PATROL User Guide

for Oracle®

Supporting
PATROL version 8.9 for Oracle
June 2008

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4

PATROL for Oracle User Guide

Contents
Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 17 17 19 19 30 33 34 35 36 36 38 38 38 43 45 46 50 50 51 51 52 53 58 59 60 61 62 63 63 64 65 66 66 67 68 Features of PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Structure of PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InfoBoxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local and remote monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oracle servers with a PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oracle servers without a PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Failover and cluster monitoring scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Failover and cluster monitoring by using the PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Failover and cluster monitoring by using PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle

Verifying installation requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing for installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing PATROL security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining the version of the installation utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining whether to install locally or remotely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining how to install and upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation . . . . . . . . . . . . Migrating customizations manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upgrading and preserving customizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing to upgrade and migrate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an installation package of the merged PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . Importing into Distribution Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing the online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing the UNIX version of the Help browser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting the environment variables for the browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Additional considerations for using online Help for UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle from a UNIX environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle from a Windows environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contents

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Chapter 3

Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle

69

Preparing to use PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Loading and preloading KMs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Determining which .kml and .km files to load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Determining which KMs to preload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Loading KMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Preloading KMs on the PATROL Agent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Removing KMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Unloading KMs from a PATROL console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Removing KMs from the PATROL Agent preload list. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Configuration overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Configuration requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Requirements checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Required configuration information form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Configuration task flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Configuration methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Batch configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Batch configuration file syntax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Creating a batch configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Automatic configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Using sqlplus to create PATROL database user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Overview of the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Using the default_auto_config.txt file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Modifying instances that were automatically configured . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 PATROL advanced configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Instance discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Adding instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Configuring instances for monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Configuring instances in restricted mode for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Enabling and disabling instance monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Modifying instance configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Modifying category monitoring for an instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Viewing instance configuration settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Removing instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Failover monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Configuring failover monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 If a problem occurs in configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Resetting the global channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Setting debugging options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Uninstalling PATROL objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Deactivating parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Monitoring ASM instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Configuring an ASM instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 ASM parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 ASM menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Where to go from here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

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PATROL for Oracle User Guide

Chapter 4

Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration

131 132 132 132 133 134 134 134 135 136 136 137 139 140 143 144 145 147 148 149 150 153 154 157 158 158 159 159 160 163 164 164 165 167 170 170 171 173 173 173 173 174 175 175 175 176

Overview of PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation and setup requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting the archive option to save a backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moving rule sets to the PATROL Configuration Manager directory . . . . . . . . . ConfigUpdate parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the ConfigUpdate parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding how the ConfigUpdate parameter operates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring PATROL for Oracle instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify or remove an instance . . . . . . . Configuration data not stored in pconfig variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuration variables that are for internal use only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application classes with status changes set in code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying or removing a configured instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying the blackout configuration variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using PATROL Configuration Manager to manage parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deactivating parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing parameter thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing parameter polling cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying parameter properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager. . . . . . . Using the rule and rule set examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle

Using Oracle utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Server Manager and SQL*Plus from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Explain Plan from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Issuing SQL commands to Oracle from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing Oracle’s job queue from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring Oracle Net from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ORANET requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Listener Password configuration menu option. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring a listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring multiple listeners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and stopping a listener. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring ORANET alarms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing ORANET reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debugging listeners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and shutting down instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shutting down instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling blackouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nesting blackout periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling unending blackouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting the time zone variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting blackout periods for categories and parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 SQL Snapshot overview . . . . . . . 184 Using the ETSM applications to monitor tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Viewing the monitoring settings . . . 226 8 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Where to go from here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and SQL statements 179 Tablespace monitoring overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Viewing the All Problem Users report . 183 Viewing reports on tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 USERS parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 TBSP_INSTANCE parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Monitoring SQL statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Viewing the ETSM reports . . 197 Monitoring problem users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Where to go from here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Using SQL Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 SQL Viewer tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 ETSM parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Viewing other reports on users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Using Space Expert to monitor tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Excluding users from space monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Excluding parameter alarms . . . . . . . 220 Archiving SQL Viewer data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Selecting users or user sessions for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Using the TABLESPACES application to monitor tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Activating SQL Viewer . . . . . . . . . .Deleting blackout periods. . . . . . 182 Activating TABLESPACES application monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Using regular expressions to choose tablespaces . . . 223 Terminating SQL Viewer sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Defining tablespace types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 225 Reports and tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Starting and stopping SQL Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Excluding tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Selecting tablespaces for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Excluding partitions from monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Exclusion examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 User monitoring overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Debugging blackouts. 194 USERS_INSTANCE parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Debugging the ETSM application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 Activating user monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Activating the ETSM applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Viewing SQL Viewer reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Excluding objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Differences between exclusion types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .Alerts parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PQO reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing and modifying HTML reporting . . . . . . . . Database reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Batch Scheduler examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HTML reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting transaction and snapshot information . . . . MTS reports. . . . . . . . . Compressing or moving log files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replication activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure FTP information . . . . . . . . Adding a job to the scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC parameters . . . . . . Getting dispatcher information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contents 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting PQO system statistics information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the Scheduler log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enhanced monitoring of the Oracle archive logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting PQO operations statistics information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Activating the ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting replication information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting information about distributed databases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automated recovery actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specifying the time the job or report should run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Capacity reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xml file . . SGA reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring HTML reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resizing the next extent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring database links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the status of a scheduled job or report . . . . . . . . . . Batch reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the settings for a job or report . . . . . Getting MTS configuration information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting PQO session statistics information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting a job from the scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Availability reports . . . . . . . . . Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Updating the server. . . Debugging the ARCHIVE application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Backup and recovery reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 226 228 234 237 240 246 249 250 251 253 254 254 255 255 255 256 256 256 257 258 260 260 262 263 268 270 271 272 272 273 275 276 277 279 279 280 281 282 283 283 284 286 289 290 290 291 291 Distributed database monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a report to the scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting PQO server statistics information . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up HTML reporting . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 Appendix C Firewall and port-forwarding considerations 353 Benefits of VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Removing standby instance from monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Debugging the RAC application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Activating the ORACLE_DATAGUARD parameters . . . . 306 Parameters to monitor standby instance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 Pconfig variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Chapter 10 Monitoring the dataguard environment 301 Overview of dataguard environment monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Glossary Index 357 365 10 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 294 ORACLE_RAC parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Limitations in the dataguard KM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 PATROL for Oracle views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Appendix A Accessing menu commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 PATROL for Oracle tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353 Protocols. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Where to go from here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 PATROL for Oracle database objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . port numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Dataguard configuration requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 9 Monitoring the RAC environment 293 Overview of RAC environment monitoring. . . . 298 Activating the ORACLE_RAC parameters . . . . . . . 302 Configuring standby instance for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Debugging the ORACLE_DATAGUARD application . . . . . . 293 Configuring RAC monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 Accessing online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 Where are PATROL objects installed? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Rulesets that manage database-specific alerts in a RAC environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Configuring a firewall for PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Troubleshooting the dataguard KM . . . . 300 Where to go from here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 Storage parameters for PATROL tables . . . . . . . . . InfoBoxes. . . . . and online Help 313 Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes . . . . . . and blocking . . . . . . . . . . . 314 Appendix B PATROL database objects 317 Grants and privileges for the PATROL account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 TABLESPACES hierarchy . . . . . . . 33 InfoBox for an Oracle instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Blackout period priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Listener configuration task flow . . .kml and ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Icon hierarchy for RAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and a graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 PATROL for Oracle configuration task flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .kml files are loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 HTML reporting overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Configuration with PATROL Agents not in cluster-specific mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Get command in PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Exclusion types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Oracle Parallel Server configuration: basic failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . .local PATROL Agents only . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Distributed environment configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Figures Icon hierarchy for PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Instance application menu in Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Collector application. . . . 295 Icon hierarchy for dataguard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 Figures 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Remote and local servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 USERS hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Icon hierarchy for ASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Tree view when ORACLE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 PATROL for Oracle applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Troubleshooting configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .txt file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Tables 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 PATROL account modification results . . . . . . 128 ASM menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Batch configuration keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Parameters supported in the ASM-monitoring feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 PATROL for Oracle configuration information summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Tablespace Free Space report . . . 199 All Problem Users report . . . 185 Tablespace Segments report . . . . . . . . 53 PATROL for Oracle KM files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 System requirements for installing PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Failed jobs report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 ETSM_tablespaceType application parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Configure [instance] for Failover Monitoring dialog box fIelds . . 87 Batch config template dialog box fIelds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Cluster configuration information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 TBSP_INSTANCE parameters . . 187 ETSM application parameter . . . . . . . . . . . 195 USERS_INSTANCE parameters . . . . . . . 190 USERS parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Variables that are for internal use only . . . . . 146 PATROL for Oracle parameters with fixed thresholds . . . . . . . .km files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Tablespace report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Tablespace Status and Storage report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .kml and . . . . . . . . . 147 ETF parameters .Tables PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . 190 ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE application parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Overdue jobs report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 ASM parameters . . . . . . . 167 Listener Status Info report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Broken jobs report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 PATROL for Oracle requirements checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Variables in the default_auto_config. . . . . . . . . . 137 Parameters that you must reactivate via PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Choosing an installation and upgrade procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Tablespaces by Size report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 Problem User Settings dialog box . . . . . . . . 151 All jobs report . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 User Column/Role Privilege report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 Snapshot report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 Redo Log report description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 14 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 AVAILABILITY alarm conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 Archiving State report description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ora report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 User Account Info report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 SQL Viewer standard report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 HTML reporting refresh cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 SQL Statements report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Free Space report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 Commit Point Strength report . . . . . . . . 222 SQL Viewer Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Space Usage By Object report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Object Space Analysis report description . . . 248 HTML reporting setup task flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Buffer Cache Contents report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 User Session Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 Database Links report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Wait State Analysis report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Shared Pool report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 Pending Transactions report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 Access Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Free Space Deficit report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 User Session report . . . . . . . 278 Operation Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Locks Outstanding report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Rollback Segments report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 Media Recovery report description . . . . . . .Active Sessions report . . . . . . 240 Schema Table Information report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 AutoExtend DB Files report description . . . . . . 232 Maximum Extents report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Dispatcher busy rates report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 SGA Memory Analysis report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Server Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 Lock conflicts report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Role Information report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Backup Status report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 Dispatcher report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 Shared Servers report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Statistic Summary report . . . . . 203 Display Oracle Users report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Session Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 SQL Viewer statistics . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Dispatcher Wait Times report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 FTP information items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Profiles report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Session Statistic report statistic names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Parameter File init. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$CANTEXTFILE table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$LOCKCONFLICTUSER table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$CANTEXTMAXTBSP table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .System Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conflicts report . ORACLE_RAC_DATABASE application parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PATROL account grants and privileges ( NON-SYS DBA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PATROL tables storage parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deferred Calls report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$DATA_OS_SPACE table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replication reports summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 282 284 286 286 287 287 288 288 289 290 298 306 310 313 315 317 320 321 322 323 323 323 324 324 324 324 325 325 325 325 326 326 326 327 327 328 328 329 330 330 331 331 331 332 332 334 334 335 Tables 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$CANTEXTMAXFILE table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$JOBSCHEDULE table . . . . . P$BH view . . . . . . . . . . . Conflict Resolution Methods report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$AUTOEXTTS table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$OBJ_EXCLUSION table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC application parameters . . . . . . P$AUTOEXTEND table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$SQLTEXT table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$DATA_TS_SPACELEFT table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$EXTENTMAP table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$AUTOEXTFILE table . . . . . . . P$JOBGENERAL table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Status of the standby database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$TEMP_TS_SPACELEFT table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$JOBACTION table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$ARCHDEST view . . . . . . . . . . Accessing online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PATROL database objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$AUTOEXT table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System Statistics report statistic names . . . . . . . . . . Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$DBA_TABLESPACES view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$SQLID table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ORACLE_DATAGUARD application parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$POK_CFG table . . . . . . . P$TBSP_DATA_FILES view . . DB Links report . . . . . . . PATROL account grants and privileges (SYS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replicated Objects report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$JOBHISTORY table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$SQL table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$TEMP_OS_SPACE table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Link Information report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$BUFFERCACHE table . . . . . . . . . pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P$LOCKCONFLICTTX table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pending Transactions report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .Protocols. . . . . . . . 355 16 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and connections . . ports. .

. . . . . . . Component files. . . . . . . . . . . . . the following topics are discussed: Features of PATROL for Oracle . . . . Local and remote monitoring. . . . . . Oracle servers without a PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In this chapter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 1 17 19 19 20 30 33 34 35 36 36 38 38 38 43 1 Product components and capabilities This chapter provides you with a brief overview of the PATROL for Oracle product. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . analyze. . . . . . . . . . and recovery actions. . . . . . . Menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and manage an Oracle installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Structure of PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Features of PATROL for Oracle The PATROL for Oracle solutions contain knowledge in the form of scripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Failover and cluster monitoring scenarios . . . InfoBoxes. . . . . . . Failover and cluster monitoring by using PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oracle servers with a PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameters . . . . . . . . This knowledge is used by PATROL to monitor. . . . . . . . . . . . Failover and cluster monitoring by using the PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0. Net8 in Oracle8 (8.Features of PATROL for Oracle PATROL for Oracle monitors the following elements of your Oracle installation: I I I I I I I I I Oracle instance resource availability and capacity archive log activity instance performance and health of the environment Oracle server options replication and Oracle jobs tablespaces users Oracle Net NOTE In Oracle9i (9. see “Applications and icons” on page 22. is now called Oracle Net Services. For consistency. and debugging. blackout.x). 18 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . The ORACLE application (its icon shown at left) enables you to perform high-level functions such as instance configuration.x) and Net8i in Oracle8 (8. and instance status.1. formerly SQL*Net in Oracle7 (7. instance discovery. the term Oracle Net is used throughout this book and refers to all Oracle Networking product versions. I I I I local and remote monitoring Real Application Cluster monitoring failover and Cluster Monitoring Scenarios Automatic Storage Management PATROL for Oracle also enables you to perform Oracle functions directly from the PATROL console. HTML reporting.x) and later.x). the Oracle Networking product. This application also enables instance configuration. For more information about the PATROL for Oracle applications. PATROL for Oracle allows you to view the state of instances and parameters through HTML pages on a web server. In addition.

and how they are accessed. and InfoBoxes that are organized and presented under application classes. The following sections describe each of these functional components of PATROL for Oracle. menu commands. PATROL for Oracle applications fall into the following types: Application type discovery container functional Description discovers the PATROL for Oracles in your environment and stores the configuration and setup information enables the organization and display of parameters by function uses specific parameters. InfoBoxes. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 19 . and online Help. see the online Help for PATROL for Oracle. Application classes are delivered in the form of . InfoBoxes. descriptions of the applications. what they look like. and InfoBox items to provide information about a specific database object The following sections provide details about the component files that contain the applications.Structure of PATROL for Oracle Structure of PATROL for Oracle PATROL for Oracle provides functionality in the form of parameters. For more detailed information about the application classes. and a graphic that displays the application icons as they appear in the PATROL consoles.km files. in the PATROL consoles. a graphic of the icons that represent each application. and they display in the PATROL consoles as icons. and online Help” on page 313. “Accessing menu commands. For information about accessing menu commands. see Appendix A. menu commands. Application classes Application classes provide the knowledge that PATROL for Oracle uses to monitor Oracle products.

km ORACLE_TABLESPACES.km SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_OBJ.km ORACLE_AVAILABILITY.km ORACLE_PQO.km files (part 1 of 3) .km ORACLE_DB_LINKS.kml PATROL for Oracle .km SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_TS.km ORACLE_INSTANCE.km ORACLE_REPLICATION.km ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC.km component files The following .km files.km ORACLE_SGA.Application classes Component files The following .km SPACE_EXPERT_SXX.km ORACLE_TBSP_INSTANCE.kml file ORACLE. but these files are used only by the Space Expert for Oracle product: I I I I SPACE_EXPERT_ORA.km ORACLE_MTS_DISP.kml (Knowledge Module® list) and .km ORANET_LISTENER.km ORACLE_ENVIRONMENT.km ORACLE_ARCHIVE.kml and .kml The following .km ORACLE_CAPACITY.km ORACLE_MTS.km files contain the application classes for the ORACLE_ARCHIVE application: I I ORACLE_ARCHIVE.km ORACLE_REPLICATION_INSTANCE.km The following files are also installed and loaded when you install and load the ORACLE.km ORANET.km ORACLE_USERS_INSTANCE.km ORACLE_COLLECTORS.km ORACLE_NETWORK.km ORACLE_USERS.km ORACLE_SQLVIEWER.kml files.kml file.km ORACLE_PERFORMANCE.km ORACLE_LOG.km ORACLE_DB_LINKS_INSTANCE. contain the application classes that monitor Oracle instances: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ORACLE.km (Knowledge Module) component files are installed into PATROL when this product is installed and loaded: Table 1 . which are loaded when you load the ORACLE.km 20 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .km ORACLE_JOBS.

kml The following .kml file PATROL for Oracle .km Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 21 .km ORACLE_FAILOVER.km ORACLE_ETSM_LARGE.km ORACLE_ETSM_VERY_LARGE.kml and .km component files The following .km ORACLE_RAC.kml ORACLE_DATAGUARD.km ORACLE_ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE.kml The following .Application classes Table 1 .km files (part 2 of 3) .km ORACLE_ETSM_REGULAR.km ORACLE_ETSM_UNDO.km files contain the application classes for the ORACLE_DATAGUARD application: I I I ORACLE_DATAGUARD.km ORACLE_DATAGUARD_DATABASE.kml The following .km ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG.km ORACLE_ETSM_ROLLBACK.km ORACLE_RAC_MEMBER_INSTANCE.km ORACLE_ETSM_READONLY.kml The following .km file contains the application classes for the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG application: ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG.km files contain the application classes for the ORACLE_ETSM application: I I I I I I I I I ORACLE_ETSM.km file contains the application classes for the ORACLE_FAILOVER application: ORAFailoverMonitor.km ORACLE_DATAGUARD_INSTANCE.km ORACLE_RAC_DATABASE.km ORACLE_ETSM.km ORACLE_ETSM_TEMP.km files contain the application classes for the ORACLE_RAC application: I I I ORACLE_RAC.

ORACLE_ASM.km When you install PATROL for Oracle.kml and .km component files The following .km For details about how to use PATROL for Oracle Parallel Server. See “Application icon hierarchy” on page 28 for a description of how these icons appear in your interface.km OPSINST.kml file PATROL for Oracle .km ORACLE_ASM_DISK. see the PATROL for Oracle Parallel Server User Guide.kml ORACLEPARALLELSERVER.km files (part 3 of 3) . scripts are also installed in the following directories: I On the PATROL Agent: — $PATROL_HOME/lib/psl I — PATROLRoot\oracle (Windows) — PATROLRoot/UNIX (UNIX) On the PATROL console: PATROLRoot/oracle Applications and icons Table 2 on page 23 contains a short description of each application class and a graphic of the icon that represents each application class.km files contain the application classes that monitor the Oracle Parallel Servers: I I ORACLEPARALLELSERVER.kml The following .km ORACLE_ASM_DGROUP. 22 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .Application classes Table 1 .km files contain the application classes that monitor the configured ASM instances: I I I I ORACLE_ASM.km ORACLE_ASM_INSTANCE.

You can also stop or start listeners from within the PATROL console. You can also use the ORACLE_INSTANCE application to perform the following functions: I I I I I PATROL for Oracle administrative functions: — Blackout — Debug the collectors and menu command — Failover configuration — Modification of configuration settings — Install/uninstall database objects — Reset global channels Oracle server administrative functions: — Shut down or start up the instance — Run the Oracle Explain Plan utility — Access SQL*Plus and Server Manager — Issue SQL commands from within the PATROL console Reporting Job scheduling SQL snapshot You can schedule reports or SQL or PSL scripts to run at specified times throughout the day.Application classes Table 2 Server PATROL for Oracle applications (part 1 of 6) Definition The application is the parent application class for PATROL for Oracle. Automatic Configuration The ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG (Automatic Configuration) functional application automatically applies a predefined configuration to all instances on a host by using an operating system authenticate account.kml file. This application icon appears only when you load the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. you can set the KM not to set off an alarm. PATROL for Oracle does not monitor databases that are in restricted mode. This application discovers the Oracle products in your environment and provides the setup or configuration of PATROL for Oracle. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 23 . When a restricted database is detected. or year. You can also activate or deactivate monitoring categories for the instance. For more information. Oracle Net Listener The ORANET application displays the information about the listener log and the status of the listeners. Application name and icon Oracle Instance The ORACLE_INSTANCE application enables you to run reports on each performance area. see “Configuring instances in restricted mode for monitoring” on page 103. week.

and temporary tablespaces If PATROL detects any resource availability problems. tablespaces. partitions. Application name and icon Availability The ORACLE_AVAILABILITY (Availability) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the availability of the selected server. This application icon appears only when you load the ORACLE_ARCHIVE. except for rollback segments. the database must be running in archive mode. to monitor multiple archive destinations. However. The Archive application monitors both optional and mandatory archive destinations. filter error logs exclude objects. stop the session that issued the statement.kml file.Application classes Table 2 Archive PATROL for Oracle applications (part 2 of 6) Definition The ORACLE_ARCHIVE (Archive) application provides information about archive destinations and enables you to monitor multiple archive destinations. and if it is causing problems. and users log file recovery administration and resize the next extent generate reports 24 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . rollback. If extent problems are detected. You can monitor the availability of resources in the database instance. you can capture the currently processing SQL statement. temporary tablespaces Oracle errors for the instance lock conflicts extents left in the tablespaces. including: I I I I I space left in one mandatory archive destination space left in data files and system. You can also I I I I I chart more than one parameter on a graph You can use one of the preset parameter selections or generate your own charts. you can activate an automatic action to resize the next extent of the object whenever it runs out of extents (up to the limit of your Oracle settings).

