PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server

Getting Started

Supporting
PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server version 4.3
Oct 2007

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4

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors space used . . . . . Applications and icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining how to upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Related publications . . . . Menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Discovers SQL Servers automatically. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors page reads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining the PATROL security levels . Monitors free buffers. . . . . . Determining the roles that each computer performs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors cache-hit ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Product components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining the version of the installation utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining how you should monitor a cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planning for the installation of a language pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors error logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors files and file groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InfoBoxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors row-level locking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking for product patches or fixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Icon hierarchy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Supports and monitors clustered environments . . . . . . . . Monitors blocking locks . . . . . . . . . . Monitors user connections . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Verifying installation requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining whether to install locally or remotely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors log space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Provides global channel access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing for installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 15 16 16 17 17 17 17 18 18 18 18 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 24 26 28 30 31 31 33 34 38 38 38 39 40 40 41 41 42 44 46 46 5 Overview and intended audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining where to install . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Object monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Installing with the Distribution Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Database monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Error log monitoring . . . . . . . . 99 6 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Configuring for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Configuring a SQL Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Parameter defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Saving backups in PATROL Configuration Manager. . . . . 89 Reviewing how PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server handles clustering events. . 59 Where to go from here . . . . . . 57 Installing the UNIX version of the Help browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Installing the online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Configuring a SQL Server instance without an sa password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Replication monitoring . . . 52 Creating an installation package of the migrated and merged KM . 87 Monitoring a cluster by using a PATROL Agent on each node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Do not deactivate application classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Loading and unloading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Setting environment variables for the browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 63 Setting up and configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 SQL Server Agent monitoring . . . 57 Additional considerations for using online Help for UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Reviewing the default settings . . . . . 76 Accelerating discovery and reviewing error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Where to go from here . . . . . . . 85 Determining how you should configure a cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Migrating customizations with the PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 First-time installation using the Distribution Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Installing a language pack . . . . . . 87 Installing and configuring a cluster with a virtual PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Importing a CD or customized installation package into Distribution Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 95 Overview of PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Preparing to upgrade and migrate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 File and file group monitoring . . . . . . . 51 Migrating customizations manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Upgrading and saving customizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Uninstalling PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. . . . . . . . 89 Installing and configuring a node-level cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Monitoring a cluster by using a virtual PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Setting up PATROL in a clustered environment . . . 64 Verifying that the SQL Server is discovered and online . . . 82 User and process monitoring . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . Enabling the monitoring of error logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling SQL Server instance discovery . . . . . . . . 108 Changing parameter polling cycles . . . . Monitoring databases . . . . . . . . . . . Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring SQL Server Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Changing parameter thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the consistency of a database . . 113 Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing the status of a database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Excluding SQL Servers from monitoring. . . . Changing the PATROL login account for a server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing the status of an object . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about the error logs . . . . . . . . . Using the SQL Server Agent parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring the SQL Server Agent job failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up SQL Server Agent jobs for monitoring . . . . . . . . . .Do not modify configuration variables that are for internal use only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 115 117 117 118 118 119 119 120 120 121 121 122 122 123 123 124 124 124 125 125 127 127 128 129 130 130 131 131 132 133 133 134 134 134 134 135 135 7 Monitoring SQL Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing the status of files and file groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Verifying changes to configuration variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the error log parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Adding or modifying pconfig variables manually. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about a SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about files and file groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and stopping the monitoring of databases . . . . Filtering SQL Server Agent job failures . . . . . . 99 Modifying an instance and deploying the changes to other instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling the monitoring of files and file groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing a server instance name . . . 107 Deactivating parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about databases . . Setting up error log monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling the monitoring of the SQL Server Agent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding the PATROL user to a database . . . . . . . . Starting and stopping the monitoring of a SQL Server . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Modifying parameter properties. . Reviewing the status of a SQL Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring error logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing the status of an error log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring files and file groups . . . . Starting and stopping a SQL Server from PATROL. . . . . . Setting up the monitoring of objects. . . . . . . Starting and stopping the SQL Server Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . 158 Appendix A Accessing menu commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InfoBoxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Parameters partially affected in a recovery action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Monitoring specific users and processes manually . . . . 148 Using automatic recovery actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monitoring replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Accessing the Global Channel menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Clearing. . . . 142 Killing a process from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Viewing the parameter recovery process . . . 137 Changing the automatic monitoring of users and processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 8 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Creating and managing parameter charts . . 149 Reviewing the ARA settings and parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Viewing reports about Subscribers and Published Articles . 142 Viewing reports about users and processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Monitoring users and processes . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Creating customized reports. . . . 158 Monitoring the Global Channel lock requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and online Help 161 Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Accessing the predefined parameter charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Using SQL commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Reviewing the status of Subscribers or Published Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Refreshing parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Using parameters to monitor specific users and processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Adding customized reports to the predefined list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . snoozing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Using the ARA Settings menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Abbreviations defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Parameter table . . . . . . . 155 Viewing SQL information . 156 Viewing SQL commands with SQL Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Working with parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Accessing the predefined reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Enabling the monitoring of replication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Accessing online Help . . . . . . . . 163 Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults 165 Column headings . . . . . . 145 Viewing parameter data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Activating and deactivating parameters and alarms . 142 Reviewing the status of a user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Where to go from here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Creating customized parameter charts . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Parameters affected in general user monitoring mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Managing the global channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and blacking out parameter alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Appendix C Appendix D Index Consumer-collector parameter dependencies Agent configuration variables 197 203 221 Contents 9 .

10 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

. . . . 27 Server application menu in Windows . . . . . . . . . . and a graph . . and application icons . . . . . . . . . 101 Parameter recovery process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Collector application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 SQL Server Instance Setup dialog box . . . . . . . . parameters. 29 InfoBox for a Server application instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server icon hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SQL Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Database application instance icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Computer. . .Figures Window showing PATROL icons for an instance . . . 151 Figures 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Configure => Get command in PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Parameters that monitor the SQL Server and SQL Server Agent error logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Tables 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Parameters affected in the general monitoring user mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 System requirements for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . their values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Consumer-collector parameter dependencies . . . . . . 162 Accessing online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Database consistency menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 SQL Server Config Setup authentication mode . . . 155 Tasks for displaying SQL for processes and users . . . and the value of the araAction variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Supported configurations for a clustered environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Parameters partially affected in a recovery action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Variables that are for internal use only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters with fixed thresholds . . . 34 Supported configurations for a clustered environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Obsolete variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tables PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 ARA options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Parameters that monitor the SQL Server Agent . 39 Choosing an installation procedure . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Agent configuration variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors blocking locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Icon hierarchy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors row-level locking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors page reads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Product components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Applications and icons . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Menu commands . . . Provides global channel access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InfoBoxes. . . . . Product components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Discovers SQL Servers automatically. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors log space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors files and file groups . . . . . . Monitors user connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors free buffers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors space used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitors cache-hit ratio . .Chapter 1 16 16 17 17 17 18 18 18 19 19 18 19 19 20 20 20 24 26 28 30 31 31 1 Product components and capabilities This chapter presents the following topics: Overview and intended audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

and manage Microsoft SQL Servers.Overview and intended audience Overview and intended audience The PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server product operates with a PATROL Agent and one or more of the PATROL consoles to monitor Microsoft SQL Server products. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server was created for use by Microsoft SQL Server database administrators. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server also helps you to monitor and manage the following key features: I I I I I I I I I I I I global channel access clustered environments cache-hit ratio page-reads free buffers space used blocking locks row-level locking user connections log space files and file groups error logs 16 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . and provides commands that allow you to perform SQL Server administrative functions directly from the PATROL consoles. and PATROL administrators in the daily administration and management of the Microsft SQL Server products. If you have any questions regarding the operation or management of Microsoft SQL Server. parameters. Features PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server discovers SQL Servers automatically. and recovery actions. system administrators. analyze. commands. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server contains knowledge in the form of applications. PATROL uses this knowledge to monitor. refer to the Microsoft SQL Server manuals and website. provides global channel access to SQL Servers. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started were created for users who have an understanding of the underlying Microsoft SQL Server products.

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides the following features: I I I I locks that synchronize access to the global channel automatic close and reopen feature to recover from global channel problems status of the global channel method for resetting the global channel Supports and monitors clustered environments PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server monitors SQL Servers (see the release notes for specific versions) in a clustered environment. which provides an important benchmark about data throughput and overall database performance. The cache-hit ratio expresses the relationship between the number of requests for data that are read from cache and the total number of requests for data. Through this global channel. Monitors cache-hit ratio PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server monitors the cache-hit ratio. See “Setting up PATROL in a clustered environment” on page 85 or the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help for more information. This application detects the presence of the SQL Servers and creates an icon for each.Discovers SQL Servers automatically Discovers SQL Servers automatically The MSSQL_Server (Server) application automatically discovers the SQL Servers in your environment. To help maintain the global channel. A drop in this ratio indicates an increase in the number of requests that the SQL Server must read from the physical disk (I/O) because the pages containing the requested data are not Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 17 . Provides global channel access PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server establishes a global channel to each SQL Server that it discovers in your environment. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server gathers the information that PATROL uses to monitor those SQL Servers.

administrators can improve database performance by adjusting the available cache or the amount of physical RAM used by SQL Server to optimize availability and throughput. When this ratio drops below a predetermined low. With this information. paging can occur. excessive waits. and disk write times result. Administrators can use this information to maintain an optimum number of free buffers for peak database performance. If this number is too low.Monitors page reads stored in cache memory. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server can identify the areas where excessive I/O waits are taking place. this parameter can also indicate a need for additional resource tuning or an increase in capacity to maintain user productivity. If SQL Server’s memory size is greater than physical RAM. Using this information. 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . When demand exceeds availability during normal or subnormal periods of activity. Monitors page reads PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server tracks how long it takes a SQL Server to read a page of data from the physical disk into cache memory or from memory to the physical disk. disk read. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server triggers alarms and warnings. Monitors blocking locks PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server monitors the total number of blocking locks. Administrators can use these values to gauge and maintain database space. and to keep page faults to a minimum. Monitors free buffers PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server monitors the percentage of free buffers (or database pages) available in memory (see the NumberofFreeBuffers parameter). A high number of blocking locks could indicate an increase in the number of processes currently waiting for a specific page or table that is exclusively locked by another process. which degrades database performance. administrators can more accurately develop capacity plans to determine whether additional resources should be allocated to increase database availability and user productivity. Once notified. Monitors space used PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server monitors the percentage of database space used (SpaceUsedPCT) and the megabytes of database space used (SpaceUsedMB).

I I Monitors user connections By tracking the number of user connections to SQL Server. or add) and. RIDLockRequestWaitPercent provides the percentage of row ID lock requests that required a caller to wait. For details about this feature. the UserConnections parameter goes into an alarm state. RIDLockRequestsPerSec provides the number of new row ID locks and lock conversions that the lock manager requested per second. delete. therefore. an increase in the number of user connections can coincide with a decrease in performance. see “Monitoring files and file groups” on page 133. When the SQL Server is running low on available user connections. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server can monitor files and file groups. which indicates the need to restrict user connections. lower the number of worker threads. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides an important indicator of ongoing demand versus capacity. Because each connection requires memory. The following parameters provide information on row-level locking: I RIDLockAvgWaitTime provides the average amount of wait time (in milliseconds) that was caused by row ID lock requests. but this feature is turned off by default. Monitors files and file groups SQL Server stores data and log files in files and file groups. you cannot dump the transaction log. A database can have one or more file groups. modify. or increase memory. SQL Server cannot run because it cannot record modifications to data (update. The values provided by these parameters help you manage transaction log space. Monitors log space When the transaction log becomes completely full. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server tracks the percentage of log space that is used with the LogSpaceUsedPCT parameter and the megabytes of log space used with the LogSpaceUsedMB parameter. and each file group can have one or more files that are associated with it. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 19 .Monitors row-level locking Monitors row-level locking PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server monitors row-level locking.

Most application classes are represented by icons. See “Icon hierarchy” on page 24 for a description of how these icons appear in your interface. and InfoBox items specifically designed to help you monitor the SQL Server and SQL Server Agent error logs for the error log strings and problems you want to monitor. 20 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . The following sections describe each of these functional components of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and how they are accessed.Monitors error logs Monitors error logs The MSSQL_SERVER_ERRORLOG (Error Log) application class provides menu commands. Applications and icons PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server applications fall into the following types: Application type discovery administrative container functional Description discovers the SQL Servers in your environment and stores the configuration and setup information stores the SQL Server logins contains and organizes the instances and parameters for specific functions uses specific parameters. menu commands. see “Monitoring error logs” on page 124. For details about this feature. parameters. and InfoBox items to provide information about a specific database object Table 1 contains a short description of each application class and a graphic of the icon that represents each application class. and InfoBoxes that are organized and presented under application classes. Product components PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides functionality in the form of parameters. menu commands.

the number of locks remaining. For more information about the Capacity application parameters.Applications and icons For more detailed information about the application classes. For more about monitoring SQL Servers. see “Monitoring SQL Servers” on page 117. For more information about the Collectors application parameters. icon. “Parameter definitions and defaults. such as the number of user connections. see the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and Appendix A. For more information about the Cache application parameters. This application discovers the SQL Servers in your environment and provides the setup or configuration of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and the SQL Server control functions.” Capacity The MSSQL_SERVER_CAPACITY (Capacity) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the capacity of the selected server.” Collectors The MSSQL_SERVER_COLLECTORS (Collectors) container application holds the collector and the standard collector parameters that set the values for the majority of the consumer parameters. Application name and icon The MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN (Administration) administrative application stores a second user ID and password that PATROL uses (This application does not display an to connect to the selected SQL Server. “Parameter definitions and defaults.” Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 21 . “Parameter definitions and defaults. “Parameter definitions and defaults.” Cache The MSSQL_SERVER_CACHE (Cache) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the database cache for the selected server.) Administrative The MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT (Login Management) administrative application handles the security modes when you (This application does not display an configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. InfoBoxes. see Appendix B. “Accessing menu commands. see Appendix B. For more information about the Availability application parameters. and the number of idle processes. and online Help. see Appendix B.” Table 1 Server PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server applications (Part 1 of 4) Definition The MSSQL_SERVER (Server) discovery application is the main application class for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. see Appendix B. icon.) Login Management Availability The MSSQL_SERVER_AVAILABILITY (Availability) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the availability of the selected server.

menu commands. For more information. and InfoBox items that pertain to the error log that the instance represents. see “Monitoring error logs” on page 124. menu commands.” MSSQL_SERVER The MSSQL_SERVER_SQLSERVER_SETUP (MSSQL_SERVER) container application holds the SQL Server instances discovered on a monitored host. Locks The MSSQL_SERVER_LOCKS (Locks) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the locks for the selected server. “Parameter definitions and defaults. Database monitoring is not activated unless you select automatic database monitoring or a database for monitoring. menu commands. File Filegroup The MSSQL_SERVER_FILEGROUP (Filegroup) functional application provides specific parameters. see “Monitoring files and file groups” on page 133 and the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. see “Monitoring files and file groups” on page 133.” Error Log The MSSQL_SERVER_ERROR_LOG (Error Log) functional application provides specific parameters. The MSSQL_SERVER_FILE (File) functional application provides specific parameters. 22 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . see Appendix B. File monitoring is disabled by default. Application name and icon Disk The MSSQL_SERVER_DISK (Disk) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the disk i/o for the selected server. To enable all of the functionality of error log monitoring. For more information about the Locks application parameters. File group monitoring is disabled by default. For more information. For more information about the Disk application parameters. SQLErrorLog Error log monitoring is partially enabled by default. “Parameter definitions and defaults. menu commands. and InfoBox items pertaining to the file group that it represents. For more about database monitoring. and InfoBox items pertaining to the database that the Database application icon represents. see “Monitoring databases” on page 129.Applications and icons Table 1 Database PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server applications (Part 2 of 4) Definition The MSSQL_SERVER_DB (Database) functional application provides specific parameters. see Appendix B. and InfoBox items pertaining to the file that it represents.

For more information. see “Monitoring replication” on page 135 and the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. Replication monitoring is disabled by default. The MSSQL_SERVER_PERFORMANCE (Performance) application is a container application that holds the parameters that pertain to the performance of the selected server.” Application name and icon Objects The MSSQL_SERVER_OBJECTS (Objects) application is a functional application that provides specific parameters and InfoBox items that pertain to the objects (tables and indexes) selected for monitoring. Subscribers The MSSQL_SERVER_SUBSCRIBERS (Subscribers) application is a functional application that provides specific parameters and InfoBox items that pertain to the database servers that subscribe to receive published articles in your SQL Server replication environment. For more information about the Procedure Cache application parameters. Replication monitoring is disabled by default. For more information.The Objects application icon does not display unless you select objects for monitoring. For more information about the Performance application parameters.” Performance Procedure Cache The MSSQL_SERVER_PROC_CACHE (Procedure Cache) application is a container application that holds the parameters that pertain to procedure cache for the selected server. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 23 . see Appendix B.Applications and icons Table 1 Network PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server applications (Part 3 of 4) Definition The MSSQL_SERVER_NETWORK (Network) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the network i/o for the selected server. “Parameter definitions and defaults. “Parameter definitions and defaults. see Appendix B. see “Monitoring replication” on page 135 and the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. see “Monitoring objects” on page 134 and the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. see Appendix B. For more information. “Parameter definitions and defaults.” Published The MSSQL_SERVER_PUBLISHED (Published) application is a functional application that provides specific parameters and InfoBox items that pertain to the articles published for replication. For more information about the Network application parameters.

NOTE The SQL Server icon looks the same. Icon hierarchy Figure 1 displays the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows Server (Developer mode) window.” Application name and icon User-Defined Counters Users The MSSQL_SERVER_USERS (Users) application is a functional application that provides specific parameters. see “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137 and the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. and PATROL Console for UNIX. or you manually select specific users or processes for monitoring. see Appendix B. but it is displayed by itself or with other applications in the PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition. “Parameter definitions and defaults. Users application icons do not display unless you select User Instance as a problem alert method in the Configure Auto User Monitoring dialog box. For more information. For more information about the User-Defined Counters application parameters. menu commands. and InfoBox items to monitor the SQL Server users or processes. Figure 1 Window showing PATROL icons for an instance SQL Server icon PATROL Agent icon operating system icons 24 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .Icon hierarchy Table 1 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server applications (Part 4 of 4) Definition The MSSQL_SERVER_USER_DEF_CNTRS (User-Defined Counters) application is a container application that holds the ten user-defined counters of the selected server. PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition.

Icon hierarchy PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides a hierarchy of icons that groups all Server application icons under the MSSQL_SERVER application icon. Figure 2 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server icon hierarchy Server application icon Published application icon Subscribers application icon Users application icon SQLErrorLog Error Log application icon Database application icons Objects application icon File application icon Filegroup application icon File application icon Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 25 . When you double-click on a Server application icon. a window opens that contains other applications. Figure 2 displays all of the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server application icons to demonstrate the hierarchy of the applications.

Collector parameters do not display the values that they collect. 26 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . creating an extremely efficient and flexible data retrieval system. Double-clicking the Collector application icon opens a window that contains all of the standard collector parameters and one standard parameter. and stored on the computer where the PATROL Agent resides.Parameters Parameters A parameter is a command that periodically obtains data on a monitored system resource. PATROL uses several types of parameters and stores parameter history data in a file.”and the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server for more information about the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters. Parameter types PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server uses the following types of parameters: I A collector parameter executes commands at regular intervals (poll times) to gather data that it sends to the consumer parameters. UserColl is found under the User application and ErrorLog Coll is found under the Error log application. “Parameter definitions and defaults. CheckConfiguration. A consumer parameter displays a value that was collected by a collector parameter (or a standard parameter with collector properties) and can generate alarms or warnings and recovery actions if those values exceed predefined thresholds. Many of the standard parameters used by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server have collector properties. A standard parameter collects a single value of data as numeric or text and displays that value.” Appendix C. see the PATROL user guide for your console. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server organizes parameters into application classes by function or by the objects that they monitor. The Collectors application contains all but two of the standard collectors used by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. The collected parameter information is available for review by a PATROL console. they execute commands and gather the data that consumer parameters display. See Appendix B. nor do they generate alarms or recovery actions. For more general information about parameters and their functions. Consumer parameters do not issue commands. summarized. I I The use of standard parameters with collector properties (standard collectors) and consumer parameters enables PATROL to set an almost unlimited number of parameters with one data retrieval query to the server. Parameter data values are collected.

Figure 3 shows the Collector Application icon. but display only information about their collections. Figure 3 Collector application. The timetable displays a mark for each data collection cycle that the standard collector parameter completed.”provides a table that cross-references the consumer parameters with the standard collector parameter that sets its value. parameters. Double-clicking on a standard collector icon opens a graph or timetable that displays a mark for each collection that the standard collector parameter completed.Parameters These standard collectors are represented by an icon that contains a check mark and an X. Appendix C.) These standard collector parameters go into an alarm state if a scheduled collection fails. and an example of a graph that standard collector parameters use to display collection information. Standard collector parameters do not display the data that they collect. Double-clicking on one of the standard collectors opens a graph or timetable for that standard collector parameter. and a graph Double-clicking the Collector application icon displays the standard collector icons. The check mark is green when the standard collector parameter is in an okay state and the X turns red when the standard collector parameter goes into an alarm state. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 27 . the parameters it contains. (See the PATROL user guide for your console for detailed information on alarm states and icons. The data collected by the standard collector parameters is distributed to related consumer parameters. Disabling a standard collector parameter also disables the consumer parameters that it sets.

Menu commands The PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server menu commands allow you to perform the following tasks: I I I define and manage PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server manage your SQL Servers from PATROL view reports about your SQL Servers The Server application class provides the majority of the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server menu commands. The following application classes provide menu commands more specific to the objects that these application classes represent: I I I I I I Database Filegroup Error Log Published Subscribers Users 28 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .hist. which is located in the following directory on the computer where the PATROL Agent resides: $PATROL_HOME\log\history\computername\portnumber See the PATROL user guide for your console for detailed information about the parameter history file. which is located in the following directory on the computer where the PATROL Agent resides: stored in a single file named param.Menu commands Parameter History file All parameter history data is stored in a single file named param.hist.

InfoBoxes. “Accessing menu commands. and the Server application menu. You can access the Database.Menu commands Figure 4 shows a Server application icon. and KM Commands is an option available from that menu. Right-clicking the Server application icon opens the console menu. and Users menus from their respective application icons. Figure 4 Server application menu in Windows Server application icon console menu Server application menu The Server application menu shown in Figure 4 is at the top level of the menu tree hierarchy for the Server application menu. Subscribers. Filegroup. the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows Servers menu. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help provides further details about menu commands. For information about how to access menu commands and online Help from the various PATROL consoles. Published. see Appendix A. and online Help.” Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 29 .

see Appendix A. Figure 5 InfoBox for a Server application instance Check marked items Update button The attributes that populate the InfoBoxes are gathered and updated periodically. The PATROL Central Operator consoles differentiate between the items in a similar fashion. and they are preceded by a check mark (PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows) or are separated from the console items by a horizontal rule (PATROL Console for UNIX). “Accessing menu commands. The PATROL consoles and PATROL Agent populate all of the attributes that appear in the parameter InfoBoxes and some of the attributes. Blackout End Time). Each InfoBox provides an Update button that you can use to force a refresh of the attributes in that InfoBox. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help provides further details about the application InfoBoxes. In each of the application InfoBoxes. that appear in the application InfoBoxes.InfoBoxes InfoBoxes PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server uses InfoBoxes to provide attributes specific to the objects in your SQL Servers. InfoBoxes are tables of attributes accessed from the icons that represent parameters and application classes.” 30 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . the items generated by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server appear below the items generated by the PATROL console. such as icon type or status. InfoBoxes. Some of the attributes that appear in the application InfoBoxes remain static (for example. Figure 5 is an example of an InfoBox for a Server application instance. For information about how to access InfoBoxes and online Help. and online Help. SQL Server Name) and some of the attributes change as your SQL Server environment changes (for example.

and deploying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server: I I I Distribution Server Getting Started Installation Utility Reference Manual PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide For more detailed information about the PATROL Agent and consoles. Where to go from here The following table suggests topics that you should read next: Topic Source of information how to install and migrate PATROL for Chapter 2.” and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help how to access the KM menu commands. see the documentation CDs provided with your PATROL Agent and console products and the online Help for those products. “Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. parameters. InfoBoxes. “Accessing menu commands.Related publications Related publications The PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help is installed with the product when you install from the Electronic Product Download (EPD) website. Appendix A. menu commands. and online Help InfoBoxes. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies” PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix D.” and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help Chapter 4. “Parameter definitions and defaults” Appendix C. and InfoBoxes Appendix B. “Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Microsoft SQL Server on page 33’ how to setup and configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server how to use PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to change configuration variables or parameter properties how to use PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server functionality to monitor and manage SQL Servers Chapter 3. The following publications contain information about installing. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on page 95’ Chapter 5. “Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. and online Help” definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies detailed descriptions of the applications. migrating. “Agent configuration variables” Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 31 .

Where to go from here 32 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

. . . . . . . . Determining how to upgrade . . . . . . . . Determining whether to install locally or remotely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing with the Distribution Server. . . . . Additional considerations for using online Help for UNIX . . . . . Planning for the installation of a language pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining the PATROL security levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing the UNIX version of the Help browser. Determining the version of the installation utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 2 34 38 39 40 40 41 41 46 46 49 50 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 57 57 59 59 60 60 61 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 2 This chapter presents the following topics: Verifying installation requirements . . . . . . Determining how you should monitor a cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing for installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First-time installation using the Distribution Server . . . . . . . . Upgrading and saving customizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an installation package of the migrated and merged KM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing a language pack . . . . . To uninstall PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server from a Windows environment To uninstall PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server from a UNIX environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 33 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Importing a CD or customized installation package into Distribution Server. . . . . Migrating customizations manually. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing the online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uninstalling PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . Setting environment variables for the browser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing to upgrade and migrate . . . . . . . Migrating customizations with the PATROL Configuration Manager. . . . . . . . .

refer to the release notes for the version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server that you are using. it cannot configure the instance. Comments If PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server cannot find the SQL Server performance objects. see the Microsoft technical information website. and it generates the following message: The SQL Server performance objects are not available. SQL Server performance objects PATROL Agent and consoles I I I at least one of the following PATROL consoles: — PATROL Console for UNIX — PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows Servers — PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition — PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition PATROL Agent PATROL Console Server 34 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .Verifying installation requirements Verifying installation requirements Before installing PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. PATROL Central consoles are not required. If you cannot resolve this issue. Table 2 Resource System requirements for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server (Part 1 of 4) Requirements The Microsoft SQL Servers you want to monitor must have the SQL Server performance objects installed and available to PATROL in order for all of the functions in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to operate. or call Microsoft support. but a PATROL Agent is required for each monitored instance and a PATROL Console for UNIX or PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows is required to initially configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. refer to your SQL Server manual. verify that the target computer meets the minimum installation requirements listed in Table 2. NOTE For specific version numbers for the products that are supported by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server.

For more information about the roles that each computer performs. see “Setting up PATROL in a clustered environment” on page 85. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server can operate at any of the security levels provided by PATROL You must have a valid demonstration license (typically good for 30 days) or a permanent license to run your PATROL products. and Console System browser security levels Netscape Navigator for UNIX and Red Hat Linux platforms. license installing into a UNIX environment without a browser You must launch the installation utility from the command line and use the -serveronly command line option. Install Netscape Navigator on the computer where the console resides. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 35 . Common System. or only on a Console System (21 MB). see page 48. For more information. contact your BMC Software sales representative or the BMC Software Contract Administration department for licensing information. Fewer megabytes are required if you are installing only on a Managed System (37 MB). “Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. If you do not have a permanent license.Verifying installation requirements Table 2 Resource System requirements for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server (Part 2 of 4) Requirements PATROL installation utility PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard (a component of PATROL for Microsoft Windows Servers) Use the following PATROL products to configure and modify PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server: I I Comments See “Determining the version of the installation utility” on page 40. For more information.” other PATROL products PATROL Configuration Manager PATROL Knowledge Module® for Event Management You can use this product to distribute PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server throughout your enterprise. see Chapter 4. This product is required if you plan to monitor a clustered SQL Server. See “Determining the PATROL security levels” on page 41. Distribution Server disk space 40 MB are required to install on a computer needed to install that is acting as a Managed System.

and security or file access problems can result. Use the following guidelines: I Stand-alone workgroup servers must use a local user account. If you use a domain account. I I I I I Warning: If you use a built-in Windows domain or local Administrator account as the PATROL default account. The account on a domain controller must be a member of the domain Administrators group. Do not use a built-in Administrator account. files created by PATROL are owned by the Administrator.Verifying installation requirements Table 2 Resource accounts System requirements for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server (Part 3 of 4) Requirements PATROL Windows account Comments You must create a dedicated user account before PATROL is installed. verify that the account you are using to install PATROL has local administrator rights on each cluster node. Note: If you are installing PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server in a cluster. Servers that are trusted members of a domain can use either a local or domain account. The PATROL account must be a member of the local Administrators group of the computer where the PATROL Agent resides. 36 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . no local account on that computer can have the same name.

PATROL uses the SQL Server or Windows account with system administrator privileges for the following functions: I I I a SQL Server login account with system administrator privileges when standard security is selected or a Windows login account with system administrator (sa) privileges when integrated security is selected a SQL Server login account with user privileges SQL Snapshot configuration DBStructureColl and LongRunningTrans parameters I PATROL uses the SQL Server user account for the following functions: I I all other parameters all other menu commands Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 37 .profile. the root account must have root access permissions on the NFS server.login. nondefault prompts. (recommended) Install PATROL on local partitions.kshrc files should not contain any customizations such as aliases.cshrc.Verifying installation requirements Table 2 Resource System requirements for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server (Part 4 of 4) Requirements PATROL UNIX account Comments I accounts (continued) The account . The account must have ftp and telnet enabled. If PATROL is installed on NFS-mounted partitions. or unmask settings other than 022. and . Do not use the root account. . The account must have access to a root account on the computer where PATROL is installed. I I I I I PATROL requires the following accounts to monitor SQL Server: I PATROL automatically uses the appropriate login for each function. . The account must have permission to create directories and write the installation logs to the $HOME and /tmp directories on the computer where you are installing products.

