Corn Promotion Board (WCPB) W1360 Highway 106 • Palmyra, WI 53156 P: 262-495-2232 • F: 262-495-3178 wicorn@centurytel.net Robert Oleson, Executive Director wicorn@centurytel.net

16

*‘07

‘37

‘57

‘67

‘77

‘87

‘97

‘98

‘99

‘00

‘01

‘02

‘03

‘04

1,438

17