The ORACLE_CAPACITY application enables you to monitor the capacity left on the Oracle instance. Dataguard The ORACLE_DATAGUARD (Dataguard) application monitors the configured standby instances and ensures high availability. data protection. This application is available only if the relevant Oracle option is active for the instance. the number of locks remaining. The following environment statistics of an Oracle instance are monitored: I I I I block change ratio block change transaction block update ration parse call ratio Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 25 . processes.Application classes Table 2 Capacity PATROL for Oracle applications (part 3 of 6) Definition The ORACLE_CAPACITY (Capacity) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the capacity of the selected server. including: I I I I I Application name and icon space in the background dump directory space in the user dump directory space in the directory for the Oracle core files number of transactions. Database links The DB_LINKS (Database Links) application monitors distributed database links. such as the number of user connections. Collectors The ORACLE_COLLECTORS (Collectors) container application holds the collector and the standard collector parameters that set the values for the majority of the consumer parameters. and cursors number of sessions and locks You can also chart more than one parameter on a graph and generate reports. Environment The ORACLE_ENVIRONMENT (Environment) functional application monitors the environment of the Oracle instance. and disaster recovery for the enterprise data. and the number of idle processes.

and then creates individual ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE applications whenever the PctUsed or SpaceLeft parameters exceed predefined limits. For more information. but not both.kml file. ASM The ORACLE_ASM container application contains the application classes that monitor the configured ASM instances. This application icon appears only when you load the ORACLE_ETSM.Application classes Table 2 ETSM PATROL for Oracle applications (part 4 of 6) Definition You can choose to load the ORACLE_ETSM. 26 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . see “Backup and recovery reports” on page 234. BMC Software recommends that you use either the ORACLE_TABLESPACE application or the ORACLE_ETSM application to monitor tablespaces. which provides a phased approach that monitors both autoextensible and non-autoextensible tablespaces for PctUsed and SpaceLeft. You can flag jobs as broken if they do not run properly. The ORACLE_LOG application monitors the activity of the redo logs on the Oracle instance. See “Tablespaces” on page 28. ETSM also enables you to view physical writes and reads to specific non-autoextensible tablespaces. Network The ORACLE_NETWORK (Network) container application holds the parameters that pertain to the network I/O for the selected server. Log MTS The ORACLE_MTS (Multithreaded Server) application monitors shared server processes and dispatcher processes. Application name and icon Jobs The ORACLE_JOBS (Jobs) application monitors jobs within the Oracle job queue for problems and complications. You can also run jobs manually or remove jobs from the job queue. You can also automate actions to compress or move the archive log files when the archive directories run out of room by accessing the Recovery Admin menu command from the ORACLE_AVAILABILITY application class. PATROL for Oracle monitors the activity of your archive logs. If the ORACLE_LOG option is activated.kml file.

table.kml file. SGA The ORACLE_SGA (System Global Area) application represents the SGA parameters of the Oracle instance. or index on the monitored instance. The SPACE_EXPERT_ORA application requires that Space Expert be installed on a monitored instance. For more information. The following areas are monitored: I I I I I I Application name and icon Performance database writer activity (DBWR) block and disk activities buffer cache activity enqueues SQL response time locking PQO The ORACLE_PQO (Parallel Query Option) application monitors the slave and query activity. see Chapter 9.Application classes Table 2 PATROL for Oracle applications (part 5 of 6) Definition The ORACLE_PERFORMANCE (Performance) application is a container application that holds the parameters that pertain to the performance of the selected server. Replication The ORACLE_REPLICATION (Replication) application monitors the following replication activity on the instance: I I database links and activity transactions and conflicts You can suspend and resume replication on the master instance from within the PATROL console. This application monitors the SGA and is available after the Oracle instance has been configured and the SGA category has been activated. The SPACE_EXPERT_ORA (Space Expert) application contains the SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_OBJ and the SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_TS applications. This application icon appears only when you load the ORACLE_RAC. These applications list any medium.or high-priority problems found in a tablespace. Space Expert Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 27 . RAC The ORACLE_RAC (Real Application Cluster) application monitors the availability of members (instances and nodes) in the Oracle RAC setup. “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293.

Application classes Table 2 PATROL for Oracle applications (part 6 of 6) Definition The ORACLE_TABLESPACES application enables you to monitor the current state of the tablespaces in the instance. see “User monitoring overview” on page 193 and the online Help for PATROL for Oracle. you can then monitor the reads. Application name and icon Tablespaces Users Application icon hierarchy The ORACLE application is a discovery application and the parent application that contains all of the other Oracle applications. transactions. enables you to view physical writes and reads to specific tablespaces. menu commands. as well as problems such as used and space left in the tablespace. For more information. The INSTANCE applications discover and contain all of the functional and container applications for the instance it represents. and InfoBox items to monitor the PATROL for Oracle users or processes. Once a user becomes a problem user. The ORACLE application discovers and creates an INSTANCE application icon for each database instance on the Oracle servers that you configure for monitoring. Users application icons do not display unless you select User Instance as a problem alert method in the Configure Auto User Monitoring dialog box. You can set thresholds to notify you if a user becomes a problem user. The ORACLE_USERS (Users) application is a functional application that provides specific parameters. and CPU consumed by the specific user. The TBSP_INSTANCE application. Functional applications are displayed under container applications. Figure 1 on page 29 displays this nested hierarchy for the applications in PATROL for Oracle. contained in the ORACLE_TABLESPACES application. or you manually select specific users or processes for monitoring. writes. 28 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

Application classes Figure 1 Icon hierarchy for PATROL for Oracle ORACLE_DATAGUA ConfigUpdate OracleStatus Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 29 .

creating an extremely efficient and flexible data retrieval system. Collector parameters do not display the values that they collect. see the user guide for your PATROL console. For more general information about parameters and their functions. PATROL uses several types of parameters and stores parameter history data in a file. A consumer parameter displays a value that was collected by a collector parameter (or a standard parameter with collector properties) and can generate alarms or warnings and recovery actions if those values exceed predefined thresholds.Parameters Parameters A parameter is a command that periodically obtains data on a monitored system resource. I A collector parameter executes commands at regular intervals (poll times) to gather data that it sends to the consumer parameters. (See the PATROL user guide for your console for detailed information on alarm states and icons.) These standard collectors go into an alarm state if a scheduled collection fails. These standard collectors are presented as an icon that contains a check mark and an X. Many of the standard parameters used by PATROL for Oracle have collector properties. and stored on the computer where the PATROL Agent resides. PATROL for Oracle organizes parameters into application classes by function or by the objects that they monitor. A standard parameter collects a single value of data as numeric or text and displays that value. nor do they generate alarms or recovery actions. I I The use of standard parameters with collector properties (standard collectors) and consumer parameters enables PATROL to set an almost unlimited number of parameters with one data retrieval query to the server. The collected parameter information is available for review by a PATROL console. they execute commands and gather the data that consumer parameters display. Parameter types PATROL for Oracle uses standard and consumer parameters. The Collectors application contains most of the standard collectors used by PATROL for Oracle. summarized. Consumer parameters do not issue commands. See the online Help for PATROL for Oracle for more information about the PATROL for Oracle parameters. 30 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . The check mark is green when the parameter is in an okay state and the X turns red when the parameter goes into an alarm state. Parameter data values are collected.

The data collected by the standard collector parameters is distributed to related consumer parameters.Parameters Double-clicking on a standard collector icon opens a graph or timetable that displays a mark for each collection that the standard collector parameter completed. Figure 2 on page 32 shows the Collector Application icon. the parameters it contains. and a standard collector parameter graph. but display only information about their collections. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 31 . Standard collector parameters do not display the data that they collect.

Double-clicking the Collector application icon displays the standard collector icons. parameters. in a single file named param.hist located in the following directory: $PATROL_HOME\log\history\computername\portnumber See the PATROL user guide for your console for detailed information about the parameter history file. 3. and a graph 1. The timetable displays a mark for each data collection cycle that the standard collector parameter completed. Parameter history file All parameter history data is stored on the computer where the PATROL Agent resides. Double-clicking on one of the standard collectors opens a graph or timetable for that standard collector parameter. 32 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 2.Parameters Figure 2 Collector application.

Figure 3 Instance application menu in Windows Oracle instance icon console menu instance application menu The instance application menu shown in Figure 3 is at the instance level of the menu tree hierarchy for the Oracle application. and KM Commands is a command available from that menu. InfoBoxes. “Accessing menu commands. PATROL for Oracle online Help provides further details about menu commands. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 33 .Menu commands Menu commands The PATROL for Oracle menu commands allow you to perform the following tasks: I I I define and manage PATROL for Oracle manage your Oracle environment from PATROL view reports about your Oracle environment Figure 3 shows the Oracle instance icon. Right-clicking the Oracle instance icon opens the console menu. and the instance application menu. the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows (Developer mode) menu. For information about how to access menu commands and online Help from the various PATROL consoles. and online Help” on page 313. see Appendix A.

that appear in the application InfoBoxes.InfoBoxes InfoBoxes PATROL for Oracle uses InfoBoxes to provide attributes specific to the objects in your Oracle applications. PATROL for Oracle online Help provides further details about the application InfoBoxes. Oracle SID) and some of the attributes change as your Oracle environment changes (for example. and they are preceded by a check mark (PATROL Console for Windows) or are separated from the console items by a horizontal rule (PATROL Console for UNIX). 34 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . InfoBoxes. The PATROL Central Operator consoles differentiate between the items in a similar fashion. Each InfoBox provides an Update button that you can use to refresh the attributes in that InfoBox. and online Help” on page 313. “Accessing menu commands. For information about how to access InfoBoxes and online Help. such as icon type or status. the items generated by PATROL for Oracle appear below the items generated by the PATROL console. In each of the application InfoBoxes. Figure 4 InfoBox for an Oracle instance Check marked items Update button The attributes that populate the InfoBoxes are gathered and updated periodically. The PATROL consoles and PATROL Agent populate all of the attributes that appear in the parameter InfoBoxes and some of the attributes. Instance Startup). Some of the attributes that appear in the application InfoBoxes remain static (for example. see Appendix A. InfoBoxes are tables of attributes accessed from parameters and application class icons. Figure 4 is an example of an InfoBox for a Oracle instance.

ora file. The SQL*Net connect string or Service name is defined in the tnsnames. do not work with remote monitoring because of the limitations of the connection. Figure 5 Remote and local servers Local server UNIX with Oracle TCP/IP PATROL Agent Full functionality PATROL console (Microsoft Windows or UNIX) communication goes through the Remote Server but appears as a local instance to the PATROL console c le N et Ora IP P/ TC P/I TC P Local server Microsoft Windows with Oracle PATROL Agent Full functionality Local server Remote server UNIX with Oracle No PATROL Agent Some functions not available on remote Instance Linux with Oracle PATROL Agent Full functionality Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 35 .Local and remote monitoring Local and remote monitoring PATROL for Oracle can monitor both local and remote instances. Figure 5 shows the relationships between the PATROL console. PATROL for Oracle connects to remote instances through Oracle Net from an instance with a PATROL Agent. however. and remote instances. Some functions. Local instances are servers that have a PATROL Agent running on them. once configured for monitoring. looks and acts like a local instance to the PATROL console. Remote instances do not have a PATROL Agent running on the server. A remote instance. local instances. The instance with the PATROL Agent must have a version of the Oracle software that can connect to a remote database.

Because a remote server does not have a PATROL Agent.Oracle servers with a PATROL Agent Oracle servers with a PATROL Agent If the server you are monitoring has a PATROL Agent. you can use all the functions and tools contained in PATROL for Oracle. the following menu items are not available for remote Oracle Servers: I Oracle Server Admin — Explain Plan — Instance Shutdown — Instance Startup — Server Manager — SQL Plus I Reports => Alert Log — All Error Messages — Enter Search String — ORA-006XX Messages — Privilege Violations — Show Tail These menu commands appear (they are not dimmed) for remote Oracle server instances. An Oracle server that is monitored through Oracle Net is called a remote Oracle server. an error message appears on the task output window or the screen output window. however. Oracle servers without a PATROL Agent PATROL for Oracle monitors Oracle servers without a PATROL Agent through Oracle Net. 36 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . when you use the menu item.

which require operating system access. are unavailable for remote Oracle Servers: I I I I AVAILABILITY — Alerts — ArchFreeSpace — ArchFreeSpaceETF — CannotExtend ARCHIVE — ArchFreeSpace — ArchFeeSpaceOptional — ArchFreeSpaceColl CAPACITY — AlertLogSize — BGDumpLeft — BGDumpLeftETF — BGDumpUsed — BGDumpUsedPct — CoreDumpLeft — CoreDumpLeftETF — CoreDumpUsed — CoreDumpUsedPct — UserDumpLeft — UserDumpLeftETF — UserDumpUsed — UserDumpUsedPct ETSM — PctUsed — SpaceLeft Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 37 .Oracle servers without a PATROL Agent Parameters that are unavailable for remote Oracle servers The following parameters.

In Figure 6. see the PATROL Agent Reference Manual. 2 Install and configure PATROL for Oracle on each instance on Node 1 and Node 3.Failover and cluster monitoring scenarios Failover and cluster monitoring scenarios The following failover and cluster monitoring scenarios are discussed: I I “Failover and cluster monitoring by using the PATROL Agent” “Failover and cluster monitoring by using PATROL for Oracle” NOTE If you want to use PATROL for Oracle to monitor RAC-managed instances. see Chapter 9.” Failover and cluster monitoring by using the PATROL Agent The PATROL Agent provides failover tolerance by operating in a cluster-specific mode (also known as the PATROL virtual agent). Figure 6 on page 40 illustrates this configuration. Node 3 is the failover computer for Instance 1 on Node 1. To set up PATROL for Oracle and the PATROL Agent by using the PATROL Agent without the cluster-specific variables defined (non-clustered mode). To install the PATROL Agent into a cluster configuration. Failover monitoring cannot be used when monitoring a RAC-managed instance. PATROL for Oracle must be installed on at least one node that contains a configured instance that is to be monitored. Failover and cluster monitoring by using PATROL for Oracle You can use PATROL for Oracle to monitor the following types of failover environments: I I “Active/passive environments” on page 38 “Active/active environment” on page 40 Active/passive environments You can use PATROL for Oracle to monitor an active/passive failover environment. use the following steps. To monitor the instance status within the RAC configuration. 1 Install and start the PATROL Agent on both Node 1 and Node 3. 38 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . “Monitoring the RAC environment.

For information about configuring the failover monitor. In normal operation. and the InstanceStatus. OracleStatus. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 39 . OracleStatus.km. the PATROL history for each instance is interrupted. If you do not want to view the warning parameters on Instance 1. In this operation. To automatically disable or enable an instance so that it will not alarm on the secondary computer. and ConnectDB parameters are in warning mode on this instance. The InstanceStatus. When a failover occurs. the failover instance (Instance 1 on Node 3) is in a standby mode. and ConnectDB parameters on Instance 1 on Node 3 go into an OK state. use ORACLE_FAILOVER. and ConnectDB parameters on Instance 1 on Node 1 go into warning or alarm (24x7).Failover and cluster monitoring by using PATROL for Oracle 3 On Instance 1 on Node 1. and ConnectDB parameters are in an OK state. see “Failover monitoring” on page 112. OracleStatus. you can use the Monitor Enable/Disable menu command to stop monitoring the warning instance. The primary instance (Instance 1 on Node 1) is running. PATROL starts monitoring Instance 1 on Node 3. As Instance 1 on Node 3 starts and retrieves the redo log from the shared Oracle device. OracleStatus. the InstanceStatus. configure the failover system by using the Failover Monitoring => Configure command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. and the InstanceStatus.

NOTE If you are using the PATROL Agent in a non-virtual mode. and is the failover computer for Instance 1. and is the failover computer for Instance 2. 40 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . all nodes have different instances. the remaining active node takes on the monitoring of all cluster applications.Failover and cluster monitoring by using PATROL for Oracle Figure 6 Configuration with PATROL Agents not in cluster-specific mode Node 1 Node 3 Instance 1 Instance 1 (in failover mode) PATROL OS KM PATROL Agent PATROL for Oracle Shared Drive for Oracle PATROL OS KM PATROL Agent PATROL for Oracle Normal operation Instance 1 up InstanceStatus OracleStatus ConnectDB Failover operation Instance 1 down InstanceStatus OracleStatus ConnectDB Instance 1 Node 3 up InstanceStatus OracleStatus ConnectDB Instance 1 Node 3 waiting InstanceStatus OracleStatus ConnectDB Active/active environment PATROL for Oracle will also monitor the instance in an active/active environment. If Node 1 fails. Node 1 contains the primary Instance 1. which is also called a “workload balancing” configuration. In this environment. Instance 1 fails over to Node 3. Node 3 contains the primary Instance 2. When a failover occurs. you will not have continuous history data in a failover situation. Figure 7 on page 42 shows this situation. and the PATROL Agent on Node 3 starts monitoring Instance 1. Figure 7 on page 42 displays the use of the PATROL Agent without the cluster-specific variables defined (non-clustered mode).

and ConnectDB parameters in a warning state. OracleStatus. OracleStatus. Instance 1 on Node 1 displays the InstanceStatus. If a failover occurs on Node 1.km. 2 Install and configure PATROL for Oracle on each instance. To automatically disable or enable an instance so that it will not alarm on the secondary computer. If you do not want to view the warning parameters on Instance 1. you can use the Monitor Enable/Disable menu command to stop monitoring the warning instance. For information about configuring the failover monitor. Instance 1 on Node 1 goes down.Failover and cluster monitoring by using PATROL for Oracle To set up PATROL for Oracle in this environment 1 Install the PATROL Agent on each node. Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 41 . Instance 1 on Node 3 displays the InstanceStatus. see “Failover monitoring” on page 112. In normal operation. 3 For each instance. and ConnectDB parameters in an OK state. and ConnectDB parameters in a warning state. OracleStatus. configure the failover system by using the Failover Monitoing => Configure command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. and Instance 1 on Node 3 comes up. Instance 1 on Node 3 and Instance 2 on Node 1 displays the InstanceStatus. use ORACLE_FAILOVER. Instance 1 on Node 1 and Instance 2 on Node 3 displays the InstanceStatus and OracleStatus parameters in an OK state. the PATROL history for the instance is interrupted. In this operation.

Normal operation Instance 1 on Node 3 Instance 1 up on Node 1 InstanceStatus OracleStatus ConnectDB Failover operation Instance 1 down on Node 1 InstanceStatus OracleStatus ConnectDB InstanceStatus OracleStatus ConnectDB Instance 1 up on Node 3 InstanceStatus OracleStatus ConnectDB 42 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . all instances will work the same.Failover and cluster monitoring by using PATROL for Oracle Figure 7 Distributed environment configuration .local PATROL Agents only Node 1 Node 3 Instance 1 Instance 1 Instance 2 Instance 2 Common Oracle Disk PATROL OS KM PATROL Agent -p nnnn (monitors both OS and Oracle instance) PATROL for Oracle Oracle Instance 1 Oracle Instance 2 PATROL OS KM PATROL Agent -p nnnn (monitors both OS and Oracle instance) PATROL for Oracle *The following description uses Instance 1 as an example.

and InfoBoxes Appendix C. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration” on page 131 Chapter 5. and SQL statements” on page 179 Chapter 7. “Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle” on page 45 Chapter 3. “Monitoring Oracle options” on page PATROL for Oracle 271 how to monitor the the RAC environment Chapter 9. “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293 how to access the KM menu commands. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 instructions for installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls detailed descriptions of the applications. Appendix A. and online Help InfoBoxes. parameters. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 PATROL for Oracle online Help Chapter 1 Product components and capabilities 43 . and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. menu commands.Where to go from here Where to go from here The following table suggests topics that you should read next: Topic how to install and migrate PATROL Source of information Chapter 2. “Accessing menu commands. InfoBoxes. users. “Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle” on page 69 and PATROL for Oracle online Help Chapter 4. “Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle” on page 157 Chapter 6. “Monitoring instance health” on page 225 for Oracle how to set up and configure PATROL for Oracle how to use PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Oracle to change configuration variables or parameter properties how to use Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle how to monitor the tablespace capacity and user activity on an Oracle instance using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor instance health using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor Oracle options using the Chapter 8. “Monitoring tablespaces.

Where to go from here 44 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing to upgrade and migrate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting the environment variables for the browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle from a Windows environment . . . . . . . . . . Upgrading and preserving customizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 45 . Determining whether to install locally or remotely . . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing PATROL security. . . . . .Chapter 2 46 50 50 51 51 52 53 58 59 60 61 62 63 63 64 65 66 66 67 68 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 2 This chapter presents the following topics: Verifying installation requirements . . . . . . . . . . Installing the UNIX version of the Help browser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing for installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing the online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle from a UNIX environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an installation package of the merged PATROL for Oracle . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Importing into Distribution Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining the version of the installation utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining how to install and upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Additional considerations for using online Help for UNIX . . . . . . . . . Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Migrating customizations manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Verifying installation requirements

Verifying installation requirements
Verify that the target computer meets the requirements listed in Table 3. For information about support for specific operating systems, Oracle servers, PATROL products, or other third-party products, see the release notes for the version of PATROL for Oracle that you are installing.

NOTE
Any information about UNIX in Table 3 applies to any supported versions of Linux, unless otherwise specified.

Table 3
Resource Oracle Net

System requirements for installing PATROL for Oracle (part 1 of 4)
Requirements SQL*Net, Net8, or Oracle Net Services Comments Oracle Net is required only if you want to monitor a remote instance. See “Local and remote monitoring” on page 35.