If fixes or patches are available for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 4.2. install the product. you should complete the following tasks: I I I I I I I I check for product patches or fixes (see page 38) determine how you should monitor a cluster (see page 39) determine whether to install locally or by using an installable image (see page 40) ensure that you are using the correct version of the installation utility (see page 40) determine the PATROL security level (see page 41) determine which roles your computers perform (see page 42) determine whether to upgrade without saving any customizations or to upgrade and save your customizations (see page 41) plan for the installation of a language pack. BMC Software recommends that you check the web page for your version of the product. are usually available through the BMC Software website. 38 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .30. which correct problems that are found after a product is released. and then configure and test PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server before installing it onto production computers. Installation prerequisites Before you install. and then apply the patch or fix using the installation instructions provided in the technical bulletin or flash that describes the patch or fix. if required (see page 46) Checking for product patches or fixes Product fixes or patches.Preparing for installation Preparing for installation BMC Software recommends that you first install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on a limited number of development or test computers.

you configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the active nodes (that is. the virtual SQL Server) Parameter history and configuration settings are stored on a shared drive and are. and use the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard to create a virtual PATROL Agent resource on each cluster group that contains a SQL Server that you want to monitor. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 39 .Determining how you should monitor a cluster Determining how you should monitor a cluster Before you begin installing the product in a clustered environment. the following disadvantages apply: I you must configure each SQL Server to which the instance can fail over you cannot view parameter history that was collected on another cluster node I BMC Software recommends that you use the virtual PATROL Agent configuration. available after failover the Failover parameter is available in this environment Only SQL Server instances belonging to the same cluster resource group as the virtual PATROL Agent are discovered Only one PATROL Agent runs on each node I I I PATROL Agent—run independent PATROL Agents on each cluster node I Because PATROL configuration data and parameter history data are not shared between the PATROL Agents on the cluster nodes. therefore. you must install and run a PATROL Agent and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on each cluster node. Table 3 Supported configurations for a clustered environment Advantage I Configuration virtual PATROL Agent—use the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard to add the PATROL Agent resource to the cluster group(s) that contains the SQL Servers you want to monitor Disadvantage You must run a virtual PATROL Agent on each cluster resource group that has a SQL Server to monitor. If you choose the virtual PATROL Agent configuration. No need to configure the SQL Server instances on each cluster node. decide which of the supported configurations shown in Table 3 you should use to monitor your clustered environment. For more information about configuring the PATROL Agent as a resource in a cluster. The PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard defines the PATROL Agent environment variables that make the history data and configuration settings available upon failover. Instead. see “Setting up PATROL in a clustered environment” on page 85.

2 Navigate to the directory where the installation utility is located. With an installable image.exe -v (Windows) — setup sh -v (UNIX) 40 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . distributing. To determine the version of an installation utility 1 Open a command prompt. If you create an installable image. You should use the version of the installation utility that comes with the product that you are installing. and installing installable images. you must either create a separate image for each set of values that you want to implement or edit the variables in the control file for the installable image by using the ctltool. or you can create an installable image of products so that you can install them at a later time on multiple computers (remote installation functionality). 3 Enter the command that is appropriate for your system: — Setup. the computers upon which you install the image must have identical values entered for the following configuration settings: I I I I I BMC Software products installation directory account names passwords PATROL Agent port number security options If you want to specify different settings for different computers. An installable image is a fully configured product image that you can use to install products to multiple computers.Determining whether to install locally or remotely Determining whether to install locally or remotely You can install products on the computer on which you are running the installation utility (local installation). see the PATROL Installation Reference Manual. Determining the version of the installation utility The version of the installation utility included on the CD or Electronic Product Download (EPD) image you use to install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server might differ from a version included on another product CD or from a version that you downloaded from the BMC Software Electronic Product Download (EPD) website. and about using the ctltool. For more information about creating. you can create one product image with one pass through the installation utility and then use that image to install to remote computers in your environment.

which can affect performance.km or . whether it is embedded in . Determining how to upgrade If you already have a version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server installed in your environment./common/security/bin/OS (UNIX) 2 To display the security policy of the current computer. and consoles.km files) that you created modified PSL code. console server. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server can include the following customizations: I I new Knowledge Modules (. switch to the path on the computer that you want to check: %BMC_ROOT\. console server. If this is a concern. you might want to verify which level of security is installed and how it was implemented..Determining the PATROL security levels Determining the PATROL security levels PATROL security is installed as part of the agent. However.. and console on which it is installed and can operate at any of the PATROL security levels. To check the security level of a previously installed agent. see the PATROL Security User Guide.11 or earlier) are saved in the agent configuration database automatically. Customizations to Knowledge Modules (.4. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. run the following command: esstool policy -a For more information about PATROL security. you need to determine whether or not there are any customizations in the installed product that you want to save. but they are not preserved and incorporated automatically. or console 1 From the command line. console server.psl) files are stored in cache. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server inherits the security policy from the agent. For more information.\common\security\bin\OS (Windows) or $BMC_ROOT/. The customizations take effect automatically.” Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 41 . the higher security levels require more overhead. see Chapter 4.km) and PSL (.psl files Customizations that were applied by using PATROL Configuration Manager or operator overrides created with a PATROL Operator Console (unless you are upgrading from a PATROL console version 3.

Determining the roles that each computer performs Use Table 4 to determine whether you should upgrade and save your customizations or upgrade without saving any customizations. I I One or more of the following customizations were made to your “Upgrading and saving currently installed version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server customizations” on page 50 and you plan to save those customizations and migrate them to the new version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server manually: I I new Knowledge Modules were created PSL code was modified “First-time installation using the Distribution Server” on page 54 If you are using the Distribution Server to install and distribute PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server throughout your environment Determining the roles that each computer performs The installation utility prompts you to select the roles performed by the computer on which you are installing BMC Software products (the target computer). The currently installed version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is a version earlier than 2. review the following definitions of the roles that are presented in the installation utility and decide which of these roles is performed by each computer in your environment. Before beginning the installation process. but you plan to migrate those customizations manually: I I I new Knowledge Modules were created PSL code was modified I One or more of the changes or customizations listed above were made by using the PATROL Configuration Manager (in which case. Table 4 Situation I Choosing an installation procedure Installation Procedure “Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation” on page 46 No customizations were made to your previous version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server One or more of the following customizations were made to your previous version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server.1. and use the appropriate procedure. You want to overwrite customizations with the default values of the new version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. they are saved in the Agent configuration file and applied to the new version automatically).00. 42 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

x) server host the PATROL Console Servers host the RTservers Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 43 .x architecture) — monitors and manages on UNIX by using a PATROL Console for UNIX (PATROL 3. and Service Reporting Retrievers.x architecture) I Managed Systems (also referred to as agent computers) host software that manages the resources on the computer. PATROL Knowledge Modules.5 (works with both the PATROL 3. user interfaces.x architecture) — monitors and manages on Windows by using a PATROL Console for Windows (PATROL 3.x architecture) — host KMs and components that contain the knowledge that PATROL uses to monitor the resources on this computer I Common Services (new with PATROL 7. viewers. Select this option if the computer to which you are installing will perform any of the following roles: I I I host the PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition (PATROL 7.Determining the roles that each computer performs Roles performed by computers in the PATROL architecture The following roles are performed by computers in the PATROL architecture: I Console Systems (also referred to as console computers) host user desktop applications such as consoles. Select this option if the computer to which you are installing will perform any of the following roles: — host a PATROL Agent 3.x architecture) computer hosts services that are shared among managed systems and console systems. such as a PATROL Agent. and browsers. You can install each of these common services on any computer in the network.x and PATROL 7. Select this option if the computer to which you are installing performs any of the following roles: — monitors and manages on Windows by using a PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition console (PATROL 7.

Web Edition Getting Started PATROL Central Operator . This selection installs the files required by the console.x environment.Microsoft Windows Edition Getting Started PATROL Console Server and RTserver Getting Started PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide PATROL Console for UNIX User Guide PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows User Guide . This section explains where to install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. This selection installs the files that run on the PATROL Agent.Understanding the Basics of PATROL.x In a PATROL 3. see the online Help systems for each product and the following documents: I I I I I I PATROL Central Operator . you must install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the following computers: I Computers hosting the PATROL Agent—Select Managed Systems as the System Role in the installation utility when installing PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. Computers hosting the PATROL Console for Windows or PATROL Console for UNIX—Select Console Systems as the System Role in the installation utility when installing PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on computers hosting the PATROL Console for Windows or PATROL Console for UNIX. I 44 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .Determining where to install Additional information For more information about the PATROL consoles and PATROL Console Server or RTserver. PATROL 3. Volume 1 Determining where to install Where you install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server depends on which system roles you have assigned to a computer and which PATROL infrastructure components are installed on that computer.

36 PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition prior to version 7. and resource files that are used by PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition and PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition. no PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server icons or Help files will be available for the PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition or PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition consoles. you must install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the following computers: I Computers hosting the PATROL Console Server—Select Common Services Systems as the System Role in the installation utility. NOTE If you do not install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the computer hosting the PATROL Console Server. This selection installs PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files that run on the PATROL Agent. Computers hosting the PATROL Agent—Select Managed Systems as the System Role in the installation utility. This selection installs the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server icons. see the PATROL Infrastructure Planning Guide.x architecture.10 You must also install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the computer hosting the PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition web server using the Common Services Systems role. I When using PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition.Determining where to install PATROL 7. Help files. This selection installs PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files for use by PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition. I Computers hosting PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition—Select Console Systems as the System Role in the installation utility.x environment. install KMs on computers hosting the PATROL Console Server using the Common Services Systems role and computers hosting the PATROL Agent using the Managed Systems role. and select Common Services Systems as the System Role in the installation utility. For more information about the PATROL 7.2.x In a PATROL 7. If you are using older versions of the following components: I I PATROL Console Server prior to version 7.1. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 45 .

if required) PATROL Agent and console products before installing or upgrading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server (If you are installing from a CD that contains Agents. When the Japanese language pack CD is installed. test the installation thoroughly. you might want to note your selections and capture the Review Selections and Start Install window (step 9 on page 49).Planning for the installation of a language pack Planning for the installation of a language pack The a language pack provides translations of all messages and user interface elements. consoles. and then install in your production environment I I 46 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . you can install them at the same time. There are two requirements you need to consider if you plan to install a language pack: I you must install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server before you can install the language pack for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server you must make the same selections in the installation windows during both installations I To ensure that you make the same selections during both installations. take the following actions: I create the PATROL default account before installing install (or upgrade. and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. Before you begin Whether this is a first time installation or an upgrade. Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation Use Table 4 on page 42 to determine whether you should use this installation procedure or proceed to “Upgrading and saving customizations” on page 50. Language pack CDs are always installed after the product has been installed. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server operates with a Japanese user interface.) install on a limited number of computers in a test environment.

and related services that are currently running. or upgrade and migrate customizations manually 1 From the installation CD or from an electronically downloaded (EPD) installation image. 3 In the Review License Agreement window. whether you plan to save your changes or not. click Next. 3 Perform a full backup of the following directories where PATROL executables and data are typically stored: I I PATROL_HOME for agent and console installation directories PATROL_CACHE for the console working cache 4 Remove all PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files with the following naming patterns from PATROL_CACHE\knowledge and PATROL_CACHE\psl: I I MSSQL* RA1MSSQL* To install for the first Time. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 47 .Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation If you are upgrading. and click Next to continue. 2 Ensure that no one is accessing any PATROL files or directories. If you do not. old product files in PATROL_CACHE are loaded instead of the newly installed files from PATROL_HOME. To back up the current installation and move files from PATROL_CACHE 1 Shut down any PATROL Agents. upgrade without saving customizations. consoles. select Accept. 2 In the Welcome to the Installation Utility window. review the license agreement. start the installation utility by running setup.exe (Windows) or setup.sh (UNIX). take the following actions: I move the old PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to a new directory that is different from PATROL_HOME remove PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files from PATROL_CACHE I WARNING You must remove the current PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files from the PATROL_CACHE directory for the console.

see the online Help systems for those products and the following documents: I I I PATROL Console Server and RTserver Getting Started PATROL Console for UNIX User Guide PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows User Guide . 5 In the Specify Installation Directory window. or accept the default and click Next. or RTserver. Volume 1 7 In the Select Products and Components to Install window. enter the directory where your current BMC products are installed. see “Determining whether to install locally or remotely” on page 40. This product directory is appended to the BMC Products Installation Directory that you entered in step 5. For help in determining which roles to select. select Create an image to be installed later.x Product Directory window. enter the directory in which you want to install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. 8 In the Provide the PATROL 3. select one of the following options: I To install locally now. 6 In the Select System Roles window.Understanding the Basics of PATROL. I To help you determine which of installation options you want to select. enter the directory where you want the installation image stored. 48 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . select I want to install products on this computer now and click Next to continue. see “Determining the roles that each computer performs” on page 42 and “Determining where to install” on page 44. The PATROL product directory that you specify in step 8 is appended to the path that you enter in this step. if different from the default. select the roles to indicate the components that you want to install and click Next.Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation 4 In the Select Installation Option window. and click Next to continue. select PATROL Solutions for Databases => PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and click Next. For more information about the PATROL consoles. PATROL Console Server. To create an installable image that you can install locally and remotely later. NOTE PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not provide a QuickStart package.

review the selections carefully. click Start Install. (Next does not appear until the installation is 100% complete. you can use this information to make sure that you make the same selections when installing from the language pack CD as you used to install using the product CD. to start installing.) 11 In the results window. when the Japanese language pack CD is installed.Installing a language pack 9 In the Review Selections and Start Install window. you can use this information to keep track of the selections that you made for each installation. For example. 10 When the status window reports that the installation is 100% complete. NOTE You must install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server before you can install a language pack for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. click Back or. click View Log to review the details of the installation or click Exit to close the installation utility. 2 The windows that display during this install are very similar to the windows you used when installing PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. To install a language pack 1 From the language pack CD. If you are planning to install a language pack.exe. TIP Capture the Review Selections and Start Install screen and save it for further reference. click Next to view the results window. and then. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server operates with a Japanese user interface. Also. and percentage complete. For each window. current milestones. Installing a language pack A language pack provides translations of all messages and user interface elements. A status window opens that contains current messages. make the same choices in the language pack installation window as you did in the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server installation window. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 49 . to make changes. if you are installing PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on several computers. Language pack CDs are always installed after the product has been installed. run setup.

2 Ensure that no one is accessing any PATROL files or directories. you can use the “Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation” on page 46 installation instructions. old product files in PATROL_CACHE are loaded instead of the newly installed files from PATROL_HOME.Upgrading and saving customizations Upgrading and saving customizations BMC Software recommends that you migrate customizations that were made to KMs by using PATROL Configuration Manager. and related services. Preparing to upgrade and migrate Whether you are upgrading and saving your customizations or simply upgrading. To back up the current installation and move files from PATROL_CACHE 1 Shut down any PATROL Agents. If you do not. Consoles.” If you want to upgrade and save your customizations by migrating your customizations manually. You can also migrate your KM customizations to a new version of the KM and distribute those migrated customizations to PATROL Agents throughout your enterprise by using the Distribution Server. you must first back up the current installation and remove PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files from PATROL_CACHE. 3 Perform a full backup of the following directories: I I PATROL_HOME for agent and console installation directories PATROL_CACHE for the console working cache 50 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . For more information about using PATROL Configuration Manager. see “Migrating customizations with the PATROL Configuration Manager” on page 51 and Chapter 4. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. WARNING You must remove the current PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files from the PATROL_CACHE directory for the console.

“Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. depending on the type of customization. Uninstall the old version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. 2. 3. 4.Migrating customizations with the PATROL Configuration Manager 4 Remove all PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files with the following naming patterns from PATROL_CACHE\knowledge and PATROL_CACHE\psl: I I MSSQL* RA1MSSQL* Migrating customizations with the PATROL Configuration Manager PATROL Configuration Manager allows you to manage customizations to KMs. Before migrating any changes to the KMs. follow these steps: 1. 5. I Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 51 . Ensure that you have made a record of your customizations and have backed up the customized files in the PATROL_HOME and PATROL_CACHE directories. you should review Chapter 4. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server.” I If you have localized parameters or global parameters that have customized poll times or thresholds. Use the Recovery Action Event Management commands as described in the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide to migrate your custom recovery actions to the PATROL Configuration Manager.” If you have created custom recovery actions. Ensure that you have made a record of your custom recovery actions. use the AS_CHANGESPRING KM to migrate these customizations into PATROL Configuration Manager rulesets as described in the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide and in Chapter 4. Install the new version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server as described in the section “Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation” on page 46.

enter the customizations that you identified in step 2. Migrate these customizations manually. Reapply your changes by using a PATROL Developer Console. If you created a new PSL file (not shipped by BMC Software) outside of a . one by one. that code will be overwritten when you install a new version of the product. and . 3 Incorporate your customizations to the new PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server by performing the following steps: A Restart the PATROL console. I I 52 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .psl files that were shipped by BMC Software. Rename any terms match existing keywords. search your .km files or stored in separate . If you modified PSL code embedded in a KM. B Load the newly installed PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. you must manually re-edit the PSL code in the new KM by using a PATROL Developer Console to reapply your changes. To migrate customizations manually 1 Move the earlier PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server installation to a new directory that is different from PATROL_HOME.psl. To migrate customized PATROL Script Language code Customizations made to PATROL Script Language (PSL) code are not automatically migrated. .ctg files for terms that you may have used that have since been adopted by BMC Software as PSL keywords. or if you created new PSL code (not shipped by BMC Software) and embedded it in a KM that was shipped by BMC Software. C Using a PATROL Developer Console. using the following guidelines: I If you modified . 2 Identify the customizations in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server by comparing the content of the text file of the KM in the current PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server version with the content of the text file for the customized KM that is saved in the PATROL console cache backup directory.km.km file. These customizations may be embedded in .psl files.km files by using a PATROL Developer Console to reapply your changes. You must manually edit the new .Migrating customizations manually Migrating customizations manually Use the following procedures to manually migrate customizations from an earlier version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to the new version.

ppf file in the previous step.ppf file.Creating an installation package of the migrated and merged KM NOTE If you have customized a PSL library that was compiled with an earlier version of the PSL compiler than the version that was provided with PATROL 3. you must create an installation package that can be used with the installation utility to install locally on one computer or with Distribution Server to install remotely on multiple computers. you would use pksckm as the directory name. You will be replacing the files there with the merged files that contain your customizations.ppf file. 2 Navigate to the packaged_results directory for the merged package and open the . 3 Rename the packaged_results directory with the file name that you found in the . Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 53 .2. 1 Copy the entire contents of the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server CD to a temporary directory on a hard drive on a server. This file name is the name of the directory that you will look for in the Products directory of the CD image.00/030107-233044 was listed in the first line of the . You can delete this temporary directory after you have successfully created an installable image. EXAMPLE If pksckm/4.09i.5 or later compiler. Creating an installation package of the migrated and merged KM After you have migrated and merged your customizations. 4 Copy the renamed directory to the Products directory of the temporary directory that you used in Step 1. 5 Copy the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server CD image to the server where you plan to install PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. you must manually recompile the library by using a PATROL 3.ppf file with a text editor.2. Write down the file name in the first line of the .

perform the following tasks: “Importing a CD or customized installation package into Distribution Server” on page 55.First-time installation using the Distribution Server First-time installation using the Distribution Server The PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server can be installed locally to a single computer or remotely to multiple computers using the Distribution Server. and reinstall products on remote systems from one central location. and diagnosis problems. gather distribution data. Details about installing a product across an enterprise to multiple computers by using the Distribution Server are beyond the scope of this book. However. It also provides a high-level overview of the enterprise installation process. I I I I To import PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server into the Distribution Server. uninstall. 54 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . this section does describe how to import the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server product into the Distribution Server. upgrade. Maintain multiple product versions to be distributed. Create collections of products and system groups to distribute multiple products to multiple systems in one distribution. View reports to check distribution status. Schedule a distribution for a specific date and time. With the Distribution Server you can perform the following actions: I Install. Distribution Server features You use the Distribution Server to perform remote installations or uninstallations of BMC Software distributed systems products across multiple systems from a central location.

Before you begin I The customized installation packages that resulted from “Creating an installation package of the migrated and merged KM” on page 53 must be accessible to the Distribution Server. 2 In the Distribution Server tab area. 3 In the list area.1. 7 Click Import to import the selected components. Ensure that you use Distribution Server version 7. the resultant directory structure would resemble merged_CD\Products\pskchm. after migrating your customizations and creating a customized installation package. You would select the directory merged_CD. connect to the Distribution Server. click the Import button. EXAMPLE Assuming that you copied the CD image into a directory called merged_CD and then. I To import components in to the Distribution Server 1 Using the Distribution Server Manager.01 or later. you can specify them by using the NFS name and path. If the components are not accessible on a local drive. 6 Select the check boxes for the components that you want to import and click OK. click the Components tab. you copied the updated package to the directory containing the CD image. 4 Navigate to the location where the components are located and click Next. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 55 .Importing a CD or customized installation package into Distribution Server Importing a CD or customized installation package into Distribution Server This task describes how to import components into the Distribution Server for deployment to multiple locations. 5 Select the directory that contains the Products directory (do not select the Products directory itself).

3 Add the systems and install the Distribution Client on the Systems tab of the Distribution Manager. 2 Arrange components in collections on the Collections tab of the Distribution Manager. For detailed instructions about how to perform remote installations with the Distribution Server. 3 Configure the collections on the Configurations tab of the Distribution Manager. 2 Add accounts and create profiles for the systems on the Systems tab of the Distribution Manager. To distribute products 1 Distribute configurations of collections to system groups on the Distributions tab of the Distribution Manager. 56 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . To set up systems 1 Create accounts in the operating system of the computers to which you want to distribute PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. To set up products 1 Import components into the Distribution Server repository on the Components tab of the Distribution Manager. 4 Arrange systems in system groups on the Systems tab of the Distribution Manager. see the Distribution Server Getting Started Guide. The tasks can be grouped into three stages.Installing with the Distribution Server Installing with the Distribution Server Once you have imported the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server into the Distribution Server. 2 Run reports to review distributions on the Reports tab of the Distribution Manager. you must perform the following tasks within the tool.

01 through 4. Otherwise. PATROL Help does not support Netscape Navigator 6. you must install the UNIX version of the Help browser separately if it is not already installed. you could experience product failures. You must install Netscape Navigator on the computer where the PATROL console resides.x to display the online Help. However. Setting environment variables for the browser The Help browser does not run unless the LANG.0. Installing the UNIX version of the Help browser The browser that is required for the UNIX version of PATROL Help on PATROL version 3. For PATROL Central Operator consoles (either Microsoft Windows Edition or Web Edition). the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is automatically installed when you install the console KM package to the console. you must run Netscape Navigator version 4.Installing the online Help Installing the online Help For the PATROL consoles. The following sections describe these variables. Type of shell Bourne Korn C Export command for LANG variable LANG=C export LANG export LANG=C setenv LANG=C Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 57 . You can install Netscape anywhere on your UNIX computer as long as the binary is in the path. if you are running a Red Hat Linux platform.x is Netscape Navigator version 3.78. the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is automatically installed when you install the KM package to the console server. LANG variable You must set the UNIX LANG environment variable to C for Netscape Navigator to work properly. and PATROL_BROWSER environment variables are set properly. Currently. PATH. If you plan to install the UNIX version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on a PATROL Console for UNIX.

add the directory to the PATROL user account path. it uses the command in the PATROL_BROWSER environment variable. Type of shell Bourne Korn C Export command for PATH variable PATH=$PATH:/netscape_location export PATH export PATH=$PATH:/netscape_location setenv PATH=$PATH:/netscape_location PATROL_BROWSER variable When PATROL starts the Help browser. If the directory containing the Netscape files is not in the path. the PATROL_BROWSER environment variable contains the following command: Type of shell Bourne Korn C Export command for PATROL_BROWSER variable PATROL_BROWSER=netscape -display $DISPLAY -install -iconic export LANG export PATROL_BROWSER=netscape -display $DISPLAY -install -iconic setenv PATROL_BROWSER=netscape -display $DISPLAY -install -iconic To use different arguments. This requirement applies only to the PATROL user account on the PATROL console computer. EXAMPLE For Korn shell: export PATROL_BROWSER=/usr/local/bin/netscape -raise 58 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . By default. set the value of PATROL_BROWSER to the appropriate string.Setting environment variables for the browser PATH variable The PATROL user account PATH variable must contain the location of the directory containing the Netscape files.

it uses a private color map. you must be aware of the following restrictions: I Netscape Navigator displays warning messages when it is invoked multiple times within the same user account because of its file-locking mechanism. however. However. you might remove files needed to perform uninstallation of other BMC Software products. I I Consult your Netscape Navigator documentation for specific platform requirements and restrictions. and then a browser window that contains the Help is displayed. Use one of the following procedures to uninstall PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server: I I “To uninstall PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server from a Windows environment” on page 60 “To uninstall PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server from a UNIX environment” on page 60 Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 59 . you might experience color flashing on your workstation. the Netscape Navigator window is displayed as an icon. For more detailed information about how to uninstall. See “Determining the version of the installation utility” on page 40. may not always display the Help files properly. it may take a few seconds for the Help browser to launch. As a result. you can set the value of PATROL_BROWSER so that the colormap option is not specified. By default. It will. continue functioning. In addition. Two windows will be displayed. If you use a different version of the installation program to uninstall.Additional considerations for using online Help for UNIX Additional considerations for using online Help for UNIX When you select Help from the PATROL console on a UNIX system. If so. The eXceed for Windows NT X Window Server product by Hummingbird Communication Ltd. when Netscape Navigator starts. some subsequent color requests might fail and the online Help will be improperly displayed. see the PATROL Installation Reference Manual. First. Uninstalling PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server You must use the same version of the installation utility that you used to install your current version of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to uninstall the product.

5 Review your selections and click Uninstall. 3 Select the installation directory from which you want to remove a product. NOTE As an option.sh to launch the installation utility in uninstall mode. click Next. 4 Select the product or products that you want to uninstall. 60 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . To uninstall PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server from a Windows environment 1 From the Uninstall directory in your BMC Software product installation directory./uninstall. and click Next. After the uninstallation is complete. you can launch the installation utility in uninstall mode by choosing Start => Settings => Control Panel => Add/Remove Programs and double-clicking BMC Software Tools in the Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box. and click Next. 3 Select the installation directory from which you want to remove a product. To uninstall PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server from a UNIX environment 1 Change to the Uninstall directory in your BMC Software product installation directory and enter the command . and click Next. you might need to stop any PATROL processes that are running on the computers where you want to uninstall PATROL. 4 Select the product or products that you want to uninstall. 2 In the Welcome window.exe to launch the installation utility in uninstall mode. 2 In the Welcome window. and click Next. a window is displayed that tells you whether the uninstallation was successful. click Next.Uninstalling PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server NOTE Before you can uninstall PATROL products. double-click uninstall. 5 Review your selections and click Uninstall.

“Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. parameters. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online menu commands. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to change configuration variables or parameter Server” properties how to use PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server functionality to monitor and manage SQL Servers how to access the KM menu commands. “Accessing menu commands.Where to go from here Where to go from here The following table suggests topics that you should read next: Topic how to setup and configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Source of information Chapter 3. and online Help” definitions and default values for parameters Appendix B. and InfoBoxes Help Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 61 . and online Help Chapter 5. “Agent configuration variables” detailed descriptions of the applications. “Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. InfoBoxes. InfoBoxes.” and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help how to use PATROL Configuration Manager Chapter 4.” and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help Appendix A. “Parameter definitions and defaults” consumer and collector parameter dependencies PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix C. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies” Appendix D.

Where to go from here 62 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing and configuring a node-level cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring a cluster by using a PATROL Agent on each node . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loading and unloading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring a SQL Server instance without an sa password . . . . . . . . . . . File and file group monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SQL Server Agent monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing the default settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saving the changes . . . . . . . . . . . Determining how you should configure a cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replication monitoring . . . . . . . . . Parameter defaults. . . . . . . . . . . . Database monitoring. . . . . . . . . . Configuring a SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accelerating discovery and reviewing error messages . Installing and configuring a cluster with a virtual PATROL Agent . . . . .Chapter 3 64 64 66 69 72 76 79 69 80 81 81 81 82 82 82 83 84 85 86 87 87 89 89 90 93 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 3 This chapter presents the following topics: Setting up and configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. . . . . Reviewing how PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server handles clustering events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring a cluster by using a virtual PATROL Agent. . . User and process monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .km files . . . . . . . . . . . . . Error log monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up PATROL in a clustered environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Object monitoring . . . Verifying that the SQL Server is discovered and online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

km files.km files into your PATROL console.km files that it provides. WARNING PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server requires the presence of all of its . you can save your console configuration so that PATROL will automatically load PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server the next time you start your PATROL console. and do not delete any of the .Setting up and configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Setting up and configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Once you have completed installation. After you load the files once. Load the MSSQL_SERVER. you must complete the setup steps before you can use PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to monitor your Microsoft SQL Servers (SQL Servers). PATROL also provides you with a way to unload any files that you no longer require.km files to operate successfully. you must load its . Before you begin This section assumes that you have completed the following tasks: I I started a PATROL console started a PATROL Agent and SQL Server on each computer you want to monitor 64 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .kml file and all of the . This section contains instructions on how to perform the following setup steps: I I I I I load the files into the console (and unload unwanted files) verify that the SQL Server is discovered and online configure the SQL Servers accelerate discovery and review the error files save the changes Loading and unloading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Before you can begin using PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server.

load the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files and the configuration file for the agent on the computer where the PATROL Agent is installed.km files Follow the instructions that apply to your console. 2 Select the computers on which you want to load KMs. and click Next.Microsoft Windows Edition displays the wizard. consider the following options: I If you want PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to start automatically whenever you open the console.kml file is listed once for each computer. The MSSQL_SERVER. The wizard displays a list of available .km files with PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition 1 On the Common Tasks tab of the taskpad. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 65 . To load .kml and computer pair that you want to load. 4 Select the check boxes for each MSSQL_SERVER. load the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server files on the computer where your PATROL console resides. If you want to manually load PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server by using the console. 3 Select the check boxes for the computers on which you want to load KMs. The wizard lists each computer on which a PATROL Agent has been installed.Loading and unloading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Before loading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. and click Next.km files with PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition 1 From the Monitored Systems page. The Load KMs page opens. PATROL loads PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the selected computers. 5 Click Next and click Finish. click the Load Knowledge Modules icon. PATROL Central .kml files for each computer selected in the previous step. click the Load/Unload KMs button. I Loading . To load . 2 Click Next to start the wizard. listing each computer on which a PATROL Agent has been installed.

Loading and unloading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server The Load KMs page displays a list of available . PATROL loads PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on all of the computers to which your console is connected. The Load KMs dialog box displays a list of available .kml files. To load .km files If you no longer want to use an application class.km file so that the application class no longer appears in the console.km files with the PATROL Console for UNIX – Developer 1 From the PATROL Console for UNIX menu bar. ensure that the KM is installed on the appropriate computer and select only that computer in Step 2.km or .kml file.kml file that was not listed in Step 2. To load . PATROL loads PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on all of the computers listed under PATROLMainMap. Unloading .km files with the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows – Developer 1 From the PATROL Console for Windows menu bar.km and . you must choose that computer by itself to load the file. If you selected more than one computer. If a particular . choose File => Load KM. In some consoles. NOTE If you want to load a .kml files.kml file and click Open. and click Open. 2 Select the MSSQL_SERVER. the only .kml files. PATROL loads PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the selected computers.km file using a console.kml file was installed only on one computer. choose File => Load KM. When you unload or delete a .kml files that are listed are the ones that have been installed on all of the selected computers. 2 Select the MSSQL_SERVER. 66 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . unloading is referred to as deleting. you can unload its . the file is not deleted from the patrol\knowledge directories on the PATROL console or the PATROL Agent computers. 3 Select the MSSQL_SERVER.kml file and click Finish. The Load KMs dialog box displays a list of available .

click the Load/Unload KMs button. Currently loaded . Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 67 . These . The wizard displays a list of application class names (that correspond to . 4 Select the check boxes for the . The Load KMs page opens.Loading and unloading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server To unload .km files will no longer be in the current management profile.km files.km files from the current management profile. The wizard lists each computer on which a PATROL Agent has been installed. click the Unload Knowledge Modules icon. and click Next and then click Finish.km files that you specified. The console removes the .km and computer pair that you want to unload. The console removes the selected .km files are highlighted in the list. 2 Click Next to start the wizard.km files that you want to unload and click Finish. listing each computer on which a PATROL Agent has been installed.km files.km files.km file names) for each computer selected. 2 Select the computers from which you want to unload .km files with PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition 1 On the Common Tasks tab of the taskpad. 3 Cancel the selection of the . and click Next.km files with PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition 1 From the Managed Systems page. The Load KMs page displays a list of . 3 Select the check boxes for the computers from which you want to unload . To unload . and click Next.