PATROL Agent and consoles

A PATROL Agent and one or more of the following consoles:
I I I I

PATROL Central consoles are not required, but a PATROL Agent is required for each monitored instance, and a PATROL Console for UNIX or PATROL Console for PATROL Console for UNIX PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows Microsoft Windows in a Developer Console PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition mode is required to configure PATROL for Oracle initially. PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition PATROL for Oracle collects disk space information from the following PATROL operating system .km files:
I I

other required PATROL products

The following PATROL products are also required:
I I

PATROL for UNIX PATROL for Microsoft Windows

FILESYSTEM.km and UNIX_OS.km for UNIX NT_LOGICAL_DISKS.km for Microsoft Windows

I

PATROL Installation Utility

See “Determining the version of the installation utility” on page 51. For the version of the PATROL installation utility required, see the Release Notes for the version of PATROL for Oracle that you are installing.

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Table 3
Resource

System requirements for installing PATROL for Oracle (part 2 of 4)
Requirements
I

Comments Distribution Server is required only if you plan to use it to distribute the KM. The PATROL Configuration Manager and the PATROL KM for Event Management are required if you plan to modify PATROL for Oracle. See Chapter 4, “Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration” on page 131. These products are required for HTML reporting. For more information, see “HTML reporting” on page 257.

other optional PATROL products

Distribution Server PATROL Configuration Manager PATROL Knowledge Module® for Event Management

I I

other general requirements

I I

JAVA2 Platform, Standard Edition Tomcat Servlet Engine, or similar software

browser

Netscape Navigator for UNIX and Red Hat Linux platforms.

Install Netscape Navigator on the computer where the console resides. For instructions, see “Installing the UNIX version of the Help browser” on page 63.

security

PATROL for Oracle operates in all PATROL security levels.

For more information about security, see “Reviewing PATROL security” on page 50. For information about installing with a firewall, see Appendix C, “Firewall and portforwarding considerations” on page 353.

license

You must have a valid demonstration license If you do not have a permanent license, contact your BMC Software sales (typically good for 30 days) or a permanent license to run your PATROL products. representative or the BMC Software contract administration department for licensing information. The installation utility might require you to specify the port number for agents The following disk space is needed to install PATROL for Oracle on agents and consoles:
I I I I

ports disk space needed to install

The default port number for agents is 3181. These numbers are approximate and assume that you are installing both PATROL for Oracle and PATROL for Oracle Parallel Server.

UNIX agent—60 MB UNIX console—86 MB Windows agent—75 MB Windows console—86 MB

disk space used after installation

The following disk space is needed to operate These numbers are approximate, and assume PATROL for Oracle on agents and consoles: you are operating both PATROL for Oracle and PATROL for Oracle Parallel Server. I UNIX agent—30 MB I UNIX console—10 MB I Windows agent—30 MB I Windows console—10 MB

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Verifying installation requirements

Table 3
Resource

System requirements for installing PATROL for Oracle (part 3 of 4)
Requirements Comments If you are installing on Microsoft Windows, a Use the following guidelines when setting up PATROL Windows account the PATROL Windows account:
I

OS accounts on Windows

Before installing PATROL, create a dedicated user account that is either a local or a domain account. Accounts that are on a domain controller must be a member of the domain Administrators group. Do not use a built-in Administrator account. If you are using a domain account, you must specify the NT domain with the user name.

I

I

I

OS accounts on UNIX

If you are installing on UNIX, a PATROL UNIX account

Use the following guidelines when setting up the PATROL UNIX account:
I

The account .login, .profile, .cshrc, and .kshrc files should not contain any customizations, such as aliases, nondefault prompts, unmask settings other than 022. Do not use the root account. The account must have permission to create directories and write the installation logs to the $HOME and /tmp directories on the computer where you are installing products. The account must have ftp and telnet enabled. The account must have access to a root account on the computer where PATROL is installed.

I I

I

I

Oracle account

PATROL account for Oracle

Use one of the following accounts for the configuration process:
I I

SYS account with the DBA role granted to it

For more information, see “Configuring instances for monitoring” on page 99.

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Verifying installation requirements

Table 3
Resource Oracle database objects Oracle database modes

System requirements for installing PATROL for Oracle (part 4 of 4)
Requirements Requires 10-15 MB available in the default tablespace and the default temporary tablespace. If a database is in restricted mode, you must configure PATROL to monitor the database. Comments For more information, see “Configuring instances for monitoring” on page 99. For more information, see “Configuring instances in restricted mode for monitoring” on page 103. TIMED_STATISTICS = TRUE TIMED_STATISTICS = TRUE TIMED_STATISTICS = TRUE O7_DICTIONARY_ACCESSIBILITY = TRUE For more information, see “Account requirements” on page 83. To monitor a parallel query option (PQO) environment, you must set the PQO parameters in the initialization file (init.ora) for a PQO environment. (The name of the init.ora file can vary. See “initialization file” on page 359.) To monitor a multithreaded server (MTS) or shared server environment, you must set the MTS or shared server parameters in the init.ora file for a shared server environment. If the file is not in the default location, specify the location of the tnsname.ora file. The TNS_ADMIN environment variable is used to explicitly define the directory location for Oracle Net to resolve where to find its configuration files. TNS_ADMIN overrides the default Oracle Net location. For example, if TNS_ADMIN is set to ORACLE_HOME\test\admin, Oracle Net looks for its configuration files in ORACLE_HOME\test\admin to make a database connection or start other Oracle Networking products such as the Listener, Connection Manager, Names Server, and so on.

other settings SQL Snapshot CPU data retrieval Monitoring high CPU users USRCpuSeconds parameter For Oracle 8i and a non-SYS account, set the 07_DICTIONARY_ ACCESSIBILITY parameter to TRUE. PQO parameter settings

MTS or shared server parameter settings

TNS_ADMIN

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Preparing for installation

Preparing for installation
Before installing PATROL for Oracle in a production environment, BMC Software recommends that you first install, configure, and test PATROL for Oracle on a limited number of development or test computers.

Before you begin
I I I I

Review PATROL security (see page 50) Ensure that you use the appropriate version of the installation utility (see page 51) Determine whether to install products locally or remotely (see page 51) Determine how you should install and upgrade (see page 52)

Reviewing PATROL security
PATROL security is installed as part of the PATROL Agent, console server, and consoles. The PATROL Agent, console server, and consoles must operate at the same security level to communicate with each other. PATROL for Oracle inherits the security policy from the agent, console server, and console on which it is installed. PATROL for Oracle can operate at any PATROL security level.

To check the security level of a previously installed agent, console server, or console 1 From the command line, switch to the path on the computer that you want to
check:
I I

%BMC_ROOT\..\common\security\bin\OS (Windows) $BMC_ROOT/../common/security/bin/OS (UNIX)

2 To display the security policy of the current computer, run the following
command:
esstool policy -a

The security level is displayed in the security level field of the output. For more information about implementing and using PATROL security, see the following documents:
I I

PATROL Security User Guide PATROL Security Release Notes

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PATROL for Oracle User Guide

Determining the version of the installation utility

NOTE
If your environment contains a firewall, please see Appendix C, “Firewall and portforwarding considerations” on page 353.

Determining the version of the installation utility
The version of the installation utility included on the CD or Electronic Product Download (EPD) image you use to install PATROL for Oracle might differ from a version included on another product CD or from a version that you downloaded from the BMC Software Electronic Product Download (EPD) Web site. You should use the version of the installation utility that comes with the product that you are installing.

To determine the version of an installation utility 1 Open a command prompt. 2 Navigate to the directory where the installation utility is located:
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%BMC_ROOT\..\common\security\bin\platform (Windows) $BMC_ROOT/../common/security/bin/platform (UNIX)

3 Enter one of the following commands:
I I

setup.exe -v (Windows) setup.sh -v (UNIX)

A message box displays the version of the installation utility.

Determining whether to install locally or remotely
You can install products on the computer on which you are running the installation utility (local installation), or you can create an installable image that you can install at a later time on multiple computers (remote installation functionality). With an installable image, you can create one product image with one pass through the installation utility and then use that image to install to remote computers in your environment.

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Determining how to install and upgrade

If you create an installable image, all computers on which the image is installed must use identical configuration information for the following settings:
I I I I I

BMC Software products installation directory account names passwords PATROL Agent port number security options

Details for installing products locally are included in this chapter. For details about creating, distributing, and installing installable images, see the PATROL Installation Reference Manual.

Determining how to install and upgrade
If you do not currently have a version of PATROL for Oracle installed, proceed to “Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation” on page 53. If you already have a version of PATROL for Oracle installed in your environment, you need to determine whether or not there are any customizations in the installed product that you want to save. Customizations to Knowledge Modules (.km) and PSL (.psl) files are stored in the cache, but they are not preserved and incorporated automatically. Customizations made to PATROL for Oracle can include the following:
I I

new and modified Knowledge Modules (.km files) that you created modified PSL code, whether it is embedded in .km or .psl files

Customizations that were applied by using PATROL Configuration Manager or operator overrides created with a PATROL Operator Console (version 3.4.11 and later) are saved in the agent configuration database automatically. These customizations take effect automatically.

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Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation

Use Table 4 to determine whether you should upgrade and save your customizations or upgrade without saving any customizations, and use the appropriate procedure. Table 4
Situation
I

Choosing an installation and upgrade procedure
Procedure Install or upgrade by using the “Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation” procedure on page 53.

You made no customizations to your previous version of PATROL for Oracle. You made one or more of the preceding changes or customizations by using the PATROL Configuration Manager (in which case, they are saved in the agent configuration file and applied to the new version automatically). You want to overwrite customizations with the default values of the new version of PATROL for Oracle.

I

I

You made one or more of the following changes or customizations Upgrade by using the “Installing for the to your previous version of PATROL for Oracle, but you plan to first time or upgrading over an existing migrate those customizations manually: installation” procedure on page 53.
I I

created new Knowledge Modules modified PSL code

You made one or more of the following customizations to your Upgrade “Upgrading and preserving currently installed version of PATROL for Oracle, you plan to save customizations” on page 59. those customizations, and migrate them to the new version of PATROL for Oracle by using the Distribution Server:
I I

created new Knowledge Modules modified PSL code

Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation
Use the following installation instructions if you are performing one of the following procedures:
I I I

installing for the first time upgrading and manually migrating customizations upgrading without saving or migrating any customizations

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53

upgrade by using the procedure described in “Upgrading and preserving customizations” on page 59. the CannotExtend parameter goes into an alarm state. 54 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation WARNING Upgrading over an existing installation does not preserve: I I I customizations made to . In this case. you need to assign a value of NULL to the OracleCantext. see “Determining how to install and upgrade” on page 52.5 (and later). After configuring PATROL for Oracle. Do not upgrade over an existing installation if you have manually added or removed variables or modified the database account.10 (and later) and PATROL Agent 3. I I NOTE You can only upgrade over an existing installation of PATROL for Oracle 8. upgrade without saving customizations.Tables configuration variable.km and .5. Before you begin I You first should install on a limited number of computers in the test environment. stop the PATROL console and agent.xx over the top of version of 8.8.InstanceName. and then install in your production environment.psl files manually added or deleted Oracle-related Agent configuration variables changes made to the database account Changes made to Agent configuration variables by using the PATROL Configuration Manager are preserved when you upgrade over an existing installation as described in “To install for the first time. If you are unsure which procedure you should perform.5x. If you are upgrading and manually migrating customizations or upgrading without saving or migrating any customizations. You must have created the PATROL default account. or upgrade and manually migrate customizations” on page 55. See OS Accounts in Table 3 on page 46. After installing PATROL for Oracle 8. test the installation thoroughly.6x or 8. This forces the tables used with the CannotExtend parameter to be re-created.

sh (UNIX). B Start a browser. and proceed to step 3. Otherwise.sh -serveronly (UNIX) A message box opens that contains the URL that connects to the installation Web server. perform the following: — Ensure that you have a record of your customizations and that you have backed up the customized files in the PATROL_HOME and PATROL_CACHE directories. 5 In the Select Installation Option window. To install for the first time. See “Preparing to upgrade and migrate” on page 60. 2 If you are installing into a UNIX environment without a browser. and click Next to continue. select one of the following options: I To install locally now. perform the following steps to launch the installation utility: A From a command line. use the URL provided in the message box to connect to the installation Web server and to start the installation utility. click Next to begin the installation. or upgrade and manually migrate customizations 1 If you are installing into a UNIX environment without a browser. I If you are using Automatic Storage Management (ASM).exe (Windows) or setup. C In the browser. select Accept. from an electronically downloaded installation (EPD) image. run setup. 4 In the Review the license agreement window. proceed to step 2.Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation I If you plan to migrate your customizations manually. select Install products on this computer now and click Next to continue. upgrade without saving customizations. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 55 . change to the directory where the installation utility is located and enter the following command to start the installation Web server: . 3 In the Welcome to the Installation Utility window. — Move the old version of PATROL for Oracle to a new directory that is different from PATROL_HOME. you have to again configure the instance after the updrade./setup.

You want the PATROL Agent to use a port other than the 3181 (the default). select any or all of the roles listed to indicate the components that you want to install.1.10.Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation I To create an installable image that you can install locally and remotely later.36. 7 In the Select Type of Installation window. see “Determining the version of the installation utility” on page 51. or PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition prior to version 7. You are upgrading PATROL for Oracle from a previously installed version. see the following documents: I I I PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition Getting Started PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition Getting Started PATROL Console Server and RTserver Getting Started 9 From the Select Products and Components to Install window. accept the default directory and click Next to continue. If you are using a PATROL Console Server version prior to 7. NOTE If you are using the PATROL Central Operator – Windows Edition or the PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition. For more information about the PATROL consoles and PATROL Console Server or RTserver. you must also install PATROL for Oracle on the computer hosting the PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition web server by using the Console Systems role. and click Next. The PATROL product directory that you enter in step 10 on page 57 is appended to the path that you enter in this step. You must use the Custom installation type in the following instances: I I I I You want to install the PATROL for Oracle Parallel Server. You are installing into an existing PATROL environment. 8 In the Select System Roles window. To determine whether to install now or create an image that you can install later locally or remotely.2. enter the directory where you want the installation image stored. you must install PATROL for Oracle on the computer that hosts the PATROL Console Server and select Common Services in the Select System Roles window. make one of the following selections: 56 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 6 In the Specify Installation Directory window. and click Next to continue. select Default or Custom and click Next to continue. select Create an image to be installed later.

or accept the default directory. 12 When the status window reports that the installation is 100% complete. NOTE PATROL for Oracle does not provide a Quick Start Package. click View Log to review the installation. and click Next. select Start Install. the Provide the PATROL 3. If you selected the Custom installation type. 13 In the Installation Results window. and click Next to view the results window. click Back and make those changes.x Product Directory window is displayed. You entered the installation directory in step 8 on page 56. 11 In the Review Selections and Install window. click Next to view the results window. click Finish to exit from the installation utility. review the selections carefully: I I If you want to change your selections.Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation I If you selected the Default installation type. current milestones. and percentage complete. A status window opens and provides current messages. 10 (Custom installation only) In the Provide the PATROL 3. The directory entered in this step is appended to the base directory path that is shown in the BMC Products Installation Directory field. If the selections are correct. and only the PATROL Knowledge Module for Oracle is installed.x Product Directory field. The Default installation type does not display the KMs for selection. enter the directory in which you want to install PATROL for Oracle in the PATROL 3. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 57 . 14 In the Installation Results window. one or both of the PATROL KMs listed. you can choose only PATROL Solutions for Databases => PATROL for Oracle. choose PATROL Solutions for Databases => PATROL for Oracle and click Next. choose PATROL Solutions for Databases => PATROL for Oracle. I If you selected the Custom installation type.x Product Directory window.

one by one. 2 If you have not already done so. Before you begin Ensure that you have made a record of your customizations and have backed up the customized files in the PATROL_HOME and PATROL_CACHE directories. enter the customizations that you identified in step 3. B Load the newly installed PATROL for Oracle. To migrate customizations to KM files manually 1 If you have not already done so. 4 Incorporate your customizations to the new PATROL for Oracle by performing the following steps: A Restart the PATROL console. Migrating customizations manually If you have only a few customizations. install the new version of PATROL for Oracle as described in the section “Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation” on page 53. See “Preparing to upgrade and migrate” on page 60. If you have made customizations to the PATROL Script Language (PSL) code. see “Migrating customizations manually” on page 58. 58 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 3 Identify the customizations in PATROL for Oracle by comparing the content of the text file of the KM in the newly installed PATROL for Oracle version with the content of the text file for the customized KM that is saved in the directory that you moved the old version to. C Using a PATROL developer console. you might find manual migration easier. move the old version of PATROL for Oracle to a new directory that is different from PATROL_HOME.Migrating customizations manually Where to go from here If you have customizations that you want to migrate manually. you must manually migrate your customizations. This task contains a procedure for migrating customizations manually.

use the pslsearch utility to search your . and . Upgrading and preserving customizations If you want to upgrade and save your customizations by migrating your customizations manually. If you created a new PSL file (not shipped by BMC Software) outside of a . you can use the “Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation” installation instructions on page 53. or if you created new PSL code (not shipped by BMC Software) and embedded it in a . you must manually edit the new .psl.ctg files for terms that you may have used that have since been adopted by BMC Software as PSL keywords. Rename any terms that pslsearch identifies as an existing keyword. you must manually recompile the library by using the compiler that was shipped with your current version of PATROL.09i.km file.km files by using a PATROL developer console to reapply your changes. I I NOTE If you have customized a PSL library that was compiled with an earlier version of the PSL compiler than the version that was provided with PATROL 3.2. These customizations are sometimes embedded in .Upgrading and preserving customizations To migrate customized PSL code Customizations made to PATROL Script Language (PSL) code are not automatically migrated. you must manually re-edit the PSL code in the new KM by using a PATROL developer console to reapply your changes. Reapply your changes by using a PATROL developer console.psl files that were shipped by BMC Software.km file that was shipped by BMC Software. Migrate these customizations manually. . using the following guidelines: I If you modified .psl files.km files or stored in separate . You can also migrate your KM customizations to a new version of the KM and distribute those migrated customizations to PATROL Agents throughout your enterprise by using the following BMC Software products: I I PATROL Configuration Manager Distribution Server Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 59 .km.km file. If you modified PSL code embedded in a .

do not delete ORACLE_history_loader. you must first perform the following tasks: I I back up PATROL_HOME and PATROL_CACHE remove PATROL for Oracle files from PATROL_CACHE NOTE Throughout this section. you must remove the current PATROL for Oracle files from the PATROL_CACHE directory for the console. To back up the current installation 1 Shut down any PATROL Agents. 60 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Remove all PATROL for Oracle files with the following naming patterns from PATROL_CACHE\knowledge and PATROL_CACHE\psl: I I ORA* OPS* NOTE If you are using History.Preparing to upgrade and migrate Preparing to upgrade and migrate No matter what method you use for upgrading and migrating customizations.km. consoles. old product files in PATROL_CACHE are loaded instead of the newly installed files from PATROL_HOME. and related services that are currently running. 2 Ensure that no one is accessing any PATROL files or directories. 3 Perform a full backup of the following two directories where PATROL executables and data are typically stored: I I PATROL_HOME for agent and console installation directories PATROL_CACHE for the console working cache To remove PATROL for Oracle files from PATROL_CACHE Before you install. If you do not. all references to PATROL_CACHE represent $HOME/patrol in UNIX and %PATROL_CACHE% in Windows. all references to PATROL_HOME represent $PATROL_HOME in UNIX and %PATROL_HOME% in Windows.km.

if pokckm/x.xx/030107-233044 is listed in the first line of the . pokckm is the file name. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 61 . You are replacing the files there with the merged files that contain your customizations. you must create an installation package that can be used with the installation utility. 3 Rename the packaged_results directory with the file name from the . 2 Navigate to the packaged_results directory for the merged package and open the . or to install using the Distribution Server.x. 5 Copy the PATROL for Oracle CD image to the target server from which you will be installing.Creating an installation package of the merged PATROL for Oracle Creating an installation package of the merged PATROL for Oracle After you have migrated and merged your customizations.ppf file. For example.ppf file in step 2. This temporary directory can be deleted after you have successfully created an installable image. To create an installation package of the merged PATROL for Oracle 1 Copy the contents of the PATROL for Oracle CD to a hard drive on a server.ppf file.ppf file. 4 Copy the renamed directory to the Products directory of the PATROL for Oracle CD image that you copied onto the server. Where to go from here Install PATROL for Oracle from the target server using the instructions in “Installing for the first time or upgrading over an existing installation” on page 53. Note the file name that is listed in the first line of the . go to “Importing into Distribution Server” on page 62.

see the Release Notes for the version of PATROL for Oracle that you are installing. and diagnosis problems I I I I Before you begin Ensure that you use a version of the Distribution Server that is currently supported by the PATROL for Oracle KM that you are installing. and that you have applied any available patches. upgrade. To import PATROL for Oracle into the Distribution Server This task describes how to import components into the Distribution Server for deployment to multiple locations. For information about supported products. uninstall. 5 Select the directory that contains the Products directory (do not select the Products directory itself). 4 Navigate to the location where the components are located and click Next. 1 Using the Distribution Server Manager.Importing into Distribution Server Importing into Distribution Server The Distribution Server product performs remote installations (or uninstallations) of BMC Software distributed system products across multiple systems from a central location. 2 In the Distribution Server tab area. and reinstall products on remote systems from one central location create collections of products and system groups to distribute multiple products to multiple systems in one distribution schedule a distribution for a specific date and time maintain multiple product versions to be distributed view reports to check distribution status. start the Distribution Server and connect to it. click the Components tab. gather distribution data. 3 In the list area. With the Distribution Server you can perform the following tasks: I install. 62 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . click the Import button.

PATROL Help does not support Netscape Navigator 6.Installing the online Help If the components are not accessible on a local drive. However. the online Help for PATROL for Oracle is automatically installed when you install the KM package to the console server. EXAMPLE Assuming that you copied the CD image into a directory called merged_CD and then. the online Help for PATROL for Oracle is automatically installed when you install the console KM package to the console. Installing the online Help For the PATROL consoles.78. For PATROL Central Operator consoles (either Microsoft Windows Edition or Web Edition).x is Netscape Navigator version 3.0. You must install Netscape Navigator on the computer where the PATROL console resides. 7 Click Import to import the selected components. do the following: I I I install the UNIX version of the Help browser separately if it is not already installed review the environment variables to make sure that they are properly set review other considerations Installing the UNIX version of the Help browser The browser that is required for the UNIX version of PATROL Help on PATROL version 3. you must run Netscape Navigator version 4. if you are running a Red Hat Linux platform. you copied the updated package to the directory containing the CD image. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 63 . the resultant directory structure resembles I I (Windows) merged_CD\Products\pokchm (UNIX) merged_CD/Products/pukchm 6 Select the check boxes for the components that you want to import and click OK. Currently.01 through 4.x to display the online Help. If you plan to install the UNIX version of PATROL for Oracle on a PATROL console for UNIX. you can specify them by using the NFS name and path. after migrating your customizations and creating a customized installation package. You can install Netscape anywhere on your UNIX computer as long as the binary is in the path.

the PATROL_BROWSER environment variable contains the following command: 64 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . If the directory containing the Netscape files is not in the path. you must have the LANG. you might experience product failures.Setting the environment variables for the browser Setting the environment variables for the browser For the Help browser to run properly. Type of shell Bourne Korn C Export command for PATH variable PATH=$PATH:/netscape_location export PATH export PATH=$PATH:/netscape_location setenv PATH=$PATH:/netscape_location PATROL_BROWSER variable When PATROL starts the Help browser. Otherwise. add the directory to the PATROL user account path. you must have the UNIX LANG environment variable must set to C. it uses the command in the PATROL_BROWSER environment variable. This requirement applies only to the PATROL user account on the PATROL console computer. Type of shell Bourne Korn C Export command for LANG variable LANG=C export LANG export LANG=C setenv LANG=C PATH variable The PATROL user account PATH variable must contain the location of the directory containing the Netscape files. As a default. The following sections describe these variables. PATH. LANG variable For Netscape Navigator to run properly. and PATROL_BROWSER environment variables set properly.

two windows are displayed in the following order: I I the Netscape Navigator window appears as an icon a browser window that contains the Help In addition. EXAMPLE For Korn shell: export PATROL_BROWSER=/usr/local/bin/netscape -raise Additional considerations for using online Help for UNIX When you select Help from the PATROL console on a UNIX system. If so. continue functioning. you should take the following conditions into consideration: I Netscape Navigator displays warning messages when it is invoked multiple times within the same user account because of its file-locking mechanism. you can set the value of PATROL_BROWSER so that the colormap option is not specified. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 65 . might not always display the Help files properly. As a result. The Exceed for Windows NT X Window Server product by Hummingbird Communication Ltd.Additional considerations for using online Help for UNIX Type of shell Bourne Korn C Export command for PATROL_BROWSER variable PATROL_BROWSER=netscape -display $DISPLAY -install -iconic export LANG export PATROL_BROWSER=netscape -display $DISPLAY -install iconic setenv PATROL_BROWSER=netscape -display $DISPLAY -install iconic To use different arguments. it takes a few seconds for the Help browser to launch. however. During the launch process. changing this value could cause some subsequent color requests to fail and the online Help to display improperly. However. It does. it uses a private color map. By default. you might experience color flashing on your workstation. I I Consult your Netscape Navigator documentation for specific platform requirements and restrictions. set the value of PATROL_BROWSER to the appropriate string. when Netscape Navigator starts.

If you use a different version of the installation program to uninstall. see the PATROL Installation Reference Manual. To uninstall in a UNIX environment 1 Change to the Uninstall directory in your BMC Software product installation directory and enter the following command to launch the installation utility in uninstall mode: .sh 2 In the Welcome window. 66 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . see “Removing instances” on page 111. Use the installation utility in the uninstall mode to uninstall PATROL for Oracle from your system. you might remove files needed to perform uninstallation of other BMC Software products. NOTE Before you can uninstall PATROL products. see the following documents: I I PATROL for UNIX User Guide PATROL Agent Reference Manual Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle from a UNIX environment The following procedure describes how to uninstall PATROL for Oracle from a UNIX environment./uninstall. you must remove the instance before uninstalling PATROL for Oracle. you may need to stop any PATROL processes that are running on the computers where you want to uninstall PATROL. For information about stopping PATROL processes. If you want to uninstall without removing log files or configuration files. Use the Instance Removal menu command described in “Removing instances” on page 111 to remove the instance from within PATROL. WARNING If you have configured an instance. click Next. Before you begin Ensure that all instances have been removed. To remove instances.Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle You must use the same version of the installation utility that you used to install PATROL for Oracle to uninstall the product.

After the uninstallation is complete. NOTE As an option. and click Next. Chapter 2 Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle 67 . 4 Select the product or products that you want to uninstall. Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle from a Windows environment Use the following procedure to uninstall PATROL for Oracle from a Windows environment. Before you begin Ensure that all instances have been removed. and click Next. To uninstall in a Windows environment 1 From the Uninstall directory in your BMC Software product installation directory.exe to launch the installation utility in uninstall mode. double-click uninstall. 3 Select the installation directory from which you want to remove a product. click Next to begin the uninstall process. you can launch the installation utility in uninstall mode by choosing Start => Settings => Control Panel => Add/Remove Programs and double-clicking BMC Software Tools in the Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box.Uninstalling PATROL for Oracle from a Windows environment 3 Select the installation directory from which you want to remove a product and click Next. see “Removing instances” on page 111. A window is displayed that tells you whether the uninstallation was successful. 5 Review your selections and click Uninstall. a window is displayed that tells you whether the uninstallation was successful. 2 In the Welcome window. 4 Select the product or products that you want to uninstall and click Next. To remove instances. 5 Review your selections and click Uninstall.

and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. “Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle” on page 69 and PATROL for Oracle online Help Chapter 4 “Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration” on page 131 Chapter 5 “Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle” on page 157 Chapter 6 “Monitoring tablespaces. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 instructions for installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls Appendix C. users. and SQL statements” on page 179 Chapter 7 “Monitoring instance health” on page 225 for Oracle how to use PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Oracle to change configuration variables or parameter properties how to use Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle how to monitor the tablespace capacity and user activity on an Oracle instance using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor instance health using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor Oracle options using the Chapter 8 “Monitoring Oracle options” on page PATROL for Oracle 271 how to monitor the the RAC environment Chapter 9 “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293 how to access the KM menu commands. “Accessing menu commands. Appendix A. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 68 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . and online Help InfoBoxes. InfoBoxes.Where to go from here Where to go from here The following table suggests other topics that you should read next: Topic how to set up and configure PATROL Source of information Chapter 3.

. . . . . . . . . . . 86 Batch configuration file syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Automatic configuration. . . . . . 81 Configuration requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .txt file . . . 83 Configuration task flow . . . . . . . 83 Required configuration information form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Using sqlplus to create PATROL database user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Removing KMs from the PATROL Agent preload list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Configuration methods. . . 85 Batch configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Modifying instance configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Using the default_auto_config. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Modifying category monitoring for an instance . . . . . 70 Determining which . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Instance discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Loading KMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 3 This chapter presents the following topics: Preparing to use PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Unloading KMs from a PATROL console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Configuring instances in restricted mode for monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .km files to load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Adding instances . . . . . 70 Determining which KMs to preload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 69 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Modifying instances that were automatically configured. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Loading and preloading KMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Enabling and disabling instance monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Configuring instances for monitoring . . . . . . . .kml and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Configuration overview . . . . . . . . . 92 Overview of the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Removing KMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 PATROL advanced configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Requirements checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Creating a batch configuration file . . . . . . . . . . 72 Preloading KMs on the PATROL Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . Determining which . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 If a problem occurs in configuration . . . . . see “Component files” on page 20. . . . . . Loading and preloading KMs When you load a KM from the PATROL console. KMs that are not preloaded only collect data while a PATROL console is connected to the PATROL Agent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Failover monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . Preloading KMs is a PATROL Agent feature that causes KM files to continue to run on the agent when no consoles are connected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Where to go from here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .km files. . .km files in this product that you can load. . . . . . . . . . . . . appears in the PATROL console. . . . . 70 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Oracle Parallel Server and failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Resetting the global channel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .km and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .km files to load Before you can configure and use PATROL for Oracle. . . . 112 Configuring failover monitoring . . . . . . . . . in the form of applications. . . usually under each agent icon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Monitoring ASM instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Each PATROL Agent then collects data based on the instructions defined in the . . . commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 ASM menu commands . . . Table 5 on page 71 lists the . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Deactivating parameters . . . . the . 126 ASM parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Removing instances . . 120 Uninstalling PATROL objects . . . . during discovery. . . . . . . . . . 125 Configuring an ASM instance . . . . . . . . For more information. . . . . . . . . . . . .Preparing to use PATROL for Oracle Viewing instance configuration settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The icons appear in your console. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . you must first load the Knowledge Modules (KMs) into the PATROL console and the PATROL Agent. . . . . 129 Preparing to use PATROL for Oracle Before you can configure PATROL for Oracle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . you must load its . and parameters.kml and . . . . . . . . . .kml and . . . . . . . . . . .kml files into the PATROL console so that the product. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . You can find the steps for loading . . . . . . . . . . . .km files are loaded on all the PATROL Agents to which your console is connected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .kml files in “Loading KMs” on page 72. .km and . 119 Setting debugging options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ORACLE_ARCHIVE. If you use certain KM files regularly and want to maintain their data collection history without gaps.kml ORACLE_RAC. even when no PATROL console is connected. you can view a KM’s data collection history without having the gaps that would otherwise occur when the console is absent. which monitors PctUsed and SpaceLeft for all tablespaces.km files in each .Determining which KMs to preload Determining which KMs to preload Preloaded KMs collect data as long as the PATROL Agent runs.kml files ORACLE.kml ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. Loads the application classes to provide enhanced archive monitoring.kml PATROL for Oracle KM files Description Loads application classes to monitor Oracle databases and servers.kml NOTE If you want to load or preload a specific application class.kml file only if you are using an OS authenticated account. Loads the automatic configuration file. Loads the application classes to monitor a RAC environment.kml Loads enterprise tablespace monitoring. except for those tablespaces that you specifically excluded. Table 5 . which uses the default_auto_conf_port number. With preloaded KMs.kml file are listed in “Component files” on page 20. ORACLE_ETSM. the .txt file to apply specified configuration settings to all instances on a host. Load this . Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 71 . preload the .kml files (listed in Table 5 on page 71) on the appropriate PATROL Agents as described in “Preloading KMs on the PATROL Agent” on page 74.

To load KMs from PATROL Central Operator – Web Edition You can use the Loading KMs feature to control which KMs are loaded on which computers. 4 Select the KM and its computer that you want to load.km and .kml files for each computer you have selected. the only . 2 Select the computers on which you want to load KMs. The Load KMs page displays a list of available .kml files.km and .km or . you must first load them with a PATROL console. click Load/Unload KMs. and click Next.kml file is listed once for each computer. 3 Select the computers on which you want to load KMs. 1 On the Common Tasks tab of the taskpad. and click Next. The . To load KMs from PATROL Central Operator – Microsoft Windows Edition You can use the Loading KMs wizard to control which KMs are loaded on which computers. follow the instructions that apply to your console. The wizard lists each computer where a PATROL Agent is installed. If a particular . If you selected more than one computer. 1 From the Monitored Systems page. The wizard displays a list of available . The Load KMs page opens and lists each computer on which a PATROL Agent has been installed. you must choose that computer by itself to load the file. 2 Click Next to start the wizard.Loading KMs Loading KMs Before you can begin using KMs that you have installed. 72 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . PATROL loads the selected KMs on the selected computers. In this task. click the Load Knowledge Modules icon to display the wizard.km files available in this product are listed on page 20.kml files that are listed are the ones that have been installed on all of the selected computers. Each . 5 Click Next and click Finish.kml file was installed only on one computer.

km) from the list box. 3 Select the .Loading KMs The KMs available in this product are listed in Table 5 on page 71.kml files.kml files. The KM files available in this product are listed in Table 5 on page 71. Figure 8 on page 74 shows the tree view that you should see if you loaded ORACLE.kml files.kml. choose File => Load KM. 2 Select one or more of the .km files by choosing KM Files (*. You can display . If your PATROL console does not have a tree view. The Load KMs dialog box displays a list of available . To load KMs from the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows 1 From the PATROL console for Microsoft Windows menu bar. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 73 . PATROL loads the selected KMs on the selected computers. 4 Click Finish.km or . The Load KMs dialog box displays a list of available . choose File => Load KM. To Load KMs from the PATROL Console for UNIX 1 From the PATROL console for UNIX menu bar. Some application classes only appear after you configure them. PATROL loads the selected KMs on all of the computers listed under PATROLMainMap. 2 Select one or more of the .kml and ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. and click Open. Where to go from here Verify that you have loaded the . PATROL loads the selected KMs on all of the computers that are connected to your console.kml files and click Open. double-click the agent computer icon to view the application classes that are loaded.km files.km files by changing the filter.kml files that you want to load. The KMs available in this product are listed in Table 5 on page 71. You can display .

Preloading KMs on the PATROL Agent Figure 8 Tree view when ORACLE. I I For more information on the wpconfig or xpconfig utilities. 2 Click the AgentSetup folder in the left pane to display the variables in the AgentSetup folder in the right pane. add it to the agent’s preload list using the wpconfig or xpconfig utilities.. Preloading KMs on the PATROL Agent If you want your KMs to continue collecting data even when there is no console running.kml and ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. A preloaded KM is a KM that is loaded by the PATROL Agent at startup and runs as long as the PATROL Agent runs. and the wpconfig window displays. you must configure PATROL for each instance.cfg). 3 Scroll down the variable list and double-click the preloadedKMs variable.. preload your KMs. Go to “Configuration overview” on page 81 for information about different methods of configuring PATROL for Oracle. You must be running a PATROL console with a developer connection.kml files are loaded Before you can use PATROL for Oracle to monitor Oracle instances. To preload a KM. 74 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Before you begin I The PATROL Agent must be running. from the PATROL Agent menu. You must have permission to modify the configuration change file (. see the PATROL Agent Reference. To preload KMs using the wpconfig utility from the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows 1 Choose Development => Agent Configuration. The console starts the wpconfig utility.

The configuration variables for the selected computer display in the Variables column in the right pane. 5 Leave REPLACE in the Type field.kml. 12 Close the wpconfig window. ORACLE.kml is a valid preloaded KMs list. from the PATROL Agent menu to display the xpconfig window. To preload KMs using the xpconfig utility from the PATROL Console for UNIX 1 Choose Development => Agent Configuration. 2 Highlight a PATROL Agent computer from the Host column in the left pane of the xpconfig window. For example.ORACLEPARALLELSERVER. type the . 8 Click OK to close the Modify Variable dialog box. 11 Save your changes to the configuration change file by click Save. 3 Click Get Configuration. The Change Entry dialog box displays.kml files include with this product. The Apply Configuration dialog box lists the PATROL Agent host name to which your that you are connected.kml files that you want to preload in the Value field. type /AgentSetup/pre*. 4 In the Filter field. 7 Click OK to close the Change Entry dialog box. 6 Using the comma-separated format without spaces.. 10 Click OK to apply your updated configuration to the PATROL Agent. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 75 .Preloading KMs on the PATROL Agent The Modify Variable dialog box displays. 4 Double-click the highlighted REPLACE line in the Change Entries field.. The wpconfig utility applies the updated configuration. 9 Choose Apply Configuration from the Tools menu. Refer to Table 5 on page 71 for a list of .

If you no longer want the PATROL Agent to run a KM that was preloaded.km file was not preloaded.km files from the PATROL Agent preload list as described in “Removing KMs from the PATROL Agent preload list” on page 79. The xpconfig utility sends the updated configuration to the selected PATROL Agent. 10 Click Apply Configuration. then unloading it does stop the file from running and collecting data on the PATROL Agent. its corresponding application class no longer appears in your console.km file was preloaded (whether as part of a .kml. For example.kml file or . 76 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Removing KMs If you want to remove a KM from being displayed in your PATROL console. ORACLE. The Edit Variable dialog box displays. However. unloading it does not stop the PATROL Agent from collecting data for that .km file.kml is a valid preloaded KMs list.” 5 Double-click the preloadedKMs variable. 8 Choose File => Exit to close the Edit window and save your changes. 6 Click Change to display an Edit window. if the .km file.kml file or not). ORACLEPARALLELSERVER.km files) as described in “Unloading KMs from a PATROL console” on page 77.km file does not delete the file from the lib\knowledge or psl directories on the PATROL console or PATROL Agent computer. you must uninstall the KM. Unloading a . you can remove its corresponding .Removing KMs The filter displays all the variables that begin with “/AgentSetup/pre. Refer to Table 5 on page 71 for a list of . If a . 11 Close the xpconfig window. 7 Using the comma-separated format without spaces. you can unload its corresponding application classes (. 9 Click OK to close the Edit Variable dialog box. type the .kml files include with this product. When you unload a . If you want to delete a KM completely from your system.kml files that you want to preload.

PATROL Central – Microsoft Windows Edition displays the wizard. To unload an entire KM. The Load KMs page opens. 5 Click Finish. listing each computer on which a PATROL Agent is installed.km file names) for each computer selected. you can unload the corresponding application class’s . the agent does not run the KM unless you load it with a running console. The wizard displays a list of application class names (that correspond to . See “Component files” on page 20 for a list of the . The console removes the selected . Each application class name is listed once for each computer. KMs that are not preloaded do not run when no console is running.km files from specified computers. click the Unload Knowledge Modules icon.km files that make up the KM.km files that make up the KM. 1 From the Managed Systems page. 3 Select the computers where you want to unload . 1 On the Common Tasks tab of the taskpad.Unloading KMs from a PATROL console When you remove a KM from the PATROL Agent preload list. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 77 . 2 Click Next to start the wizard.km files from the current management profile. select all the . click Load/Unload KMs. The wizard lists each computer on which a PATROL Agent has been installed. and click Next. To unload KMs from PATROL Central – Web Edition You can use the Load/Unload KMs feature to unload specified . 4 Select the . To unload KMs from PATROL Central – Microsoft Windows Edition You can use the PATROL Central – Microsoft Windows Edition wizard which to unload specified .km files in each KM. and click Next.km files.km and computer pair that you want to unload.km files from specified computers. Unloading KMs from a PATROL console If you no longer want to view a KM that currently appears in your console.

and click Next. 1 From the PATROL Main window.km files that you want to unload. To unload an entire KM. 3 Cancel the selection of the . 4 From the console menu bar.km files that you specified from the current management profile.km file is removed from your console session file when you save your changes. 2 Click the name of the application class that you want to delete. The console removes the . To unload KMs from the PATROL Console for UNIX Unloading a KM is also referred to as deleting a KM in the PATROL Console for UNIX. right-click the application class name that you want to delete and choose Delete from the menu.km files associated with the KM that you want to delete. cancel the selection of all the .km files that make up the KM.Unloading KMs from a PATROL console 2 Select the computers from which you want to unload . A dialog box is displayed that asks if you want to delete the selected application. 2 Click Yes to delete the application class. choose Edit => Delete. 78 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . The application class is removed from your console and its corresponding . However. choose File => Save KM to save your changes. See “Component files” on page 20 for a list of the . The Load KMs page displays a list of . 1 From the KM tab of the tree view. 3 From the List of Application Classes menu bar. 4 Click Finish. However. Currently loaded files are highlighted in the list. 3 Repeat Step 1 and Step 2 until you have deleted all of the application classes/.km files in each KM. choose Attributes => Application Classes. To unload KMs from the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows Unloading a KM is also referred to as deleting a KM in the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows. the files are actually unloaded from the console’s memory rather than deleted from your hard drive.km files. the files are actually unloaded from the console’s memory rather than deleted from your hard drive.km files.

delete the . You must have permission to modify the configuration change file (. 5 In the Change Entry dialog box..kml files include with this product. Refer to Table 5 on page 71 for a list of .kml file names that you want to remove from the preload list.cfg).km file from the agent preload list. The console starts the wpconfig utility. 2 Click the AgentSetup folder in the left pane. you should remove the corresponding . 3 Scroll down the variable list and double-click the preloadedKMs variable.kml or . 6 In the Value field. 5 From the List of Application Classes menu bar.Removing KMs from the PATROL Agent preload list The application class and its corresponding . 4 Repeat Step 2 and Step 3 until you have deleted all of the application classes associated with the KM that you want to delete. 4 In the Modify Variable dialog box.km file are removed from your console session file when you save your changes. Before you begin I The PATROL Agent must be running. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 79 . You must be running a PATROL console in Developer mode. Removing KMs from the PATROL Agent preload list If you want to remove a KM or application class so that it no longer runs on the PATROL Agent.. choose File => Save KM to save your changes. leave REPLACE in the Type field. The variables in the AgentSetup folder display in the right pane. and the wpconfig window displays. double-click the highlighted REPLACE line in the Change Entries field. I I To remove a KM from the preload list using the wpconfig utility from the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows 1 Access the PATROL Agent’s pop-up menu and choose Development => Agent Configuration.

The Apply Configuration dialog box lists the PATROL Agent host name to which your that you are connected. Refer to Table 5 on page 71 for a list of . 80 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 9 Choose Apply Configuration from the Tools menu. 2 Click to highlight a PATROL Agent computer from the Host column in the left pane of the xpconfig window. The configuration variables for the selected computer display in the Variables column in the right pane. delete the . The Edit Variable dialog box is displayed. type /AgentSetup/pre*. 4 In the Filter field.Removing KMs from the PATROL Agent preload list 7 Click OK to close the Change Entry dialog box. and the xpconfig window displays.kml file names that you want to remove from the preload list. The console starts the xpconfig utility. 10 Click OK to apply your updated configuration to the PATROL Agent... The filter displays all the variables that begin with “/AgentSetup/pre.kml files include with this product. 12 Close the wpconfig window. 6 In the Edit Variable dialog box. 3 Click Get Configuration. The wpconfig utility applies the updated configuration. To remove a KM from the preload list using the xpconfig utility from the PATROL Console for UNIX 1 Access the PATROL Agent’s pop-up menu and choose Development => Agent Configuration. 11 Save your changes to the configuration change file by clicking Save. click the Change button.” 5 Double-click the preloadedKMs variable. 8 Click OK to close the Modify Variable dialog box. 7 In the Edit window.