The application class is removed from your cache directory and your console session file.km files with the PATROL Console for UNIX – Developer Unloading a KM is referred to as deleting a KM in the PATROL Console for UNIX. The console displays a dialog box that asks if you want to delete the selected application.km files with the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows – Developer Unloading a KM is referred to as deleting a KM in the PATROL Console for Windows. 1 From the KM tab of the tree view. 2 Click the name of the application class that you want to delete. choose Attributes => Application Classes. 1 From the PATROL Main window. 4 From the console menu bar.Loading and unloading PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server To unload . To unload . choose Edit => Delete. right-click the application class name that you want to delete and choose Delete from the pop-up menu. 2 Click Yes to delete the application class. The application class is removed from your cache directory and your console session file. If you do not save your changes. The PATROL Console for UNIX removes the application class name from the List of Application Classes. The console displays the List of Application Classes window.km files will reload the next time you start the console. choose File => Save KM to save your changes. 3 Repeat step 1 and step 2 until you have deleted all of the application classes associated with the KM that you want to delete. 3 From the List of Application Classes menu bar. 4 Repeat step 2 and step 3 until you have deleted all of the application classes associated with the KM that you want to delete. the . The console highlights the application class name. 68 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

km files that you loaded into the PATROL console are reloaded into the console each time that you start the console.Verifying that the SQL Server is discovered and online 5 From the List of Application Classes menu bar. If you do not save your changes.km files that you unloaded are not reloaded into the PATROL console the next time that you start the console. The changes that you made to the console when loading and unloading . the .km files will reload the next time you start the console.km file are saved in the console cache file. Saving the changes Saving the changes that you made to the PATROL console setup ensures that I the . and which application icons do not appear automatically. the . I To save changes to the PATROL console In the PATROL console menu bar. and where those applications appear when they are enabled or set up. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 69 . choose File => Save KM. Verifying that the SQL Server is discovered and online This section describes which application icons should appear and where they appear. choose File => Save KM to save your changes.

Verifying that the SQL Server is discovered and online The following PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server application class instance icons appear by default: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I MSSQL_SERVER MSSQL_SERVER_AVAILABILITY MSSQL_SERVER_CACHE MSSQL_SERVER_CAPACITY MSSQL_SERVER_COLLECTORS MSSQL_SERVER_DB MSSQL_SERVER_DISK MSSQL_SERVER_ERRORLOG MSSQL_SERVER_LOCKS MSSQL_SERVER_NETWORK MSSQL_SERVER_PERFORMANCE MSSQL_SERVER_PROC_CACHE MSSQL_SERVER_SQLSERVER_SETUP MSSQL_SERVER_USER_DEF_CNTRS The following PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server application class instance icons do not appear by default: I I I I I I MSSQL_SERVER_FILE MSSQL_SERVER_FILEGROUP MSSQL_SERVER_PUBLISHED MSSQL_SERVER_SUBSCRIBERS MSSQL_SERVER_OBJECT MSSQL_SERVER_USERS The following PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server application classes are not represented by icons: I I MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN application MSSQL_SERVER_ LOGIN_MGMT application 70 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

See “Replication monitoring” on page 82 and “Monitoring replication” on page 135. 2 Double-click on the MSSQL_SERVER application instance icon to open the window that contains the application icons as shown in Figure 6. 3 Double-click on the MSSQL_SERVER_DB application icon to open a window that contains a MSSQL_SERVER_DB application instance icon for each database discovered for the SQL Server instance. The MSSQL_SERVER_SUBSCRIBERS and MSSQL_SERVER_ PUBLISHED application instance icons appear under the MSSQL_SERVER icon when you have replication defined and enabled. SQL Server. The MSSQL_SERVER_USERS application instance icons appear under the MSSQL_SERVER icon when you change the default settings for user monitoring. Figure 6 Computer. See “Error log monitoring” on page 81 and “Monitoring error logs” on page 124. as shown in Figure 7. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 71 . See “User and process monitoring” on page 83 and “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137.Verifying that the SQL Server is discovered and online To verify that the objects are discovered 1 Double-click the PatrolMainMap to open the window that contains the MSSQL_SERVER application instance icon. and application icons Computer icon MSSQL_SERVER application icon MSSQL_SERVER_DB application icon The MSSQL_SERVER_ERRORLOG application icons appear under the MSSQL_SERVER icon when you have enabled error log monitoring.

The MSSQL_SERVER_OBJECT application instance icons appear under the MSSQL_SERVER_DB application icon when you select an object to monitor. See “Object monitoring” on page 82 and “Monitoring objects” on page 134. PATROL records the information provided in the PATROL Agent configuration database. See “Verifying installation requirements” on page 34. The MSSQL_SERVER_FILE and MSSQL_SERVER_FILEGROUP application instance icons appear under the MSSQL_SERVER_DB application instance icon when you enable file and file group monitoring.Configuring a SQL Server Figure 7 Database application instance icons The name of the database the MSSQL_SERVER_DB application instance represents displays under each Database instance icon. See “File and file group monitoring” on page 82 and “Monitoring files and file groups” on page 133. right-click the server icon and choose Show System Output Window. If the appropriate icons do not appear after two to three minutes. Configuring a SQL Server This section describes how to configure a SQL Server by supplying information about it. This section contains the following tasks: I I I I open the SQL Server Instance Setup dialog box configure the login used by PATROL that has system administrator privileges configure the login used by PATROL that has user privileges verify the accounts and close the dialog box 72 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

Configuring a SQL Server

Before you begin
These tasks assume that you have completed the following tasks:
I I

loaded PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server verified that the SQL Server instance is discovered and online

To open the SQL Server Instance Setup dialog box
Choose KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => SQL Server Instance Setup from the Server application pop-up menu. The SQL Server Instance Setup dialog box is displayed as shown in Figure 8 on page 74.

Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server

73

Configuring a SQL Server

Figure 8

SQL Server Instance Setup dialog box

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server automatically detects the security mode of the SQL Server and displays only the appropriate radio buttons in the SQL Server Instance dialog box shown in Figure 8.
I

If the SQL Server is configured for integrated security, only the Integrated radio button is displayed. If the SQL Server is configured for standard security, only the Standard radio button is displayed. If the SQL Server is configured for mixed security, both the Standard and the Integrated radio buttons are displayed.

I

I

74

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started

Configuring a SQL Server

In the top half of the SQL Server Instance Setup dialog box is where you configure the login that PATROL uses for those functions that require a System Administrator (SA) privilege. In the bottom half of this dialog box, you configure the login that PATROL uses for those functions that require User privileges. For more information, see “Verifying installation requirements” on page 34.

To configure the login used by PATROL that has system administrator privileges 1 If your SQL Server is configured for mixed security, click either Standard or
Integrated as the security mode to use with this login.

2 Enter the user name for the system administrator (sa) account that PATROL for
Microsoft SQL Server needs to monitor your Microsoft SQL Server installation.

3 Enter and reenter the password for the sa account. NOTE
If you chose Integrated security, you must enter a valid Windows login account (see Figure 8 on page 74).

4 If you chose Integrated security for the sa account:
I

Click Yes in the Grant admin. privilege to this login? field if the Windows login account you entered in Step 3 does not already have the required sa privilege. Click No in the Grant admin. privilege to this login? field if the specified Windows login account you entered in Step 3 already has the sa privilege.

I

To configure the login used by PATROL that has user privileges 1 If your SQL Server is configured for mixed security, click either Standard or
Integrated in the Security mode to use with this login field.

2 Enter the user name for the PATROL account that PATROL for Microsoft SQL
Server needs to monitor your Microsoft SQL Server installation.

NOTE
If you chose Integrated security, the PATROL account must be a valid Windows login account.

3 Enter and reenter the password for the PATROL account.
Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 75

Configuring a SQL Server instance without an sa password

4 If you chose Integrated security for the sa account:
I

If the specified sa account does not have the system administrator privilege, click Yes in the Grant login to MS SQL Server? field. If the specified sa account already has the system administrator privilege, click No in the Grant login to MS SQL Server? field.

I

5 To select whether you want PATROL to add a SQL Server login ID for the
PATROL account, click Yes or No in the Add this login to MS SQL Server? field. If you chose Standard security for the PATROL account in Step1, and if you clicked No in Step 5, you must have already added a SQL Server login ID for the PATROL account. If you chose Integrated security for the PATROL account in Step 1, and if you clicked No in Step 4, the PATROL account automatically maps to the default login account that you specified when you configured the SQL Server security options. In addition, PATROL is only able to monitor the databases that use that default login account.

To verify the accounts and close the dialog box 1 To verify whether the accounts are correct, display a confirmation message, and
keep the dialog box open, click Verify.

2 To close the dialog box, click Done.
If the accounts are incorrect, a message is displayed and the dialog box stays open.

Configuring a SQL Server instance without an sa password
You can configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to monitor SQL Server instances without the sa password. The configuration uses the privileged login to add stored procedures and to add the monitoring user to the monitored databases. After the configuration, the sa user name is stored in the pconfig file but the password is not stored in the pconfig file. This configuration sets the value of the /MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstanceName/GENUSERFLAG variable to 1. In the SQL Config Setup dialog box, the top section is used by a SQL Server login or Windows user with SQL Server admin privileges. The bottom section is used by a SQL Server login or Windows user with SQL Server user privileges, who is defined as a monitoring user.

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PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started

2 In the Security mode to use with this login check box. 6 Click Verify. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 77 . Table 5 lists the configuration status of the authentication mode used in the SQL Config Setup dialog box. 3 Enter the SQL Server login name and password of the login who has admin privileges.Configuring a SQL Server instance without an sa password NOTE After you execute the KM Commands => KM Admin => SQL Config Set up menu command. it will be created. the following message is displayed for a limited time in the system output window: close: bad channel number. select Standard. You can ignore this message. A confirmation message is shown. 4 In the Login used by Patrol for SQL KM Monitoring section. 5 Enter the login name and password to use for general user monitoring. select Standard. If the login does not exist in the SQL Server. Table 5 SQL Server Config Setup authentication mode User login mode used by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Admin login mode used by PATROL Server for Microsoft SQL Server Standarda Integratedb Standardc Integrated a b c d d configured configured not supported configured refers to a SQL Server login refers to a Windows user refers to a SQL Server login with admin privileges refers to a Windows user with SQL Server admin privileges To configure a SQL Server using the standard security mode for the SQL Server admin and user logins 1 Open the SQL Config Setup dialog box by choosing KM Commands => KM Admin => SQL Config Set up.

3 Enter the Windows user name and password for the user who has SQL Server admin privileges.Configuring a SQL Server instance without an sa password 7 Click DONE to exit. To configure a SQL Server using the integrated security mode for the SQL Server admin and user logins 1 Open the SQL Config Setup dialog box by choosing KM Commands => KM Admin => SQL Config Set up. select Integrated. The selected server instance is configured for the integrated security mode for the Windows user. 4 In the Login used by Patrol for SQL KM Monitoring section. 78 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . select Integrated. A confirmation message is shown. 3 Enter the Windows user name and password for the user who has SQL Server admin privileges. it will be registered. To configure a SQL Server using the integrated security mode for the SQL Server admin login and standard security mode for the user login 1 Open the SQL Config Setup dialog box by choosing KM Commands => KM Admin => SQL Config Set up. 5 Enter the login name and password for general user monitoring. select Standard. 5 Enter the Windows user name and password for the user who has SQL Server user privileges. If the Windows user has not been registered in the SQL Server. 6 Click Verify. 7 Click DONE to exit. 2 In the Security mode to use with this login check box. 4 In the Login used by Patrol for SQL KM Monitoring section. 2 In the Security mode to use with this login check box. select Integrated. The selected server instance is configured for the standard security mode for the SQL Server login.

Discovery takes place immediately. If you want to use PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server in this security combination. 6 Click Verify. use the KM Commands => KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => SQL Server Instance Setup menu command to configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. 7 Click DONE to exit. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 79 . and you cannot configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server for general user monitoring. if any. choose the PATROL => Force Discovery menu command. choose KM Commands => Trigger Agent Activities => Perform Application Discovery. To trigger application discovery From the pop-up menu accessed from the PATROL_NT Agent icon. This configuration stores the SQL Server admin login password information in the pconfig file and disables the general user monitoring mode. It describes how you can accelerate discovery. The selected server instance is configured for the standard security mode for the SQL Server login.Accelerating discovery and reviewing error messages If the login does not exist in the SQL Server. To configure a SQL Server using the standard security mode for the SQL Server admin login and integrated security mode for the user login The combination of using the admin login with standard security mode and the user login with integrated security mode is not supported. You can also perform this task from the Host icon. the CheckConfiguration parameter goes into an alarm state. it will be created. A confirmation message is shown. Accelerating discovery and reviewing error messages This section is optional and it assumes that you have the PATROL for Windows KM installed. If you try to configure the SQL Server instance in this way. Right-click on the Host icon and from the KM Commands. refresh parameters. from the PATROL console. and review any error messages.

The system output log displays in the System Output Window. Within one application discovery cycle (approximately 40 seconds). based on the number of databases that are monitored. Refer to the PATROL user guide for your operating system for more information. Reviewing the default settings PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides default settings for the following monitoring options and parameters: I I I I I I I I SQL Server Agent monitoring(see page 81) error log monitoring (see page 81) database monitoring (see page 81) object monitoring (see page 82) file and file group monitoring (see page 82) replication monitoring (see page 82) user and process monitoring (see page 83) parameter defaults (see page 84) 80 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . To review error messages From the pop-up menu accessed from the computer icon in the PatrolMainMap window. The Database application discovery might take longer. choose Show System Output Window.Reviewing the default settings To refresh parameters From the pop-up menu accessed from the Server application instance. choose KM Admin => Refresh Parameters. most of the discovered objects (instances) should change to the online state.

Use the KM Commands => KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command to enable monitoring of the SQL Server Agent. Use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Set DB Auto Discovery menu command from the Server application pop-up menu to change the default settings for monitoring databases.SQL Server Agent monitoring SQL Server Agent monitoring By default. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 81 . For more information. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server automatically monitors all databases and creates a Database application instance for each database that resides on the SQL Server. NOTE PATROL does not monitor databases that contain unsupported characters or databases that it cannot access. Once monitoring is enabled for error logs. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server uses a filter to capture the SQL Server error messages that contain the character strings that you enter by using the Setup Error Log String Monitoring menu command from the Error Log application instance. see “Monitoring error logs” on page 124. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not automatically monitor the SQL Server Agent. For step-by-step instructions. SQL Server Agent error logs and the SQL Server error logs. see “Monitoring SQL Server Agent” on page 121. You can also use this command to exclude databases from monitoring. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. For more information about monitoring the SQL Server Agent. Database monitoring By default. Error log monitoring Error Log application monitoring is disabled by default. For step-by-step instructions. You can change the default at any time and specify only certain databases to monitor. Use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu from the Server application pop-up menu to enable the monitoring of the SQL Server Agent.

For more information. The current SQL Server is configured as the distribution server. The SQL Server you are monitoring is configured for replication. see “Monitoring objects” on page 134. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server creates an Object application instance for that object. NOTE PATROL does not allow you to create published articles or subscribers. Use the KM Admin => Object Space Monitor command from the Server application pop-up menu to specify the database objects you want to monitor. Subscribers and Published application instances appear only when the following conditions exist: I I I You have enabled the monitoring of replication. File and file group monitoring By default. see “Monitoring databases” on page 129. You must enable file and file group monitoring using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu from the Server application pop-up menu. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not automatically monitor published articles and SQL Servers that are subscribing to those articles. 82 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not automatically monitor files and file groups.Object monitoring For more information. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not automatically monitor individual database objects (user tables and indexes). For stepby-step instructions. see “Monitoring files and file groups” on page 133. For more information. Object monitoring By default. For step-by-step instructions. Replication monitoring By default. For step-by-step instructions. When you specify a monitored object. refer to the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. You can manually set up individual user tables or indexes to monitor. You can create published articles and subscribers from the SQL Server Enterprise Manager sql.

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not create Users application instances. which goes into an alarm state and displays information in a task output window. For stepby-step instructions. see “Monitoring replication” on page 135. The default is three minutes. For more information. For step-by-step instructions. see “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137. which goes into an alarm state and displays information in a task output window (the problem alert methods). You can also change the automatic monitoring setup and exclude specific users from monitoring. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server allows you to select a specific user or process for monitoring. User and process monitoring By default. The default is 20 minutes. Blocking and idle processes A blocking process holds locks and blocks other users for at least the minimum amount of time configured (blocked detection time). It does automatically monitor and create reports to let you know when user processes are causing the following problems: I I Processes are blocking other processes (blocker processes). Processes are idle. Blocking processes are reported by the BlockerProcs parameter.User and process monitoring Use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu to enable the monitoring of replication. refer to the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. For more information. You can change the default blocked detection time or the default idle detection time for all users and the default problem alert methods for all users by choosing the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring command from the Server application pop-up menu. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 83 . An idle process is one that has not been accumulating resources for at least the minimum amount of time configured (idle detection time). and it then creates a Users application instance for the specific users or processes that you select. Idle processes are reported by the IdleProcs parameter. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. use the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin commands from the Server application pop-up menu. To change the default settings for user and process monitoring.

You can also exclude a user from automatic monitoring of blocked processes or idle processes. Failover parameter alarm shipped inactive The Failover parameter is shipped with the alarm inactive. refer to Appendix B. repl_publisher. respectively. The active or inactive setting is just one of many property definition defaults contained in the Parameter Properties dialog box. probe.Parameter defaults You can change the default blocked detection time or the default idle detection time for an individual user by choosing the Change Local Defaults command from the User application pop-up menu. parameter type. “Parameter definitions and defaults”or refer to the online Help for that parameter. Property definition defaults Parameter definition defaults include the command type. see “In a clustered environment” on page 91. For detailed instructions about changing default values. the sa. polling time (scheduling). Parameter defaults PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server ships all of its parameters in the active mode. To activate this alarm. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup. I KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Exclude Specific User from monitoring of Blocked Processes KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Exclude Specific User from monitoring of Idle Processes I NOTE By default. For more on the Failover parameter. history retention period. icon type. and alarm ranges. and repl_subscriber logins are excluded from the Auto User Monitoring feature. To view a table that contains the defaults for all PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters. PATROL also provides default automatic recovery actions for key parameters. 84 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . refer to the PATROL user guide for your console. by choosing one of the following commands from the Server application popup menu.

Setting up PATROL in a clustered environment Automated recovery action (ARA) defaults PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is set up to automatically perform the following actions when any of several key parameters go into a warning or an alarm state: I I I execute an external recovery script ara_MSSQL. Setting up PATROL in a clustered environment You can set up and configure a Microsoft SQL Server cluster for monitoring by PATROL in the following ways: I I by using a virtual PATROL Agent by using node-level PATROL Agents For instructions on how to determine which method you should use and how to set up your Microsoft SQL Server cluster for monitoring. see “Using automatic recovery actions” on page 149.cmd annotate the parameter warning or alarm trigger an event in the PATROL Event Manager (PEM) You can change these defaults at any time. see the following topics: I I I I I I “Determining how you should configure a cluster” on page 86 “Monitoring a cluster by using a virtual PATROL Agent” on page 87 “Installing and configuring a cluster with a virtual PATROL Agent” on page 87 “Monitoring a cluster by using a PATROL Agent on each node” on page 89 “Installing and configuring a node-level cluster” on page 89 “Reviewing how PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server handles clustering events” on page 90 Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 85 . For more information about automated recovery actions.

the Failover parameter is available in this environment. You do not need to configure the SQL Server instances on each cluster node. Parameter history and configuration settings are stored on a shared drive and are. You cannot view parameter history that was collected on another cluster node. you configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the active nodes (that is. decide which of the supported configurations shown in Table 6 you should use to monitor your clustered environment. Instead.Determining how you should configure a cluster Determining how you should configure a cluster Before you begin installing the product in a clustered environment. Only one PATROL Agent runs on each node. available after failover. the virtual SQL Server). I 86 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . the following disadvantages apply: I You must configure each SQL Server to which the instance can fail over. Table 6 Supported configurations for a clustered environment Advantage I Configuration virtual PATROL Agent— use the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard to add the PATROL Agent resource to the cluster group(s) that contains the SQL Servers you want to monitor Disadvantage You must run a virtual PATROL Agent on each cluster resource group that has a SQL Server to monitor. I I I PATROL Agent—run independent PATROL Agents on each cluster node I Because PATROL configuration data and parameter history data are not shared between the PATROL Agents on the cluster nodes. therefore. Only SQL Server instances belonging to the same cluster resource group as the virtual PATROL Agent are discovered.

Installing and configuring a cluster with a virtual PATROL Agent Using the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard.com/ega. you install a virtual PATROL Agent as a resource for each cluster group that contains a SQL Server you want to monitor.bmc. You will need a license and the user name and password provided to you by your sales representative.Monitoring a cluster by using a virtual PATROL Agent Monitoring a cluster by using a virtual PATROL Agent BMC recommends that you use a virtual PATROL Agent to monitor your clustered environment. In a virtual PATROL Agent configuration. see the PATROL for Microsoft Windows Servers Clustering Getting Started manual.1 and higher). you can specify the following properties of a clustered PATROL Agent: I I I PATROL Agent resources communication port for the PATROL Agent location to save history and configuration files In order to configure PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server in a clustered environment you need the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard. install it from your PATROL for Microsoft Windows Servers CD. If you do not have a product CD. The PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard sets the PATROL Agent environment variables that make the history data and configuration settings available upon failover. If you do not have the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard installed.bmc. You install a virtual PATROL Agent using the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 87 . but you have a license for the product and a user name and password provided by your sales representative. For complete instructions on how to use the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard. This manual is available from the PATROL for Microsoft Windows Servers documentation CD or from the BMC Software website: http://www. which is a component of the PATROL for Microsoft Windows Servers product (versions 2. The PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard is used to make the PATROL Agent service a clustered resource. you can download PATROL for Microsoft Windows and the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard from the BMC Software website at http://www.com/ega. This provides the PATROL Agent the ability to failover between nodes while keeping its configuration and history intact.

sql2k\db1. see the PATROL Agent Reference Manual. clustering. sql2k\db2 etc. These groups must contain the following resources: I physical disk to store history and configuration data—preferably a standard cluster-shared disk. See your Microsoft SQL Server documentation for details about SQL Servers. Thus.exe select Start => Programs => BMC PATROL => PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard. I I 4 On each cluster node. network name—a name the virtual PATROL Agent uses to refer to the resources PATROL will monitor. and failovers. To start the wizard. sql2k. For information about how the PATROL Agent supports an application in a cluster environment and what type of failover tolerance it provides. type pcc. use one of the following methods: I I from command prompt. run the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard. the resources can failover to a node. IP address—so that the virtual PATROL Agent can run from any node. This process involves adding the virtual PATROL Agent to the Disk Group that contains the Virtual SQL Server default and named instances that is.Installing and configuring a cluster with a virtual PATROL Agent To use the PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard 1 Create a domain PATROL account with local administrator rights on all SQL Server nodes in the cluster on which PATROL is installed: 2 Using the PATROL account created in step 1. even if that node does not own the cluster IP address. 88 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . Each virtual PATROL Agent must be configured with a unique port number. install the following products on each SQL Server cluster node: I I I PATROL Agent PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard 3 Identify the SQL Server cluster groups into which you want to install a virtual PATROL Agent.

1 Install a PATROL Agent and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on each node in the cluster. Neither PATROL history data nor configuration settings are accessible by the other nodes in a cluster upon failover. 4 Configure the SQL Server name for SQL_SERVER_A by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => SQL Server Name Used By PATROL command. 5 Configure the username and password entries for SQL_SERVER_A using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => SQL Server Instance Setup command from the SQL Server application pop-up menu. you install a PATROL Agent on each cluster node. (See your SQL Server cluster administration documentation for instructions on how to fail over the SQL Server. 2 Start SQL_SERVER_A on node SERVER_ONE. In the dialog box. enter the SQL server name in the form of <Virtual server name>\SQL_SERVER_A. 3 Connect the PATROL console to node SERVER_ONE. from the SQL Server application pop-up menu. NOTE You might want to perform this setup during regularly scheduled maintenance. you must set up and configure each SQL Server instance on the physical PATROL Agents on the cluster nodes to which it can failover. This requires that you fail over each SQL Server to each of the physical PATROL Agents to which it can failover.Monitoring a cluster by using a PATROL Agent on each node Monitoring a cluster by using a PATROL Agent on each node In a PATROL Agent (node-level) configuration.) Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 89 . These agents run independently and are not part of a cluster resource group. Installing and configuring a node-level cluster Use this procedure to configure each SQL Server in a clustered environment that you are monitoring using a PATROL Agent at the node-level. Because PATROL does not share the Agent configuration information between nodes. 6 Fail over SQL_SERVER_A to the next node in the cluster (SERVER_TWO).

If a SQL Server goes down PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server performs differently in a clustered environment than in a non-clustered environment when a SQL Server goes down or is taken offline. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server performs as follows: 1. 90 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . With this configuration. the SQL Server icon does not appear.Reviewing how PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server handles clustering events 7 Connect the PATROL console to node SERVER_TWO and repeat steps 4. 2. and then repeat the process for all other nodes to which the SQL Server is configured to failover. SQL Server icons display as follows: I If a cluster node owns the SQL Server resource group and the SQL Server is running. If a cluster node does not own the SQL Server resource group. 5. and 6. the SQL Server icon appears in online mode. 8 Repeat steps 1 through 7 for each SQL Server in the cluster. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server discovery determines that the SQL Server is down. I I Reviewing how PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server handles clustering events The following topics compare and describe how PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server reacts to a SQL Server going down or coming online when it is not in a clustered environment and when it is in a clustered environment. If a cluster node owns the SQL Server resource group and the SQL Server is not running. In a non-clustered environment When a SQL Server goes down in a non-clustered environment. the SQL Server icon appears in offline mode. The SQLServerStatus parameter (under the MSSQL_SERVER_ AVAILABILITY application) is updated by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server discovery and goes into alarm.

If you are monitoring a virtual PATROL Agent. The Failover parameter is only available from SQL Servers that are monitored using a virtual PATROL Agent.) D. PATROL discovers the other SQL Server during full discovery and creates an instance for that SQL Server in the same way that PATROL discovers and creates an instance for a SQL Server in a non-clustered environment.Reviewing how PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server handles clustering events 3. If you are using a PATROL Agent to monitor at the node-level. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server puts the SQL Server instance in an offline mode. After 5 seconds. The virtual PATROL Agent also fails over. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server discovery determines that the current SQL Server is down. B. After five seconds. (The 5-second delay allows the recovery action for the SQLServerStatus parameter to complete. C. You can configure the Failover parameter to alarm by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup. 2. by default the Failover parameter is set to 1 and is annotated with information about the node that failed.) In a clustered environment When a SQL Server resource group fails over from the current SQL Server to another SQL Server in the cluster. Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 91 . If configured to alarm. the Failover parameter is set to 2 when the virtual PATROL Agent discovers on another node. The SQL Server instance is deleted (only in full discovery). (The five-second delay allows the recovery action for the SQLServerStatus parameter to complete. Once the virtual PATROL Agent discovers on another node. The SQLServerStatus parameter (under the MSSQL_SERVER_ AVAILABILITY application icon) is updated by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server discovery and goes into alarm. 3. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server performs as follows: 1. PATROL puts the SQL Server instance in an offline mode. the following occurs: A.

If no application instance exists for this SQL Server.Reviewing how PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server handles clustering events If a SQL Server comes online PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server performs differently in a clustered environment than in a non-clustered environment when a SQL Server comes online. you will see the Failover parameter. The Failover parameter is available only for SQL Servers that are monitored using a virtual PATROL Agent. In a non-clustered environment When a SQL Server comes up or is brought online (it does not fail over from another cluster node). You can configure the Failover parameter to alarm by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup. You will not see the hardware failure that caused the failover. the Failover parameter is set to 2 when the virtual PATROL Agent discovers on another node. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server discovers the SQL Server during full discovery and creates an instance for that SQL Server in the same way that PATROL discovers and creates an instance for a SQL Server in a non-clustered environment. but once the failover is complete. I 92 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server performs as follows: 1. If configured to alarm. By default the Failover parameter is set to 1 and is annotated with information about the node that failed. It can take several minutes. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server creates one. This occurs during full discovery. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server changes the application instance to an online mode. If you are using a virtual PATROL Agent to monitor. How long this take varies depending on your environment. 2. In a clustered environment When a SQL Server fails over from another node in the cluster to the current node in the cluster. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server performs as follows: I If you are using a PATROL Agent to monitor at the node-level. the virtual SQL Server instance you are monitoring goes offline and then comes back online.

” and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help how to access the KM menu commands. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server” Chapter 5. “Parameter definitions and defaults” Appendix C. “Agent configuration variables” Chapter 3 Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 93 . menu commands. Appendix A. “Accessing menu commands. and online Help InfoBoxes. “Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. The following table suggests topics that you should read next: Topic how to use PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to change configuration variables or parameter properties how to use PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server functionality to monitor and manage SQL Servers Source of information Chapter 4. “Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies” PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix D.” for an overview of the parameters. and online Help” definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies detailed descriptions of the applications.Where to go from here Where to go from here Now that you have installed and configured PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. you might want to read Chapter 5. and InfoBoxes provided by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and how to use those functions to monitor the SQL Servers in your environment. menu commands. parameters. and InfoBoxes Appendix B. InfoBoxes.

Where to go from here 94 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Modifying parameter properties. . . . . . . . . 99 Do not modify configuration variables that are for internal use only . . . . . . . . . 96 Saving backups in PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Verifying changes to configuration variables . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Changing parameter thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Changing parameter polling cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Adding or modifying pconfig variables manually. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Do not deactivate application classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Modifying an instance and deploying the changes to other instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 95 . . . 97 Configuring for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Deactivating parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 4 This chapter presents the following topics: Overview of PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

I This chapter assumes that you have successfully installed and configured the following products: I I PATROL Configuration Manager PATROL Knowledge Module (KM) for Event Management This chapter also assumes that you know how to operate PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL KM for Event Management. which enables you to create customizations that are specific to a computer or to a group of computers. 96 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . before using PATROL Configuration Manager to change the configuration of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. which makes upgrading easier. see “Verifying installation requirements” on page 34. However. You can create different rules and rule sets files for each computer or for different purposes. and database administrators to define rules and rule sets that manage configuration variables for PATROL Agents on multiple hosts.Overview of PATROL Configuration Manager Overview of PATROL Configuration Manager The PATROL Configuration Manager is used by PATROL administrators. See “Saving backups in PATROL Configuration Manager” on page 97. Using the PATROL Configuration Manager to customize the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server product gives you the following advantages: I You can maintain customizations outside PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. The general requirements for installing PATROL Configuration Manager and the PATROL KM for Event Management are set out in the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide. BMC Software recommends that you ensure that PATROL Configuration Manager is set up to save or backup the configuration. system administrators. For more information about general requirements for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server.