PATROL then creates the tables and views. password.Configuration overview 8 Choose File => Exit to close the Edit window and save your changes. and grants the PATROL account the appropriate privileges. PATROL then sets up the selected categories to start monitoring the instance. “Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle. and default tablespace to create the PATROL account for Oracle on the instance and install the necessary tables and views the categories to use to monitor the instance I I During configuration. The information that is entered includes: I the username and password of a privileged account to be used only for configuration the username. Instance discovery creates the icons for the categories and starts the appropriate collector parameters to gather information for the applications. The privileged account is used only for account creation. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 81 . To configure PATROL for Oracle. PATROL for Oracle uses the privileged account to create the PATROL account for Oracle on the instance.” on page 45 provides the requirements to install PATROL for Oracle into your environment. and starts the discovery process. Configuration requirements Chapter 2. you must fulfill certain PATROL for Oracle account requirements. you are entering the data that PATROL for Oracle needs to monitor the Oracle instance. 9 Click OK on the Edit Variable dialog box to close the dialog box. Configuration overview When you configure PATROL for Oracle. 10 Click the Apply Configuration button. The xpconfig utility sends the updated configuration to the selected PATROL Agent.

km and UNIX_OS.km files remain active (they are by default): I FILESYSTEM.km for PATROL for Microsoft Windows — LDLogicalDiskColl — LDldFreeMegabytes — LDldFreeSpacePercent NOTE The DFColl and the DCMColl parameters are not FILESYSTEM.km for PATROL for UNIX — FSAvailableSpace — FSUsedSpace — FSInodeUsedPercent — FSFreeInodes I NT_LOGICAL_DISKS. The following parameters in PATROL for Oracle are affected if the above components and parameters are not activated and running: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ArchFreeSpace ArchFreeSpaceETF BGDumpLeft BGDumpLeftETF BGDumpUsed BGDumpUsedPct CannotExtend CoreDumpLeft CoreDumpLeftETF CoreDumpUsed CoreDumpUsedPct PctUsed SpaceLeft UserDumpLeft UserDumpLeftETF UserDumpUsed UserDumpUsedPct 82 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .km and DCM. but belong to the UNIX_COLLECTORS.Configuration requirements PATROL requirements To gather operating system space data in PATROL for Oracle. you must install the following .km parameters.km respectively.km files and ensure that the parameters listed below each of the following .

Net8i. Requirements checklist Table 6 provides a checklist of the requirements that PATROL for Oracle needs to operate successfully. Oracle Net Services) software version 2. Table 6 Met? PATROL for Oracle requirements checklist Requirement A supported version of an Oracle Database Server SQL*Net (Net8. You can copy this page as needed. you must use a SYS account or an account with the DBA role granted to it. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 83 .x or later init.ora parameters are set: I I I TIMED_STATISTICS MTS (if applicable) PQO (if applicable) TNS_ADMIN (specify the location of the tnsname.Requirements checklist Account requirements To configure instances for monitoring.ora file if the file is not in the default location) The same versions of the PATROL console and the PATROL Agent are installed on all computers PATROL for your operating system components are loaded and running (used to monitor specific space information): I I FILESYSTEM for UNIX NT_LOGICAL_DISKS for Microsoft Windows One of the following accounts to use to configure instances for monitoring: I I I SYS in the DBA group Non-SYS in the DBA group Non-SYS in a non-DBA group Required configuration information form Use this table to organize the configuration information for the Oracle instances that you want to monitor using PATROL.

enter the service name Oracle instance name Oracle privileged account username and password (SYS or DBA) password PATROL account for Oracle username and password default tablespace to be used by PATROL temporary tablespace to be used by PATROL Oracle home directory for the instance Should this instance always be online (24x7)? Configuration task flow Figure 9 on page 85 presents the task flow for configuring PATROL for Oracle and the Oracle instance. 84 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .Configuration task flow Table 7 PATROL for Oracle configuration information summary Instance 1 Instance 2 Instance 3 Required information Is the monitored server local or remote? If remote.

except for those instances that are explicitly excluded and those that are already configured. However. This option is best for a small number of instances. The ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG application represents an automatic configuration feature. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 85 . discovery identifies all of the instances that it can. and applies the configuration specified in a file to all instances on the host. but differ in their methods of configuration. When this application is loaded. The configuration is done in real-time.Configuration methods Figure 9 PATROL for Oracle configuration task flow Does Instance Configure list all instances on Oracle server host? Yes Configure instance on host No Are unlisted instances local or remote (does the host have a PATROL Agent?) Local (has Agent) Add the instance but do not specify service Remote (has no Agent) Add Instance and specify Service Configure instance on host Configuration methods PATROL for Oracle allows you to use different methods of configuration: I I I PATROL console-based configuration (also called the Advanced Configuration) Automatic configuration by loading and using ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. so any problems are discovered quickly. The PATROL console-based configuration allows you the most control and the most interactive configuration. this means that you must enter the data for each instance interactively.kml Batch Configuration Each method requires the same information.

wri file as a template Batch configuration file syntax The batch configuration file should be formatted in three columns. You can create a file in two ways: I I use the Create Batch Template menu command in PATROL for Oracle create a text file in a text editor. but any difficulties with configuration that arise require that you research the logs and revise the text file. I Batch configuration Batch configuration uses a configuration file that you can create from within PATROL for Oracle. using the pipe character (|) as the separator. Once this file has been created. or outside of PATROL. the InstanceStatus parameter detects and runs the batch configuration text file during the next polling cycle. The configuration file contains the settings for all the instances that you want to configure. The columns should be in the following form: 86 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . using the sample_config. you can do one of the following options to allow PATROL to monitor the instances: I Use the same version of Oracle on both the local and the remote instance Use the highest version of Oracle on the local instance to communicate with the remote instance. the InstanceStatus parameter scans for the existence of the configuration file. all the instances defined in the configuration file are configured at one time. This allows for quick and unattended configuration. When the file is activated by the InstanceStatus parameter in the ORACLE application.Batch configuration The Batch Configuration allows you to create a text file that contains the configuration information for the Oracle instances. You must end each row with a separator. Once the file is completed and saved. using the information in the configuration file. it automatically starts the configuration process. Configuring multiple Oracle installations on Microsoft Windows If a Microsoft Windows computer has multiple Oracle for Microsoft Windows installations with different $ORACLE_HOME directories. Once it finds the file.

Batch configuration file syntax <sid>|<keyword>|value| There must be no spaces in the columns. the flag that triggers an alarm when the instance is offline. which is either a SYS or a DBA account password for the privileged account. The comment character (# ) can be used only in the following two circumstances: I I at the beginning or end of a row directly before the category value in the CATEGORIES keyword row The following lines demonstrate the proper syntax for comments: #ORCL|DB_USER|patrol| ORCL|CATEGORIES|AVAILABILITY COLLECTORS #LOG CAPACITY| The keywords you can use are listed in the following table: Table 8 Keyword DB_USER DB_PASSWD PRIV_USER PRIV_PASSWD ALWAYS_ON_LINE MONITORING Batch configuration keywords (part 1 of 2) Description username for the PATROL account for Oracle that you created password for the PATROL account for Oracle. default) or 0 (FALSE). username of the privileged account. You can use either the PATROL encrypted string or plain text. DEF_TABLESPACE DEF_TMP_TABLESPACE default tablespace for the PATROL account default TEMP tablespace for the PATROL account Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 87 . The values are either 1 (TRUE. indicates whether monitoring is enabled for this SID Values are 1 (TRUE. You can use either the PATROL encrypted string or plain text. default) or 0 (FALSE).

The default tablespace is USERS. the ORACLE_HOME. ora816|DB_USER|patrol| ora816|DB_PASSWD|FB0A195D60626300| ora816|PRIV_USER|SYS| 88 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Microsoft Windows. Since this is a local UNIX instance. You can select from the following categories: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I CATEGORIES CAPACITY DB_LINKS ENVIRONMENT JOBS LOG MTS NETWORK PERFORMANCE PQO REPLICATION SGA SQLVIEWER TABLESPACES USERS ORA_DB (for OpenVMS only ) ORACLE_HOME directory where the orauser_dbname. or remote instances. and the temporary tablespace is TEMP.Batch configuration file syntax Table 8 Keyword Batch configuration keywords (part 2 of 2) Description categories to use to monitor the instance The default categories are AVAILABILITY and COLLECTORS. ORA_DB.com file is located. CONNECT_STRING Service name or connect string for a remote database SID Example files This section provides examples for the following scenarios: I I a local instance a remote instance Local instance batch configuration example The following example illustrates a batch configuration file for the instance SID ora816. using the monitoring category CAPACITY. normally located under the ORA_ROOT directory $ORACLE_HOME for the SID This keyword may be necessary for OpenVMS. and the CONNECT_STRING keyword values are not necessary.

In this example. Creating a batch configuration file Use either of the subtasks described in this task to create a batch configuration file. PATROL for Oracle automatically formats the SID as follows: sid@ConnectString. neo901s1|DB_USER|patrol| neo901s1|DB_PASSWD|FB0A195D60626300| neo901s1|PRIV_USER|SYS| neo901s1|PRIV_PASSWD|63DB00D4E96AE020| neo901s1|ALWAYS_ON_LINE|1| neo901s1|MONITORING|1| neo901s1|DEF_TABLESPACE|USERS| neo901s1|DEF_TMP_TABLESPACE|TEMP| neo901s1|CATEGORIES|AVAILABILITY COLLECTORS CAPACITY DB_LINKS ENVIRONMENT JOBS LOG MTS NETWORK PERFORMANCE PQO REPLICATION SGA SQLVIEWER TABLESPACES USERS| #neo901s1|ORA_DB|| #for VMS only neo901s1|ORACLE_HOME|/usr/oracle/8.1.Creating a batch configuration file ora816|PRIV_PASSWD|63DB00D4E96AE020| ora816|ALWAYS_ON_LINE|1| ora816|MONITORING|1| ora816|DEF_TABLESPACE|USERS| ora816|DEF_TMP_TABLESPACE|TEMP| ora816|CATEGORIES|AVAILABILITY COLLECTORS CAPACITY| #ora816|ORACLE_HOME|| #ora816|CONNECT_STRING|| #ora816|ORA_DB|| #for VMS only Remote instance batch configuration example NOTE Enter the SID and the Connect String in separate lines. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 89 . the SID becomes neo901s1@neon_neo901s1.5| neo901s1|CONNECT_STRING|neon_neo901s1| NOTE The $ORACLE_HOME is the local directory where the PATROL Agent is running.

You can open the file in a word processing program. the filename is changed to ora_batch_conf<port_number>. and another SID is processed. 2 Enter the following information for the servers you want to configure. I To create a batch configuration file from outside PATROL 1 From the $PATROL_INSTALL/oracle/conf directory. and click Apply. and then changed to ora_batch_conf<port_number>. 90 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .done when processing is completed. starts processing the file to configure the instances on that PATROL agent port. Do not use a reserved Oracle user such as SYS or SYSTEM. The filename is changed to ora_batch_conf<port_number>. Table 9 Field SID DB User Batch config template dialog box fIelds Description the SID that you want to configure the username to use for the PATROL database account. If there is an error during processing. The InstanceStatus collector parameter in the ORACLE application class must be set to active. 3 Save the file as ora_batch_conf<port_number>. The PATROL account should be used exclusively for PATROL You must surround the entry with double-quotation marks. To create a batch configuration file from the PATROL console 1 Choose Configuration => Create Batch Template from the ORACLE menu to display the Batch Config Template dialog box. Configuring an instance should take less than 30 minutes. and when found. open the sample_config.wri file. in a text only format.Creating a batch configuration file Before you begin I The PATROL Account for the operating system must have read and write permissions to the $PATROL_INSTALL/oracle/conf directory.configuring during processing. 2 Edit the SID and the keyword values to reflect the instances you want to configure.err. If configuring an instance takes longer than 30 minutes. PATROL presumes that the process is hung.txt. but the word processing program must allow you to save the file in a text only format. The InstanceStatus collector parameter searches for this file.

4 When you are finished. If there is an error during processing. DB Password Confirm DB Password Privileged User the password to use for the PATROL database account for confirmation either the SYS account for the instance. it is not referenced or used by PATROL after the configuration has successfully completed.com file is located. Make sure that you add _batch to the name and change the file type to . The filename is changed to ora_batch_conf<port_number>.done when processing is completed.tpl file with a text editor.txt as a text-only file. The default is SYSTEM the temporary tablespace you want to use for the PATROL database account.Creating a batch configuration file Table 9 Field Batch config template dialog box fIelds Description the password to use for the PATROL database account You must surround the entry with double-quotation marks. and when found. and then changed to ora_batch_conf<port_number>. Privileged User Password Confirm Privileged Password Default Tablespace Temporary Tablespace the password to use for the privileged account the password to use for the privileged account for confirmation the tablespace to use for the PATROL database account.configuring during processing. click Exit. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 91 . or an account with the DBA role The SYS account is used only for configuration. The InstanceStatus collector parameter searches for this file.tpl file. 5 Open the ora_conf<port_number>.err. Windows. normally the ORA_ROOT directory $ORACLE_HOME for the SID service name or connect string for remote databases 6 Close and save the file as ora_batch_conf<port_number>. The default is TEMP 3 You must click Apply to store the information to the ora_conf<port_number>. the filename is changed to ora_batch_conf<port_number>. or a remote instance) CONNECT_STRING Value directory where the orauser_<dbname>. The information for each SID is in one section. Edit the section to specify the following information: Keyword ORA_DB (for OpenVMS only) ORACLE_HOME (for OpenVMS. starts processing the file to configure the instances for the PATROL agent port.txt.

$ cd ${PATROL_HOME}/oracle/AutoDBConfig 2 Enter the following: $ sqlplus ‘DBA ACCOUNT/DBA PASSWORD AS SYSDBA’ The following displays: SQL> start ORACreateUser. 5 When John Smith logs into the system at the OS level. Before using the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG function. Configuring an instance should take less than 30 minutes. to create an OS-validated account for John Smith. Automatic configuration The ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG function automatically applies a predefined configuration to all instances on a host. Using sqlplus to create PATROL database user ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG requires an OS authenticated account. enter a username. He should then be able to connect to the Oracle database by entering the following: 92 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . such a user has an Oracle account named after the OS user with ops$ prepended. you must have created an OS authenticated user. Auto config supports only a user that is validated by the operating system (OS).sql 3 When prompted. 4 When prompted. PATROL presumes that the process is hung. For example. The user is created. You can perform that procedure using sqlplus. and another SID is processed. enter default and temporary tablespaces. you would create one called ops$jsmith. Use the following procedure to create that user. Typically.Automatic configuration If configuring an instance takes longer than 30 minutes. he enters jsmith and his OS password to log in. To create a PATROL database user via sqlplus 1 Open a command line and navigate to the AutoDBConfig directory.

Overview of the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG application $ sqlplus / The following should display: SQL> Overview of the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG application When you load the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. The default_auto_config. Once the user has been created. prepares the instance and the Oracle KM for monitoring by installing the required p$objects.txt file is similar to the batch configuration file. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 93 . the Activate parameter fails to connect to the instance.) — once connection is successful. see “Using sqlplus to create PATROL database user” on page 92. the PATROL for Oracle user creates the p$objects. Once the configuration is complete. the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG application parameters perform the following tasks: I Configure parameter performs the following tasks: — identifies all of the instances it can and creates a list — removes from the list any instances that you explicitly excluded from monitoring — removes from the list any instances that you already configured — verifies the values entered for the CATEGORIES and CUSTOMLISTENERCONFIGLOCS variables and goes into an alarm if it cannot verify these values — applies the configuration settings found in the default_auto_conf_agentPortNumber. except that it applies the same configuration settings to all instances that are not already configured or excluded on a host.txt file to all instances remaining on the list I Activate parameter performs the following tasks: — attempts to connect to each instance that is set up by the Configure parameter but is not yet active (If it fails to connect. See “Using sqlplus to create PATROL database user” on page 92.kml file. If you have not created a user through sqlplus. the instances are not monitored until PATROL for Oracle successfully connects to a specified user and the objects and privileges it requires are in place and verified.

Each entry at the instance level should have 3 columns (instance. except that it does not specify a separate set of configuration variables for each instance.txt file also works with the ORACLE_ETSM applications to define the tablespaces for the ETSM applications. 1 Using these guidelines. as in the following example: MONITORING|1| I I Separate values with a space. keyword. except for those instances that are already configured or specifically excluded.txt file. NOTE The default_auto_config. It specifies the configuration variables that are used to configure all instances on a host.txt file to configure instances. you can ignore these settings if you do not want to use or have not loaded the ORACLE_ETSM. To modify the default_auto_config. Each entry at the host level should have 2 columns. 94 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 3 Rename the file to default_auto_conf_agentPortNumber. The default_auto_config.txt file is similar to the batch configuration file. 2 Save the default_auto_config. For more information.txt file Use the following guidelines when entering the values: I The auto configuration process configures the instances discovered on the local host.txt. as in the following example: Oracle1|UNDO_TBS|tbs1 tbs2 tbs3| I I A pipe should always follow the list of values. see “Using the ETSM applications to monitor tablespaces” on page 188.txt file The ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG application applies the variables set in the default_auto_config. enter the correct values for each variable.kml component.txt file Using the default_auto_config. and value) and each column is separated by a pipe. However. and each column is separated by a pipe.Using the default_auto_config.

txt file and their values. rollback.txt file. override the logic in discovery that determines which containers they would go into by default. Table 10 Variable Variables in the default_auto_config.. NOTE The variables such as Default_TBS. If you do not define the ETSM tablespace types in the default_auto_config.txt file (part 1 of 2) Values 1 = InstanceStatus parameter goes into alarm if the instance goes offline for any reason 0 = nothing happens if the instance goes offline ALWAYS_ON_LINE|value| MONITORING|value| 1 = instance is enabled for monitoring 0 = instance is not enabled for monitoring CATEGORIES|value| application classes that you want the instances to monitor By default. see “Using the ETSM applications to monitor tablespaces” on page 188.txt file Variables in the default_auto_config. EXCLUDE_SID|value| name of the instances (SID) that you want to exclude from the automatic configuration process For example: EXCLUDE_SID|Inst1 Inst2| Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 95 . or temp are put into those specialized containers first. the AVAILABILITY and COLLECTORS application classes are monitored. etc.txt file The following table contains the variables in the default_auto_config. and then the remaining tablespaces are placed into the regular container. read-only.Using the default_auto_config. Large_TBS. For more information. tablespaces identified as undo.

VERY_LARGE_TABLESPACE_SIZE|value| number of bytes that a tablespace must exceed before it is defined as a very large tablespace This variable defines the size of very large tablespaces for all instances.Using the default_auto_config. you must modify it to work with your system. inst_name|DEFAULT_TBS|value| inst_name|LARGE_TBS|value| inst_name|VERY_LARGE_TBS|value| inst_name|READONLY_TBS|value| inst_name|ROLLBACK_TBS|value| inst_name|TEMPORARY_TBS|value| inst_name|UNDO_TBS|value| names of tablespaces that you want to define as the default or REGULAR tablespaces names of tablespaces that you want to define as large tablespaces names of tablespaces that you want to define as very large tablespaces names of tablespaces that you want to define as readonly tablespaces names of tablespaces that you want to define as rollback tablespaces names of tablespaces that you want to define as temporary tablespaces names of tablespaces that you want to define as undo tablespaces 96 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .ora files and their locations is activated Note: The default script was written for a specific system. ORANET uses the list created to discover listeners.txt file (part 2 of 2) Values 1 = script that creates a list of all fully qualified listener.txt file Table 10 Variable Variables in the default_auto_config. If you want to use this script. 0 = script is not activated CUSTOMLISTENERCONFIGLOCS|value| LARGE_TABLESPACE_SIZE|value| number of bytes that a tablespace must exceed before it is defined as large This variable defines the size of large tablespaces for all instances. The script is located in PATROL_HOME/oracle/oranet and it is called: locate_lsnr_configs.

and you want to apply those changes to existing instances. 4. The Configure parameter only applies the auto default configuration settings to new instances. Select the Enable OS Authentication check box. 3. you cannot modify the configuration by changing the default_auto_config. but you must select Enable OS Authentication in the Modify Instance dialog box. Table 11 Task Adding instances Configuring instances for monitoring Configuration tasks Page 98 99 Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 97 .Modifying instances that were automatically configured Modifying instances that were automatically configured After instances are configured using the AUTO_CONFIG feature.sql again (See “Using sqlplus to create PATROL database user” on page 92) You can use the Modify command to modify individual instances that were configured via auto configuration.txt file. Therefore. Use the following steps from the Modify Instance dialog box: 1. In the Username field. enter the default tablespace name. Leave the Password field and the Confirm Password field blank. 5.txt file settings. 6. PATROL advanced configuration This method allows you to configure an instance in real-time from within PATROL. if you change the default_auto_config. In the Default field. enter the user name as OPS$<os_authenticated_username>. 2. Click Apply. Use this method of configuration if you have a small number of servers to configure. you must do the following: I I I remove the instances you want to modify re-add them so that the Configure parameter detects them as new run the ORACreateUser. enter the default tablespace name. or if you want to immediately deal with any configuration problems. In the Temporary field. Table 11 lists the advanced configuration tasks.

choose Configuration => Advanced => Instance Add. To add instances 1 From the ORACLE menu. you must add the information for the instance to the registry using the task “Adding instances” on page 98. you must add all instances using the task “Adding instances” on page 98 before any instances can be discovered.Instance discovery Table 11 Task Configuration tasks Page 103 104 105 108 109 111 112 Configuring instances in restricted mode for monitoring Enabling and disabling instance monitoring Modifying instance configuration Modifying category monitoring for an instance Viewing instance configuration settings Removing instances Configuring failover monitoring Instance discovery All Oracle instances on Microsoft Windows computers are automatically discovered from the registry if you have installed and loaded the PATROL KM for Windows Knowledge Module. Remote instances are instances that PATROL for Oracle connects to Oracle Net. The SQL*Net connect string or Service name is defined in the tnsnames. If the instance is not in the registry. you must add the instance before configuring the instance. add the instance using the task “Adding instances” on page 98. all instances are automatically discovered from either the oratab file. On OpenVMS.ora file. If an instance is not discovered. You can also use this function to add a remote instance. On UNIX. 2 Enter the following information into the Add Instances dialog box: 98 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . If an instance is a remote instance. Adding instances Use this task to add Oracle instances that do not appear in the configuration list.ora file. or from the init.