4 Click OK to save the settings and close the dialog box. Configuring for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances You must configure each PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instance separately using the Instance Configure menu command.Saving backups in PATROL Configuration Manager Saving backups in PATROL Configuration Manager Before making any changes to PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 97 . 2 Click the Archives tab to open the Backup Settings. Ensure that it remains selected as the backup option. “Configuring PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. To select the backup option in PATROL Configuration Manager 1 From the main menu. and it appears as an option in other PATROL Configuration Manager dialog boxes as well. BMC Software recommends that you check the configuration settings in PATROL Configuration Manager to ensure that the Save Backup Before Apply archive option is selected. choose File => Configure to open the Configuration dialog box. You can use PATROL Configuration Manager only to modify instances that were previously configured. see Chapter 3.” You cannot use PATROL Configuration Manager to perform the initial configuration of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances. For more information. 3 Ensure that Save Backup Before Apply is selected. This option is set as the default during configuration of PATROL Configuration Manager.

no validations are performed. I I I The following procedure shows you how you can modify SQL Server instances by using this process: “Modifying an instance and deploying the changes to other instances” on page 100. but PATROL Configuration Manager allows you to easily export those changes to many other instances. Whether you modify an instance by changing rules and rulesets in PATROL Configuration Manager or by changing the configuration variables in an instance. you cannot change the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server configuration variables and application classes that are discussed in the following topics: I I “Do not deactivate application classes” on page 99 “Do not modify configuration variables that are for internal use only” on page 99 When you modify an instance by changing the rules and rulesets in PATROL Configuration Manager. you must use the proper values or the change does not take effect. Test the changes in that instance to ensure that the changes operate as expected. However. The following topics provide information about how to change the configuration variables or rules for blackout periods and automatic recovery actions. if you plan to modify variables manually. where they are known as rules and rulesets. BMC Software recommends using the following process for modifying SQL Server instances: I Make changes in one instance by using the menu commands. Deploy the modified variables or rules and rulesets to other instances through the PATROL Configuration Manager. To take advantage of the validations performed by the KM and the deployment capabilities of PATROL Configuration Manager. I I “Modifying the blackout configuration variable” on page 103 “Modifying the automatic recovery action variable” on page 103 98 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . Export the modified variables to PATROL Configuration Manager. Also. There are some pconfig variables that do not appear automatically. You must enter these variables manually. see the following procedure: “Adding or modifying pconfig variables manually” on page 102.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances You can modify an instance by either changing the rules and rulesets in PATROL Configuration Manager or by changing the configuration variables through menu commands in an instance.

Do not modify configuration variables that are for internal use only Some variables are created for internal use only. Chapter 5. and that you should never delete or modify. “Loading . “Agent configuration variables. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server uses the change_state command each time an application is created.km files. but all application classes must exist in the environment for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to operate correctly.instance . For information about loading . “Reviewing the default settings” on page 80. Table 7 Variables that are for internal use only (Part 1 of 2) Description indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files Configuration variable /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER. If you do modify any of the these variables. “Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. You do not have to monitor all application classes. and each time the SQL Server is stopped or started.km files that represent the application classes are loaded and active. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. For more information on monitoring the application classes. These variables are used by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and alteration of these variables can harm the operation of PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. you must restart the agent for the changes to take effect.instance .”and the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. Therefore.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances For a complete list of the PATROL configuration variables and the strings that they generate. ensure that all of the . see “Applications and icons” on page 20. Table 7 lists the configuration variables that are for internal use only. whether through PATROL Configuration Manager or manually. see Appendix D.OSdefaultAccountAppliesToCmds Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 99 .km files” on page 65.” For more detailed descriptions of the parameters.OSdefaultAccount /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER. For more infomation about these variables. see the PATROL Agent Reference Manual. Do not deactivate application classes PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server requires the presence of all of the application classes.

2 Test the instance over a period of time to ensure that the modified instance performs to your satisfaction.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances Table 7 Variables that are for internal use only (Part 2 of 2) Description indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files. OSdefaultAccountAppliesToCmds /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT. OSdefaultAccount /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN. instance. 3 In PATROL Configuration Manager. defaultAccount /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN. instance.instance.defaultAccount /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT. To modify an instance of SQL Server 1 In a PATROL Developer console. choose Configuration => Get.instance. the line that represents the host turns green and OK is displayed in the Status field for the host. When the PATROL Configuration Manager completes the transfer of the configuration variables from the selected host. 4 In the menu for agentHostName. right-click the agentHostName that contains the modified configuration. instance. 100 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .instance. The instance status is displayed in the Job Status Information dialog box.OSdefaultAccountAppliesToCmds Modifying an instance and deploying the changes to other instances The following procedures use PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server to modify a SQL Server instance and PATROL Configuration Manager to deploy the modifications to other SQL Server instances.OSdefaultAccount /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files Configuration variable /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN. modify the configuration of one instance of SQL Server using the menu commands provided in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server until the instance meets all of your specifications.

create a folder in the following directory: RuleSets\ChangeSpring 7 Highlight the new folder. converts them into rules. a ruleset is the entire set of rules for an instance. Each rule in PATROL Configuration Manager contains a configuration variable or properties for a parameter. The rules are given a timestamp and placed into the new folder: Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 101 . 6 In PATROL Configuration Manager. and Paste the rules.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances The Configuration => Get command copies the pconfig variables from the instance. Figure 9 Configure => Get command in PATROL Configuration Manager 5 Select and copy all of the rules from the RuleSets\ChangeSpring\backup\agentHostName\instanceName\date-timestamp directory (use the one with the most recent timestamp at the bottom of the list). and pastes them into the PATROL Configuration Manager in the following folder: RuleSets\ChangeSpring\backup\agentHostName\instanceName\date-timestamp Figure 9 on page 101 shows the Configuration => Get menu command in the left panel of PATROL Configuration Manager and an example of the rules that are displayed in the right panel after the Configuration => Get command finishes importing the configuration variables from the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instance.

5 Click the Apply Changes icon in the PATROL Configuration Manager menu bar. 4 Drag and drop this rule set on the agentHostName. 3 Right-click the timestamp under this new folder. perform the following steps to distribute those same modifications to other instances. 6 Repeat step 1 through step 4 for each agentHostName to which you want to apply the modified configuration. However. you must enter valid values. 102 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . To deploy the configuration variables for a modified instance to other instances Now that you have modified the configuration for the original instance. “Agent configuration variables. or if the variables you want to use are not available through menu commands. and instructions on how to add pconfig variables manually using a PATROL Developer console.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances RuleSets\ChangeSpring\newFolder\timestamp\ 8 Drag and drop the new rule set on the agentHostName.” The following topics provide the values to enter for the blackout and automatic recovery action variables. and find and replace the SQL Server instance in the source with the name of the next agentHostName to which you want to apply the modified configuration. All of the variables and their valid values are listed in Appendix D. 1 Create a new folder under RuleSets\ChangeSpring. you can add pconfig variables manually. The PATROL Configuration Manager does not verify or let you know when you enter an invalid entry. select Edit > Source from the menu. 2 Copy and paste the rules you created in “To modify an instance of SQL Server” on page 100 into this folder. Adding or modifying pconfig variables manually If you choose not to use menu commands. 9 Click the Apply Changes icon in the PATROL Configuration Manager menu bar.

The easiest and safest way to change this setting is to use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure => ARA Settings => Set Default Actions menu command to set the value of the variable in one instance. if you set a server called SQLServer1 for a blackout period that takes place on Monday starting at 1:00 a. then use the output for that modified configuration in PATROL Configuration Manager to apply that blackout period to other instances. When you create a blackout period for an instance using the Blackout menu command from PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. and blacking out parameter alarms” on page 146 and the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. For more information about the blackout feature in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. to any other instances to which you want the change applied.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances Modifying the blackout configuration variable Blackout periods set in PATROL Configuration Manager are not verified.m. To validate your changes you should set blackout periods for one instance by using the Blackout menu command. Modifying the automatic recovery action variable PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides a menu command that changes the variable that modifies the automatic recovery actions performed by a set of key parameters. and lasting for 60 minutes. If you want to modify this variable manually. See “Modifying an instance and deploying the changes to other instances” on page 100. See “Modifying an instance and deploying the changes to other instances” on page 100. see “Using automatic recovery actions” on page 149. For a complete list of those parameters and more information on the ARA settings. which is referred to as a ruleset in PATROL Configuration Manager. and deploy the changed configuration. the following value would be displayed for the /MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstance/blackout variable: SQLServer1 Monday 3600 60. capture the modified configuration of that instance in PATROL Configuration Manager. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 103 . the blackout information is stored in the /MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstance/blackout variable. snoozing. see “Clearing. use the following format: serverName dayOfTheWeek startTime (in seconds after midnight) Duration (in minutes) For example.

and the value of the variable is the sum of the values for all of the options that are selected. their values. Table 8 provides you with a list of the options and their values. you must first decide which options you want to activate. The ARA variable (and menu settings) activate or deactivate the following options for the parameters that use the ARA settings: I I I I I I Execute the ara_MSSQL. Find the row that contains an X below all of the options that you want to activate.cmd script (active by default) Execute net send to specified Windows desktops Execute an SNMP trap (snmptrap command) Create an output file Annotate a parameter warning or alarm (active by default) Trigger an event in PATROL Event Manager (active by default) Each option is given a value. and then use the value in the last column of that row as the value for the araAction variable.cmd=1 send=2 X 104 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . Table 8 ARA options.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances To calculate the value of the araAction variable manually If you plan to modify the araAction variable manually. and the value of the variable when the options marked with an X are selected. and the value of the araAction variable (Part 1 of 3) Execute snmp trap=4 Create Output File=8 Annotate Trigger Parameter Event in alert=16 PEM=32 Value of variable 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Execute Execute ara_MSSQ net L.

cmd=1 send=2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Value of variable 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 105 . their values.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances Table 8 ARA options. and the value of the araAction variable (Part 2 of 3) Execute snmp trap=4 Create Output File=8 Annotate Trigger Parameter Event in alert=16 PEM=32 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Execute Execute ara_MSSQ net L.

The Add Variable dialog box opens. enter the value you want to apply to the variable. their values. and the value of the araAction variable (Part 3 of 3) Execute snmp trap=4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Execute Execute ara_MSSQ net L. and they are not activated through a menu command.Modifying PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instances Table 8 ARA options. To add or modify a pconfig variable manually 1 Right-click on the host. 3 In the Variable: text box. see Appendix D. enter the SQL Server Instance name (if required) and then the variable. and select Development => Agent Configuration. select Edit => Add Variable. For information about valid values. select File => Save. You can add a pconfig variable by using a PATROL Developer console. The following are examples of completed entries: I I I /MSSQLServer/Agent host name/idle_procs_monitoring_enabled /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName\\InstanceName/DBCC_PSS_Disabled /MSSQLServer/SQLServersExcludedFromDiscovery 4 In the Value: text box. 2 From the main menu.” 5 To save the configuration variable you created. after /MSSQLServer/.cmd=1 send=2 X X X X X X Create Output File=8 Annotate Trigger Parameter Event in alert=16 PEM=32 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Value of variable 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 Adding pconfig variables manually There are some configuration variables that are not automatically available. 106 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . You must enter these variables manually. “Agent configuration variables.

you can enter a pconfig variable that disables the retrieval of the SQL query text by the recovery actions used by the above parameters. You can perform the following tasks: I I I I deactivate paramaters change parameter polling cycles change parameter thresholds modify parameter properties Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 107 . see “Adding pconfig variables manually” on page 106. This pconfig appears as follows: /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName\\InstanceName/DBCC_PSS_Disabled For information about valid values. see Appendix D. Trace output file written to the error Log In some SQL Server configurations. “Agent configuration variables. see the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide. For instructions. the trace output is also includeded in the recovery action output for the following parameters: I I I I CpuIdle CpuBusy CpuIoBusy LongRunningTrans In PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. the trace output file is written to the SQL Server error log file. When this occurs.” Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server You can modify PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters by using the PATROL Configuration Manager or by using a PATROL Developer console to change the parameter properties in an instance.Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server For instructions on how to add a variable or rule set using PATROL Configuration Manager.

see the online Help for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. However. I Deactivate a collector parameter. For information on how to set up monitoring for application classes. no alarms or warnings are displayed and no recovery actions are triggered for that consumer parameter.” For more complete descriptions of the parameters. The collector parameter continues to send data to the consumer parameter. I I Instead of disabling consumer parameters. Some collector parameters might also set off recovery actions if it cannot find a deactivated consumer parameter. consider the results that occur when you perform one of the following actions: I Disable only the alarms for a consumer parameter.” 108 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . consider the results: I The icon for the consumer parameter disappears and no data is collected or stored. However. and the consumer parameter continues to provide a view and history for that data. see Chapter 5. see Appendix B. Deactivating parameters To reduce the impact on your system resources and enhance performance. you can deactivate parameters that are not commonly needed. “Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. I Deactivate monitoring of an application class. The collector parameter that sets the deactivated consumer parameter notates the System Output Window with an error each time that collector attempts to send information to the deactivated consumer parameter.Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server However. These restrictions are described in the following topics: I I “Parameters with their status set in code” on page 109 “Do not change parameters that have fixed thresholds” on page 110 For a complete list of the parameters and their default values. before deactivating a consumer parameter. “Parameter definitions and defaults. you are restricted in the modifications that you can make to some PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters. The collector parameter stops collecting data for the consumer parameters it sets. No parameters are displayed for an application class that is not set up for monitoring.

you can change poll times. UserDefCounter1-10 is deactivated by the UserDefCountersColl collector parameter. The poll time assigned to a collector or standard parameter sets the interval between executions of the query used by the parameter. DeliveredCmdsPerSec and ReplicationCmdsPerSec are deactivated by the ReplicationColl collector parameter. is deactivated by the ObjectSizeColl collector parameter when the Objects application class instance represents an index. but do so with the following cautions in mind: I Increasing poll times could cause you to receive notification of problems late. To avoid problems. which is found under Availability application class instances. ErrorLog application parameters are activated and deactivated by the ErrorLogColl collector parameter. SQL Server Agent monitoring is disabled by default. is set to inactive unless SQL Server Agent monitoring is enabled.Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Parameters with their status set in code The status of the following parameters are set in the code. If your system requires longer or shorter poll times. use Debug to find the Query Execution Time before decreasing a poll time. SQLAgentStatus. These internal status changes overwrite whatever changes are made through PATROL Configuration Manager. I I I I Changing parameter polling cycles Collector and standard parameters use queries to obtain data from a monitored server or database. I RowCountEstimate. I I Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 109 . which could lead to performance problems. Decreasing poll times increases the resources used by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. You can switch SQL Server Agent monitoring on and off using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command. which is found under Objects application class instances. Poll times must exceed the amount of time it takes to execute the query and allow time for the parameter to parse and distribute the data obtained before it must resend the query. The default poll times set for collector and standard parameters in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server are calculated to collect sufficient data to appropriately monitor most systems.

Execution times can vary.” Table 9 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters with fixed thresholds Parameters ARATest Failover SQLServerStatus Collectors ConfigUpdates Application class Availability 110 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . or other serious problems. For example. “Parameter definitions and defaults. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server ships with the parameters set at thresholds that are appropriate for those parameters in the average environment. You should make changes to the thresholds in one instance and then test the results in that instance before exporting those changes throughout your entire enterprise. Table 9 provides a list of the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters that have fixed thresholds that you should not modify. Do not change parameters that have fixed thresholds Some PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server consumer parameters have thresholds that are not on a sliding scale. Changing parameter thresholds Using the PATROL Configuration Manager. so make sure that you find the longest possible execution time by running Debug on your busiest system during your busiest time. you can change the thresholds for most of the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters. look at the Debug output and find the Total Execution Time. When the parameter completes a polling cycle. see the online Help. but are fixed at particular values because those values are directly connected to the KM. see Appendix B. For brief descriptions and default values for parameters. all parameters that have a Boolean output are created to react only to a setting of 0 or 1. For complete descriptions and default values for these parameters.Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server WARNING Changing the poll time for a standard or collector parameter to an amount of time that is shorter than the amount of time it takes to complete the execution of the query used by that parameter can cause the parameter to go into an infinite loop. turn Debug on for that parameter. To find the query execution time To find out how long it takes a collector or standard parameter to execute a query.

Export the modified parameter changes to PATROL Configuration Manager. then click on Attributes and then on Parameters to open the list of parameters provided by the selected application class. select the KM tree tab and expand the appropriate application class. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 111 . 2 Right-click (Windows) or click (UNIX) on the parameter to access the parameter properties. Select an application class.Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Table 9 Error Log PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters with fixed thresholds Parameters ErrorLogColl ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold ErrorLogSizeThreshold ErrorLogUpdates Application class Modifying parameter properties The following procedure for modifying parameters employs the strengths of the KM and PATROL Configuration Manager: I I I I Make changes in one instance through the parameter property dialog boxes. To modify parameter properties for an instance 1 Navigate to the parameter properties for the parameter you want to change: I In the PATROL Console for UNIX. then click Global and then on Parameters to open the list of parameters provided by the selected application class. click on Attributes and then on Application Classes to open a list of the application classes. Test the instance until satisfied that the changes operate as expected. This method takes advantage of the validations performed by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and gives you the opportunity to verify that the changes perform as expected before deploying those changes throughout your environment. Deploy the modified parameter changes to other instances by using the PATROL Configuration Manager. I In the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows.

perform one of these actions: I I (Windows) Select the Border. Alarm1. (UNIX) Double-click the parameter and select or deselect Active. Consumer parameters do not have polling times. (UNIX) Click on Alarm Ranges. The _ANYINST_ designation allows you to apply these changes to any agent host name without adding a specific agent host name to the rule for each parameter. (UNIX) Click on the parameter and change the polling time. 6 Save the configuration by selecting File => Save Configuration. and double-click Border. and make changes. see your PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide. 5 To change the alarm thresholds or disable the alarms. 7 Test the changes on the instance to make sure that the changes are working as you expected. and make changes. perform one of these actions: I I (Windows) Select the General tab and select or deselect Active. NOTE The PATROL Configuration Manager rules that represent each parameter contain the _ANYINST_ designation for the instance name. Alarm1. 8 Convert the parameters in the instance to a rule set in PATROL Configuration Manager. 4 To change the interval between polling cycles. NOTE Only collector and standard parameters have polling times. and Alarm2 tabs. or Alarm2. You can convert the parameters in the instance to a rule set in PATROL Configuration Manager by using one of the following menu commands: I KM Commands => Create Global Parameters => Create Rulesets => Select Knowledge Modules menu command from the AS_CHANGESPRING application class I KM Commands => Event Management => Parameter Settings => Status Flags => Set for Instances or Classes menu command from the Host icon.Modifying parameters using PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 3 To activate or deactivate a parameter. 112 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . For more information. perform one of these actions: I I (Windows) Select the Scheduling tab and change the polling time.

the ConfigUpdates parameter sets a value of 2 and creates an annotation that includes information on which change was not applied successfully. For more information. You must verify that the changes perform correctly on each instance where they are applied.Verifying changes to configuration variables 9 Drag and drop the rule set to any Agent host name where you want the changes applied. I If the update is applied to the instance successfully. see the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 113 . change “2” to “1” or remove this rule and reinitialize the Agent for the instance when you are ready to apply the changes. Verifying changes to configuration variables The ConfigUpdates parameter under the Collectors application class checks for changes to the configuration variables. Validations are performed by the ConfigUpdates parameter to ascertain whether the new configuration variables or parameter changes were successfully applied to the instance. this parameter creates an annotation that contains the name of the configuration variable that was changed and information about how it was changed. If the update is not applied to the instance successfully. NOTE The following rule is created when you move the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters to a rule set in PATROL Configuration Manager: /AS/EVENTSPRING/PARAM_SETTINGS/STATUSFLAGS/ paramSettingsStatusFlag” ={ REPLACE = “2” } This rule forces the instance to apply parameter changes as soon as you apply them to an instance or Agent host name. I WARNING No validations are performed on the effectiveness or validity of the new configuration variables and parameter property changes. When a change is detected. If you do not want the changes to take place immediately. the ConfigUpdates parameter sets a value to 1 and creates an annotation that includes information on the changes.

4.” and Appendix C. see the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows User Guide—Customizing PATROL. version 1. 2. For detailed information about how to use the PATROL Configuration Manager. InfoBoxes. “Accessing menu commands. “Parameter definitions and defaults” Appendix C. Appendix A. parameters. “Agent configuration variables” 114 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . see the PATROL Agent Reference Manual. and online Help” definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies detailed descriptions of the applications.” Where to go from here For summary information about wpconfig.Where to go from here Before a variable change can take effect. For information about parameter poll times and dependencies see Appendix B. the appropriate collector parameter must update the effected consumer parameters. The ConfigUpdates parameter must run and discover the new configuration variable(s). If applicable. menu commands. Discovery or the appropriate parameters must complete the next cycle. the following events must occur: 1. 3.01 or later. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies. “Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. Volume 3. For detailed information about how to use pconfig. and InfoBoxes Appendix B. see the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide.” and PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help how to access the KM menu commands. and online Help InfoBoxes. Discovery or the appropriate parameter must complete another cycle after ConfigUpdates discovers the new variable. The following table lists other topics in this book: Topic how to use PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server functionality to monitor and manage SQL Servers Source of information Chapter 5. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies” PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix D. 4. “Parameter definitions and defaults.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring the SQL Server Agent job failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Filtering SQL Server Agent job failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the PATROL login account for a server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and stopping the monitoring of databases . . . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Excluding SQL Servers from monitoring. . . . . . . . Enabling the monitoring of files and file groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the SQL Server Agent parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing the status of a SQL Server. . . . . . . . . . . Changing a server instance name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 5 117 117 118 118 119 119 120 120 121 122 123 123 124 124 124 125 125 127 127 128 129 130 130 131 131 132 133 133 134 134 134 115 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 5 This chapter presents the following topics: Monitoring SQL Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up SQL Server Agent jobs for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and stopping the SQL Server Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling the monitoring of error logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and stopping the monitoring of a SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing the status of a database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the consistency of a database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the error log parameters . . . . . Setting up error log monitoring. . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about a SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing the status of files and file groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring SQL Server Agent . . . . . . Reviewing the status of an error log . . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about files and file groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding the PATROL user to a database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and stopping a SQL Server from PATROL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing reports about the error logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring files and file groups . . Monitoring objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring error logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . 158 116 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Changing the automatic monitoring of users and processes. . 134 Reviewing the status of an object. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Where to go from here . . . 158 Monitoring the Global Channel lock requests . . . . . . . . . . 149 Reviewing the ARA settings and parameters . . . . . 147 Creating customized parameter charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Clearing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . snoozing. . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Refreshing parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Parameters affected in general user monitoring mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Enabling the monitoring of replication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Viewing reports about users and processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Using parameters to monitor specific users and processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Viewing reports about Subscribers and Published Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Monitoring users and processes . . . and blacking out parameter alarms . . . . . . . . 135 Viewing reports about objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Accessing the Global Channel menu commands . . . . . 143 Creating customized reports. . 144 Adding customized reports to the predefined list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Viewing parameter data . . . . 148 Creating and managing parameter charts . . . . . . 138 Monitoring specific users and processes manually . . . . . . 148 Accessing the predefined parameter charts . . . . . . . . . . . .Setting up the monitoring of objects . . . 148 Using automatic recovery actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Activating and deactivating parameters and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Reviewing the status of Subscribers or Published Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Reviewing the status of a user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Killing a process from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Monitoring replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Viewing SQL information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Parameters partially affected in a recovery action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Managing the global channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Using the ARA Settings menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Viewing the parameter recovery process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Viewing SQL commands with SQL Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Viewing reports about Subscribers and Published Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Working with parameters . . . . . . . . . . 143 Accessing the predefined reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

with a vertical pipe (|) character separating the names of the SQL Servers. use the following query: “SELECT @@SERVERNAME” To determine the Windows service name. This pconfig variable does not appear automatically. TIP To determine the SQL Server name. You must enter the pconfig variable manually. To exclude SQL Servers from monitoring 1 Determine the SQL Server or Windows service name of each SQL Server you want to exclude from monitoring. you can exclude from monitoring one or more SQL Servers. You can perform the following tasks: I I I I I I exclude SQL Servers from monitoring start and stop the monitoring of a SQL Server start and stop a SQL Server review the status of a SQL Server view reports and create customized reports about a SQL Server change a SQL Server instance name in PATROL Excluding SQL Servers from monitoring Using the /MSSQLServer/SQLServersExcludedFromDiscovery/ pconfig variable. For instructions on how to add or modify pconfig variables. see “Adding or modifying pconfig variables manually” on page 102. as in the following example: /MSSQLServer/SQLServersExcludedFromDiscovery/ ABC\SQL8_TEST|MSSQLServer|MSSQL$SQL8DATA|ABC\SQL8_PROD Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 117 . use the following query: "SELECT @@SERVICENAME" 2 Enter the following pconfig variable followed by the names of the SQL Servers that you want to exclude from monitoring.Monitoring SQL Servers Monitoring SQL Servers With the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server product. you can monitor Microsoft SQL Server computers that are running a PATROL Agent.

However. See “Configuring a SQL Server” on page 72 for step-by-step instructions. objects. stop all processes.Starting and stopping the monitoring of a SQL Server The above example excludes the following SQL Servers: I I I I SQL Server with SQL Server name ABC\SQL8_TEST SQL Server with Windows service name MSSQLServer SQL Server with Windows service name MSSQL$SQL8DATA SQL Server with SQL Server name ABC\SQL8_PROD Starting and stopping the monitoring of a SQL Server To start monitoring a server. To stop viewing a monitored server. choose SQL Server Admin => Shutdown SQL Server from the Server application pop-up menu. all parameters are automatically changed to a suspended state and PATROL stops monitoring databases. PATROL continues to monitor the server even after you break the connection between the server and the PATROL console. When you restart a SQL Server. right-click the icon that represents the computer or host and choose the Update Connection (PATROL console) or Connect to Managed System (PATROL Central Operator) menu command. users and processes. if you preloaded PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server on the agent. users and processes. Starting and stopping a SQL Server from PATROL When you shut down a SQL Server. and other resources. right-click the icon that represents the computer or host and choose the Break Connection (PATROL console) or Disconnect from Managed System (PATROL Central Operator) menu command. To update the connection between PATROL and the server. objects. PATROL resumes monitoring databases. 118 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . WARNING The Shutdown SQL Server menu option uses the net stop mssqlinstancename command. and begin a roll back of the queries or transactions that the processes were executing. you can break the connection between the PATROL console and the server. To break the connection between the PATROL console and the server. Using this command causes SQL Server to disconnect all users. To shut down a monitored SQL Server from PATROL. and other resources. you must first configure it. See your Microsoft SQL Server documentation for more information.

see “InfoBoxes” on page 30. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 119 . This option starts the SQL Server in a minimal configuration mode and enables you to reconfigure the SQL Server. There are many reports available from this Reports menu that provide information about all aspects of the SQL Server. see “Application Classes. Only experienced users should attempt to reconfigure the SQL Server. Viewing reports about a SQL Server Access reports about the server by selecting Reports from a Server application pop-up menu. See your SQL Server documentation for more information. see “Creating customized reports” on page 143.Reviewing the status of a SQL Server To restart a monitored SQL Server that you previously shut down. The Reports menu also provides a Parameter Charts menu that enables you to create and combine the output from any of the parameters available in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. For more information. choose the SQL Server Admin => Start SQL Server command from the Server application pop-up menu. NOTE If the SQL Server does not start. For a description of the InfoBox items. See “Working with parameters” on page 145. For more information. WARNING You can also start SQL Server from the command line using the -f startup option. only experienced users should attempt to restart the SQL Server using the -f option. and InfoBoxes” in the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. Icons. You can also start SQL Server from the command line using the -f startup option. However. The Reports menu also provides the User Customizable Reports menu that enables you to create and combine your own reports. Reviewing the status of a SQL Server You can check the current status of a Microsoft SQL Server by reviewing information in the InfoBox accessed from the Server application icon that represents that server. look at the error log created in SQL Dir/log/ERRORLOG for information about why it would not start.

This function also verifies whether the account information is correct or incorrect. the parameters that issue SQL queries cannot run and therefore. If CheckConfiguration cannot validate the account. This is the only time you should use this menu command. but PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides menu commands that do the following: I change the label that displays under a Server application icon in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server change the name that PATROL uses for a SQL Server when PATROL fails to connect to the SQL Server I Changing the icon label If the name of the SQL Server is too long. cannot collect data. You can change the icon label by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Change Icon Label menu command under the Server application icon. You can change the PATROL login account that PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server uses to monitor a SQL Server by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => SQL Server Instance Setup menu command in the Server application pop-up menu. 120 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . The CheckConfiguration parameter directs you to use this feature when PATROL cannot connect to the SQL Server. For detailed information about the PATROL login account.Changing the PATROL login account for a server Changing the PATROL login account for a server PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides you with the ability to enter and change the accounts used by PATROL to access and monitor SQL Server. you also change the account for the CheckConfiguration parameter. You cannot alter the actual name of the SQL Server using this menu command. This does not change the name that PATROL uses for that SQL Server. When you change the PATROL login account. see “Configuring a SQL Server” on page 72. you might want to change the name that appears under the icon in PATROL. Changing a server instance name PATROL cannot change the name of a SQL Server. Changing the SQL Server name used by PATROL Changing the name that PATROL uses for a SQL Server enables you to change the SQL Server name to an associated Windows SQL Server service name.

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is not set up to automatically monitor SQL Server Agent. Select the SQL Server instance for which you want to change the SQL Server name used by PATROL by using the MSSQL_SERVER => KM Commands => OSQL. This container enhances the functionality of the SQL Server instance discovery in the following ways: I I provides better discovery debugging reduces instance discovery failure If the SQL Server instances are not discovered after the KM is loaded. When SQL Server Agent monitoring is enabled. I I Monitoring SQL Server Agent By default. The corresponding application class name for this container is MSSQL_SERVER_SQLSERVER_SETUP. For more information on monitoring the SQL Server Agent error log.exe path used by PATROL menu command. Enabling SQL Server instance discovery To enable SQL Server instance discovery. see “Monitoring error logs” on page 124. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 121 . the MSSQL_SERVER container holds the SQL Server instances discovered on a monitored host. Debugging helps when the SQL Server instances are not discovered after a KM is loaded. Select the SQL Server instance for which you want to change the SQL Server name used by PATROL by using the MSSQL_SERVER => KM Commands => Sql server name used by PATROL menu command. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server reports the up and down status of SQL Server Agent and information about SQL Server Agent jobs and you can view the SQL Server Agent job information. you can use the following menu commands to help determine the problem: I Set the prediscovery and discovery debug mode for PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server by using the MSSQL_SERVER => KM Commands => SET DEBUG MODE menu command.Enabling SQL Server instance discovery You can change the name that PATROL uses for a SQL Server by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => SQL Server Name Used by PATROL menu command under the Server application icon. You must have SQL Server Agent monitoring enabled before you can monitor the SQL Server Agent error log.

Enabling the monitoring of the SQL Server Agent From PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server you can perform the following tasks: I I I I I I enable the monitoring of the SQL Server Agent start and stop the SQL Server Agent access parameters that monitor the SQL Server Agent monitor the SQL Server Agent job failures filter SQL Server Agent job failures set up the monitoring of SQL Server Agent jobs Enabling the monitoring of the SQL Server Agent You can manually enable monitoring of a SQL Server Agent by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command in the Server application pop-up menu. and then it starts the SQL Server Agent. You can shut down the SQL Server Agent from PATROL by using the SQL Server Admin => Shutdown SQL Server Agent menu command from the Server application pop-up menu. cannot operate unless the SQL Server Agent is running. such as Replication. the SQLAgentStatus parameter goes into an alarm state. WARNING Some Microsoft SQL Server features. 122 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . Once you enable the monitoring of the SQL Server Agent. You can restart the SQL Server Agent that you previously shut down by using the SQL Server Admin => Start SQL Server Agent menu command from the Server application pop-up menu. PATROL activates the Starting and stopping the SQL Server Agent When you shut down the SQL Server Agent while monitoring of the SQL Server Agent is turned on. The Start SQL Server Agent menu command forces the SQL Server to start if it is not already running.