Go to “Configuring instances for monitoring” on page 99. ensure that a database account created strictly for PATROL exists. you must add instances as described in “Adding instances” on page 98. Configuring instances for monitoring This task configures PATROL for Oracle to monitor specific Oracle instances. I I Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 99 . 4 Click Exit to exit this function. you might have to perform some additional steps. add the C privilege by using pconfig. have that table available. If you have used Table 7 on page 84 to organize your information. you must configure PATROL monitoring for the instance. If not.ora file) 3 Click Apply. Before you begin I If an instance on the server does not appear in the Configuration Instances box. If you are configuring multiple instances of Oracle for Microsoft Windows on one host. Before you begin.Configuring instances for monitoring For a local instance: I name of the instance on the host I $ORACLE_HOME directory on the local server running a PATROL Agent I For a remote instance: I name of the instance I $ORACLE_HOME directory on the local server running a PATROL Agent I the service name or the connect string for the remote instance (the alias name for the instance in the tnsnames. Refer to “Configuration task flow” on page 84 for more instructions. Where to go from here Once you have added the instance to the configuration list. All PATROL objects are installed into this account. Verify that the PATROL Agent configuration variable AccessControlList has the ‘C’ (configure) privilege assigned.

that instance is not configured. The Privileged Account Information dialog box appears. PATROL uses this account to create the PATROL account and install the PATROL database objects.remote hostname.chicago. The Configure Instances dialog box displays all instances that are available for configuration. and the remote Oracle SID is inventory. 2 Select the instance or instances to configure. the PATROL user and password. The following table summarizes information about each account: 100 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . If you selected multiple instances to configure and did not select the Same configuration check box. you must enter the configuration information for each instance one at a time. I Select the Same configuration check box to configure multiple instances with the same database account and options. The service name generally uses the syntax Remote Oracle SID. If you select many instances but do not select this check box. 4 Enter the name and the password for the privileged account to use to configure the Oracle account for PATROL. or the default and temporary tablespace. These instances include all instances that PATROL for Oracle has discovered and any instances that you may have added by using the Instance Add menu command.Configuring instances for monitoring To configure instances for monitoring 1 From the ORACLE menu. choose Configuration => Advanced => Instance Configure. Select the List of tablespaces check box to list the tablespaces in the instance in a text box for reference. the tablespaces for each instance that is being configured is listed one at a time. If the Service is listed as <NIL>. the instance is a local instance. the service name uses the connect string inventory. You can use either the SYS account for the instance or an account with the DBA role. If any of the selected tablespaces cannot support the SYS or DBA username and password. the tablespaces from only the first selected instance are listed. if the remote hostname is chicago.ora file used for connecting to a remote instance. For example. If you selected multiple instances to configure and selected Same configuration. The Service is the alias defined in the tnsnames. I I I I I 3 Click Accept.

be sure to specify an existing tablespace. I If you select Enable Instance Monitoring. If you select Always On Line. and messages inform you of any problems or errors. but you must explicitly enable monitoring on the instance. Enable OS Authentication. In addition. the instance is modified. If you select Enable OS Authentication. 6 Click Exit to close the Privileged Account Information dialog box. When specifying the default tablespace and temporary tablespace. and Enable ASM Storage check boxes. the instance is configured and discovered.Configuring instances for monitoring SYS account full functionality for PATROL for Oracle “grant select’ only on certain SYS-owned objects that PATROL interacts with DBA account full functionality except for the Buffer Cache Report ‘grant select any’ given to the PATROL account for Oracle 5 Click Apply. The Enable OS Authentication option authenticates your PATROL account. I 8 Select or clear the Enable Instance Monitoring. I I Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 101 . Always On Line. You must close the Privileged Account information dialog box before configuration can continue. If you do not select this check box. The PATROL account should be used exclusively for PATROL. 7 Type the following information: I I I the user name and password for the PATROL account the default tablespace for the PATROL account the temporary tablespace for the PATROL account NOTE I You must surround the entry with double-quotation marks. The account username and password are verified. This instance was originally configured by using automatic configuration feature. The Database Account dialog box for the instance appears. the instance is discovered and monitored by PATROL. PATROL goes into an alarm state if the instance goes offline for any reason. do not use a reserved Oracle user such as SYS or SYSTEM as the PATROL account.

verifies the tablespaces that you have entered. and you need to enter the following details regarding the ASM instance: I I I ASM Instance name ASM home directory ASM SYS password 9 Select only the categories that you want to monitor the instance. NOTE Until you have properly exited all configuration dialog boxes. using the privileged account user name and password. If an error occurs If the Oracle account that you want to use for PATROL already exists (perhaps from an earlier installation). and reports the results in the Messages section of the dialog box. and the PATROL objects are installed on each instance. The PATROL account is created. the instance does not appear and discovery does not start. To monitor all categories. ASM Instance Information dialog box will appear. the ASM storage support is enabled. 10 Click Apply. the instance is discovered and its icon appears in the ORACLE container in the next polling cycle. These categories are always enabled and do not appear in the list. 12 Click Exit to exit this function. PATROL logs onto each instance. or you can select individual categories from the list. AVAILABILITY and COLLECTORS are the default categories for all instances. select Select All Categories. it no longer appears in the configuration list as available for configuration. PATROL updates the account and installs the new database objects on it. NOTE If you click Apply after selecting the Enable ASM Storage option. After an instance is configured. 11 Click Exit to close the Configure Instances Database Account dialog box. If an instance has been enabled for monitoring.Configuring instances for monitoring I If you select Enable ASM Storage. 102 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

The console starts the wpconfig utility. PATROL for Oracle does not monitor instances that are in restricted mode. Go to “Enabling and disabling instance monitoring” on page 104. PATROL performs a drop cascade on the new account and deletes the database objects and the new account.InstanceID. If you need to modify the instance configuration.InstanceID. and the Oracle account for PATROL already existed. you must enable the monitoring for the instance. Configuring instances in restricted mode for monitoring By default.restrictSessionEnabled variable. and the Oracle account for PATROL did not exist. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 103 . go to “Modifying instance configuration” on page 105 or “Viewing instance configuration settings” on page 109. If an instance is in restricted mode and the ORACLE_INSTANCE. To configure instances in restricted mode for monitoring 1 Choose Development => Agent Configuration from the PATROL Agent menu. 2 Click the AgentSetup folder in the left pane to display the variables in the AgentSetup folder in the right pane. establishes the SQL session and collectors can collect data. If an error occurs during configuration.restrictSessionEnabled variable is enabled: I I I the InstanceStatus parameter is in OK state for that instance the ConnectDB parameter goes into an ALARM state OracleStatus parameter will be in OK state. PATROL deletes only the new database objects. PATROL does not delete the Oracle account. by enabling the ORACLE_INSTANCE. since InstanceStatus is in OK state NOTE Enabling monitoring for instances in restricted mode. To enable monitoring for instances in restricted mode. Where to go from here If you have configured the instance but did not enable monitoring. See “To configure instances in restricted mode for monitoring” on page 103. and the wpconfig window is displayed.Configuring instances in restricted mode for monitoring If an error occurs during configuration.

104 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 4 Double-click the highlighted REPLACE line in the Change Entries field. 12 Close the wpconfig window.Enabling and disabling instance monitoring 3 Scroll down the variable list and double-click the ORACLE_INSTANCE. the instance is still configured. 11 Save your changes to the configuration change file by clicking Save. 1 From the ORACLE menu. 5 Leave REPLACE in the Type field. Enabling and disabling instance monitoring Use this task to start or stop PATROL for Oracle monitoring for an instance. select an instance or instances from the Instances Being Disabled list box and click Accept. The Change Entry dialog box is displayed. The left side of the Enable/Disable Instance Monitoring dialog box lists all instances that have been configured and are being monitored. 9 Choose Apply Configuration from the Tools menu. 6 Type YES in the Value field. 8 Click OK to close the Modify Variable dialog box. If you disable monitoring of the instance. The Apply Configuration dialog box lists the PATROL Agent host name to which you are connected. The Modify Variable dialog box is displayed. 2 Enable or disable monitoring as necessary: I To enable monitoring for an instance. 7 Click OK to close the Change Entry dialog box. The right side lists all instances that have been configured but are not being monitored. choose Configuration => Advanced => Monitor Enable/Disable.InstanceID.restrictSessionEnabled variable. 10 Click OK to apply your updated configuration to the PATROL Agent.

you cannot modify the configuration by changing the default_auto_config. You can also modify the settings for the PATROL database account on an instance. This account is used to configure PATROL to monitor instances. but you must select Enable OS Authentication in the Modify Instance dialog box. Therefore. Modifying instance configuration Use this task to modify the configuration settings for an instance.txt file settings. The instance name is moved from the left side to the right side and is no longer being monitored. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 105 .Modifying instance configuration The instance name is moved from the right side to the left side and is now enabled for monitoring. the instance icon disappears from the ORACLE container in the next discovery cycle. you must remove the instances you want to modify and re-add them so that the Configure parameter detects them as new. the instance is discovered and its icon appears in the ORACLE container in the next polling cycle. Where to go from here Now you can start monitoring the instance. 3 Click Exit to exit this function. if you change the default_auto_config. If an instance has been enabled. If an instance has been disabled. select an instance or instances from the Instances Being Enabled list box and click Accept. The Configure parameter only applies the auto default configuration settings to new instances. NOTE After instances are configured using the AUTO_CONFIG feature. You can use the Instance Modify command to modify individual instances that were configured via auto configuration. as shown in Table 12. I To disable monitoring for an instance. Before you begin Review the results of modifying an instance configuration.txt file.

Change options no change (the modify configuration task is run but no changes are made to the account information) password changed PATROL performs an Oracle ALTER USER command on the PATROL account to change the password. default tablespace changed username changed PATROL creates a new PATROL account for the new username. The Modify Instances dialog box displays all configured instances. Nothing else is changed. PATROL uses this account to modify the PATROL account and the PATROL database objects. 3 In the Privileged Account Information dialog box.Modifying instance configuration Table 12 PATROL account modification results Result PATROL performs an Oracle ALTER USER command on the PATROL account. If any of the database objects are missing or invalid. enter the name and the password for the privileged account to use to access the Oracle account for PATROL and click Apply. and a new set of database objects are created on the default tablespace. with all its database objects intact. PATROL creates a new set of database objects on the new tablespace. 106 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . the objects are deleted and re-created. 4 Click Exit to close the Privileged Account Information dialog box. The old objects on the old tablespace still exist. but they are not accessible to the PATROL account. 2 Select the instance that you want to modify and click Accept. If all database objects exist. choose Configuration => Advanced => Instance Modify. To modify instances 1 From the ORACLE menu. keeping the tablespace and account information. Any new category settings or monitoring settings are updated. and messages inform you of any problems or errors. The old PATROL account still exists. and any new monitoring or categories settings are updated. nothing is changed. You can use either the SYS account for the instance or a DBA account. The account username and password are verified.

I I I NOTE If you click Apply after selecting the Enable ASM Storage option. and they do not appear on the list. Enable OS Authentication. If you select Enable ASM Storage. ASM Instance Information dialog box will appear. 8 Click Apply. This instance was originally configured by using automatic configuration feature. If you select Always On Line. the instance is discovered and monitored by PATROL. the ASM storage support is enabled. These categories are always enabled. If you do not select this check box. or you can select individual categories from the list. I If you select Enable Instance Monitoring. select Select All Categories. but you must explicitly enable monitoring on the instance. PATROL modifies the account or objects. To enable all categories. 9 Click Exit to close the Database Account dialog box.Modifying instance configuration 5 In the Database Account dialog box. and you need to enter the following details regarding the ASM instance: I I I ASM Instance name ASM home directory ASM SYS password 7 Select the categories that you want monitoring the instance. AVAILABILITY and COLLECTORS are the default categories for all instances. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 107 . Always On Line. 10 Click Exit to exit this function. and Enable ASM Storage check boxes. the instance is modified. the instance is configured and discovered. Depending on what you have changed. The Enable OS Authentication option authenticates your PATROL account. PATROL goes into an alarm state if the instance goes offline for any reason. If you select Enable OS Authentication. type the following information: I I I the user name and password for the PATROL account the default tablespace for the PATROL account the temporary tablespace for the PATROL account 6 Select or clear the Enable Instance Monitoring.

I I I 108 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . The left side lists all categories that are currently monitoring the instance. If you select Always On Line. Modifying category monitoring for an instance Use this task to modify the category monitoring for a single instance. Before you begin The instance must have been configured to be monitored by PATROL. Where to go from here If you have configured the instance but did not enable monitoring. The Enable OS Authentication option authenticates your PATROL account. This instance was originally configured by using automatic configuration feature. Enable OS Authentication. If you select Enable OS Authentication. the instance is automatically discovered or its icons is deleted according to their monitoring status. If you select Enable ASM Storage.Modifying category monitoring for an instance After you have modified the instance. 2 Select or clear the Enable Instance Monitoring. the instance is monitored by PATROL. I If you select Enable Instance Monitoring. PATROL goes into an alarm state if the instance goes offline for any reason. The Instance dialog box displays the categories that are currently monitoring the instance. the ASM storage support is enabled. the instance is not monitored. the instance is modified. you must enable the monitoring for the instances. The category is the application class that monitors certain functions for the instance. choose KM Admin => Monitor Settings Modify. If you do not select this check box. To modify category monitoring for an instance 1 From the INSTANCE menu for the instance whose category monitoring you want to change. Go to “Enabling and disabling instance monitoring” on page 104. The right side lists all categories that are not enabled for monitoring the instance. and Enable ASM Storage check boxes. Always On Line.

the icon for the disabled category is deleted from the INSTANCE container and the collector parameters for that category are disabled as well. ASM Instance Information dialog box will appear. and click Apply. and you need to enter the following details regarding the ASM instance: I I I ASM Instance name ASM home directory ASM SYS password 3 Select the categories on the right side that you want enable to monitor the instance. It can take two polling cycles for the category parameters to become active.Viewing instance configuration settings NOTE If you click Apply after selecting the Enable ASM Storage option. If you disable a category. The categories are moved from the left side (enabled) to the right side (not enabled). The collector parameters for the category collect information and populate the consumer parameters during the next polling cycle. The categories are moved from the right side (not enabled) to the left side (enabled). 4 Select any categories on the left side that you want to disable from monitoring the instance. 5 Click Exit to exit this function. and click Apply. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 109 . You can view the information either in a dialog box or in the task output window for later copying or editing. The category applications that you selected appear in the INSTANCE container. Viewing instance configuration settings Use this task to view PATROL configuration information for an instance or instances. Where to go from here Now you can start monitoring the instance.

NOTE If a report is longer than 40 lines. it is automatically displayed in a text window. You cannot print this box. To view the configuration for one instance 1 Select an INSTANCE application instance for which you want information and choose Reports => KM Configuration from the INSTANCE menu for the selected instance. The report appears in a task output window or in a response box. choose Configuration => Advanced => Monitor Settings List from the ORACLE menu. 5 Click Close to close the List Monitoring Settings of Instances dialog box. 6 Click Close to exit the function. 2 Click Close to close the response box. The configuration settings are displayed in a response box. 3 Click Close to exit the function. The configured instances are displayed in the List Monitoring Settings of Instances dialog box. I Text Window displays the report information in a task output window. 110 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . or select the List All Instances check box. 4 Click Apply. 3 Select the output mode for the report: I Response Window displays the report information in a response box. 2 Select the instances whose configuration information you want to see. You can open this report in a text editor for printing.Viewing instance configuration settings To view the configuration for an instance or instances 1 From the ORACLE menu.

2 Select the instance or instances you want to remove and click Accept. You must add the instance again to have it available for configuration. The instances are removed according to the following rules: I If the instance was added by using the Add Instance menu command. 3 Enter the password for the privileged account that was used to create the PATROL account. and click Apply. and then remove it. See “Removing an instance from HTML reporting” on page 269. the instance is discarded. you must first remove it from HTML Reporting. I 4 Click Exit to exit this function. Before you begin If you are removing an instance that you have disabled from monitoring. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 111 . Deleting a configured instance makes the instance available for configuration. See “Enabling and disabling instance monitoring” on page 104. If the instance was configured. it is removed from the monitored instances list.Removing instances Removing instances Use this task to delete instances from the configuration listing or remove instances from PATROL. To remove an instance 1 From the ORACLE menu. If you remove an instance that you have configured for HTML Reporting. Removing an instance removes the Oracle-related agent configuration variables and drops the P$-related objects within the database owned by the PATROL account. The instance remains in the list of instances that are available for configuration. It does not drop the PATROL account. Any instances that were added using the Add Instance function are also listed. The Remove Instances dialog box displays the configured instances that are available for removal. you must first enable the instance. choose Configuration => Advanced => Instance Removal.

“Configuring failover monitoring” on page 112 describes how to set up PATROL to monitor the failover instance. You are connected to and monitoring the primary instance from PATROL. Failover monitoring You can use the failover monitoring option provided by the ORACLE application and the advanced failover monitoring option provided by the ORACLE_FAILOVER application to monitor Oracle instances in a failover or cluster environment. This is done by using the Failover Monitoring => Configure command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. and PATROL for Oracle are running on the primary instance. A PATROL Agent and PATROL for Oracle are installed on the failover instance. Configuring failover monitoring Use the following task to set up failover monitoring. see “Failover and cluster monitoring scenarios” on page 38. Oracle. I I I 112 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . you can configure ORACLE_FAILOVER to automatically disable the instance on the secondary machine to avoid InstanceStatus going into an alarm state. the PATROL history for each instance is interrupted. Because the PATROL Agent is not running in the cluster-specific mode.Failover monitoring Where to go from here You can later monitor the instance by using the steps in “Adding instances” on page 98 and “Configuring instances for monitoring” on page 99. For a description of how PATROL for Oracle monitors failover and clustering environments. To use failover monitoring. When the failover instance comes online during a failover. Before you begin You must meet the following requirements: I A PATROL Agent. You should use the same user name and password for PATROL on the failover instance and the primary instance. The PATROL Agent is running on the failover instance when you set up failover monitoring on the primary instance. you must establish the PATROL link between the primary instance and the failover instance.

NOTE This dialog box appears only the first time you configure a failover instance. 2 In the dialog box. enter the following information: I I I I the host name of the failover instance the PATROL Agent port number for the failover instance the Oracle SID of the failover instance the Oracle home directory of the failover instance 3 Click Accept. The Configure [instance] for Failover Monitoring dialog box is displayed. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 113 . choose KM Admin => Failover Monitoring => Configure. and all PATROL for Oracle configuration information is transferred to the failover computer. 4 Provide the following information and click Accept: Table 13 Field Backup Host Name Backup Agent Port Backup Oracle SID Backup Oracle Home Configure [instance] for Failover Monitoring dialog box fIelds Description enter the computer name for the failover instance enter the port number for the PATROL Agent on the failover instance computer enter the Oracle SID for the failover instance enter the Oracle home directory for the failover instance A link is established.Configuring failover monitoring NOTE The ORACLE_FAILOVER application I I does not work in a RAC environment is available only in a UNIX environment To configure a failover instance 1 From the ORACLE_INSTANCE application menu for the primary instance.

If you do not want the InstanceStatus parameter to go into an alarm state when a failover occurs. Advanced failover monitoring with the FOBGPMonitor parameter 1 In pre-discovery. You can implement advanced failover monitoring with one of the following parameters: I I FOBGPMonitor parameter (the default option requiring no setup). deactivate FOBGPMonitor first and then activate the FOMonitor parameter. users. which is advanced failover monitoring. depending on the instance’s online 24x7 status. To use the FOMonitor parameter. The InstanceStatus parameter for the primary instance goes into an alarm or warning state. including category and 24x7 monitoring all exclusions for database objects. See “Advanced failover monitoring with the FOMonitor parameter” on page 116. and tablespaces all users selected for monitoring Configuring advanced failover monitoring When the primary instance goes down. NOTE Make sure that only one of these parameters is running at a time.Configuring failover monitoring 5 Verify that the following pconfig variables have been successfully transferred to the failover computer: I I I all configuration settings. FOMonitor parameter (an option requiring setup). See “Advanced failover monitoring with the FOBGPMonitor parameter” on page 114. and the failover instance comes online. you can configure automatic monitoring on the failover computer by using the ORACLE_FAILOVER application. The FOMonitor parameter is inactive by default. whereas the FOBGPMonitor parameter is active by default. NOTE Advanced failover monitoring is available in UNIX environments only. the following conditions must be true: I PATROL for Oracle is installed There are instances configured for failover by using the Instance => KM Admin => Failover Monitoring => Configure menu command I 114 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . the InstanceStatus parameter for the failover instance goes into the OK state.

the following actions occur: A. FOBGPMonitor. and then B by parsing instance names from those process names. The parameter goes into a warning state until its next poll cycle. you can set up notifications. B. and then click Apply. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 115 . runs every sixty seconds. I If the instance is running. NOTE If you want to be notified of such an occurrence. The parameter goes into a warning state for one poll cycle before being reset. the parameter determines whether the instance under consideration is running on the current host: I If the instance is not running on the current host. These events occur in pairs: one indicating the instance going down on one host and another indicating the instance coming up on the other host. but was not running during the previous poll cycle. NOTE If you want to be notified of such an occurrence. If the instance is still not running during the next poll cycle. C.Configuring failover monitoring 2 When these conditions are true. Monitoring for that instance is enabled B. 4 After discovery is complete. 3 From the Oracle icon menu of the failover host. choose KM Commands => KM Admin => Configuration => Advanced => Monitor Enable/Disable command. and the instance was running during the previous poll cycle. Monitoring for that instance is disabled. The parameter looks for Oracle instances that are running: A by searching for the dbw* background processes. the parameter is reset to the OK state. you can set up notifications. the AuxFailoverMonitor application instance appears under the ORACLE application. 5 Using this process list. select the instance to exclude. the following actions occur: A. the standard parameter. One or the other showing up alone indicates a problem.

whereas the FOBGPMonitor parameter makes its determination based on where the instance is seen. 6 In the Variable field. an application and the disks it uses are associated with a package. When a failover occurs. The pconfig window is displayed. The Add Variable dialog box is displayed. for example.kml on the primary computer. This is a slightly stronger monitoring option than the monitoring option provided by the FOBGPMonitor parameter. This can be the Oracle home. 4 From the host name of the primary instance. However. defining the Oracle home as the directory does not work. The FOMonitor parameter looks for one of the application disks and uses the visibility of that disk to determine whether to activate monitoring. 116 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .Configuring failover monitoring Advanced failover monitoring with the FOMonitor parameter Failover environments such as HP ServiceGuard and Solaris Clustering allow for the definition of packages or logical hosts. 3 Activate the FOMonitor parameter. The FOMonitor parameter determines where the instance should be running based on the presence of the disk. enter /OracleConfig/<ora_sid>/FailoverMonitoring/siddirpairslist. Where <ora_sid> is the Oracle instance identifier. 2 Deactivate the FOBGPMonitor parameter under the AuxFailoverMonitor icon. If the instance is down on all hosts. In this case. The InstanceStatus parameter could. You need to indicate the directory for the parameter to use for each instance. However. no monitoring occurs at all. right-click and choose Development => Agent Configuration. the relevant disks and packages are unmounted from the first host and mounted to the host to which the application moves. if the Oracle installation is on a common disk or is duplicated across local disks and is not part of the disks defined in the package. To configure advanced failover monitoring with the FOMonitor parameter 1 Load ORACLE_FAILOVER. go into alarm if the disk is mounted and the instance did not come up. the FOMonitor parameter requires setting up. 5 In the pconfig window. For information about setting up the FOMonitor parameter. choose Edit => Add Variable. see “To configure advanced failover monitoring with the FOMonitor parameter” on page 116.

activate tracing by using the Activate Tracing menu command available from the AuxFailoverMonitor icon. right-click the Oracle instance icon and choose KM Commands => KM Admin => Debug and set the Debug option to YES. For example. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 117 . After that. the FOMonitor parameter goes into a warning state on each host for sixty seconds. the parameter resets to OK until a failback or another failover occurs. for an Oracle instance whose SID is Prod01 and an application specific disk /app/prod01/data that is part of the failover package containing the Oracle instance. use the Deactivate Tracing menu command. which contains the FOMonitor parameter. install the PATROL KM for OPS on both the primary node and the secondary node in the same cluster. but InstanceStatus will be green. To deactivate tracing. The instance icon also appears on the failover computer.Configuring failover monitoring 7 In the Value field. is displayed in the PATROL console window. Both Nodes must use the same Oracle account for PATROL and must be running a local Oracle database instance. The AuxFailoverMonitor icon. enter the following value in the Value field: Prod01:/app/prod01/data 8 Click Apply Configuration. After a failover. This command writes debugging information to the system output window. Oracle Parallel Server and failover You can also monitor failover in an Oracle OPS cluster. Debugging failover monitoring To debug failover monitoring. To debug advanced failover monitoring. where SID denotes the Oracle instance identifier and directory_name denotes a directory that is visible only on the host on which the Oracle instance (SID) is running. enter failover instance names and their respective directories in the format SID:directory_name. but the InstanceStatus parameter is in a warning state. The following items must be installed on all nodes in the cluster: I I I I PATROL Agent PATROL KM for OS component PATROL for Oracle PATROL KM for Oracle Parallel Server NOTE For a basic failover scenario.

I On the server whose failover operation you want to monitor. Ensure you use the same database account as the primary node. Node 1 Instance 1 Node 2 Instance2 Node 3 Instance 3 PATROL OS KM PATROL KM for OPS PATROL for Oracle PATROL Agent PATROL OS KM PATROL for Oracle PATROL Agent PATROL for Oracle PATROL Agent Instance 1 Configure the instance using Instance Configure command from the ORACLE menu. In this scenario. 118 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Install the OPS objects using the PATROL Admin => Install PATROL DB Objects from the ORACLEPARALLELSERVER cluster menu. Instance 1. Configure the PATROL KM for OPS on any member of the cluster by installing the PATROL KM for OPS objects onto the server. I See the PATROL Knowledge Module for Oracle Parallel Server User Guide for more information about this component. Figure 10 Oracle Parallel Server configuration: basic failover Instance 1.Configuring failover monitoring Figure 10 on page 118 shows where to put each component if the PATROL Agent in its normal state is used. and Instance 3 are all members of an OPS cluster. In addition. Instance 1 fails over to Instance 3 if necessary. perform the Failover Monitoring=>Configure command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. Instance 1 fails over to Instance 3. and 3 are all members of the same cluster. including the one you want to act as the failover support computer. Configure the failover to Instance 3 by using the Failover Monitoring=>Configure command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. 2. In addition. Instance 2. Database Instance 2 Configure Instance 2 and 3 using Instance Configure command from the ORACLE menu. I Configure PATROL for Oracle on each node in the cluster.

either PIPE or FILE whether the channel is SHARED or NOT SHARED the read PID of the PSL process waiting to read from the channel. An excessive number of simultaneous requests for locks can block or choke the global channel. To reset the global channel for all instances 1 From the ORACLE menu. The following information for each global channel is displayed: Item Global Channel Name Status File/PID Description name given to the global channel when it was created or when it was changed from a local channel to a global channel current status of the global channel. you can unblock the global channel by using the following tasks to reset it. choose Global Channel Reset. or UNAVAILABLE if a process is waiting but the name is not available Type Scope Read PID Read Name Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 119 . The Global Channels dialog box lists all global channels for all instances.If a problem occurs in configuration If a problem occurs in configuration The following tasks can help you to troubleshoot any problems that occur while configuring PATROL for Oracle: Table 14 Task Resetting the global channel Setting debugging options Uninstalling PATROL objects Deactivating parameters Troubleshooting configuration tasks Page 119 120 123 124 Resetting the global channel The global channel provides a single connection between the PATROL Agent and the PATROL console. if one exists the name of the PSL waiting to read from the channel: NONE if no process is waiting. either open or closed either the file name that is opened or the process ID of the external operating system process to which the channel is attached type of the channel. When this occurs.

see the appropriate log file: I I For the batch configuration log file. Debug displays all messages from both PATROL and Oracle in a text window. 120 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . choose KM Admin => Global Channel Reset. choose Debug. For the configuration log files. see the $PATROL_HOME/./oracle/conf file.. Setting debugging options Use this task to set the options for the debugging function. The selected global channel is reset. 3 Click Cancel to exit this function. To set general debugging options 1 From the ORACLE menu./oracle/log file. For the automatic configuration log file. or UNAVAILABLE if a process is waiting but the name is not available 2 Select the global channel to reset and click Accept. To reset the global channel for a specific instance 1 From the INSTANCE menu. 2 Select the global channel to reset and click Accept. 3 Click Cancel to exit this function. The Set Debug Mode dialog box displays the debugging options. The Global Channels dialog box lists all open global channels for the selected instance. if one exists the name of the PSL waiting to write to the channel: NONE if no process is waiting. see the $PATROL_HOME/. This information can be useful for troubleshooting your installation or configuration.. The selected global channel is reset.Setting debugging options Item Write PID Write Name Description the write PID of the PSL process waiting to write to the channel.

enter the following command: %PSL pconfig("REPLACE". 0). enter the following command in the system output window: %PSL pconfig("REPLACE". "/OracleConfig/FILE_DEBUG". When the instance is discovered or configured. "/OracleConfig/dir_location". "c:\\abc"). I Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 121 . "/tmp"). "/OracleConfig/dir_location". NOTE I The debug information is written to the specified location with the file naming convention of HOST_NAME_InstanceStatus. 3 Select the Instance Configuration check box if you want debugging information for configuring an instance or modifying an instance’s configuration.Setting debugging options 2 Select the Instance Discovery check box if you want debugging information for discovering the instance. To save debug information to a file To write the debug in external file when the InstanceStatus parameter goes into an alarm state: 1 In the system output window. "/OracleConfig/dir_location". "/OracleConfig/FILE_DEBUG". "/OracleConfig/dir_location". 4 Click Accept. 2 To specify the directory where the file containing debug information should be stored. the debugging messages appear in a task output window. "<Drive>:\\<Directory>"). "/<Directory>"). The options are applied. For example: %PSL pconfig("REPLACE". 1). enter the following command in the system output window: On Windows: %PSL pconfig("REPLACE". For example: %PSL pconfig("REPLACE". 5 Click Exit to exit the function. To disable this feature. On UNIX: %PSL pconfig("REPLACE".

the debug information for that parameter is displayed in a task output window. EXAMPLE If the debugging option for a collector is OFF. every time the collector parameter collects information. The Set Debug Mode dialog box displays the current debugging settings for the instance. 3 Select a collector parameter. click Exit. the option is set for all menu items. choose KM Admin => Debug. 122 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . right-click the ORACLE application and choose KM Commands => Debug => Instance Configuration for GUI. 5 To exit the function.Setting debugging options To set debugging options for an instance 1 From the INSTANCE menu. NOTE If you select Yes. 4 To apply the debugging options that you selected. To debug the InstanceStatus parameter To debug the InstanceStatus parameter. To debug the graphical user interface To debug the graphical user interface. You can set options for the following items: I I menu commands used on the instance collector parameters for the instance 2 Select Yes to select the debugging option for menu commands. Every menu item that can print a debugging message does so. click Accept. If debug for a parameter is on. right-click the ORACLE application and choose KM Commands => Debug => InstanceStatus. select a parameter to set the debugging output to ON.

If you uninstall the PATROL objects. right-click the ORANET application icon and choose KM Commands => Discovery Debug => On. choose KM Admin => PATROL DB Object Install. 2 Enter the privileged user name and password that was used to create the PATROL account and install the PATROL objects (SYS or DBA). type the following command in the system output window: %PSL set(“/ORACLE_INSTANCE/<instance_name>/debug_chan”. Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 123 . and parameter icons remain visible in the console. All parameter history is retained. To reinstall the PATROL Database objects 1 From the INSTANCE menu. choose KM Admin => PATROL DB Object Deinstall. you may need to uninstall and then reinstall the PATROL database objects. In this case. is not deleted. and click Apply. PATROL performs no more parameter monitoring. unless objects other than PATROL objects exist in the PATROL account. and the parameters reflect the state that they were in at the time the database objects were uninstalled. however. 2 Enter the privileged user name and password that was used to create the PATROL account and install the PATROL objects (SYS or DBA). All messages appear in a text window. The application class. To deinstall the PATROL objects 1 From the INSTANCE menu. the PATROL account is not dropped. Uninstalling PATROL objects If the database objects become corrupted or are deleted. all PATROL objects and the PATROL account are dropped. 3 Click Exit to exit the function. 1).Uninstalling PATROL objects To debug discovery in the ORANET application To debug full discovery in the ORANET application. instance. To debug a channel To debug a channel. and click Apply. The instance configuration. parameter monitoring resumes. After you uninstall the objects. After you install the objects. The PATROL DB objects are uninstalled.

Deactivating a consumer parameter only stops that parameter from accepting the data sent to it by the collector that sets its value. 2 Right-click the parameter that you want to deactivate. To deactivate parameters with the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows 1 From the KM tab in the left or tree view. Before deactivating a consumer or collector parameter. Some collector parameters also trigger unwanted recovery actions when they cannot find a deactivated consumer. To deactivate parameters with the PATROL Console for UNIX 1 Choose Attributes => Application Classes from the menu bar. However. 124 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . see the “Collector-consumer dependencies” in the PATROL for Oracle online Help To deactivate parameters and parameter alarms across an enterprise. and choose Properties from the pop-up menu. see the PATROL for Oracle User Guide and the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide. and see “Using PATROL Configuration Manager to manage parameters” on page 144 for information about how to use the PATROL Configuration Manager to manage parameters in PATROL for Oracle. Deactivating parameters To reduce the impact on your system resources and enhance performance. 3 Select one or more parameters. and choose Options => Deactivate. the collector that sets the deactivated consumer parameter sends an error message to the System Output Window each time that collector attempts to send information to the deactivated consumer parameter. 2 Select the application class. go to the application class that contains the parameter you want to deactivate and choose Global => Parameters.Deactivating parameters 3 Click Exit to exit the function. 3 Deselect Active. and choose Attributes => Parameters. A deactivated consumer parameter does not appear in the console and does not go into an alarm or warning state. you can deactivate parameters that you do not want to see.

Monitoring ASM instances Monitoring ASM instances Automatic Storage Management (ASM) is a feature of Oracle 10g that you can use as a volume manager to manage and store Oracle database files. This flag is also available during instance modification. If an instance is using ASM for storing its data files or archive log files. then during configuration you must enable the Enable ASM Storage check box. so the ASM-monitoring features of PATROL for Oracle do not support OpenVMS. and archive log files. For ASM instance.2 and later. Figure 11 on page 126 displays the nested hierarchy for ASM: Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 125 . redo log files. control files. providing data for the I I I I I ASM instance online disk group for each monitored ASM instance parameters related to disk group space opened or cached online disks under each disk group parameters related to disk space NOTE Oracle 10g is not supported for HP OpenVMS. The ASM-monitoring features of PATROL for Oracle are supported on Oracle 10. you must configure the instance from the ORACLE_ASM icon. PATROL for Oracle monitors configured ASM instances.

prefix the instance name with +. To configure an ASM instance 1 Choose the ORACLE_ASM => ASM Instance Configure menu command from the host. 2 In the ASM Instance name field. NOTE Auto-configuration and batch configuration are not supported in the ASM-monitoring features of PATROL for Oracle. 126 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . enter the ASM instance name.Configuring an ASM instance Figure 11 Icon hierarchy for ASM Configuring an ASM instance A SYS account is required to configure an ASM instance for montoring. The ASM Instance Configure dialog box appears.

keep the default user name as SYS. keep the default user name as SYS. disk group parameters. 4 In the Username field. It will also delete the respective pconfig variables. enter the ASM home directory. The ASM instance will be removed from monitoring. 7 Click Exit. type the password. 6 Click Exit. 5 Click Apply. type the password. enter the ASM instance name you want to remove. The ASM Instance Remove dialog box appears. 5 In the Password field. 2 In the ASM Instance name field. 4 In the Password field. To remove an ASM instance 1 Select ORACLE_ASM => ASM Instance Remove menu command from the host. 6 Click Apply. PATROL for Oracle will remove the ASM Instance and its child objects – disk groups.ASM parameters 3 In the ASM Home field. ASM parameters Table 15 lists the parameters that PATROL for Oracle uses to monitor the ASM. and disk parameters from monitoring. 3 In the Username field. Table 15 FreeMb FreeMbPct UsedMb UsedMbPct UsableFileMb ASM parameters (part 1 of 2) Disk parameter FreeMb FreeMbPct UsedMb UsedMbPct DiskIOReads Disk group parameter Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 127 . prefix the instance name with +. disk.

Table 17 ASM menu commands Description configures an ASM instance removes an ASM instance turns on instance configuration debugging turns off instance configuration debugging turns on ASM discovery debugging turns off ASM discovery debugging turns on ASM instance collector debugging turns off ASM instance collector debugging Menu command ORACLE_ASM => ASM Instance Configure ORACLE_ASM => ASM Instance Remove ORACLE_ASM => Debug => Instance Configuration => ON ORACLE_ASM => Debug => Instance Configuration => OFF ORACLE_ASM => Debug => ASM Discovery => ON ORACLE_ASM => Debug => ASM Discovery => OFF Oracle_ASM_Instance => Debug => CollASM => ON Oracle_ASM_Instance => Debug => CollASM => OFF 128 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .ASM menu commands Table 15 ASM parameters (part 2 of 2) Disk parameter DiskIOWrites DiskReads DiskWrites Disk group parameter ActualFreeMb Table 16 lists the parameters that the ASM-monitoring feature of PATROL for Oracle supports: Table 16 Parameter ArchFreeSpace CannotExtend ArchFreeSpace ArchFreeSpaceOptional Parameters supported in the ASM-monitoring feature Application class ORACLE_AVAILABILITY ORACLE_ARCHIVE ASM menu commands Table 17 lists the ASM menu commands for PATROL for Oracle that support ASM monitoring.

Where to go from here Where to go from here The following table suggests other topics that you should read next: Topic how to use PATROL Configuration Manager with PATROL for Oracle to change configuration variables or parameter properties how to use Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle how to monitor the tablespace capacity and user activity on an Oracle instance using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor instance health using PATROL for Oracle Source of information Chapter 4. users. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration” on page 131 Chapter 5. and SQL statements” on page 179 Chapter 7. “Monitoring Oracle options” on page PATROL for Oracle 271 how to monitor the the RAC environment Chapter 9. InfoBoxes. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 Chapter 3 Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle 129 . Appendix A. and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293 how to access the KM menu commands. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 instructions for installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls Appendix C. “Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle” on page 157 Chapter 6. and online Help InfoBoxes. “Monitoring instance health” on page 225 how to monitor Oracle options using the Chapter 8. “Accessing menu commands. “Monitoring tablespaces.

Where to go from here 130 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

. . . . . . . ConfigUpdate parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation and setup requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuration data not stored in pconfig variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the ConfigUpdate parameter . . . . Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify or remove an instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing parameter thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using PATROL Configuration Manager to manage parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting the archive option to save a backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deactivating parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing parameter polling cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding how the ConfigUpdate parameter operates . Application classes with status changes set in code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the rule and rule set examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring PATROL for Oracle instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 132 132 133 134 134 134 135 136 136 137 139 140 143 144 145 147 148 149 150 153 154 Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 131 . . Moving rule sets to the PATROL Configuration Manager directory . . . . .Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 4 This chapter presents the following topics: Overview of PATROL Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuration variables that are for internal use only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . Modifying or removing a configured instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying parameter properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying the blackout configuration variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PATROL Configuration Manager uses rules and rule sets to manage PATROL Agents on multiple hosts.4.Overview of PATROL Configuration Manager Overview of PATROL Configuration Manager The PATROL Configuration Manager component is intended for use by PATROL administrators. Installation and setup requirements The general requirements for installing PATROL Configuration Manager and the PATROL KM for Event Management are set out in the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide version 1. see “Verifying installation requirements” on page 46. 132 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . PATROL for Oracle requires the following setup considerations for PATROL Configuration Manager: I I make sure that the Save Backup Before Apply option is selected move the rules and rule sets created specifically for PATROL for Oracle to the appropriate directory Setting the archive option to save a backup Check the configuration settings in PATROL Configuration Manager to make sure that the following archive option is selected before making any changes to PATROL for Oracle: Save Backup Before Apply This option is set as the default during configuration of PATROL Configuration Manager. This chapter assumes that you have successfully installed and configured the following components: I I PATROL Configuration Manager PATROL Knowledge Module for Event Management This chapter also assumes that you know how to set up a host and operate PATROL Configuration Manager and PATROL KM for Event Management. Make sure that it remains selected as the backup option. and it appears as an option in other PATROL Configuration Manager dialog boxes as well. and database administrators.01. For more information on general requirements for PATROL for Oracle. system administrators.

3 Make sure that Save Backup Before Apply is selected.4. or as examples of how rule sets are constructed and used. Before you can use these rules and rule sets.r.Moving rule sets to the PATROL Configuration Manager directory To select archiive option in PATROL Configuration Manager version 1.cfg files are installed in one of the following folders: I I (Windows)PATROLInstallationDirectory\Patrol3\oracle\rulesets (UNIX)PATROLInstallationDirectory/Patrol3/oracle/rulesets You must move 1 set of these . which contain rules and rule sets. these .01 1 Select FileConfigure from the main menu to open the Configuration dialog box. Some of these rule sets are required to perform certain changes. 2 Select the Archives tab to open the Backup Settings.cfg files to the appropriate folder.cfg files. you must move these .mm (UNIX)PATROLInstallationDirectory/pconfmgr/rulesets/Shipped/POK_v. 4 Click OK to save the settings and close the dialog box.mm Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 133 . several . are also installed.cfg files to the computer where PATROL Configuration Manager is installed and from which you plan to manage your PATROL for Oracle environment. Every time you install PATROL for Oracle on a console computer. and others are optional rule sets that you can use as described. Moving rule sets to the PATROL Configuration Manager directory When you install PATROL for Oracle.r. and into one of the following folders located on that computer: I I (Windows)PATROLInstallationDirectory\pconfmgr\rulesets\Shipped\POK_v.

POKKMConfigUpdated /OracleConfig. the ConfigUpdate Parameter performs as follows: 1 The ConfigUpdate parameter checks (every 10 minutes. by default) for the POKKMConfigUpdated and POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved rules. I I Understanding how the ConfigUpdate parameter operates When one or both of the rules are applied to a rule set. If a rule set modifies an instance configuration variable or a parameter and removes an instance. add both the POKKMConfigUpdated and the POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved rules to the rule set. See “Moving rule sets to the PATROL Configuration Manager directory” on page 133. the ConfigUpdate parameter changes from a default value of 0 to one of the following values: 134 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . If a rule set removes an instance. The parameter does this by looking for one or both of the following rules: I I /OracleConfig. then add the POKKMConfigUpdated rule to the rule set. add the POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved rule to the rule set.POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved These rules are among the rules and rule sets shipped with PATROL for Oracle. you must add one or both of these rules to the rule sets using the following guidelines: I If a rule set changes an instance configuration variable or a parameter. 2 Upon detection of one or both of these rules. Using the ConfigUpdate parameter When you make a change to the instance configuration variables or parameters by using PATROL Configuration Manager.ConfigUpdate parameter ConfigUpdate parameter The ConfigUpdate parameter provided by PATROL for Oracle under the ORACLE application class checks for changes made to the PATROL for Oracle configuration variables and parameters through the PATROL Configuration Manager.