Double-click any annotated data point to open a report in an annotation output window. Table 10 Parameter SQLServerAgent JobFailures Parameters that monitor the SQL Server Agent Description Reports SQL Server Agent job failures. the following events occur: I SQLServerAgentJobFailures parameter goes into an alarm state each time a job fails SQLServerAgentJobFailures parameter value increments by 1 each time a job fails information is automatically displayed in a task output window each time a job fails an event is triggered in the PEM each time a job fails I I I You must manually clear the parameter alarm from a menu item or the PEM. Monitoring the SQL Server Agent job failures The SQLServerAgentJobFailures parameter monitors all SQL Server jobs. SQLAgentStatus Monitors and reports the up and down status of SQL Server Agent. When the SQLServerAgentJobFailures parameter goes into an alarm state. When a job fails. it automatically creates an output window that contains information about SQL Server Agent job failures. This parameter also generates annotated data points in the parameter graph that provide reports about the job failures. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 123 . You can view information about all SQL Server Agent jobs by using the Reports => SQL Server Agent Job Failures menu command from the Server application pop-up menu.Using the SQL Server Agent parameters Using the SQL Server Agent parameters Table 10 displays information about parameters that collect and report information about SQL Server Agent. and goes into an alarm state whenever any step in a job fails at any point during the job.

Filtering jobs enables you to monitor only the jobs that are critical and exclude the non-critical job failures. set up the jobs using one or more of the following suggestions: I Break large jobs down into smaller jobs so that the SQLAgentJobFailures parameter monitors each stage of a job. but this feature is disabled by default. Create the SQL Server Agent job in Transact SQL so that no failure occurs for steps that you want to ignore. From PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server you can perform the following tasks: I I I I I enable the monitoring of error logs set up the monitoring of error logs view reports about the error logs review the status of the error logs use the Error Log parameters to monitor the error logs 124 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . and then include that user-defined message for monitoring by using the KM Admin => Set up Error Log String Monitoring menu command from an Error Log application instance.”) I I Monitoring error logs PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server uses a filter to detect user-defined strings in the SQL Server and SQL Server Agent error logs. and a way to monitor those error logs. To enable filtering. Setting up SQL Server Agent jobs for monitoring To receive more precise information about the progress of your SQL Server Agent jobs. choose the KM Commands => Exclude SQLAgent Jobs from Monitoring command from the Availability application class. Create the SQL Server Agent job so that any error that occurs at a strategic step sends a user-defined message to the SQL Server Agent error log.Filtering SQL Server Agent job failures Filtering SQL Server Agent job failures You can exclude certain SQL Server Agent jobs from monitoring. “Monitoring error logs. giving you more accurate information about where and when a job fails (if it fails). (How to initiate and use error log monitoring is described in the next topic.

you can check Enable or Disable. The ErrorLogColl searches the error logs for the strings you entered. you can enter strings for the error log filter to detect by using the KM Admin => Set up Error Log String Monitoring menu command from an Error Log application instance. To change the error log filter If error log monitoring is enabled. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 125 . This allows you to set up string monitoring. PATROL uses the ErrorLogColl standard collector parameter to search your environment and create an Error Log application instance icon for every error log it detects. In the Error Log String Monitoring dialog box. and whenever one of the entered strings is detected. but keep it disabled until you need it. and the Error Log application instances appear. you can turn off error log string monitoring by using the KM Admin => Set up Error Log String Monitoring menu command from an Error Log application instance. Once you enable the monitoring of error logs. Setting up error log monitoring The Error Log application instances provide menu commands that you can use to manage error log monitoring in the following ways: I I I I I I enable or disable string monitoring set up how often you want to receive an alert for the same string enter or remove strings from the error log filter add an alarm or warning to the ErrorLogColl parameter turn the ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter on or off and set the threshold for the error log size turn the ErrorLogFreeDiskSpaceThreshold parameter on or off and set the threshold for the space that is free on the disk that contains the error log To enable or disable string monitoring Once you have enabled error log monitoring. the ErrorLogUpdates parameter goes into an alarm state and creates an annotation. while keeping all other error log monitoring features active. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server creates MSSQL_SERVER_ERRORLOG (Error Log) application instance icons and monitors the error logs that it discovers.Enabling the monitoring of error logs Enabling the monitoring of error logs You can use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command from the Server application pop-up menu to enable error log monitoring.

To set up threshold monitoring for the error log size By default. For more information. By using the Set up Error Log Size Threshold menu command from an Error Log application instance menu. you can perform the following tasks: I I I I I view the current size of the error log enable and disable error log threshold monitoring set the threshold for the size of the error log state the action taken if the size of the error log exceeds the threshold set the ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter to autoreset 126 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .Setting up error log monitoring TIP You can use this feature to monitor jobs. the ErrorLogSize parameter monitors the size of the error log. but you can change that to a warning or an alarm state by using the KM Admin => Set up Error Log String Monitoring menu command from an Error Log application instance. see “Setting up SQL Server Agent jobs for monitoring” on page 124. You can set this parameter to also go into a warning or an alarm state whenever it fails to complete a collection attempt. but you can also enable and configure the ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter to monitor whether or not the size of the error log exceeds a user-defined threshold. the ErrorLogColl collector parameter is set to remain in an OK state when a collection fails. Create the SQL Server Agent job so that any error that occurs at a strategic step sends a user-defined message to the SQL Server Agent error log. You can choose to receive an alarm or a warning using one of the following modes: I I every time every string that you entered is detected once the first time each string that you entered is detected To set an alert when the ErrorLogColl parameter fails to complete a collection The ErrorLogColl standard collector parameter collects the data that populates the error log consumer parameters and the Error Log application instance InfoBox items. By default. The Set up Error Log String Monitoring dialog box also allows you to choose between two modes that determine the number or frequency of alarms and warnings that you receive for each string that you enter. and then include that user-defined message for monitoring.

100. or 250 lines of the error log. but you can also enable and configure the ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold parameter to monitor whether or not the amount of free space on the disk falls below a user-defined threshold. For a description of the InfoBox items. see “InfoBoxes” on page 30. For more information. Icons.Viewing reports about the error logs To set up threshold monitoring for the amount of free space on the error log disk By default. Reviewing the status of an error log You can check the status of an error log by reviewing the information in the Error Log application InfoBox. the ErrorLogDiskSpaceFree parameter monitors the amount of free space on the disk that contains the error log. and one of the following options: I Reports => Search Error Log enables you to search the error log for a user-defined string and to view the results. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 127 . and InfoBoxes” in the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. I Reports => Show Latest Error Log Data generates a report that contains the last 10. Viewing reports about the error logs You can also view the SQL Server error log by choosing the Reports menu from an Error Log application pop-up menu. you can perform the following tasks: I I I I I I view the current amount size of the error log view the current amount of free space on the disk that contains the error log enable and disable the threshold monitoring of the free disk space set the threshold for the amount of free disk space state the action taken if the amount of free disk space falls below the threshold set the ErrorLogFreeDiskSpaceThreshold parameter to autoreset To exclude the error log strings from monitoring By using the KM Admin => Exclude Errorlog String from Monitoring command from the SQLERRORLOG application class. 50. 20. By using the Set up Error Log Disk Space Free Threshold menu command from an Error Log application instance menu. see “Application Classes. you can exclude the error log strings from monitoring.

ErrorLogSizeMB Reports the size in megabytes of the SQL Server error log. By default. If threshold monitoring is disabled for the amount of free space on the disk that contains the error log. ErrorLogDiskSpaceFree Displays in megabytes the amount of free space that is available on the disk that contains the error log. This parameter collects the data for all of the other Error Log application class parameters. the ErrorLogSizeMB parameter does not go into alarm. See “Setting up error log monitoring” on page 125. 128 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . Table 11 Parameter ErrorLogColl Parameters that monitor the SQL Server and SQL Server Agent error logs (Part 1 of 2) Description Monitors the error log for updates and filters new log entries for the user-defined search strings entered by using the SQL Server Error Log Filter menu command Whenever the ErrorLogColl parameter detects one of the user-defined search strings. this parameter indicates whether or not the amount of free space is below the user-defined threshold value. You can enable and disable threshold monitoring by using the KM Commands => Set up Error Log Free Disk Space Threshold menu command from an Error Log application instance menu. PATROL does not display an icon for this parameter.About the error log parameters About the error log parameters Table 11 displays information about the parameters that collect and report information about the SQL Server and SQL Server Agent error logs. ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold If threshold monitoring is enabled for the amount of space that is free on the disk that contains the error log. You can select to receive a notification if this parameter fails to complete a collection by using the KM Commands => Set up Error Log Collector menu command. it sends information about the detected error to the ErrorLogUpdates parameter.

See“Setting up error log monitoring” on page 125. An event is triggered in the Patrol Event Manager (PEM) for each user-defined error log string detected. The parameter value increments by 1 each time a user-defined error log string is detected or each time a new user-defined error log string is detected. When user-defined error log strings are detected. this parameter indicates whether or not the size of the error log is greater than the user-defined threshold value. Monitoring databases PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server enables you to automatically discover Microsoft SQL Server databases that are not currently monitored. or manually add a database for monitoring. The most recent text data written to the error log since the last collection cycle that matches the warning or alarm string filter is displayed in a pop-up window and in an annotation.Monitoring databases Table 11 Parameter Parameters that monitor the SQL Server and SQL Server Agent error logs (Part 2 of 2) Description If threshold monitoring is enabled for the error log size. ErrorLogSizeThreshold ErrorLogUpdates Displays the user-defined error log strings that are detected by the ErrorLogColl parameter. You must manually clear the parameter alarm by using the KM Commands => Reset Alarms menu command from the Error Log application menu or the PEM. the following events occur: I I This parameter goes into an alarm state. If threshold monitoring for error log size is disabled. PATROL does not display an icon for this parameter. automatically monitor databases. You can enable and disable threshold monitoring by using the KM Commands => Set up Error Log Size Threshold menu command from an Error Log application instance menu. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 129 . depending upon the user-defined configuration. I I You can also manually view the error log by using the KM Commands => Reports menu command from the Error Log application menu.

and the database checks the consistency of the internal allocation of the database checks the consistency of the internal allocation of the database menu options that check the internal consistency of data and index pages performs the checktable function on a selected table Requires system administrator (sa) or database administrator (dba) privileges. Table 12 displays the submenus that appear when you select this menu option. Table 12 Allocation Allocation => Checkalloc of DB Allocation => Newalloc Checktable Checktable => Other Table Database consistency menu options (Part 1 of 2) Description menu of options that perform consistency checks on indexes. tables. 130 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . where you can turn auto-discovery on or turn auto-discovery off and select the databases you want to monitor from a list. For step-by-step instructions. Checking the consistency of a database You can check the consistency of a database by using the KM Admin => Database Consistency menu options from the Database application pop-up menu. This menu command opens the Set Database AutoDiscovery dialog box. Menu command Checktable => Syslogs performs the checktable function on all the syslogs Requires sa or dba privileges. or you can manually select databases to monitor. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help.Starting and stopping the monitoring of databases From PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server you can perform the following tasks: I I I I I start and stop the monitoring of databases check the consistency of a database add the PATROL user to a database review the status of a database view reports about databases Starting and stopping the monitoring of databases You can have PATROL automatically discover and monitor all databases. You can perform both of these tasks using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Set DB Auto-Discovery menu command from the Server application pop-up menu.

The PATROL username must have system administrator privileges. Reviewing the status of a database You can check the status of a database by reviewing the information in the Database application InfoBox. that is. upon a restore of a backup database or in some other circumstances. For a description of the InfoBox items. You would use this menu command to add the PATROL user under those circumstances. on all tables in the database Requires sa or dba privileges. Open Transactions displays information on the oldest active transaction Requires sa or dba privileges. the database does not have the Patrol user. it checks the internal consistency of data and index pages. The Add PATROL User to Database menu command uses sp_adduser to add the PATROL username associated with the instance to the list of user names for the database monitored by this instance.Adding the PATROL user to a database Table 12 Database consistency menu options (Part 2 of 2) Description checks the database for tables or views with no columns. For more information. see “InfoBoxes” on page 30. Microsoft SQL Server does not allow you to add sa as a user of a database. checks the validity of the column data types. Menu command Checkcatalog Checkdb performs a checktable. Occasionally. Showcontig displays the fragmentation of a selected table or an index Adding the PATROL user to a database You can perform this task using the KM Admin => Add PATROL User to Database menu command from the Database application pop-up menu. Under normal circumstances. and InfoBoxes” in the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 131 . sa is a reserved login name in SQL Server. Icons. such as moving a database from one SQL server to another. you do not need this menu command. and validates the last checkpoint log in syslogs Requires sa or dba privileges. see “Application Classes. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server adds the Patrol user to databases at the time they are discovered so that it can monitor them.

Viewing reports about databases Viewing reports about databases Access database reports from the Server application menu by selecting the following menu commands: I Reports => Database Help Information => — Helpdb Info — Helprotect Info — Helptext Info I Reports => Database Resources => — DB File Info — DB Options — Filegroup Info — Space Used I Reports => Database Users => — Group/Role Info — User Info I Reports => Device Information => — Database on Device Info — Default Devices — Dump Devices I Reports => User Customizable Reports => — Open Databases Report — Suspect Databases Report Access database reports from the Database application menu by selecting the following menu commands: I Reports => Database Help Info => — Help Info — Helpdb Info — Helpprotect Info — Helptext Info 132 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

You must enable file and file group monitoring before PATROL creates File and Filegroup application icons for all of the files and file groups that it discovers and begins to monitor those files and file groups. PATROL uses the DbStructureColl standard collector parameter to search your environment and create an MSSQL_SERVER_FILE (File) or MSSQL_SERVER_FILEGROUP (Filegroup) application icon for every monitored file or file group it detects. NOTE PATROL only detects and monitors files and file groups for monitored databases. Once you enable the monitoring of files and file groups. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 133 . PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server creates File and Filegroup application icons and monitors all files and file groups that it discovers.Monitoring files and file groups I Reports => Database Resources => — DB File Info — DB Options — Filegroup Info — Space Used I Reports => Database Users => — Group/Role Info — User Info I Reports => Other Database Info => Who’s Using Databases Monitoring files and file groups Files and file groups are by default not automatically monitored by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. For information about selecting databases for monitoring. From PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server you can perform the following tasks: I I I enable the monitoring of files and file groups check the status of the files and file groups view reports on file groups Enabling the monitoring of files and file groups You can use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command from the Server application pop-up menu to enable file and file group monitoring. see “Starting and stopping the monitoring of databases” on page 130.

you can only monitor up to ten objects. For more information. see “Application Classes. (tables and indexes) on each database. 134 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . However. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is not set up to automatically monitor individual database objects (tables and indexes). Icons. Viewing reports about files and file groups Access the following reports by selecting Reports => Database Resources from the Server or Database application pop-up menu: I I DB File Info Filegroup Info Access the following reports from the Filegroup application pop-up menu: I I I Chart File Sizes for Filegroup Chart Space Used for Filegroup DBCC CheckFilegroup Monitoring objects By default. From PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server you can perform the following tasks: I I I set up the monitoring of objects for a particular database review the status of an object set up for monitoring view reports on the objects set up for monitoring Setting up the monitoring of objects You can manually select and can monitor tables and indexes for each individual Database application instance. and InfoBoxes” in the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. For a description of the InfoBox items.Reviewing the status of files and file groups Reviewing the status of files and file groups You can check the status of monitored files and file groups by reviewing information in the InfoBox for the File and Filegroup application instances. see “InfoBoxes” on page 30.

Monitoring replication PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not automatically monitor the replication process in your environment. For detailed instructions. Reviewing the status of an object You can check the status of an object by reviewing information in the InfoBox for the Object application instance. Subscribers and Published application icons only appear when the following conditions exist: I the SQL Server you are monitoring is configured as a distributor for replication (See your SQL Server documentation for more information about configuring your server for replication. see “Application Classes. For more information. see “InfoBoxes” on page 30. When replication monitoring is enabled.Reviewing the status of an object To set up the monitoring of an object. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server creates Subscribers application icons for each subscriber to published articles and Published application icons for each published article. Choose Reports => Database Information =>Object Information from the Server application pop-up menu. use the KM Admin => Object Space Monitor from the Server application pop-up menu or the Object Space Monitor menu command from the Database application pop-up menu.) the SQL Server service has been started in the Services dialog box for Windows or Windows NT (See your Windows documentation for more information about the Services dialog box.) you have enabled the monitoring of Replication I I Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 135 . Icons. For a description of the InfoBox items. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. and InfoBoxes” in the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. including objects that you have selected for monitoring. Viewing reports about objects PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides detailed information about any object for a specific database.

From PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. Reviewing the status of Subscribers or Published Articles Check the status of a Subscriber by reviewing information in the Subscribers application InfoBox. The following reports are accessed from the Reports menu in the Published application pop-up menu: 136 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . distributors. The Published applications do not provide InfoBoxes. and subscribers use SQL commands to manage the distributor and the subscriber Enabling the monitoring of replication Use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command from the Server application pop-up menu to enable the monitoring of Replication. see “InfoBoxes” on page 30. see “Application Classes. you must create published articles and subscribers by using the SQL Server Enterprise Manager or ISQL. and articles. and InfoBoxes” in the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. Viewing reports about Subscribers and Published Articles PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides reports with detailed information about publications. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server uses the ReplicationColl standard collector parameter to create a Published or Subscribers application icon for every publication or subscriber it detects in the SQL Server. For more information. databases. Once you enable replication monitoring. subscribers. distributors. For a description of the InfoBox items.Enabling the monitoring of replication NOTE PATROL does not allow you to create published articles or subscribers. Icons. you can perform the following actions: I I I I enable the monitoring of Replication review the status of a subscriber or published article instance view reports about published articles.

you must change the default settings for automatic monitoring or manually monitor a specific user or process. You can also monitor users and processes using the Users application parameters and review the status of a user or process using the Users application InfoBox. Use the following menu commands from the Subscriber application pop up menu: I I SQL Commands => To Distributor SQL Commands => To Subscriber Monitoring users and processes PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not automatically create Users application icons. If you want PATROL to monitor specific users.Using SQL commands I Articles => — Articles — Article Columns I Publications => — For this Database — List Publication DBs I Subscriber Info The following reports are accessed from the Reports menu in the Subscribers application pop-up menu: I Job Details => — From Distributor — From Subscriber I Subscriber Status => Using SQL commands The Subscriber application provides menu commands that open a command window to the distributor or the subscriber. and it enables you to manually select and monitor specific processes or users. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server automatically monitors processes that are blocking other processes and processes that are idle. Server and User application menu Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 137 .

PATROL provides menu commands that enable you to change the automatic monitoring settings in the following ways: I I I I I I turn automatic monitoring off or on change the blocked detection time change the idle detection time enabling and disabling idle and blocked process monitoring change the problem alert method exclude specific users or processes from automatic monitoring NOTE By default. and IdleProcs parameters monitor resources used by processes or users and check for processes that are blocking other processes and idle processes. or view SQL statements for a user or process. the sa. 138 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . BlockerProcs. Turning auto user monitoring off and on Turning auto user monitoring off stops the MonProbUsers collector parameter from detecting and collecting information about idle or blocking processes. and repl_subscriber logins and their processes are excluded from the automatic monitoring feature. From PATROL you can perform the following tasks: I I I I I I change the settings for automatic monitoring of users and processes monitor specific users and processes manually user parameters to monitor specific users and processes review the status of a user view reports on users and processes kill a process Changing the automatic monitoring of users and processes PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server automatically monitors processes that are blocking other processes and processes that are idle.Changing the automatic monitoring of users and processes commands allow you to view reports about users and processes. repl_publisher. but you can remove them from the exclusion list at any time. and User application menu commands enable you to stop monitoring a user or process. shut down or kill a process from the PATROL console. probe. The MonProbUsers. which stops the IdleProcs and BlockerProcs parameters from going into an alarm state.

the blocked detection time for that user or process returns to the amount of time set in the Configure Auto User Monitoring dialog box. You can change it at any time. The default blocked detection time is 3 minutes. a blocking process is a process that blocks other users for at least the minimum amount of time configured for blocked detection time. You can change the idle detection time for all users and processes from the Server application pop-up menu by using KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command. The default idle detection time is 20 minutes. Enabling and disabling blocked process and idle process monitoring To enable or disable monitoring of blocked or idle processes. You can change the blocked detection time for a specific user or process from the Users application pop-up menu by using the KM Admin => Change Local Defaults => Blocked Detection Time menu command. You can change it at any time for all users and processes or for a specific user or process. the idle detection time for that user or process returns to the amount of time set in the Configure Auto User Monitoring dialog box. you can enter configuration variables for idle and blocked process monitoring through the PATROL Console for Windows or by using PATROL Configuration Manager. Changing the idle detection time In PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. For information about how to add pconfig variables. once that user instance is deleted. once that user instance is deleted. see “Adding or modifying pconfig variables manually” on page 102. However. You can change the blocked detection time for all users and processes from the Server application pop-up menu by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command. You can change the idle detection time for a specific user or process from the Users application pop-up menu by using the KM Admin => Change Local Defaults => Idle Detection Time.Changing the automatic monitoring of users and processes You can turn Auto User Monitoring off or on by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command from the Server application menu. an idle process is a process that has not been active for at least the minimum amount of time configured for idle detection time. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 139 . Changing the blocked detection time In PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. However.

Setting this pconfig variable to any other value enables blocked process monitoring. the sa. repl_publisher. and repl_subscriber logins and their processes are excluded from the automatic monitoring feature.Changing the automatic monitoring of users and processes For idle processes. Changing the problem alert method used by the MonProbUsers. and IdleProcs parameters are also effected by the changes made using the ARA settings menu command. probe. and IdleProcs parameters By default. By default. the configuration variable should appear as follows: /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/idle_procs_monitoring_enabled Setting the value of this pconfig variable to 0 (zero) disables idle process monitoring. the BlockerProcs and IdleProcs parameters provide a report if the MonProbUsers collector parameter detects a blocking or idle process. BlockerProcs. For blocked processes. the configuration variable should appear as follows: /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/blocked_procs_monitoring_enabled Setting the value of this pconfig variable to 0 (zero) disables blocked process monitoring. For more information. You can exclude or include logins from monitoring from the Server application popup menu by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Exclude Specific User menu command. but you can include these logins or exclude other logins from monitoring at any time. a blocking process or idle process does not create a Users application icon. Setting this pconfig variable to any other value enables idle process monitoring. 140 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . You can change the default so that the MonProbUsers collector parameter generates a Users application icon for each idle process and blocking process it detects. You can change the problem alert method from the Server application pop-up menu by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command. Excluding specific users or processes from monitoring By default. BlockerProcs. see “Using automatic recovery actions” on page 149. The recovery actions generated by the MonProbUsers.

If you choose to monitor each process individually. I I I view a list of process IDs monitor specific user by login name or by process ID stop monitoring a user or process Viewing a list of process IDs You can review a list of all users and their process IDs that are currently on the SQL Server by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Monitor Specific User => Lookup Process ID’s from the Server application pop-up menu. however. NOTE You may want to review this list before you select individual users or processes to monitor. PATROL creates a Users application icon for each process.Monitoring specific users and processes manually Monitoring specific users and processes manually By default. Monitoring specific users by login name or by process ID When you select a user to monitor. manually set up individual users or processes to monitor. you can choose whether to monitor each user process individually or all processes together as an aggregate. PATROL creates one Users application icon that represents the user. You can select a user to monitor by login name by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Monitor Specific User => By Login Name menu command from the Server application pop-up menu. You can select a user process to monitor by process ID by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Monitor Specific User => By Process ID (spid) menu command in the Server pop-up menu. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 141 . You can. If you choose to monitor all processes as an aggregate. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server does not automatically monitor individual users or processes that are not blocking other processes or that are idle. Stopping the monitoring of a user You can stop monitoring a user or a process that you manually selected for monitoring by using the Stop Monitoring menu command in the Users application pop-up menu.

and memory usage of a monitored user or a monitored process. Reviewing the status of a user You can check the status of a user by reviewing information in the InfoBox for that Users application instance. see “InfoBoxes” on page 30. and InfoBoxes” in the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. Access these parameters by double-clicking the Users application icon that represents the user or process you are monitoring. I/O. Other parameters monitor the CPU usage. the UserBlocked and UserIdle parameters for a monitored user inherit the blocked or idle detection times from the SQL Server.Using parameters to monitor specific users and processes Using parameters to monitor specific users and processes PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides a number of parameters that monitor a specific user or a process. For a description of the InfoBox items.Resources — Blocked Process Listing — Resource Hogs — Top (n) Active Processes — Top (n) Active Users 142 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .Detail — All Processes . For more information. see “Application Classes. The UserBlocked and UserIdle parameters go into an alarm state when processes for a monitored user are blocked or idle for a certain amount of time. By default. Viewing reports about users and processes The following reports are accessed from the Reports menu in the Server application pop-up menu: I User Login Info => — General Login Info — NULL Passwords I User Process Info => — Active Process(es) for — All Processes . Icons.

NOTE You cannot use the Kill This Process menu command to kill processes for a particular user that PATROL is monitoring as an aggregate (collectively). you can select from a list of predefined reports and combine reports to create customized reports. This command kills the process whether you are monitoring that process or not. You can kill the process you are currently monitoring by using the Kill a Process => Kill This Process menu command from the Users application pop-up menu.Killing a process from PATROL The following reports are accessed from the SQL Snapshot menu in the Server application pop-up menu: I I I Active Processes All Processes Blocked Processes The following reports are accessed from the User application pop-up menu: I Reports => — Blocked Process Listing — Process Listing for User I SQL Snapshot for User Killing a process from PATROL WARNING Killing a process disconnects the user who was using that process and causes a roll back of the query or transaction the process was executing. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 143 . You can kill any process by using the SQL Server Admin => Kill Server Process menu command in the Server application pop-up menu. Creating customized reports Using the Reports => User Customizable Reports menu command from the Server application pop-up menu. You can also add your own reports to this list.

Accessing the predefined reports Accessing the predefined reports The Reports => User Customizable Reports menu from the Server application pop-up menu accesses the Customizable Reports dialog box.Title=yourReportName The yourReportName variable is the name you want displayed in the list. copy it into the %PATROL_HOME%\mssql\sql directory on the PATROL Agent computer. The next time you access the Reports => User Customizable Reports menu. the name of the report you created appears in the list of reports in the Custom Reports dialog box. Once you create the script and test it against SQL Server.sql file extension and contain the following line: -. which contains the following predefined reports: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Blocked Processes Report CPU and I/O Usage Report CPU Usage Report Command Queue Length Settings Report Connections Remaining Report Disk I/O Errors Report Locks Types Held Report Locks Remaining Report Locks Info for CPU Users Report Memory Used by Processes Report Memory Usage Report Open Databases Report Process Listing Report sp_who Report Suspect Databases Report Adding customized reports to the predefined list You can add your own reports to the predefined list of reports by creating your own transact SQL script that generates the information you want. The script must have a . 144 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

see “Parameters” on page 26. see Appendix B. and blackout parameter alarms refresh parameters Viewing parameter data You can display current parameter data by double-clicking the parameter icon. you can deactivate parameters that you do not need. Parameter history data is stored by the PATROL Agent in compressed binary files. To reduce the impact on your system resources and enhance performance. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server usually generates a report automatically and displays the information in a task output window. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 145 .” From PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server you can perform the following tasks: I I I I view parameter data activate and deactivate parameters and alarms clear. You can manually view detailed information about a warning or an alarm in the PATROL Event Manager. see Appendix C. For detailed information about working with specific parameters. When a parameter goes into a warning or an alarm state. see the online Help. Activating and deactivating parameters and alarms As shipped.” For information about the relationship between the consumer and collector parameters. snooze. “Parameter definitions and defaults. refer to the PATROL user guide for your console. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies.Working with parameters Working with parameters For an overview of the different types of parameter used by PATROL. all of the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters are active. you can display output by doubleclicking the data point. For information about current and historical parameter information. If a parameter graph generates annotated data points. To view a table of the parameters available in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server and their default values. see the PATROL user guide for your console. For information on how to customize parameters. Each warning and alarm from PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server adds an event to the PATROL Event Manager.

see the online Help. or black out parameter alarms. you must manually clear the parameter alarm. and blacking out parameter alarms Activating or deactivating a parameter You can activate or deactivate any parameter by using a Developer console in PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows Servers or PATROL Console for UNIX. Clearing an alarm PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters stop their warning or alarm after you or the recovery actions resolve the problem. as follows: I (Windows) Right-click the parameter in the KM tree. snoozing. Clearing. with the exception of ErrorLogUpdates and SQLAgentJobFailures. see “In a clustered environment” on page 91. but the alarm for this parameter is not active by default. For information about how to clear a parameter alarm from the PATROL Event Manager. and blacking out parameter alarms PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server enables you to clear. I Activating the alarm for the Failover parameter The Failover parameter is shipped in an active state (that is. NOTE The Failover parameter is available only when you are monitoring a clustered SQL Server using a virtual PATROL Agent configuration. For complete instructions.Clearing. choose Properties. (UNIX) Choose the Attributes => Application Classes menu. You can activate the alarm for the Failover parameter by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command. snoozing. the parameter gathers information and creates annotated data points). 146 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . and then select or deselect Active. You can clear a parameter alarm through the PEM or through a menu item.. For more information. see the PATROL user guide for your console. snooze. When ErrorLogUpdates or SQLAgentJobFailures goes into an alarm state and you have corrected the problem.

all collecting parameters (collector parameters. Published. the collectors distribute the information gathered to the consumer parameters. If you select Refresh Parameters from the KM commands for the Users. only the collecting parameters associated with the selected application are forced into an unscheduled collection. Once the collection commands execute. It could take several minutes. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 147 . NOTE The amount of time it takes for the Refresh Parameters menu command to execute depends on the number of collectors involved and the availability of the Global Channel and CPU. choose Reset Alarms from the Error Log application pop-up menu. Snoozing a parameter To stop a parameter icon from flashing an alarm before the problem is resolved. and the collecting parameters return to their regularly scheduled poll times. Use the KM Admin => Set Blackout menu from the Server application pop-up menu to set or delete a black out period for all parameters for a SQL Server.Refreshing parameters To clear the SQLAgentJobFailures parameter alarm from the KM menu. choose KM Admin => Reset Parameter Alarm from the Server application pop-up menu. To clear alarms that occur for the Error Log application parameters. all of the requests are placed in the Global Channel queue and are executed one at a time. When you refresh the parameters. or Subscribers applications. rightclick on the parameter and select Alarm Snooze. standard parameters and standard parameters with collector properties) are forced into an unscheduled collection. The parameter remains in an alarm state. Adding or deleting parameter black out periods The Set Alarm Blackout dialog box enables you to select a time period during which the parameters for the selected SQL Server do not go into an alarm or warning state. Refreshing parameters If you select KM Admin => Refresh Parameters from the KM commands for the Server application.

”or Appendix C. and it provides predefined parameter charts that you can view. and ResponseSqlTime parameters combines the DatabaseSpaceUsedPct parameter output from all of the monitored databases for the selected server combines the output for the DatabaseSpaceUsedMB parameter for all of the monitored databases on the selected server combines the output from the DiskIoWrites. and to display.Creating customized parameter charts Creating customized parameter charts PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server enables you to create. view. “Parameter definitions and defaults. delete. edit or delete those custom parameter charts. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies”for detailed information about the parameters that these parameter charts contain. (You cannot display. use the Reports => Parameter Charts => Custom Charts menu command. Creating and managing parameter charts To create custom parameter charts. See the online Help for step-by-step instructions. Appendix B. DiskIoReads. Menu command/parameter chart CPU Busy/Response Time Database Space Used (Percent) Description combines the output from the CpuBusy. edit. or delete predefined parameter charts. and DiskIoErrors parameters combines the output from the LogSpaceUsedPct parameter for all of the monitored databases in the selected server combines the output from the LogSpaceUsedMB parameter for all of the monitored databases in the selected server Database Space Used (Size) Disk I/O Log Space Used (Percent) Log Space Used (Size) 148 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . ResponseExecTime. and edit customized parameter charts that combine the output from several parameters.) Accessing the predefined parameter charts The Reports => Parameter Charts menu from the Server application pop-up menu accesses the following menu commands that open charts that contain output from one or more parameters. See the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help.

It also enables you to test the recovery and alert notification actions that you set and to enter the names of those who receive a notice when net send is activated. which makes upgrading easier. Using the ARA menu commands provided by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server instead of the PATROL Console for parameter recovery actions provides these benefits: I You can maintain custom recovery actions outside PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. CpuIobusy. You can create different recovery batch files for each computer.Using automatic recovery actions Menu command/parameter chart Network Traffic Performance Summary Description combines the output from the PacketsReceived. ResponseSqlTime. PacketsSent. and CacheHitRatio parameters Using automatic recovery actions You can use the following methods for adding or changing automatic recovery actions to the parameters in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server: I You can access parameter definition dialog boxes and specify PATROL Script Language (PSL) and operating system recovery actions. which enables you to perform recovery actions that are computer-specific. CpuBusy. NOTE The PATROL user guide for your operating system describes how to add recovery actions by accessing parameter definition dialog boxes. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 149 I . I You can apply certain automatic recovery actions to certain key parameters using the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => ARA Settings menu in the Server application pop-up menu. and PacketErrors parameters combines the output from the ResponseExecTime. After PSL recovery actions are generated. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server generates other automatic recovery actions that you select through the ARA Settings menu. When one of the key parameters goes into an alarm state. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server runs PSL and operating system recovery actions that are specified as part of the parameter property definition. This automatic recovery action (ARA) function in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server enables you to customize the automatic recovery actions that occur when any of several key parameters go into alarm.

cmd script (active by default) Execute net send to specified Windows desktops Execute an SNMP trap (snmptrap command) Create an output file Annotate a parameter warning or alarm (active by default) Trigger an event in PATROL Event Manager (active by default) The following key parameters are affected by the ARA functions that you select using the ARA Settings menu: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ARATest BlockerProcs CacheHitRatio CheckConfiguration CommandQueueLength ConnectionsRemaining CpuBusy CpuIdle CpuIoBusy DatabaseSpaceUsedPct DbSpaceColl DbStructureColl DiskIoErrors ErrorLogColl ErrorLogUpdates Failover I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IdleProcs LocksRemaining LogSpaceColl LogSpaceUsedPct LongRunningTrans MonProbUsers NumBlockedProcesses OpenDbRemaining PacketErrors SpaceUsedPCT (File and Filegroup) SQLAgentJobFailures SQLAgentStatus SQLServerStatus SuspectDatabases UserBlocked UserIdle 150 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .Reviewing the ARA settings and parameters Reviewing the ARA settings and parameters When you access the ARA menu settings. you can activate or deactivate the following options for the parameters that use the ARA settings: I I I I I I Execute the ara_MSSQL.

When this batch file is called. such as the name of the alarming instance (for example.cmd batch file can perform operating system commands as well as SQL commands using isql. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 151 .cmd generates the following message: No recovery action associated with name of parameter. database. or SQL Server name). However. PATROL automatically passes the batch file information.cmd script using operating system commands independent from the PATROL console. the parameter name. the output from the ara_MSSQL.Viewing the parameter recovery process Viewing the parameter recovery process Figure 10 illustrates the parameter recovery process. Figure 10 Parameter recovery process Execute PSL and OS recovery actions through parameter property definition Output to task window Execute ARA menu settings Execute ara_MSSQL. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is set up to automatically call the ara_MSSQL. if you have not set up a script.cmd script send SNMP traps Execute net send Create output file Annotate parameter Trigger event in PATROL Event Manager Messages to SNMP managers Message to Windows desktop Output to %PATROL_TEMP% Annotation to parameter window Event created Using the ARA Script option This option in the ARA Default Action dialog box performs the recovery action entered by you in the ara_MSSQL. and the value of the parameter causing the alert.cmd file.cmd file. the alarm state. Once you have a script set up. The ara_MSSQL. which is located in the %PATROL_HOME%\mssql directory on each monitored Microsoft SQL Server computer. you can inactivate the file at any time through the ARA menu settings. You can also execute this ara_mssql. user.

cmd file. add the command that you want this parameter to execute whenever it crosses an alarm or warning threshold.cmd file.cmd file is a Windows command file that executes on the Agent system.cmd file In deciding upon a command to enter in the ara_MSSQL. PATROL executes the query and reads all rows returned by the query. If it does not. 6 Save and close the ara_MSSQL. To add a command in the ara_MSSQL. The next time the selected parameter goes into an alarm or warning state. review the following conditions: I check the syntax in your command make sure the parameter you selected is configured to perform recovery actions and has alarm ranges and alarm actions enabled. It uses the PATROL user login you entered in the SQL Server Instance Setup dialog box. 3 In the ara_MSSQL. You can create a different ara_MSSQL. 2 Read the instructions and information provided in the ara_MSSQL.cmd file. keep the following general rules in mind: I Limit the amount of output generated by the query. I 152 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . It is important to note that the actual command executed is located in the ara_MSSQL.cmd file. Use queries with short execution times (the query places an additional load on the SQL Server) Do not enter queries that require system administrator privileges. navigate to the parameter for which you want to create a recovery action. I I NOTE The ara_MSSQL. 4 Delete the following statement under the selected parameter name: goto NO_RECOVERY_ACTION 5 Under the parameter name. 1 Using a text editor. navigate to and open the ara_MSSQL. the command you created should execute.Viewing the parameter recovery process The parameter name generally determines the action steps taken.cmd file for each computer that PATROL is monitoring.cmd file.cmd file. but the command applies to all of the SQL Servers monitored by that PATROL Agent.

see the PATROL Agent Reference Manual section about the configuration variable snmp/p1V1m_list. For information about accessing the PATROL Event Manager. Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 153 . the ARA function builds a small message describing the problem and sends this message to each name listed in the ARA_SENDTO PATROL Agent configuration variable. For information about registering SNMP managers to receive traps. Activating the SNMP trap option If you activate the SNMP trap option when you issue the net send command. Activating the output file option If you activate the output file option.Viewing the parameter recovery process Activating the net send option If you activate the net send command. the recovery action text is sent to the parameter annotation window for that parameter warning or alarm. the ara_MSSQL( ) function sends the message to all registered SNMP managers. The following file naming convention is automatically used: SQL_Server_name-parameter_name. see the PATROL User Guide for your console. NOTE To receive messages through net send.out Activating the annotate parameter option If you activate the annotate parameter option. the parameter warning or alarm generates an event in the PATROL Event Manager with the recovery action text. the recovery action text is sent to the %PATROL_TEMP% directory. Activating the event trigger option If you activate the event trigger option. The receiving computers see a Microsoft SQL Server message on the desktop. each receiving computer must have the Windows Messenger service started.

you can customize automated recovery actions for all parameters of a monitored SQL Server. you must I select the net send automated recovery option using KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => ARA Settings => Set Default Actions I make sure that each of the recipients you enter has the Microsoft SQL Server Messenger service started choose KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => ARA Settings => Set Send To Names from the Server application pop-up menu. I To test current ARA settings To test current ARA settings use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => ARA Settings => ARA Test menu command from the Server application pop-up menu. You can also test current automated recovery actions. This test causes the ARATest parameter to go into an alarm state so that you can verify that the automated recovery actions perform correctly. 154 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . choose KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => ARA Settings => Set Default Actions from the Server application pop-up menu. To change the ARA settings To change the automated recovery actions that PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server performs when the parameters connected to the ARA function go into a warning or an alarm state. To change or add to the Windows message recipients To customize the list of Windows message recipients who receive a net send message whenever one of the ARA parameters goes into an alert state.Using the ARA Settings menu commands Using the ARA Settings menu commands Using the ARA Settings menu commands. and enter the names. This test also resets the ARATest parameter back to an OK state.

you cannot obtain the values of certain parameters because that action requires the admin privilege. Table 14 Parameters partially affected in a recovery action Parameter BlockerProcs CpuIdle CpuIoBusy Database LongRunningTrans Application class Availability Performance Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 155 . the DBCC command cannot run. However. If the value of the DBCC_PSS_Disabled pconfig variable is not set to 1. the report shows a blank SQL statement. You must manually add the variable in the configuration settings and set the value to 1. the status of these parameters remains online. If PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is running in general user mode. Table 13 lists the parameters. The DBCC_PSS_Disabled pconfig variable is not configured by default in the configuration settings. Table 13 Collectors Procedure Cache Parameters affected in the general monitoring user mode Parameter LongRunningTrans LongRunningTransColl PCProcBuffersUsedPct PCProcBuffersActivePct PCProcCacheActivePct PCProcCacheUsedPct ProcedureCacheColl Application class Parameters partially affected in a recovery action The parameters listed in Table 14 require admin privileges to run a DBCC command to populate the SQL statement of the report created in a recovery action. BMC recommends that you disable the DBCC command by setting the value of the /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName\\InstanceName/DBCC_PSS_Disabled pconfig variable to 1.Parameters affected in general user monitoring mode Parameters affected in general user monitoring mode If PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is running in general monitoring user mode.

Whenever a process causes one of the following parameters to go into an alarm state. 156 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . SQL Snapshot displays a report containing the last SQL statements generated by the processes described by the submenu command. — BlockerProcs — CpuBusy — CpuIoBusy — IdleProcs I I Whenever you select one of the following submenu commands in the SQL Snapshot menu. This feature enables you to examine the SQL statements that a problem process is currently executing. the recovery action report also lists the last SQL statement that the process used. — Active Processes — All Processes — Blocked Processes Setting up SQL Snapshot To use SQL Snapshot. you must specify a SQL Server account with System Administrator privilege. you specify these accounts when you set up PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. SQL Snapshot enables you to display the last SQL statement sent by a client process. Viewing SQL commands with SQL Snapshot SQL Snapshot enables you to view the last SQL statement sent by a SQL Server client process. SQL Snapshot displays the last SQL statement for a process under the following conditions: I Whenever the client process executes a stored procedure or trigger. Normally. SQL Snapshot uses DBCC INPUT BUFFER and can only display the first 255 bytes of the SQL statement.Viewing SQL information Viewing SQL information PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server enables you to view and obtain information about SQL commands using the SQL Snapshot utility. SQL Snapshot displays the name of the stored procedure or trigger and the text of the line that is currently executing within the stored procedure or trigger. but you may need to verify or change the accounts.

using the SQL Snapshot => All Processes menu command can use a significant amount of resources and execute for a long time. and for a particular user. this menu command can use a significant amount of resources and take a long time. Table 15 Task Tasks for displaying SQL for processes and users Menu command To display the last SQL statement use the SQL Snapshot => All Processes menu command for all users and all processes in the Server application pop-up menu Warning: Do not use this menu command unless you have the appropriate resources. Using SQL Snapshot Table 15 on page 157 displays a list of tasks for displaying SQL for selected users and processes that you can perform using a PATROL Operator Console or a PATROL Developer Console. WARNING Do not attempt to display all SQL statements for all users and processes unless you have the appropriate resources. If you have a large number of users or processes. for blocked and blocking processes.Viewing SQL commands with SQL Snapshot To verify and change PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server accounts that SQL Snapshot uses. If you have a large number of users or processes. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => SQL Server Instance Setup menu command in the Server application pop-up menu. To display SQL statements for blocked processes To display SQL statements for a currently active user To display SQL statements for a specific user or process use the SQL Snapshot => Blocked Processes menu command in the Server application pop-up menu use the SQL Snapshot => Active Processes menu command in the Server application pop-up menu use the SQL Snapshot for User menu command in the User application pop-up menu Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 157 . You can display SQL statements for all or selected user processes.

“Accessing menu commands. For step-by-step instructions. “Parameter definitions and defaults. For more information. and online Help” definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies Appendix B. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides menu commands that perform the following tasks: I I access information on the status of the global channel reset the global channel Accessing the Global Channel menu commands To access the global channel menu commands. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server provides the GlobalChannelLockErrors parameter. “Parameter definitions and defaults” Appendix C. see the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help and Appendix B.” Where to go from here The following table suggests topics that you should read next: Topic Source of Information how to access the KM menu commands. and online Help InfoBoxes. which goes into an alert state when five or more global channel lock requests have not been granted. “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies” 158 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . choose KM Admin => Global Channel Info or Global Channel Reset from a Server application pop-up menu.Managing the global channel Managing the global channel PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server establishes a global channel to each SQL Server instance detected. Monitoring the Global Channel lock requests To monitor the global channel. PATROL uses this global channel to gather the information it needs to monitor the SQL Server instances. InfoBoxes. Appendix A.

“Agent configuration variables” Chapter 5 Working with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server 159 .Where to go from here Topic detailed descriptions of the applications. menu commands. and InfoBoxes Source of Information PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix D. parameters.

Where to go from here 160 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

. . . . . . . each one uses a different method to display and access information in the KM. This appendix provides instructions for accessing the KM menu commands and InfoBoxes. . . . . . Because of the different environments in which these consoles run. . . . . . . . . . . 163 Appendix A Accessing menu commands. . . . . It also provides instructions for accessing the online Help. . . . InfoBoxes. . . InfoBoxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and online Help A BMC Software offers several PATROL consoles from which you can view a PATROL Knowledge Module (KM). See the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help for more detailed information about navigation in the PATROL Consoles. . . . . In this appendix. . . . the following topics are discussed: Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes . . . . . . . . . . . and online Help 161 . . . . . . . . . .Appendix A Accessing menu commands. . . . . . . . . 162 Accessing online Help . . . . .

Knowledge Module Commands from the pop-up menu. In the work area. right-click a PATROL object and choose application icon and choose Infobox from the pop-up menu. Table 16 Console PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows Servers Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes Menu commands In either the Desktop tree tab or the work area. right-click a computer. 162 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . click an application class or parameter icon. In the tree view area. InfoBoxes In either the Desktop tree tab or the work area. right-click a PATROL object and choose managed system or application InfoBox from the pop-up menu. right-click a In the navigation pane.Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes Table 16 provides information about how to access KM commands and InfoBoxes from the various PATROL consoles. With the middle mouse button. or parameter icon and choose InfoBox from the pop-up menu. application class. right-click a computer or application icon to display a pop-up menu that contains KM-specific commands. icon and choose Knowledge Module Commands from the pop-up menu. right-click a computer or application icon and choose KM Commands from the pop-up menu. right-click an In the tree view area. PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition For more information about menu commands and InfoBoxes. PATROL Console for UNIX PATROL Central Operator – Windows Edition In the navigation pane. see “Product components” on page 20.

see the PATROL Installation Reference Manual for specific instructions about installing and setting up a browser in the UNIX environment. From the Application Properties dialog box. Table 17 Console Accessing online Help To access product help From the console menu bar. Choose Attributes => Application Classes and double-click the application name. choose Help On => Knowledge Modules. choose Help => Help Topics => PATROL Knowledge Modules. I I PATROL Console for UNIX From the console menu bar. KM Help. right-click In the tree view. from the properties dialog box. choose Help => Help Topics. Click Show Help in the Application Definition dialog box.Accessing online Help Accessing online Help Table 17 provides information about how to access Help from each console. and online Help 163 . right-click an application class and a parameter and choose PATROL Central. click the Help tab. Double-click a parameter icon. Right-click a parameter icon and click Help On. then click Show Help. To access parameter help I PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows Servers Right-click a parameter icon and choose Help On from the pop-up menu. In the Operator tab of the navigation pane. click Help. To access application class help Double-click an application class in the KM tab of the console. InfoBoxes. click the ? icon or Help button in the parameter display window. In the Contents tab. Help and choose PATROL choose Help. NOTE If you are trying to access Help from a UNIX console. Then click Show Help. select an application icon and press F1. PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition In the upper right corner of In the tree view. In the Operator tab of the navigation pane. click the name of your product. click the Help tab. PATROL Central Operator – Windows Edition From the console menu bar. Appendix A Accessing menu commands. select a parameter icon and press F1. Double-click a parameter in the KM tab of the console.

Accessing online Help

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Appendix

B

B

Parameter definitions and defaults
This appendix contains a definition and default values for each parameter used in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. For more information about individual parameters, refer to the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help. For information about the dependencies between standard collector and consumer parameters, see Appendix C, “Consumer-collector parameter dependencies.” In this appendix, the following topics are discussed: Column headings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abbreviations defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameter table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Availability Application Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cache Application Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Capacity Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collectors Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Database Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disk Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Error Log Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . File Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Filegroup Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Locks Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Objects Application Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Performance Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Procedure Cache Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Published Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subscribers Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . User–Defined Counters Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Users Application Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 167 168 168 170 171 173 177 179 180 181 182 183 188 188 189 192 193 193 194 194

Appendix B

Parameter definitions and defaults

165

Column headings

Column headings
The column headings used in Table 18 on page 168 are defined as follows:
Parameter states the parameter name and describes the parameter’s function; for consumer parameters, lists the collector parameters that gather the data displayed by this parameter indicates whether the parameter is active or inactive by default indicates the parameter type: standard (Std) gathers and displays a single data value; collector (Coll) gathers multiple data values but has no display capabilities; consumer (Con) displays values gathered by collector or standard parameters. Some standard parameters have collector properties. defines the default range for the parameter; can be set so that values that fall outside this range trigger warnings, alarms, or recovery actions specifies the thresholds for the first-level alarm specifies the thresholds for the second-level alarm specifies how frequently the parameter runs and collects data (polling cycle); not applicable to consumer parameters specifies whether the parameter is represented as a graph, gauge, text box, stoplight (signal), or Boolean state specifies the unit of measure in which the parameter output is expressed, such as a percentage, a number, or bytes

Active at installation Parameter type

Border range Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Scheduling (poll time) Icon style Unit

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Abbreviations defined

Abbreviations defined
The following abbreviations are used in Table 18 on page 168:
bool coll con disc GB hr KB MB MHz min msec N NA nsec sec std TB undef warn Y Boolean; shows a state, such as on or off, OK or not OK collector parameter consumer parameter discovery; refers to the PATROL discovery process gigabyte or gigabytes hour or hours kilobyte or kilobytes megabyte or megabytes megahertz minute or minutes millisecond or milliseconds no; parameter is inactive after KM is installed not applicable; a value cannot be set nanosecond or nanoseconds second or seconds standard parameter terabyte or terabytes undefined; a value can be set, but no default is provided warning; type of alert yes; parameter is active after KM is installed

Appendix B

Parameter definitions and defaults

167

The parameters are grouped alphabetically by application class. Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 1 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter Availability Application Class ARATest Allows testing of automated recovery actions without triggering false alarms on the parameters you are monitoring. >100 warn 0-50 OK 50–100 alarm NA graph test results Y con undef 1–100 alarm undef set by coll graph number of processes Y con undef 1–1 alarm undef NA graph user connections remaining 168 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit .Parameter table Parameter table Table 18 contains a short definition and all of the default values for each parameter in PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. Y con <0. Collector: none BlockerProcs Provides information about processes that are holding locks and blocking other processes longer than the time period set by using the Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command (120 seconds by default). Collector: MonProbUsers ConnectionsAvailable Tests to see if PATROL can connect to the database with an OSQL connection. This parameter does not monitor logons that you excluded by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Exclude Specific User menu command. You can test that setting through the ARA Settings => ARA Test menu command. You can set automated recovery actions by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => ARA Settings menu command.

The alarm for this parameter is disabled by default. Creates an annotation that contains information about a failover whenever a failover occurs. if a failover is detected and the alarm is enabled. These jobs usually include scheduled backup and maintenance procedures. Collector: ProcessColl SQLAgentJobFailures Monitors the completion status of the jobs that the SQL Server Agent runs. >15 alarm undef undef set by coll gauge number of processes Y std <0. the value is set to 1. You can clear the alarm by using the Reset Parameter Alarm menu command. you can enable the alarm by using the Monitoring Setup menu command. the value is set to 2.km discovery NumBlockedProcesses Monitors the number of processes that are blocked. Y con undef 1–1 OK 2–2 alarm set by coll graph 1 or 2 Y con <0. Collector: MSSQL_SERVER. >0 alarm undef undef 15 min graph number of failed jobs Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 169 .Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 2 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter Failover Appears only when the instance is running on a virtual PATROL Agent in a cluster. If a failover is detected and the alarm is disabled.

If parameter history collection is enabled. It is disabled by default. SQLServerStatus Tracks the status of the SQL Server. If SQL Server goes off line. This parameter only monitors databases that are setup for monitoring. when it goes into an alarm state.km (SQL Server discovery) SuspectDatabases Determines which databases. if any. including those that are not monitored. then statistics on the availability of the SQL Server are collected over long periods. Y std undef 1–1 alarm undef 5 min bool none Y con undef 1–1 alarm undef NA bool none Y std undef 1–1 alarm undef 4 hr bool none Cache Application Class BufferCacheHitRatio Displays the ratio of cache hits to cache lookups. are marked as suspect (corrupt) by the SQL Server. this parameter generates a report that lists all suspect databases. However. Collector: SQLServerColl Y con undef undef undef NA graph ratio of cache hits to lookups 170 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . Collector: MSSQL_SERVER.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 3 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter SQLAgentStatus Monitors the up and down status of the SQL Server Agent when SQL Server Agent monitoring is enabled. then SQLServerStatus goes into an alarm state. You can switch SQL Server Agent monitoring on and off by using the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command. and it was not shut down from within PATROL.

Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 4 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter NumberOfFreeBuffers Displays the number of cache buffers that are in the free buffer pool. A parameter value of less than 300 seconds might indicate one of the following conditions: I I I Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of free buffers Y con undef 0-300 undef NA graph seconds memory pressure missing indexes cache flush Collector: SQLServerColl Capacity Application Class ConnectionsRemaining Monitors the number of user connections available for use on the SQL Server and goes into an alarm state when the number falls below the alarm thresholds. to calculate the number of connections remaining. SYSCURCONFIGS table to determine the maximum number of user connections that are allowed and the SQL Server General Statistics counter. For Online Transaction Processing (OLTP). User Connections. This parameter uses the MASTER . Collector: SQLServerColl PageLifeExpectancy Displays the number of seconds a page stays in the buffer pool without any reference. the value of an average page life expectancy is 300 seconds.. Collector: CurConfigsColl Y con undef 0–2 alarm 3–4 warn set by coll graph number of available connections Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 171 .

This value is derived from the total number of rows in the MASTER . This parameter does not display if the SQL Server is set to dynamically configure lock resources. as defined in the MASTER .. which is the default configuration.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 5 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter IdleProcs Provides information about processes that are idle longer than the amount of time set by using the Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command (20 minutes by default). Collector: CurConfigsColl NumProcesses Tracks the number of SQL Server processes. Collector: ProcessColl UserConnections Displays the number of user connections. This parameter does not monitor processes that you excluded from monitoring by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Exclude Specific User menu command.. Collector: MonProbUsers LocksRemaining Monitors the number of locks that are available for use. SYSCURCONFIGS table. Collector: SQLServerColl Y con undef 1–100 alarm undef set by coll graph number of idle processes Y con undef 1–50 alarm 51–75 warn set by coll graph number of available locks Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of processes Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of connections 172 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . SYSPROCESSES table.

Y std undef undef undef 55 min text none Y std <0. installs the sp_patrol_ monitor and sp_patrol_user stored procedures in the SQL Server master database. attempts to reconnect to the global channel. >0 alarm undef undef 15 min bool none Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 173 . upon a global channel failure. SYSCURCONFIGS table pertaining to SQL Server configuration.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 6 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter Collectors Application Class CheckConfiguration Ensures that the PATROL Agent default account exists and that it has SQL Server administrator privileges.. gathers data on the availability of the global channel. and parameters collecting data report any global channel lock timeouts to this parameter. When a change is detected. Other parameters check the status of this parameter before executing. this parameter creates an annotation that contains the name of the configuration variable that was changed and information about how it was changed. ensures that the SQL Server performance counters are available to PATROL. >0 alarm undef undef 5 min bool none ConfigUpdates Checks for changes to the PATROL Configuration Variables. Y std <0. and. CurConfigsColl Gathers information from the SQL Server MASTER .

or key for instances of SQL Server. extent. Warning: This parameter does not function correctly when the db file is mapped to a shared drive by using a universal naming convention (UNC) format. table. For more details. >0 alarm undef undef 34 min bool none Y std <0. This collector uses the SQL Server Locks performance counters to calculate the wait times and number of requests for locks by database. For more information. >0 alarm undef undef 5 min bool none Y std <0.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 7 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter DbSpaceColl Collects information about files and file groups. and underscore (_). based on the settings for the database. >0 alarm undef undef 5 min bool none Y std <0. for example. DbStructureColl Collects information about monitored databases. Note: This parameter does not discover or monitor databases with names that contain characters other than A–Z. GlobalVarsColl Collects various SQL Server statistics using SQL Server global variables (for example. Creates and destroys file and file group instances. maxsize or current size plus x percent. It uses sp_spaceused to calculate the space available. see the online Help. then calculates the change in the value of these global variables between poll cycles. Y std <0.. 0–9. @@CPU_BUSY).D. page. a–z. LocksColl Collects information about all the locks that are within SQL Server. >0 alarm undef undef 15 min bool none 174 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . row I. see the online Help.

>0 alarm undef undef 10 min bool none Y std <0. MonProbUsers Collects information about processes that are blocking other processes (blocker processes) and processes that are idle. This parameter does not monitor logins that you excluded from monitoring by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Exclude Specific User menu command. System Administrator or Database Administrator privileges are required for proper execution of this parameter. >0 alarm undef undef 5 min 30 sec bool none Y std <0. ObjectSizeColl Collects information about and monitors the size of database objects.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 8 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter LogSpaceColl Collects information about the amount of log space used by the databases that PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is monitoring. >0 alarm undef undef 24 min bool none Y std <0. LongRunningTransColl Monitors the oldest open transaction. This parameter makes calculations based on DBCC SQLPERF (LOGSPACE) and takes into account the autogrow settings. To determine the amount of time configured for blocker or idle processes. For more details. and creates and destroys the Objects application instances. Long-running transactions are those transactions that are open for longer than one poll cycle of this parameter (the default poll cycle is 10 minutes). see KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin. >0 alarm undef undef 4 hr bool none Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 175 . Y std <0. see the online Help.

Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 9 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter ProcedureCacheColl Collects information about the SQL Server procedure cache. To calculate the values for the procedure cache consumer parameters. >0 alarm undef undef 10 min bool none Y std <0. >0 alarm undef undef 5 min bool none Y std <0. Y std <0. For more information. ReplicationColl Collects information about transactions that are delivered from the transaction log of the publication database to the distribution database and transactions that are delivered from the distribution database to the destination database. >0 alarm undef undef 15 min bool none Y std <0. this parameter uses the SQL Server DBCC PROCCACHE command for SQL Server. SQLServerColl Collects statistics about SQL Server performance. >0 alarm undef undef 15 min bool none 176 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . and return a response by executing and then monitoring the progress of a sample SQL statement. execute a simple query. UserDefinedCountersColl Collects information from User Settable object for SQL Server. see the online Help. >0 alarm undef undef 5 min bool none Y std <0. ProcessColl Collects information about the status and number of processes that are running on the SQL Server. gathers information about all servers subscribing to published articles. >0 alarm undef undef 10 min bool none Y std <0. ResponseColl Measures the amount of time it takes to connect to the SQL Server. and creates and destroys the Published and Subscribers application instances.

plus any free disk space for autogrow files or the maxsize set). Collector: LogSpaceColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph MB of database space used Y con <0. Collector: DbSpaceColl DatabaseSpaceUsedPct Monitors the percentage of available space that is used (the space used divided by the sum of the database size. Note: The DBCC showfilestats command is undocumented. Collector: DbSpaceColl LogSpaceUsedMB Displays (in megabytes) the amount of transaction log space that is used. the DBCC showfilestats command (instead of sp_spaceused) is used for space calculation. >100 warn 85–95 warn 95–100 alarm set by coll graph percentage of database space used Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph MB of transaction log space used Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 177 . If the /MSSQLServer/A_DBSPMB_ENA BLED pconfig variable is set to 1. Note: The values for this parameter do not match the values provided by the Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager because the KM takes into account autogrow settings and free disk space.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 10 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter Database Application Class DatabaseSpaceUsedMB Displays (in megabytes) the amount of used space (the size of the database device or files minus the unallocated space within the database).

Long-running transactions are transactions that are open for longer than one poll of the LongRunningTransColl standard collector parameter. >100 alarm 70–80 warn 80–100 alarm set by coll graph percentage of transaction log space used Y con undef 1–1 alarm undef set by coll bool none Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of locks Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of Processes 178 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . Collector: ProcessColl Y con <0. Collector: LogSpaceColl LongRunningTrans Displays information about the oldest long-running transaction.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 11 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter LogSpaceUsedPct Displays the percentage of the transaction log that is used. Note: The values for this parameter do not match the values that are provided by the Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager because the KM takes into account autogrow settings and free disk space. Collector: LongRunningTransColl NumCurrentLocks This parameter displays the number of locks granted for the database. Collector: LocksColl NumCurrentUsers This parameter displays the number of User Processes granted for the database.

Collector: SQLServerColl OutstandingWrites Displays the number of physical writes that are pending. Collector: SQLServerColl Y con <0. Collector: GlobalVarsColl DiskIoWrites Monitors the number of disk writes that SQL Server performs between polls of the @@TOTAL_WRITE global variable. Collector: GlobalVarsColl LazyWritesPerSec Displays the number of pages that lazywriter flushes to disk per second.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 12 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter Disk Application Class DiskIoErrors Monitors the number of disk errors that SQL Server encounters while reading and writing to disk. Collector: SQLServerColl OutstandingReads Displays the number of physical reads that are pending. The size of a page is 8 KB. >0 alarm undef undef set by coll graph number of disk I/O errors Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of disk I/O reads Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of disk I/O writes Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of pages flushed to disk per sec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of pending reads Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of pending writes Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 179 . This value represents the number of errors that occurred between polls of the @@TOTAL_ERRORS global variable. Collector: GlobalVarsColl DiskIoReads Monitors the number of disk reads that SQL Server performs between polls of the @@TOTAL_READ global variable.

con undef 2-2 warn 3-3 alarm set by coll graph none Note: These alarm values cannot be changed. in megabytes (MB). the size of the error log file. Collector: ErrorLogColl Y coll undef 2-2 warn 3-3 alarm 10 min graph none Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph MB of free space on disk drive ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold Y Monitors whether the amount of space that is free on the disk where the error log resides is below the user-defined threshold.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 13 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter Error Log Application Class ErrorLogColl Monitors the SQL Server and SQL Server Agent error logs for updates. Collector: ErrorLogColl ErrorLogSizeMB Displays. ErrorLogDiskSpaceFree Displays. the amount of free space on the disk drive where the error log file is located. in megabytes (MB). Collector: ErrorLogColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph MB of space in error log file 180 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . and sends information about any user-defined search strings that it detects to the ErrorLogUpdates parameter. filters new log entries for the user-defined search strings. they are hard-coded flags that work in conjunction with the Error Log Free Disk Space menu command.

Collector: DbSpaceColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph used space in MB Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph size of file in MB Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 181 . This value is obtained from the sysfiles table. This parameter goes into an alarm state if the updated error log text contains one of the strings entered using the KM Admin => Set up Error Log String Monitoring menu command from an Error Log application class instance.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 14 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter ErrorLogSizeThreshold User-defined threshold for the ErrorLogSizeMB parameter. Collector: ErrorLogColl ErrorLogUpdates Monitors the SQL Server error log for updates. Y con undef 2-2 3-3 set by coll graph none Note: These alarm values cannot be changed. they are hard-coded flags that work in conjunction with the Error Log Size Monitoring menu command. Collector: DbSpaceColl SpaceUsedMB Displays (in megabytes) the amount of file space that is used by the database file. Collector: ErrorLogColl Y con undef 2-2 warn 3-3 alarm set by coll graph none File Application Class FileSizeMB Displays (in megabytes) the size of the database file.

Collector: DbSpaceColl Y con undef 80–90 warn 90–100 alarm set by coll graph percentage of file space used Filegroup Application Class SpaceUsedMB Displays (in megabytes) the amount of the file group space that is used.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 15 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter SpaceUsedPCT Displays the percentage of the database file that is full. account autogrow settings and free disk space are taken into account. Collector: DbSpaceColl SpaceUsedPCT Displays the percentage of the database file group that is full. When this value is calculated. When this value is calculated. autogrow settings and free disk space are taken into account. Collector: DbSpaceColl Y con undef 80–90 warn 90–100 alarm set by coll graph percentage of space used Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph used file group space in MB 182 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit .

Collector: LocksColl DatabaseLockRequestsPerSec Displays the number of new database locks and lock conversions that lock manager requested per second. PATROL uses the Lock Requests/sec performance counter for the database instance. To calculate this value. PATROL uses the Lock Requests/sec and Lock Waits/sec performance counters for the database instance. To calculate this value. To calculate this value. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Average Wait Time (ms) performance counters for the extent instance. Collector: LocksColl ExtentLockAvgWaitTime Displays (in milliseconds) the average amount of wait time that was caused by extent lock requests. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Average Wait Time (ms) performance counters for the database instance. Collector: LocksColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph percentage of database locks per sec that had to wait con undef undef undef set by coll graph average wait time in msec Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 183 .Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 16 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter Locks Application Class DatabaseLockAvgWaitTime Displays (in milliseconds) the average amount of wait time caused by database lock requests. Collector: LocksColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph wait time in msec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of lock requests per sec DatabaseLockRequestWaitPercent Y Displays the percentage of database lock requests that required a caller to wait. To calculate this value.

Collector: LocksColl ExtentLockRequestWaitPercent Displays the percentage of new extent lock requests per second that required a caller to wait.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 17 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter ExtentLockRequestsPerSec Displays the number of new extent locks and lock conversions that the lock manager requested per second. Collector: LocksColl KeyLockRequestsPerSec Displays the number of new key locks and lock conversions that the lock manager requested per second. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Requests/sec performance counter for the extent instance. To calculate this value. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Lock Requests/sec performance counters for the extent instance. To calculate this value. Collector: LocksColl KeyLockAvgWaitTime Displays (in milliseconds) the average amount of wait time that was caused by key lock requests. To calculate this value. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Requests/sec performance counter for the key instance. Collector: LocksColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of lock requests per sec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph percentage of new extent lock requests per sec that had to wait Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph average wait time in msec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of new lock requests per sec 184 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . To calculate this value. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Average Wait Time (ms) performance counters for the key instance.

PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Lock Requests/sec performance counters. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Lock Requests/sec performance counters for the key instance. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Requests/sec performance counter.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 18 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter KeyLockRequestWaitPercent Displays the percentage of key lock requests that required a caller to wait. Collector: LocksColl LockRequestsPerSec Displays the number of all locks and lock conversions that the lock manager requested per second. To calculate this value. To calculate this value. Collector: LocksColl PageLockAvgWaitTime Displays (in milliseconds) the average amount of wait time that was caused by page lock requests. Collector: LocksColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph percentage of key lock requests per sec that had to wait Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of lock requests per sec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph percentage of lock requests per sec that had to wait Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph average wait time in msec Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 185 . PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Average Wait Time (ms) performance counters for the page instance. To calculate this value. To calculate this value. Collector: LocksColl LockRequestWaitPercent Displays the percentage of all lock requests that required a caller to wait.

Collector: LocksColl RIDLockAvgWaitTime Displays (in milliseconds) the average amount of wait time that was caused by row ID lock requests. To calculate this value. PATROL uses the SQL Server Locks Waits/sec and Average Wait Time (ms) performance counters. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Lock Requests/sec performance counters for the page instance. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Requests/sec performance counter for the page instance.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 19 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter PageLockRequestsPerSec Displays the number of new page locks and lock conversions that the lock manager requested per second. Collector: LocksColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of new page lock requests per sec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph percentage of lock requests per sec that had to wait Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph average wait time in msec 186 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . To calculate this value. To calculate this value. Collector: LocksColl PageLockRequestWaitPercent Displays the percentage of page lock requests that required a caller to wait.

To calculate this value. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Requests/sec performance counter. Collector: LocksColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of row ID lock requests per sec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph percentage of row ID lock requests per sec that had to wait Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph average wait time in msec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of new table lock requests per sec Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 187 . PATROL uses the SQL Server Locks Requests/sec performance counter. To calculate this value. To calculate this value. Collector: LocksColl TableLockAvgWaitTime Displays (in milliseconds) the average amount of wait time that was caused by table lock requests. PATROL uses the SQL Server Locks Waits/sec and Average Wait Time (ms) performance counters. To calculate this value. Collector: LocksColl RIDLockRequestWaitPercent Displays the percentage of row ID lock requests that required a caller to wait. PATROL uses the SQL Server Locks Waits/sec and Lock Requests/sec performance counters. Collector: LocksColl TableLockRequestsPerSec Displays the number of new table locks and lock conversions that the lock manager requested per second.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 20 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter RIDLockRequestsPerSec Displays the number of new row ID locks and lock conversions that the lock manager requested per second.

Collector: LocksColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph percentage of table lock requests per sec that had to wait Network Application Class PacketErrors Monitors the number of packet errors that SQL Server encounters while reading and writing network packets. To calculate this value. Collector: ObjectSizeColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph MB of space used by data 188 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit . This value represents the number of errors that occur between polls of the @@PACKET_ERRORS global variable. Collector: GlobalVarsColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of packets sent Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of packets received Y con <0. >99 alarm undef undef set by coll graph number of packet errors Objects Application Class ObjectDataSizeMB Displays (in megabytes) the total amount of space that is used by data in the table or index which you are monitoring. Collector: GlobalVarsColl PacketsReceived Monitors the number of network packets that SQL Server receives between polls of the @@PACK_ RECEIVED global variable.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 21 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter TableLockRequestWaitPercent Displays the percentage of table lock requests that required a caller to wait. Collector: GlobalVarsColl PacketsSent Monitors the number of network packets that SQL Server sends between polls of the @@PACK_SENT global variable. PATROL uses the SQL Server Lock Waits/sec and Lock Requests/secperformance counters.

Collector: SQLServerColl CacheHitRatio Displays the percentage of requests for data that the SQL Server can satisfy from memory (data cache) rather than reading the data from a disk. To calculate this value. Collector: ObjectSizeColl RowCountEstimate Provides an estimate of the number of rows in a table. Collector: ObjectSizeColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph MB of space used Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of rows in table Performance Application Class AvgLatchWaitTime Displays the average wait time (in milliseconds) for latch requests that had to wait.Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 22 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter ObjectReservedSizeMB Displays (in megabytes) the total amount of space that is reserved for use by the table or index which you are monitoring. see the online Help. PATROL uses the SQL Server:Buffer Manager => Buffer Cache Hit Ratio performance counter for SQL Server. including space for data and system information and space not used. For recommendations. >100 alarm 0–50 alarm after two times 50–70 warn after two times set by coll graph percentage of time a request is found in cache Y con undef undef undef NA graph milliseconds Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 189 . Collector: SQLServerColl Y con <0. This parameter is not available when the monitored object is an index.

Parameter table

Table 18

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 23 of 28)
Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style

Alarm1 range

Alarm2 range

Border range

Parameter
CpuBusy Monitors the percentage of time that the SQL Server is busy between polls of the @@CPU_BUSY global variable. Collector: GlobalVarsColl CpuIdle Monitors the percentage of time that SQL Server is idle between polls of the @@IDLE global variable. Collector: GlobalVarsColl CpuIoBusy Monitors the percentage of time that SQL Server performs input and output operations between polls of the @@IO_BUSY global variable. Collector: GlobalVarsColl DeadlocksPerSec Displays the number of lock requests per second that resulted in a deadlock. Collector: SQLServerColl FullScansPerSec Displays the number of unrestricted full scans per second. Collector: SQLServerColl

Y

con

<0, >100 alarm

90–95 warn

95–100 alarm

set by coll

graph

percentage of time the SQL Server was busy

Y

con

<0, >100 alarm

0–5 alarm

6–10 warn

set by coll

graph

percentage of time the SQL Server was idle

Y

con

<0, >100 warn

30–40 warn

40–100 alarm

set by coll

graph

percentage of time the SQL Server performed I/O operations number of lock requests

Y

con

undef

undef

undef

NA

graph

Y

con

undef

undef

undef

NA

graph

number

190

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started

Unit

Parameter table

Table 18

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 24 of 28)
Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style

Alarm1 range

Alarm2 range

Border range

Parameter
ResponseExecTime Provides the total operating response time (in milliseconds). The value of this parameter includes the time it takes a sample SQL statement to connect to SQL Server, execute a simple query, and return a response. See ResponseColl for information on how to change the sample SQL statement. Collector: ResponseColl ResponseSqlTime Provides the amount of time (in milliseconds) that it takes SQL Server to execute a simple query when a sample SQL statement is executed. This parameter is formed by subtracting the connect and disconnect times from the information that is gathered by ResponseColl, leaving only the amount of time that SQL Server took to execute the query. Collector: ResponseColl TransactionsPerSec Displays the number of Transact-SQL command batches that are executed per second. This number is affected by all constraints, such as, I/O, number of users, cache size, and complexity of the requests. PATROL uses the SQL Statistics => Bath Requests/sec performance counter to calculate the value of this parameter. Collector: SQLServerColl

Y

con

undef

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

operating response time in msec

Y

con

undef

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

SQL response time in msec

Y

con

undef

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

number of tsql batches executed per sec

Appendix B

Parameter definitions and defaults

Unit 191

Parameter table

Table 18

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 25 of 28)
Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style

Alarm1 range

Alarm2 range

Border range

Parameter
Procedure Cache Application Class PCProcBuffersActivePct Monitors the percentage of procedure buffers that are actively used. To calculate this value, PATROL uses the DBCC PROCCACHE command for SQL Server. Collector: ProcedureCacheColl PCProcBuffersUsedPct Monitors the percentage of procedure buffers in the procedure cache that are used. To calculate this value, PATROL uses the DBCC PROCCACHE command for SQL Server. Collector: ProcedureCacheColl PCProcCacheActivePct Monitors the percentage of procedure cache that is active. To calculate this value, PATROL uses the DBCC PROCCACHE command for SQL Server. Collector: ProcedureCacheColl PCProcCacheUsedPct Monitors the percentage of procedure cache that is used. To calculate this value, PATROL uses the DBCC PROCCACHE command for SQL Server. Collector: ProcedureCacheColl

Y

con

<0, >100 OK

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

percentage of buffers actively used

Y

con

<0, >100 OK

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

percentage of buffers used

Y

con

<0, >100 OK

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

percentage of active cache

Y

con

<0, >100 OK

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

percentage of used cache

192

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started

Unit

Parameter table

Table 18

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 26 of 28)
Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style

Alarm1 range

Alarm2 range

Border range

Parameter Published Application Class
ReplicatedCmdsPerSec Displays the number of replication commands that were read out of the transaction log of the publication database and delivered to the distribution database per second. Collector: ReplicationColl ReplicatedTransPerSec Displays the number of transactions that were read out of the transaction log for the publication database and delivered to the distribution database per second. Collector: ReplicationColl

Y

con

undef

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

number of commands per sec

Y

con

undef

undef

undef

set by coll

graph

number of replicated transactions read per sec

Subscribers Application Class DelieveredCmdsPerSec
Displays the number of delivered commands per second in the distribution database. This value is calculated by using the Delivered Cmds/sec performance counter under the SQLServer:Replication Dist. object. Collector: ReplicationColl DeliveredTransPerSec Displays the number of transactions delivered per second. Collector: ReplicationColl DeliveryLatency Displays the number of milliseconds that a transaction remains in the distribution database before it is delivered to the subscription server. Collector: ReplicationColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of milliseconds transactions remain in distribution database Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of transactions delivered per sec Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph delivered commands per second

Appendix B

Parameter definitions and defaults

Unit 193

Collector: UserColl Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of CPU computer ticks Y std undef undef undef 10 min bool none Y con undef 1–1 warn 2–2 alarm set by coll none none 194 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started Unit .Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 27 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter UserDefCounter1–10 Displays the user-defined Windows performance counters 1 through 10 that SQL Server sets. UserCpu Displays the CPU time that a user connection and checkpoint process used since the last poll of the UserColl parameter. Collector: UserColl UserColl Collects data for the Users application class. sets all values for user and process parameters within the User application class. Change the blocked detection time for the selected user process through the Change Local Defaults menu command. Collector: UserDefinedCountersColl User–Defined Counters Application Class Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of CPU computer ticks Users Application Class UserBlocked Gives a warning if one user process is blocked longer than the blocked detection time. Change the blocked detection time for all SQL Server user processes by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command. Goes into alarm when two or more user processes are blocked longer than the blocked detection time.

Parameter table Table 18 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server parameters (Part 28 of 28) Active at installation Scheduling (poll time) Parameter type Icon style Alarm1 range Alarm2 range Border range Parameter UserIdle Generates a warning if one user process remains idle longer than the idle detection time. Collector: UserColl UserTotCpu Displays the cumulative CPU time for a user connection and checkpoint process. Collector: UserColl UserTotIo Displays the cumulative total number of disk reads and writes for the current statement. Change the idle detection time for the selected user process by using the Change Local Defaults menu command under a User application. Collector: UserColl UserIo Displays the number of disk reads and writes for the user connection that you are monitoring. Change the idle detection time for all SQL Server user processes by using the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command under a Server application. Collector: UserColl UserMemUsage Displays the amount of memory (in in 8 KB pages) allocated to a user connection. Collector: UserColl Y con undef 1–1 warn undef set by coll none none Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of disk reads and writes Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph number of pages of allocated memory Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph CPU time ticks Y con undef undef undef set by coll graph disk reads and writes Appendix B Parameter definitions and defaults Unit 195 .

Parameter table 196 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

“Parameter definitions and defaults. see Appendix B. Disabling a standard collector parameter also disables the consumer parameters that it sets. Appendix C Consumer-collector parameter dependencies 197 .Appendix C Consumer-collector parameter dependencies C Consumer parameters depend on a collector parameter. For more information about parameters. Each consumer parameter is cross-referenced with the standard collector parameter that sets its value. (All of the collectors used by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server are standard parameters with collector properties. or a standard parameter used as a collector. The standard parameters that set only their own values and the consumer parameters that are set by something other than a collector or standard parameter are listed with the consumer parameters. to set their values or to collect information.”and the PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server online Help.) Table 19 on page 198 lists the consumer parameters alphabetically in the first vertical column and the standard collector parameters alphabetically across the top of the table.

poll time 5 minutes) x x x x ConfigUpdates (standard parameter. poll time 55 minutes) ConnectionsRemaining CpuBusy CpuIdle CpuIoBusy DatabaseLockAvgWaitTime DatabaseLockRequestsPerSec DatabaseLockRequestWait Percent DatabaseSpaceUsedMB DatabaseSpaceUsedPCT DeadlocksPerSec DeliveredCmdsPerSec DeliveredTransPerSec DeliveryLatency DiskIoErrors DiskIoReads DiskIoWrites ErrorLogDiskSpaceFree ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold ErrorLogSizeMB x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 198 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started UserColl .5 240 15 5 10 10 10 ARATest (set by ARA Test menu command) AvgLatchWaitTime BlockerProcs BufferCacheHitRatio CacheHitRatio CheckConfiguration (standard parameter.Table 19 Consumer-collector parameter dependencies (Part 1 of 4) UserDefinedCountersColl 15 LongRunningTransColl ProcedureCacheColl DbStructureColl ReplicationColl CurConfigsColl GlobalVarsColl MonProbUsers ObjectSizeColl SQLServerColl 5 LogSpaceColl ResponseColl DbSpaceColl ErrorLogColl ProcessColl LocksColl Collector Consumer Collector Poll Time (in minutes) 55 34 5 10 5 15 24 10 5.

km discovery) FileSizeMB FullScansPerSec IdleProcs KeyLockAvgWaitTime KeyLockRequestsPerSec KeyLockRequestWaitPercent LazyWritesPerSec LockRequestsPerSec LockRequestWaitPercent LocksRemaining LogSpaceUsedMB LogSpaceUsedPct LongRunningTrans NumberOfFreeBuffers NumBlockedProcesses NumProcesses NumCurrentUsers NumCurrentLocks ObjectDataSizeMB ObjectReservedSizeMB OutstandingReads OutstandingWrites PacketErrors x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Appendix C Consumer-collector parameter dependencies UserColl 199 .5 240 15 5 10 10 10 x x x x x ExtentLockRequestWaitPercent Failover (set by MSSQL_ SERVER.Table 19 Consumer-collector parameter dependencies (Part 2 of 4) UserDefinedCountersColl 15 LongRunningTransColl ProcedureCacheColl DbStructureColl ReplicationColl CurConfigsColl GlobalVarsColl MonProbUsers ObjectSizeColl SQLServerColl 5 LogSpaceColl ResponseColl DbSpaceColl ErrorLogColl ProcessColl LocksColl Collector Consumer Collector Poll Time (in minutes) ErrorLogSizeThreshold ErrorLogUpdates ExtentLockAvgWaitTime ExtentLockRequestsPerSec 55 34 5 10 5 15 24 10 5.

poll time 15 minutes) SQLAgentStatus (standard parameter. poll time 5 minutes) SQLServerStatus (set by discovery) SuspectDatabases (standard parameter.Table 19 Consumer-collector parameter dependencies (Part 3 of 4) UserDefinedCountersColl 15 LongRunningTransColl ProcedureCacheColl DbStructureColl ReplicationColl CurConfigsColl GlobalVarsColl MonProbUsers ObjectSizeColl SQLServerColl 5 LogSpaceColl ResponseColl DbSpaceColl ErrorLogColl ProcessColl LocksColl Collector Consumer Collector Poll Time (in minutes) PacketsReceived PacketsSent PageLifeExpectancy PageLockAvgWaitTime PageLockRequestsPerSec PageLockRequestWaitPercent PCProcBuffersActivePct PCProcBuffersUsedPct PCProcCachActivePct PCProcCacheUsedPct ReplicatedCmdsPerSec ReplicatedTransPerSec ResponseExecTime ResponseSQLTime RIDLockAvgWaitTime RIDLockRequestsPerSec RIDLockRequestWaitPercent RowCountEstimate SpaceUsedMB (file) SpaceUsedPCT (file) SpaceUsedMB (filegroup) SpaceUsedPCT (filegroup) 55 34 5 10 5 15 24 10 5.5 240 15 5 10 10 10 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x SQLAgentJobFailures (standard parameter. poll time 240 minutes) TableLockAvgWaitTime x 200 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started UserColl .

5 240 15 5 10 10 10 x x x x x x x x x x x x Appendix C Consumer-collector parameter dependencies UserColl 201 .Table 19 Consumer-collector parameter dependencies (Part 4 of 4) UserDefinedCountersColl 15 LongRunningTransColl ProcedureCacheColl DbStructureColl ReplicationColl CurConfigsColl GlobalVarsColl MonProbUsers ObjectSizeColl SQLServerColl 5 LogSpaceColl ResponseColl DbSpaceColl ErrorLogColl ProcessColl LocksColl Collector Consumer Collector Poll Time (in minutes) TableLockRequestsPerSec TableLockRequestWaitPercent TransactionsPerSec UserBlocked UserConnections UserCpu UserDefCounter1-10 UserIdle UserIo UserMemUsage UserTotCpu UserTotIo 55 34 5 10 5 15 24 10 5.

202 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

“Using PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server. For detailed information about how to use pconfig. see Chapter 4. This appendix provides information about the following variables: I I Agent configuration variables (Table 20 on page 204) Obsolete variables (Table 21 on page 218) Appendix D Agent configuration variables 203 . or modify existing variables.01 or later. For detailed information about how to use the PATROL Configuration Manager.” For more detailed information. I I This section also lists variables that were formerly used by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server but are now obsolete. see the following BMC Software documentation products: I For summary information about wpconfig. version 1. add new variables.4. see the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows User Guide—Customizing PATROL. For information about how to modify these variables. Volume 3. see the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide. see the PATROL Agent Reference Manual. WARNING When you use the wpconfig utility or PATROL Configuration Manager to remove variables.Appendix D D Agent configuration variables The configuration variables described in this section are PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server variables that are set in the PATROL Agent. no validations are performed.

you must restart the Agent. OSdefaultAccountAppliesToCmds /AgentSetup/ MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 1 of 15) Description If this variable is modified. See the PATROL Agent Reference Manual for more information. defaultAccount /AgentSetup/ MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN. See the PATROL Agent Reference Manual for more information. you must restart the Agent.AgentHostName to display the following variables: /AgentSetup/ MSSQL_SERVER. you must restart the Agent. Click /AgentSetup/MSSQL_SERVER. If this variable is modified.AgentHostName.AgentHostName.AgentHostName. If this variable is modified. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files. If this variable is modified. defaultAccount 204 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . you must restart the Agent. OSdefaultAccount /AgentSetup/ MSSQL_SERVER. See the PATROL Agent Reference Manual for more information. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files. OSdefaultAccount /AgentSetup/ MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files. If this variable is modified.AgentHostName. OSdefaultAccountAppliesToCmds /AgentSetup/ MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT. See the PATROL Agent Reference Manual for more information. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files. you must restart the Agent. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files. See the PATROL Agent Reference Manual for more information.AgentHostName. you must restart the Agent. AgentHostName. If this variable is modified. See the PATROL Agent Reference Manual for more information. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files.

Table 20
Variable

Agent configuration variables (Part 2 of 15)
Description If this variable is modified, you must restart the Agent. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files. See the PATROL Agent Reference Manual for more information. If this variable is modified, you must restart the Agent. indicates the account information used to execute the OS commands and external executable files. See the PATROL Agent Reference Manual for more information. Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. flag indicating whether DEBUG is turned on during discovery
I I

/AgentSetup/ MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT .AgentHostName. OSdefaultAccount /AgentSetup/ MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT. AgentHostName. OSdefaultAccountAppliesToCmds Click /MSSQLServer to display the following variables: /MSSQLServer/ DEBUG_DISC_STAT

0 = DEBUG is turned off during discovery 1 = DEBUG is turned on during discovery

To create or modify this variable, use the KM Admin => DEBUG menu command from the Server, User, or Database application. /MSSQLServer/ DEBUG_PRE_DISC_STAT flag indicating whether DEBUG is turned on during pre-discovery
I I

Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter.

0 = DEBUG is turned off during pre- discovery 1 = DEBUG is turned on during pre- discovery

To create or modify this variable, use the KM Admin => DEBUG menu command from the Server, User, or Database application.

Appendix D

Agent configuration variables

205

Table 20
Variable

Agent configuration variables (Part 3 of 15)
Description lists the SQL Servers excluded from discovery You must enter this variable manually. It does not appear otherwise. Enter the pconfig variable followed by the names of the SQL Servers that you want to exclude from monitoring, with a vertical pipe (|) character separating the names of the SQL Servers, as in the following example: SQL8_TEST|MSSQLServer This example excludes the following SQL Servers:
I

/MSSQLServer/ SQLServersExcludedFromDiscovery

with the SQL Server name "ABC\SQL8_TEST", where ABC is the host name with the Windows service name "MSSQLServer" for SQL Server with a default instance name

I

/MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstanceName/ ExcludedDbs

stores the list of databases excluded from monitoring when Auto Discovery is set on To create or modify this variable, use the KM Commands => KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Set DB Auto-Discovery command.

/MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstanceName/ SQLERRORLOG/ EXCLUDED_ERRORLOG_STRINGS

stores the list of strings to be excluded from monitoring To create or modify this variable, use the KM Admin => Exclude Errorlog String from Monitoring command from the SQLERRORLOG application class. stores the list of SQLServer logins SQLAgent jobs owned by these logins are excluded from monitoring. To create or modify this variable, use the KM Admin => Exclude SQLAgent jobs from monitoring command from the Availability application class.

/MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstanceName/ ExcludedLogins

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PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started

Table 20
Variable

Agent configuration variables (Part 4 of 15)
Description This variable is not present by default. If it is set to 1, the command DBCC showfilestats is used for space calculation instead of sp_spaceused. Note: The DBCC showfilestats command is undocumented.

/MSSQLServer/A_DBSPMB_ENABLED

/MSSQLServer/ SQLServerInstanceName/ UserExListBlocked /MSSQLServer/ SQLServerInstanceName/ UserExListIdle

This pconfig variable contains the list of Users excluded from monitoring of blocked processes. This pconfig variable contains the list of Users excluded from monitoring of idle processes.

/MSSQLServer/ SQLServerInstanceName/ blocked_waittime The processes having waittime greater than this variable are considered for the parameter NumBlockedProcesses. The default value of this pconfig variable is 100 ms. /MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstanceName/ JobStepFailFlag However, PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server ignores a job step failure if the Quit with success option is set for that job step. The default value is 0, meaning PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server addresses a job step failure as a job failure even if the Quit with success option is set. /MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstanceName/ ExcludedJobCategories To create or modify this variable, use the KM Commands => Exclude SqlAgent jobs by Job Category command from the Availability application class. /MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstanceName/ ExcludedSQLServerJobNames To create or modify this variable, use the KM Commands => Exclude SqlAgent jobs by JobNames command from the Availability application class. stores the list of SQLServer Agent job names that are excluded from monitoring stores the list of SQLServer Agent job categories that are excluded from monitoring checks a job step failure if the value of this variable is set to 1

Appendix D

Agent configuration variables

207

Table 20
Variable

Agent configuration variables (Part 5 of 15)
Description determines whether PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server is configured for general user monitoring The value of GENUSERFLAG must be one character long.
I

/MSSQLServer/SQLServerInstanceName/ GENUSERFLAG

If the value is 0, the product is configured for sa user monitoring. If the value is 1, the product is configured for general user monitoring. If the value is null, or other than 1 or 0, the product is not configured for general user monitoring.

I

I

To create or modify this variable, use the KM Commands => KM Admin => SQL Config Set up command. /AgentSetup/ VirtualServerName stores the virtual server name This variable is required for Veritas cluster discovery. When running SQL Server on a Veritas cluster, set the virtual server name in this variable. /AgentSetup/VirtualServerName should be the same as the virtual server name assigned to the PATROL_VIRTUALNAME_port. This name is case sensitive. /AgentSetup/ Veritas_sql_server_group stores the SQL Server group name This variable is required for Veritas cluster discovery. When running SQL Server on a Veritas cluster, set the SQL Server group name in this variable. /AgentSetup/Veritas_sql_server_group should be the same as the SQL Server group name. /AgentSetup/ isVeritasCluster stores information about the Veritas cluster This variable is required for Veritas cluster discovery. When running SQL Server on a Veritas cluster, the value for this variable must be equal to 1.

208

PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started

The default is 180 seconds. turns off SQL Snapshot (DBCC output with trace) I Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. For more information. it does not appear automatically. see “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137. 1 disables the retrieval of the SQL query text by the recovery actions. I Appendix D Agent configuration variables 209 . /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName\\InstanceName/DBCC If this variable is modified. use the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command from the Server application. You must enter this variable manually. For more information. To create or modify this variable. use the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command from the Server application. flag indicating whether or not a user instance is created for users or sessions that are blocking other sessions I I Click /MSSQL_SERVER/AgentHostName to display the following variables: /MSSQL_SERVER/AgentHostName/ BlockAutoLaunch Yes = user instances are created No = user instances are not created To create or modify this variable. see “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 6 of 15) Description Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. any value other than 1 enables the retrieval of the SQL query text. /MSSQL_SERVER/AgentHostName/ BlockedTime indicates the amount of time a process can block another process before raising an alarm The value for this variable is the amount of time in seconds entered as the blocked detection time. you must restart the _PSS_Disabled Agent.

use the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command from the Server application. flag indicating whether or not a user instance is created for users or sessions that are idle I I /MSSQL_SERVER/AgentHostName/ IdleAutoLaunch 0 = user instance is not created 1 = user instance is created To create or modify this variable. 210 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . To create or modify this variable. It does not appear automatically.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 7 of 15) Description Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. I I 0 disables idle process monitoring any value other than 0 enables idle process monitoring /MSSQL_Server/AgentHostName/ blocked_procs_monitoring_enabled disables and enables blocked process mopnitoring You must enter this variable manually. /MSSQL_Server/AgentHostName/ idle_procs_monitoring_enabled disables and enables idle process monitoring You must enter this variable manually. I I 0 disables blocked process monitoring any value other than 0 enables blocked process monitoring /MSSQL_SERVER/AgentHostName/ StoppedTime Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. see “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137. It does not appear automatically. indicates the idle detection time The value for this variable is the amount of time in seconds entered as the idle detection time. The default is 20 minutes which displays as 1200 seconds. For more information. use the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command from the Server application. see “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137. For more information.

Appendix D Agent configuration variables 211 .Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 8 of 15) Description Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. To create or modify this variable. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => ARA Settings => Set Default Actions menu command from the Server application. See also “Using automatic recovery actions” on page 149. see “Creating customized parameter charts” on page 148. use the KM Admin => Reports => Parameter Charts => Custom Charts menu command from the Server application. flag indicating whether or not a user instance is created for users or sessions that are idle I I /MSSQL_SERVER/AgentHostName/ UserActive 1 = a user instance is created 0 = a user instance is not created To create or modify this variable. see “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137. lists the parameters included in a user-defined parameter charts The value of this parameter is a list of parameter names separated by a new line character. Click /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName to display the following variables: /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ araAction indicates the automatic recovery actions selected in the ARA Default Actions dialog box See “Modifying the automatic recovery action variable” on page 103 for the values this variable uses. Click /MSSQLServer to display the following variables: /charts/AgentHostName/name of chart Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. use the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Configure Auto User Monitoring menu command from the Server application. Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. For more information. To create or modify this variable. For more information.

lists the computer names and IP addresses to which you want the araSendTo option to send a message whenever one of several key parameters goes into an alert state Computer names and IP addresses are separated by a new line character. see “Modifying the blackout configuration variable” on page 103 and “Clearing. For more information. for a duration of 60 minutes. To create or modify this variable. For more information. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => ARA Settings => Set Send To Names menu command from the Server application. starting at 1:00 a. To create or modify this variable. /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ araSendTo /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ blackout Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. and blacking out parameter alarms” on page 146. indicates the time periods (blackout periods) when the PATROL Agent does not set off any parameter alarms for the instance Values are expressed as follows: I I I I <server_name> <day of the week> <starting time in seconds after midnight> <duration expressed in minutes> For example. see “Using automatic recovery actions” on page 149. use the KM Admin => Set Blackout menu command from the Server application. if you set a blackout period on a server called SQLServer1 for Monday.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 9 of 15) Description Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. the following value would displays: SQLServer1 Mon 3600 60 Blackout periods are separated by a new line character.m. 212 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . snoozing.

flag indicating whether auto discovery for user monitoring is on or off I I /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ DBAutoDisc 0 = auto discovery is off 1 = auto discovery is on To create or modify this variable. To create or modify this variable. /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ dbInstances lists the databases that you selected to monitor in the DB Autodiscovery dialog box Database names are separated by a new line character. For more information.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 10 of 15) Description Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Set DB Auto-Discovery menu command from the Server application. see “Monitoring databases” on page 129. see “Monitoring databases” on page 129. /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_DATA_COLLECTION_ACTION I I I I Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. indicates the action the ErrorLogColl parameter takes when a data collection problem occurs 1 = remains in an OK state 2 = goes into a warning state 3 = goes into an alarm state any other value or null = remains in OK state /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_DATA_COLLECTION_AUTORESET indicates whether the ErrorLogColl parametter is automatically reset to OK when it goes into an alarm or warning state I I I 0 = does not automatically reset 1 = automatically resets null or any value other than 0 or 1 = does not automatically reset /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_WARN_STRING list of the error log strings configured to set off a warning Appendix D Agent configuration variables 213 . For more information. use the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Set DB Auto-Discovery menu command from the Server application.

null. or any value other than 1 = error log threshold monitoring is disabled a number greater than 0 = error log size threshold in megabytes indicates whether the ErrorLogsSizeThreshold parametter is automatically reset to OK when it ERROR_LOG_FILE_SIZE_THRESHOLD_AUTORESET goes into an alarm or warning state /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ I I I 0 = does not automatically reset 1 = automatically resets null or any value other than 0 or 1 = does not automatically reset /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_SHOW_FILE_SIZE_IN_MB indicates whether file size is displayed in megabytes (MB) or kilobytes (KB) I I I 0 = KB 1 = MB null or any value other than 0 or 1 = MB /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_FILE_SIZE_THRESHOLD_ MONITORING indictes whether threshold monitoring is active for the size of the error log file I I I 0 = not active (ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter is not displayed) 1 = active (ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter is displayed) null or any value other than 0 or 1 = not active 214 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . 2. warn. or 3 = threshold monitoring is disabled and the ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter is not displayed /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_FILE_SIZE_THRESHOLD_AMOUNT indicates the error log size threshold in megabytes I I 0.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 11 of 15) Description list of the error log strings configured to set off an alarm indicates whether the ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter is set to OK. or alarm if error log file size threshold monitoring is active and the error log file crosses the user-defined threshold I I I I /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_ALARM_STRING /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_FILE_SIZE_THRESHOLD_ACTION 1 = OK 2 = warn 3 = alarm null or any value other than 1.

or 3 = threshold monitoring is disabled and the ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter is not displayed /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_FREE_DISK_SPACE_THRESHOLD_ AUTORESET indicates whether the ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold parameter is automatically reset to OK when it goes into an alarm or warning state I I I 0 = does not automatically reset 1 = automatically resets null or any value other than 0 or 1 = does not automatically reset /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_FREE_DISK_SPACE_THRESHOLD_MB indicates the error log disk space free threshold in megabytes I I 0.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 12 of 15) Description indicates the action taken if the ErrorLogFreeDiskSpaceThreshold is crossed I I I I /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_FREE_DISK_SPACE_THRESHOLD_ ACTION 1 = OK 2 = warn 3 = alarm null or any value other than 1. null. or any value other than 1 = error log threshold monitoring is disabled A number greater than 0 = error log disk space free threshold in megabytes /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_FREE_DISK_SPACE_THRESHOLD_MB indicates the error log disk space free threshold in megabytes I I 0. 2. or any value other than 1 = error log threshold monitoring is disabled A number greater than 0 = error log disk space free threshold in megabytes /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_FREE_DISK_SPACE_THRESHOLD_ MONITORING indictes whether threshold monitoring is active for the amount of free space on the disk where the error log resides I I I 0 = not active (ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold parameter is not displayed) 1 = active (ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold parameter is displayed) null or any value other than 0 or 1 = not active Appendix D Agent configuration variables 215 . null.

/MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ IconLabel lists the name that displays beneath the instance icon To create or modify this variable. 0 = filegroup and file monitoring are off 1 = filegroup and file monitoring are on To create or modify this variable. no matter how often the same strings are detected I I I /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_GENERAL_ALARM_WARNING_ EVERY_TIME 0 = only the first time 1 = every time null or any value other than 0 or 1 = only the first time /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ ERROR_LOG_STRING_MONITORING indicates whether the ErrorLogUpdates parameter monitors the error log for updated strings I I I 0 = does not monitor 1 = monitors null or any value other than 0 or 1 = does not monitor Regardless of this setting. see “Monitoring files and file groups” on page 133. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Change Icon Label menu command. Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ filegroup_monitoring_on_off flag indicating whether filegroup and file monitoring is on or off I I Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. For more information. see “Changing a server instance name” on page 120. 216 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . For more information. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command from the Server application. the ErrorLogUpdates parameter is displayed.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 13 of 15) Description indicates whether the ErrorLogUpdates parameter generates a warning or an alarm only the first time each user-defined string is detected or every time a a user-defined string is detected.

see “Creating customized reports” on page 143. flag indicating whether replication monitoring is on or off I I 0 = replication monitoring is off 1 = replication monitoring is on To create or modify this variable. see “Monitoring replication” on page 135. Appendix D Agent configuration variables 217 . use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup menu command. /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ SQL_Server_Agent_monitoring_on_off flag indicating whether SQL Server Agent monitoring is on or off I I Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. 0 = SQL Server Agent monitoring is off 1 = SQL Server Agent monitoring is on To create or modify this variable. lists the objects selected for monitoring To create or modify this variable. /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ replication_monitoring_on_off Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. use the KM Admin => Object Space Monitor menu command. For more information. For more information. For more information.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 14 of 15) Description Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. lists the processes you selected for exclusion from long running process monitoring To create or modify this variable use the KM Admin => /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ long_running_process_exclude_list /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ object_monitor Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. you must restart the Agent. /MSSQLServer/MSSQL$ service name/ UserDefinedOSQLPath used to discover the SQL Server If this variable is modified. see “Monitoring objects” on page 134. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => Monitoring Setup.

use the KM Admin => User Monitoring Admin => Exclude Specific User menu command. use the KM Admin => Setup/Configure KM => SQL Server Name Used by PATROL menu command. For more information. lists the names of the users that are excluded from blocked or idle monitoring User names are separated by a new line character. For more information. Table 21 lists the variables that are no longer used by PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server: Table 21 Obsolete variables (Part 1 of 2) Variable name /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/dsquery /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/column_separator /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/DefaultDomain /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/errorlog /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/home /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/masterdb /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/RunawayCPUTime /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/security /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/server /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/SQL_Executive_errorlog /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/version /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/DTC_monitoring_on_off /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/SQLViewer/FullFilePath 218 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . lists the names entered for use by PATROL for a SQL Server instance To create or modify this variable. see “Monitoring users and processes” on page 137. To create or modify this variable. /MSSQLServer/MSSQL$ AgentHostName/ UserDefinedSQLServerName /MSSQLServer/AgentHostName/ UserExList Changes to this variable are detected by the ConfigUpdates parameter. you must restart the Agent. see “Changing a server instance name” on page 120.Table 20 Variable Agent configuration variables (Part 15 of 15) Description If this variable is modified.

Table 21 Obsolete variables (Part 2 of 2) Variable name /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/FilterIncl /MSSQLServer/serverInstance/FilterExcl Appendix D Agent configuration variables 219 .

220 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

cmd script 85. 150. See ARA function ara_MSSQL( ) function 153 ara_MSSQL. 104. 22 File 22 Filegroup 22 functional 20 icons 20 list of 20 Locks 22 login management 21 MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN 21 MSSQL_SERVER_AVAILABILITY 21 MSSQL_SERVER_CACHE 21 MSSQL_SERVER_CAPACITY 21 MSSQL_SERVER_COLLECTORS 21 MSSQL_SERVER_DATABASE 22 MSSQL_SERVER_DISK 22 MSSQL_SERVER_ERRORLOG 20 MSSQL_SERVER_LOCKS 22 MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT 21 MSSQL_SERVER_NETWORK 23 MSSQL_SERVER_OBJECTS 23 MSSQL_SERVER_PERFORMANCE 23 MSSQL_SERVER_PROC_CACHE 23 MSSQL_SERVER_PUBLISHED 23 MSSQL_SERVER_SUBSCRIBERS 23 MSSQL_SERVER_USER_DEF_CNTRS 24 MSSQL_SERVER_USERS 24 Network 23 Objects 23 Performance 23 Procedure Cache 23 Published 23 Server 21 Subscribers 23 User-Defined Counters 24 Users 24 without icons 70 ARA function annotate parameters 153 benefits of use 149 modifying 104 output file 153 parameter recovery process 151 recovery script 151 send messages 154 settings 150 testing 154 trigger PEM events 153 variable value 104 Windows message 154 ARA Settings menu command 103. 154 ARA Test menu command 154 ARA. 150. PATROL configuration information 89 installing a KM to 43 set up variables 203 alarm state 27 alert notification actions 149 All Process report 156 All Processes menu command 157 annotate parameters 153 annotated data points 145 applications administrative 20 appear by default 70 Availability 21 Cache 21 Capacity 21 Collectors 21 container 20 Database 22 descriptions 20 discovery 20 Disk 22 do not appear 70 Error Log 20.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Index A accessing data 17 accounts NULL passwords report 142 PATROL login 75 Active Processes menu command 157 Active Processes report 156 adding reports 144 Administration application 21 affected parameters general monitoring user mode 155 recovery action 155 agent. 149. 151 ARA_SENDTO variable 153 ARATest parameter 168 archiving configuration settings 97 Index 221 .

139. 86 history data 39. PATROL Agent 65 for clusters 39. 86 resource group 39. 144 virtual PATROL Agent 39 ctltool 40 CurConfigsColl parameter 173 Custom Charts menu command 148 B backing up installation 47. 86 monitoring 39. contacting 2 Bourne shell 57 Break Connection menu command 118 browser requirements 35 BufferCacheHitRatio parameter 170 buffers 18 C C shell 57 Cache application description 21 icon 21 parameters 170 CacheHitRatio parameter 17. 142 Blocked Processes menu command 157 Blocked Processes Report 144. 86 for remote installation 40 login for PATROL 75 modifying 100 PATROL Configuration Manager 97 SQL Servers 72 variables 203 Connect to Managed System menu command 118 Connections Remaining Report 144 ConnectionsAvailable parameter 168 ConnectionsRemaining parameter 171 console systems overview 43 console systems. 86 SQL Server status 90 collection commands 109 collection failure 27 collector parameters 26 Collectors application description 21. 89 PATROL Agent resource 39. 86 nodes 39. installing a KM to 43 consumer parameters 26 CPU and I/O Report 144 CPU Busy/Response Time parameter chart 148 CPU reports 144 CPU Usage Report 144 CpuBusy parameter 156. 156 BlockerProcs parameter 83. 189 can 124 Capacity application description 21 icon 21 parameters 171 Change Icon Label menu command 120 CheckConfiguration parameter 120. overview 43 console. 86 set up 89 shared drive 39. validating 103 blackout variable 103 blocked detection time 83. 86 monitoring choices 39. -serveronly option 35 Command Queue Length Settings Report 144 computer icon 71 ConfigUpdates parameter 113. 190 CpuIdle parameter 190 CpuIoBusy parameter 156. See ARA function Availability application description 21 icon 21 parameters 168 AvgLatchWaitTime parameter 189 installation requirements 39. 168 blocking locks 18 blocking processes definition 83.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z AS_CHANGESPRING. 142 blocked processes 83. 26 icon 21 parameters 173 colormap option 59 command line options. 190 creating an installable image 40 parameter charts 148 recovery actions 151 reports 119.kml 51 automated recovery actions 85 automatic recovery actions. 156. 139 detection time 139 problem alert method 139 BMC Software. 86 in offline mode 90 in online mode 90 222 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . 50 batch file for recovery actions 151 Blackout menu command 103 blackout periods. 173 configuration clustered servers 89 deploying 98 file. 173 clearing parameter alarms 146 clusters configurations 39 configuring 39.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z custom reports 143. 135 SQL Server Agent monitoring 81 E environment variables for browser 57 LANG 57 PATH 57. 25 InfoBox 131 parameters 177 Database Information menu command 132 database pages 18 Database Resources menu command 132 Database Space Used (Percent) parameter chart 148 Database Space Used (Size) parameter chart 148 Database Users menu command 132 DatabaseLockAvgWaitTime parameter 183 DatabaseLockRequestsPerSec parameter 183 DatabaseLockRequestWaitPercent parameter 183 databases automatic discovery 129 discovering 129 InfoBox 131 manual discovery 129 monitoring 81. 142 object monitoring 82. 128 ErrorLogDiskSpaceFree parameter 127 ErrorLogDiskSpaceFreeThreshold parameter 127 ErrorLogSize parameter 126 ErrorLogSizeThreshold parameter 126 ErrorLogUpdates parameter 129. 144 Custom Reports dialog box 144 customer support 3 Customizable Reports dialog box 144 customizations. 134 parameter. automated recovery 85 parameter. migrating 52 subscriber monitoring 82. reviewing 80 ErrorLogColl parameter 125. 58 PATROL_BROWSER 58 setting for browser 57 error log filter 125 parameters 146 reports 127 string monitoring 125 trigger 123 trigger PEM events 129 viewing 119. 180 error logs 20 error messages. 142 database monitoring 81 idle detection time 83. related 31 D data history 28 data retrieval parameters 26 summary 26 Database application description 22 icon 22. 181 eXceed 59 Index 223 . automatic 129 databases. 135 user monitoring 83 user problem alert method 140 deleting old versions 47. migrating 52 customized PSL. 146. finding query execution time 110 default values for parameters 165 defaults blocked detection time 83. 129 monitoring objects 134 object monitoring defaults 82. property definition 84 process monitoring 83 published articles monitoring 82. 139. 50 DeliveredCmdsPerSec parameter 193 DeliveredTransPerSec parameter 193 DeliveryLatency parameter 193 Device Information menu command 132 Disconnect from Managed System menu command 118 discovery accelerating 79 automatic 17 databases. 134 space used 18 status 131 stop monitoring 118 DatabaseSpaceUsedMB parameter 177 DatabaseSpaceUsedPct parameter 177 DBCC INPUT BUFFER statement 156 DbSpaceColl parameter 174 DbStructureColl parameter 174 DeadlocksPerSec parameter 190 debug. 127 Error Log application description 22 icon 22 parameters 128. manual 129 servers 17 SQL Server 69 Disk application description 22 icon 22 parameters 179 Disk I/O parameter chart 148 disk space requirements 35 DiskIoErrors parameter 179 DiskIoReads parameter 179 DiskIoWrites parameter 179 documentation.

158 Global Channel Info menu command 158 Global Channel Reset menu command 158 GlobalVarsColl parameter 174 F -f startup 119 failover from another node 92 history data 39. 86. 50 for the first time 46 in a cluster 39. 25 InfoBox 134 monitoring 125.cmd 151 loading 64 param. 86 monitoring 39. 133 reports 134 File Application Class parameters 181 file group monitoring 72. 50 choosing a target computers 42 clearing cache 47.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Exclude Errorlog String from Monitoring menu command 127 ExtentLockAvgWaitTime parameter 183 ExtentLockRequestsPerSec parameter 184 ExtentLockRequestWaitPercent parameter 184 G Get configuration menu command 100 global channel lock requests 158 maintaining 17 managing 158 monitoring 158 overview 17. 146 behavior 92 configuring 91 default values 169 description 169 virtual PATROL Agent 39. 133 Filegroup application description 22 icon 22. 145 history files 28 I I/O waits 18 icons alarm state 27 hierarchy 25 in a cluster 90 types of 20 idle detection time 83. 142 idle processes 83 IdleProcs parameter 83. 25 InfoBox 134 monitoring 125. 142 installable image configuration 40 creating 40 ctltool 40 installation backing up 47. monitoring 18 FullScansPerSec parameter 190 functions. 133 parameters 182 reports 134 filegroups 19 files ARA function output 153 ara_MSSQL. 156. 50 system requirements 34 utility 40 integrated security mode 75 224 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . 133 file monitoring 72. 84. list of 16 File application description 22 icon 22. 86 features. 86 in UNIX 35 local 40 online Help 57 preparing for 38 remote 40 removing old files 47. 86 node-level monitoring 89 PATROL Agent 91 settings 39 to another node 91 Failover parameter activating alarm 84.hist 28 FileSizeMB parameter 181 first time installation 46 Force Discovery menu command 79 free buffers. ara_MSSQL( ) 153 H hierarchy of application icons 25 history data 39. 172 index monitoring 134 InfoBox accessing 119 database 131 SQL Server 119 user 134.

137. 134 page reads 18 processes 83.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z K KeyLockAvgWaitTime parameter 184 KeyLockRequestsPerSec parameter 184 KeyLockRequestWaitPercent parameter 185 Kill Server Process menu command 143 Kill This Process menu command 143 KM 124 KM customizations. 177 LogSpaceUsedPCT parameter 19 LogSpaceUsedPct parameter 178 LongRunningTrans parameter 178 LongRunningTransColl parameter 175 Lookup Process IDs menu command 141 M managed systems. 70 icon 21. 84. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_CACHE application description 21 Index 225 . 133 error log strings 20 error logs 20. 86 file groups 72. 82. 133 global channel 158 I/O waits 18 idle processes 83 objects 82. 124 failover 39. 143 replication 71 row-level locking 19 space used 18 SQL Server Agent 121 SQL Server Agent error log 121 SQL Server Agent job failures 123 SQL Server Agent jobs 122 SQL Servers 117 SQL statements 156 strings 125 subscribers 82. 81. 137 Monitoring Setup menu command 125. 121. overview 43 manual migration 52 memory reports 144 Memory Usage Report 144 migration back up before 47 backing up before 50 customized PSL 52 of customizations manually 52 mixed security mode 75 modifying instances 98 Monitor Specific User menu command 141 monitoring blocking locks 18 blocking processes 83 buffers 18 cache-hit-ratio 17 cluster 39. 135 enabling 125. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_AVAILABILITY application description 21 discovery 70 icon 21. 70. 133 files 72. 71 MSSQL_SERVER_ADMIN application description 21 discovery 70 icon 21. 135 transaction log 19 user connections 19 users 83. transaction 19 Login Management application 21 LogSpaceColl parameter 175 LogSpaceUsedMB parameter 19. migrating 52 km files loading automatically 65 loading manually 65 Korn shell 57 L LANG environment variable 57 LazyWritesPerSec parameter 179 license requirements 35 loading files 64 lock reports 144 LockRequestsPerSec parameter 185 LockRequestWaitPercent parameter 185 locks blocking 18 global channel 158 row-level 19 Locks application description 22 icon 22 parameters 183 Locks Info for CPU Users Report 144 Locks Remaining Report 144 Locks Types Held Report 144 LocksColl parameter 174 LocksRemaining parameter 172 Log Space Used (Percent) parameter chart 148 Log Space Used (Size) parameter chart 148 log. 86 databases 129 defaults 81. 133 MonProbUsers parameter 175 MSSQL_SERVER application description 21 discovery 17.

57 Network application description 23 icon 23 parameters 188 Network Traffic parameter chart 149 node-level agent 89 NumberofFreeBuffers 18 NumberOfFreeBuffers parameter 171 NumBlockedProcesses parameter 169 NumCurrentLocks 178 NumCurrentUsers 178 NumProcesses parameter 172 O Object Information menu command 135 object monitoring 134 Object Space Monitor menu command 135 ObjectDataSizeMB parameter 188 ObjectReservedSizeMB parameter 189 objects monitoring defaults 82 status 135 stop monitoring 118 Objects application 135 description 23 icon 23. 153 Netscape Navigator 35. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_COLLECTORS application description 21 discovery 70 icon 21. 71 N net send command 104. 71 MSSQL_SERVER_SQLSERVER_SETUP application discovery 70 icon 70 MSSQL_SERVER_SUBSCRIBERS application description 23 discovery 70 icon 23. 25 parameters 188 226 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . 71 MSSQL_SERVER_USER_DEF_CNTRS application description 24 discovery 70 icon 24. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_OBJECT application discovery 70 icon 70 MSSQL_SERVER_OBJECTS application description 23 icon 23 MSSQL_SERVER_PERFORMANCE application description 23 discovery 70 icon 23. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_USERS application description 24 discovery 70 icon 24. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_PROC_CACHE application description 23 discovery 70 icon 23. 150. 71 monitoring 81 overview 20 MSSQL_SERVER_FILE application discovery 70 icon 70. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_ERROR_LOG application description 22 icon 22 MSSQL_SERVER_ERRORLOG application discovery 70 icon 70. 70. 72 MSSQL_SERVER_LOCKS application description 22 discovery 70 icon 22.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z discovery 70 icon 21. 70. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_PUBLISHED application description 23 discovery 70 icon 23. 72 MSSQL_SERVER_FILEGROUP application discovery 70 icon 70. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_CAPACITY application description 21 discovery 70 icon 21. 70. 71 instances 72 MSSQL_SERVER_DISK application description 22 discovery 70 icon 22. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_LOGIN_MGMT application 21 discovery 70 icon 70 MSSQL_SERVER_NETWORK application description 23 discovery 70 icon 23. 70 MSSQL_SERVER_DATABASE application description 22 icon 22 MSSQL_SERVER_DB application discovery 70 icon 70.

153 processes 138 property definitions 149 recovery actions 149 refreshing 80 reviewing data 26 Index 227 . monitoring 18 param. 150 default values 165 defaults. 129.hist file 28 Parameter Charts menu command 119. definition 84 definition dialog boxes 149 definitions 165 error log 146 ErrorLogUpdates 146 history data 28. 86 parameter data. 86. storing 26 virtual 39. 129. automated recovery actions 85 defaults. 120 PATROL Script Language (PSL) 149 PATROL security 41 PATROL_BROWSER variable 58 PATROL_CACHE 47. 88 PATROL Central Operator . 129. 57 navigating to 163 Open Databases Report 144 operating system recovery actions 149 OutstandingReads parameter 179 OutstandingWrites parameter 179 snoozing 147 SQL Server Agent 123 SQL Server Agent (SQL Executive) 123 SQLExecJobFailures 146 standard 26 storing data 26 suspended 118 users 138 with automatic recovery actions 150 with fixed thresholds 110 with status set in code 109 parameters affected general monitoring user mode 155 recovery action 155 partially 155 PATH variable 58 PATROL Agent cluster resource 39. changing 111 parameters activating recovery actions 104.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ObjectSizeColl parameter 175 online Help installing 43. 86 history file 28 IdleProcs 83 modifying 111 overview of 26 PEM events 123. reviewing 26 PATROL Event Manager (PEM) 104. 148 parameter properties. 50 PATROL_HOME 47. 145.exe 88 PCProcBuffersActivePct parameter 192 PCProcBuffersUsedPct parameter 192 PCProcCacheActivePct parameter 192 PCProcCacheUsedPct parameter 192 PEM 123 PEM (PATROL Event Manager) 123. 203 installing a KM to 43 node-level 89 node-level cluster 39. 150 PATROL KM for Event Management 96 PATROL login account 75. 86 PATROL Configuration Manager archiving 97 ConfigUpdates parameter 173 detecting changes 173 modifying instances 98 overview 96 removing instances 98 requirements 96 PATROL Console installing a KM to 43 loading KM 65 Netscape Navigator and 57 parameter data. 86 configuration file 65 configuration variables 153. 39. 123. 50 PatrolMainMap 71 pcc.Web Edition 43 PATROL Cluster Configuration Wizard 39. 150 annotate 153 BlockerProcs 83 changing poll times 109 changing thresholds 110 clearing alarms 146 collector 26 collector-consumer dependencies 197 ConfigUpdates 113 consumer 26 creating charts 148 data retrieval 26 deactivating 108 deactivating recovery actions 104. 145 perfmon 34 P PacketErrors parameter 188 PacketsReceived parameter 188 PacketsSent parameter 188 page reads 18 PageLifeExpectancy parameter 171 PageLockAvgWaitTime parameter 185 PageLockRequestsPerSec parameter 186 PageLockRequestWaitPercent parameter 186 pages.

144 customized 143 database information 132 Disk I/O Errors 144 error log 127 I/O 144 locks 144 Locks Info for CPU Users 144 Locks Remaining 144 Locks Types Held 144 Memory Usage 144 memory use 144 most active processes 142 NULL passwords 142 Open Databases 144 process detail information 142 Process Listing 144 process listing for user 143 process resource hogs 142 Q query execution time 110 228 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . migrating 52 publications. 150 isql 151 operating system 149 parameters 150 PSL 149 queries 152 report 156 Red Hat Linux 35 Refresh Parameters menu command 80 refreshing parameters 80 related publications 31 remote installation 40 ReplicatedCommandsPerSec parameter 193 ReplicatedTransPerSec parameter 193 replication monitoring 71 ReplicationColl parameter 176 reports active processes 156 active processes by login 142 all processes 156 Blocked Process List 142. 143 Blocked Processes 144 blocked processes 144. 139.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Perform Application Discovery menu command 79 Performance application description 23 icon 23 parameters 189 performance objects 34 Performance Summary parameter chart 149 physical PATROL Agents 89 planning for installation 38 poll times 109 polling cycles 109 preparing for installation 38 problem alert method 140 Procedure Cache application description 23 icon 23 parameters 192 ProcedureCacheColl parameter 176 Process Listing Report 144 ProcessColl parameter 176 processes automatic monitoring 83 blocked 83. related 31 Published application description 23 icon 23. 156 Command Queue 144 Command Queue Length Settings 144 connections 144 Connections Remaining 144 CPU 144 CPU and I/O 144 CPU usage 144 creating 119 creating custom 143. 150 adding 149 batch file 151 changing 149 deactivating 104. 25 parameters 193 reports 136 published articles monitoring defaults 82. 142 blocked detection time 139 blocking 139 display blocked 142 idle 83 idle detection time 83 manual monitoring 141 monitoring 137 monitoring defaults 83 most active 142 problem alert method 140 reports 143 resource usage 142 reviewing list IDs 141 stop monitoring 118. 135 reports 136 R recovery actions activating 104. 141 product support 3 property definitions for parameters 149 PSL.

86. 153 snmp/p1V1m_list variable 153 snoozing a parameter 147 sp_who Report 144 SpaceUsedMB parameter 18. 182 SQL 123. 156 SQL commands via isql 151 SQL Performance Objects 34 SQL Server change label for instance 120 change name of 120 configuring 72 database reports 132 discovery 17. discovery of 17 Set Database Auto-Discovery menu command 130 Set Default Actions menu command 154 Set Send To Names menu command 154 Set up Error Log Disk Space Free Threshold menu command 127 Set up Error Log Size Threshold menu command 126 Set up Error Log String Monitoring menu command 125 setting up clusters 89 setting up SQL Snapshot 156 Index 229 . 187 RIDLockRequestWaitPercent parameter 19. 25 reports 142 -serveronly command line option 35 servers. 135 restarting 119 start monitoring 118 starting 119 status 119 stop monitoring 118 user monitoring 137 user monitoring reports 142 SQL Server Agent defaults 81. 187 RowCountEstimate parameter 109. 121 error log 121 job 123 jobs 122 monitoring 121 monitoring defaults 81. 86 shells Bourne 57 C 57 Korn 57 Show Latest Error Log Data report 127 Show System Output Window menu command 80 Shutdown SQL Server Agent menu command 122 Shutdown SQL Server menu command 118 shutting down a server 118 SNMP trap 104. 75 Server application description 21 icon 21. 189 row-level locking 19 rules and rule sets converting from variables 101 examples displayed 101 timestamp 101 setting up the product 64 setting variables for browser 57 setup steps accelerating discovery 79 configuring a SQL Server 72 loading the files 64 saving changes 69 verifying SQL Server is discovered 69 shared drive for cluster 39.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z process resource usage 142 processes 142 Published application 136 published articles 136 sp_who 144 subscribers 137 Suspect Databases 144 suspect databases 144 user login information 142 users 142 requirements browser 35 disk space 35 installation 34 system 34 resource group 39. 121 parameters 123 SQL Server Agent (SQL Executive) parameters 123 S Save KM menu command 69 saving changes 69 Search Error Log report 127 security levels overview 41 requirements 35 security modes 21. 69 -f startup 119 failing over 91. 90 ResponseColl parameter 176 ResponseExecTime parameter 191 ResponseSqlTime parameter 191 restart a monitored server 119 restarting SQL Server 119 retrieving data 26 RIDLockAvgWaitTime parameter 19. 182 SpaceUsedPCT parameter 18. 92 icon 71 InfoBox 119 monitoring 117 PATROL login 75 performance objects 34 published and subscriber defaults 82. 181. 186 RIDLockRequestsPerSec parameter 19. 150.

132. 157 SQL Server Name Used by PATROL menu command 121 SQL Snapshot 156 SQL Snapshot for User menu command 157 SQL Snapshot menu command 143. 120. 143. 141 Users application description 24 icon 24 InfoBox 142 monitoring 137 parameters 194 UserTotCpu parameter 195 UserTotIo parameter 195 using recovery actions 151 T table monitoring 134 TableLockAvgWaitTime parameter 187 TableLockRequestsPerSec parameter 187 TableLockRequestWaitPercent parameter 188 target computers 42 task output window 123 V variable for PATROL_BROWSER 58 230 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started . viewing 156 storing parameter data 26 subscribers monitoring defaults 82. 170 standard collector parameter 197 standard collectors 26. changing for parameters 110 transaction log 19 TransactionsPerSec parameter 191 triggers. 172 UserCpu parameter 194 UserDefCounter1–10 parameter 194 User-Defined Counters application description 24 icon 24 parameters 194 UserDefinedCountersColl parameter 176 UserIdle parameter 142. customer 3 Suspect Databases Report 144 SuspectDatabases parameter 170 System Output Window 72 system requirements 34 system roles console systems 43 managed systems 43 overview of target computers 42 tasks 157 technical support 3 testing recovery actions 154 thresholds. 144 UserBlocked parameter 142. 194 UserColl parameter 194 UserConnections parameter 19. 25 InfoBox 136 parameters 193 reports 137 support.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z SQL Server Instance Setup dialog box 73 SQL Server Instance Setup menu command 73. 156 SQL statements displaying 157 monitoring 156 SQLAgentJobFailures parameter 123. 142 stop monitoring 118. 195 UserIo parameter 195 UserMemUsage parameter 195 users InfoBox 134 manual monitoring 141 monitoring 137 most active 142 resource usage 142 reviewing list of IDs 141 status 134. 27 standard parameters 26 standard security mode 75 start monitoring a server 118 Start SQL Server Agent menu command 122 Start SQL Server menu command 119 stop monitoring process 141 server 118 user 141 Stop Monitoring menu command 141 stored procedures. 169 SQLAgentStatus parameter 109. 170 SQLExecJobFailures parameter 146 SQLServerAgentJobFailures parameter 123 SQLServerColl parameter 176 SQLServerStatus parameter 90. 135 status 136 Subscribers application description 23 icon 23. viewing 156 U Update Connection menu command 118 upgrading backing up before 47. 50 choosing a procedure 42 user account 58 User application icon 25 reports 143 User Customizable Reports menu command 119. 123.

snmp/p1V1m_list 153 setting up 203 virtual PATROL Agent configuring 39. ARA_SENDTO 153 PATROL Agent. 86 creating 88 fails over 91 W Windows message recipients 154 wpconfig utility 203 Index 231 .A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z variables agent set up 203 deploying to new host 102 descriptions 203 for internal use only 99 PATROL Agent 203 PATROL Agent.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 232 PATROL for Microsoft SQL Server Getting Started .

Notes .

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