If this parameter goes into a warning state. the ConfigUpdate parameter returns to a value of 0. C If an update request fails the validation tests performed by PATROL for Oracle. You cannot use PATROL Configuration Manager to perform the initial configuration of PATROL for Oracle instances. This causes the instance icons to disappear briefly and then reappear. the ConfigUpdate parameter sets a value of 1 and goes into a warning state to let you know that a change was sent through the PATROL Configuration Manager. B Removes the POKKMConfigUpdated and POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved rules or variables from the instance. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 135 . the parameter goes into an alarm state and it sets a value of 3. 3 Upon detection of the POKKMConfigUpdated or POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved rule. B If an instance removal request is applied. 4 After completion of 1 polling cycle (by default. the ConfigUpdate parameter sets a value of 2 and goes into a warning state to let you know that an instance removal request was sent through the PATROL Configuration Manager. 10 minutes). Configuring PATROL for Oracle instances You must configure each PATROL for Oracle instance separately using either batch configuration or the Instance Configure menu command. NOTE When an instance is removed by using PATROL Configuration Manager. and only some validations are performed for updates. PATROL for Oracle does not remove the Oracle account or the objects owned by that Oracle account from the Oracle database. you must verify that the removal or update was successful for each instance where it was applied. the ConfigUpdate parameter takes the following actions: A Forces the Oracle KM to deactivate and reactivate the monitoring of each configured and actively monitored instance.Configuring PATROL for Oracle instances A If an update request is applied. You can only use PATROL Configuration Manager to modify instances that were previously configured. even instances that were not modified. WARNING No validation is performed for requests for removal.

For a list of those objects. When you remove an instance using PATROL Configuration Manager. However. you cannot change the variables and application classes listed in the following topics: I I I “Configuration data not stored in pconfig variable” “Configuration variables that are for internal use only” on page 137 “Application classes with status changes set in code” on page 139 The following procedure for modifying or removing a configured Oracle instance employs the strengths of the KM and PATROL Configuration Manager: “Modifying or removing a configured instance” on page 140 Also included in this section is a topic about how to modify the Blackout variable: “Modifying the blackout configuration variable” on page 143. Configuration data not stored in pconfig variable The following configuration information for PATROL for Oracle is not stored with the PATROL configuration variables: I I P$OBJ_EXCLUSION—a table that contains information about object exclusions. 136 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . You must remove those objects.Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify or remove an instance Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify or remove an instance You can modify or remove a configured instance by using either the PATROL Configuration Manager or by changing the variables through menu commands in an instance. SmartDBA product. Inc. see “Pconfig variables” on page 334.P$POK_CFG—a table used to provide integration with the BMC Software. For more information on these objects. These objects are used by PATROL for Oracle and alteration of these objects can harm the operation of PATROL for Oracle. see Appendix B. Do not delete or modify these objects. see “PATROL for Oracle database objects” on page 321. the PATROL for Oracle objects are not removed from the Oracle database. SYS. For a complete list of the PATROL configuration variables and the strings that they generate. “PATROL database objects” on page 317.

ORACLE_SID.Configuration variables that are for internal use only Configuration variables that are for internal use only Some variables are created for internal use only.defaultAccount /AgentSetup/ORACLE_DATAGUARD_DATABASE. start time of the SQLViewer collector stop time of the SQLViewer collector temporary default account stores the type of standby.kml.deactivatedByKM indicates whether the ArchFreeSpace parameter was deactivated by the KM indicates whether the TempTSLeftPct and TempTSLeft parameters were deactivated by the KM Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 137 . ORACLE_SID. standbyInstanceName. whether through PATROL Configuration Manager or manually.defaultAccount standby instance /AgentSetup/ORACLE_SQLVIEWER.DBHome /DGConfig.standbyInstanceName.monDGDBList /DGConfig.collectorRunning /AgentSetup/ORACLE_SQLVIEWER. ORACLE_SID. ORACLE_SID.collStartTime /AgentSetup/ORACLE_SQLVIEWER.primaryDatabaseName.defaultAccount /AgentSetup/ORACLE_DATAGUARD_INSTANCE.primaryInstanceName.collStopTime /AgentSetup/ORACLE. /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY.active /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY. tempTSparams.temp.sid.monDGInstType /DGConfig. defaultAccount /DGConfig.monDGInstList /DGConfig.DBName indicates whether the collector for SQL Viewer is running. and that you should never delete or modify.standbyInstanceName. ORACLE_SID. Table 18 Variables that are for internal use only (part 1 of 3) Description specifies a default username and password combination for the application class (ORACLE_ CATEGORY) in its name stores the sys user password of the configured standby instance Configuration variable /AgentSetup/ORACLE_CATEGORY.defaultAccount configured primary instance in Oracle KM /AgentSetup/ORACLE_DATAGUARD_DATABASE. stores the sys user password of the configured standbyInstanceName. stores the PATROL database user password of the primaryInstanceName. it can be physical or logical indicates the TNS entry of a standby instance stores the list of configured database names of the primary instances stores the names of the standby instances configured for a primary database ORACLE HOME of primary instance stores the database name of primary instance This pconfig gets created only when primary instance is configured with auto db configuration in ORACLE. These variables are used by PATROL for Oracle and alteration of these variables can harm the operation of PATROL for Oracle.primaryInstanceName.TNSService /DGConfig. Table 18 lists the configuration variables that are for internal use only.ArchFreeSpace.

DBAUsername /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID.tempOSTableExists /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY.ORACLE_LISTENER. SCHEMA NAME.TableExists /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. that the collector need not create this table. Listener.ORACLE_SID.kmactive /ORACLE_INSTANCE.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. identical to SID number of privileges granted to patrol user indicates whether recovery is set Configuration variable /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY.Configuration variables that are for internal use only Table 18 Variables that are for internal use only (part 2 of 3) Description indicates that the p$temp_os_space table exists.DIRECTORY /OracleConfig. ALTERNEXT.temp.AlternateListenerName /OracleConfig.Name /OracleConfig. dbObjectsDeinstalled /OracleConfig. FailoverMonitoring.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. ORACLE_SID. ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID.kmactive /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY.OBJECT NAME /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID.Active /OracleConfig. localInstance /OracleConfig.FailoverMonitoring.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. that the collector need not create the table.NumPrivs /OracleConfig.Failover Monitoring. AlertFileInfo_size /OracleConfig. AlertFileInfo_eof_pos /OracleConfig. FreeSpaceDeficit. ORACLE_SID. directory where archive log is moved when the current archive destination is full time of last configuration or reconfiguration activity for the ORACLE_SID instance username of the dba account used to configure the KM for ORACLE_SID name of the database indicates whether the database objects have been deinstalled alternate listener for failover monitoring local listener name for failover monitoring name of database. RECOVERY 138 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . ORACLE_SID.FreeSpace.LocalFailoverListenerName /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID.DBName /OracleConfig. ARCHIVELOG. and that the collector can count on the presence of this table indicates whether the FreeSpace parameter was deactivated by the KM indicates whether the FreeSpaceDeficit parameter was deactivated by the KM indicates whether an instance is monitored locally or remotely indicates whether the named listener is a part of the Failover Configuration indicates the end of the file for the alert log last time the alert log was modified size of the Alert Log indicates whether the KM is set to alter the next extent of the object in the schema if there is a space problem. and that the collector can count on the presence of this table indicates that the p$temp_ts_space table exists.ORACLE_SID>.ORACLE_SID. ConfigTime /OracleConfig. AlertFileInfo_modtime /OracleConfig.

error (except ORA-02019) is returned from Oracle.PackageList /OracleConfig.SessTimeStamp /OracleConfig. and it is set to offline if ORA-01029 is detected. views. Any status changes made in PATROL Configuration Manager are overwritten by these state change functions: I ORACLE_DB_LINKS_INSTANCE is directly set to alarm if any ORA-.ARCHIVELOG /OracleConfig.ObjectsList /OracleConfig. RECOVERY. TNS-. I I I I ORACLE_MTS ORACLE_PQO ORACLE_REPLICATION ORANET_LISTENER The following application classes are acted upon by internal state change functions.TimeStamp /OracleConfig. or PLS.ORACLE_SID.PackageBodyList /OracleConfig. synonyms) created by instance configuration list of package bodies created by instance configuration list of packages created by instance configuration time of completion of last activity for session settings time of completion of last activity for instance configuration time of completion of last activity for User settings Configuration variable /OracleConfig.UsrTimeStamp Application classes with status changes set in code The following application classes are activated or deactivated when the features they monitor are active in Oracle. or MOVE (create new destination for log file) list of database objects (tables. Status changes made in PATROL Configuration Manager are overwritten by the internal status. I Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 139 . ORACLE-TBSP_INST (Tablespace Instance) is set to OFFLINE if the Oracle instance detects that the subject tablespace is offline and to OK if the Oracle instance detects that the subject tablespace is online.Application classes with status changes set in code Table 18 Variables that are for internal use only (part 3 of 3) Description indicates which action PATROL for Oracle performs when the archive log destination is full: compress (compress log files).

you must apply the following rules to the rule sets created in PATROL Configuration Manager before they are applied to a PATROL for Oracle instance.Modifying or removing a configured instance Modifying or removing a configured instance The following procedure for modifying and removing configured instances employs the strengths of the KM and PATROL Configuration Manager: I I I I make changes in one instance through the menu commands test the changes in that instance until satisfied that the changes operate as expected export the modified variables to PATROL Configuration Manager deploy the modified variables to other instances through the PATROL Configuration Manager This method takes advantage of the validations performed by PATROL for Oracle and gives you the opportunity to verify that the changes perform as expected before deploying those changes throughout your environment. 140 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .cfg file. 2 Copy the OracleConfig. 4 Paste the OracleConfig.POKKMConfigUpdated = {REPLACE = “1”} rule. 1 Open the POKKMConfigUpdate. 5 Apply the rule set to the instance.POKKMConfigUpdated = {REPLACE = “1”} rule into the PATROL for Oracle rule set folder. No matter which method you use to modify or remove an instance. To apply the POKKMConfigUpdated rule to every rule set that modifies an instance or parameter You MUST add the POKKMConfigUpdate rule to every rule set that you create and apply to an Oracle instance that modifies any of the configuration variables or parameters for that instance. open the rule set folder that you created for the configuration changes you are currently applying to a PATROL for Oracle instance. This rule works with the ConfigUpdate parameter in PATROL for Oracle to keep you notified of any changes to the instance configuration variables. 3 In PATROL Configuration Manager.

cfg file. This rule works with the UpdateConfig parameter in PATROL for Oracle to keep you notified of any changes to the instance configuration variables.Modifying or removing a configured instance To apply the POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved rule to every rule set that removes an instance You MUST add the POKKMConfigRemoveInstance rule to every rule set that you create and apply that removes an Oracle instance. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 141 . open the rule set folder that you created for the configuration changes you are currently applying to a PATROL for Oracle instance. The Configuration => Get command copies the pconfig variables from the instance. 3 In PATROL Configuration Manager version 1.4. 3 In PATROL Configuration Manager.POKKMConfigRemoveInstance = {REPLACE = “1”} rule into the PATROL for Oracle rule set folder. and pastes them into the PATROL Configuration Manager in the following folder: Rule Sets\Change Spring\backup\hostName\instanceName\date-timestamp Figure 12 shows the menus that contain the Configuration => Get menu command in the left panel of PATROL Configuration Manager version 1.01. 1 Open the POKKMConfigRemoveInstance. 4 Paste the OracleConfig. 2 Copy the OracleConfig. 5 Drag and drop the rule set to the AgentHostName. converts them into rules.POKKMConfigRemoveInstance = {REPLACE = “1”} rule.4. right-click the AgentHostName that contains the modified configuration and choose the Configuration => Get from the menu. this rule set would include the /OracleConfig.Instances rule. The instance status is displayed in the Job Status Information dialog box.01 and an example of the rules that are displayed in the right panel after the Configuration => Get command finishes importing the variables from the instance. 2 Test the instance over a period of time to make sure that the instance you modified performs to your satisfaction. To remove an instance. The line that represents the instance turns green and OK is displayed in the Status field for the instance when the job has completed. To modify or remove an instance 1 Modify the configuration of one instance of PATROL for Oracle in a PATROL Developer console until it meets all of your specifications.

Modifying or removing a configured instance Figure 12 Get command in PATROL Configuration Manager 4 Select and copy all of the rules from the Rule Sets\Change Spring\backup\hostName\instanceName\date-timestamp directory (use the one with the most recent timestamp at the bottom of the list). The rules are given a timestamp and placed into the new folder: Rule Sets\Change Spring\newFolder\timestamp\ 6 Copy and paste the OracleConfig. choose Edit => Source from the menu. and find and replace the ORACLE_SID in the source with the name of the next Agent host name to which you want to apply the modified configuration. 2 Right-click the timestamp under this new folder. and Paste the rules.POKKMConfiguUpdated = {REPLACE = “1”} rule in with the other rules in the new rule set. 142 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 7 Drag and drop the new rule set on the AgentHostName. 8 Click the Apply Changes icon in the PATROL Configuration Manager menu bar. To deploy the configuration variables for a modified instance 1 Create a new folder under Rule Sets\Change Spring\(new folder) and copy and paste the same rules into this folder. 5 Create a folder in the following directory in PATROL Configuration Manager: Rule Sets\Change Spring\newFolder Highlight the new folder.

then use the output for that variable in PATROL Configuration Manager to apply that blackout period to other instances.and lower-case characters. To validate your changes you should set Blackout for one instance by using the Blackout menu command. the blackout information is stored in the /OracleConfig. and lasting for 60 minutes.Modifying the blackout configuration variable NOTE ORACLE_SID is case sensitive. test the blackout periods. 4 Click the Apply Changes icon in the PATROL Configuration Manager menu bar. and deploy the new variable throughout your environment. Modifying the blackout configuration variable Blackout periods set in PATROL Configuration Manager are not verified. add the POKKMConfigUpdated rule to the rule set that contains the blackout rule. if you set a server called Oracle1 for a blackout period on Monday starting at 1:00 a.m. The value created for the variable contains the following information in the following format: server_name day of the week start time in seconds after midnight duration of the blackout in minutes For example. you can set your blackout periods by using the PATROL for Oracle Blackout menu command. import the modified variable into PATROL Configuration Manager. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 143 . When you create a blackout period for an instance using the Blackout menu command from an ORACLE or ORACLE_INSTANCE menu.blackout variable: Oracle1 Monday 3600 60 You can change your blackout periods several ways: I In a PATROL Developer Console. Make sure that you enter both the old and the new instance names in the appropriate upper. 3 Drag and drop this rule set on the AgentHostName named in this Rule Set.blackout variable. the following value would display for the /OracleConfig. 5 Repeat steps 1 through 4 for each AgentHostName to which you want to apply the modified configuration.

“Do not change parameters with fixed thresholds” on page 147 The following topics provide guidelines and cautions with regard to changing parameters. Using PATROL Configuration Manager to manage parameters You can modify PATROL for Oracle parameters by using either the PATROL Configuration Manager or by changing the parameter properties in an instance. NOTE During a Blackout. see “Scheduling blackouts” on page 174. as described in the following topics: I I I “Parameters with their status set in code” on page 146.Using PATROL Configuration Manager to manage parameters I In PATROL Configuration Manager. NOTE Use only the PATROL Configuration Manager to update parameter details. there are restrictions to the modifications you can make to some PATROL for Oracle parameters. However. For more information about the Blackout feature in PATROL for Oracle. For a complete list of the values generated by variables. you can modify the example the rule set provided in the Blackout. add the POKKMConfigUpdated rule to the rule set that contains the blackout rule. “Reactivate parameters via PATROL Configuration Manager” on page 146. the ETSM instances under Oracle_ETSM are turned off. see “Pconfig variables” on page 334.cfg file installed with PATROL for Oracle. and the icons disappear. no matter which method you use: I I I “Deactivating parameters” on page 145 “Changing parameter thresholds” on page 147 “Changing parameter polling cycles” on page 148 144 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . and deploy the modifications throughout your environment.

For a complete list of the parameters and their default values. use the Reinitialize Agent feature in PATROL Configuration Manager to force deactivation. Deactivating parameters To reduce the impact on your system resources and enhance performance. For more information about the ETF parameters. NOTE If a parameter does not deactivate after following all suggestions and instructions. Collector parameters might also set off unwanted recovery actions if they cannot find a deactivated consumer parameter. you select which Categories or application classes are enabled to monitor the instance. However. require rule sets that help you configure and deactivate the ETF parameters in PATROL Configuration Manager. If you deactivate a collector parameter. A deactivated consumer parameter does not appear and does not go into an alarm or warning state. However. the ETF parameters. the collector parameter that sets the deactivated consumer parameter continues to send information to the deactivated consumer parameter. see the PATROL for Oracle online Help. the collector parameter continues to send data to the consumer parameter. the collector parameter stops collecting data for the consumer parameters it sets. you can deactivate parameters that are not commonly needed. or recovery actions. the collector notates the System Output Window with an error each time it attempts to send information to a deactivated consumer parameter. If you disable an application class. the consumer parameter no longer triggers any alarms. I I Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 145 . see “Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager” on page 150. see the online Help for PATROL for Oracle. Further. no parameters under that application class are displayed. warnings. Consider the following before deactivating a parameter: I If you disable only the alarms for a consumer parameter. However. because of their unusual makeup. During configuration.Deactivating parameters The following procedure for modifying parameters employs the strengths of the KM and PATROL Configuration Manager: “Modifying parameter properties” on page 149. and the consumer parameter continues to provide a view and history for that data. For more complete descriptions of the parameters.

Deactivating parameters Parameters with their status set in code The following parameters directly set their status. Table 19 Parameters that you must reactivate via PATROL Configuration Manager Parameter AutoExtended CannotExtend RSExtentsLeft RSExtentsLeftPct RSSpaceLeft RSSpaceLeftPct SystemTSLeft SystemTSLeftPct Application class ORACLE_TBS_INSTANCE ORACLE_AVAILABILITY 146 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . I I I Reactivate parameters via PATROL Configuration Manager Table 19 lists parameters that you must reactivate through PATROL Configuration Manager if you deactivated them through PATROL Configuration Manager. depending on whether the features associated with these application classes are active for the Oracle instance. TempTSLeft and TempTSLeftPct—these parameters are set offline when all temporary tablespaces are excluded from monitoring. The parameters under the ORACLE_MTS. and their status changes when conditions change. and ORACLE_REPLICATION application classes are offline or online. I Cannot Extend—the status for this parameter is set to OK when the parameter is set to active. ORACLE_PQO. These internal status changes overwrite whatever changes are made through PATROL Configuration Manager. and OFFLINE when the parameter is set to inactive. The ListenerTraceSize and ListenerLogSize parameters under the ORANET_LISTENER application class are offline or online depending upon whether tracing or logging is on or off.

Table 20 PATROL for Oracle parameters with fixed thresholds Parameters Alerts CannotExtend ConnectCheck ConnectDB FreeSpaceDeficit InstanceStatus SchedulerOutput ShutdownInProgress ListenerLog ListenerStatus ArchLogCreated ConfigUpdate InstanceCheck InstanceStatus OracleStatus find_problems StorageProblems StorageProblemsCnt AutoExtended ProblemUsers Application class Availability Listener Log Oracle SPACE_EXPERT_ORA SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_TS TBSP_INSTANCE USERS Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 147 . however. before changing thresholds. For example. you can change the thresholds for most of the PATROL for Oracle parameters.Changing parameter thresholds Changing parameter thresholds Using the PATROL Configuration Manager. For complete descriptions and the default values for these parameters. You should make changes to the thresholds in one instance and then test the results in that instance before exporting those changes throughout your entire enterprise. You should use caution. but are fixed at a particular value because that value is directly connected to the KM. see the online Help. Do not change parameters with fixed thresholds You cannot change parameters that have fixed thresholds. Table 20 provides a list of the PATROL for Oracle parameters that have fixed thresholds that you should never modify. Some PATROL for Oracle consumer parameters have thresholds that are not on a sliding scale. see the PATROL for Oracle online Help. PATROL for Oracle ships with the parameters set at thresholds that are appropriate for those parameters in the average environment. For a brief description and the default values for these parameters. all parameters that have a Boolean output are created to react only to a setting of 0 or 1.

look at the Debug output and find the Total Execution Time. use Debug to find the Query Execution Time before decreasing a poll time. you can change poll times. I I WARNING Changing the poll time for a standard or collector parameter to an amount of time that is shorter than the amount of time it takes to complete the execution of the query or collection command used by that parameter can cause the parameter to go into an infinite loop or other serious problems. To find the query execution time To find out how long it takes a collector or standard parameter to execute a query. Poll times must exceed the amount of time it takes to execute the query and allow time for the parameter to parse and distribute the data obtained before it must resend the query. Execution times can vary. When the parameter completes a polling cycle. The default poll times set for collector and standard parameters in PATROL for Oracle are calculated to collect sufficient data to appropriately monitor most systems. but do so with the following cautions in mind: I Increasing poll times could cause untimely notification of problems as they arise. If your system requires longer or shorter poll times. 148 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . so make sure that you find the longest possible execution time by running Debug on your busiest system during your busiest time. The poll time assigned to a collector or standard parameter sets the interval between executions of the query used by the parameter. Decreasing poll times increases the resources used by PATROL for Oracle. To avoid problems.Changing parameter polling cycles Changing parameter polling cycles Collector and standard parameters use queries to obtain data from a monitored server or database. turn Debug on for that parameter. which could lead to performance problems.

This method takes advantage of the validations performed by PATROL for Oracle and gives you the opportunity to verify that the changes perform as expected before deploying those changes throughout your environment. perform one of these actions: I I (Windows) Select the Scheduling tab. 3 To activate or deactivate a parameter. (UNIX) Click on the parameter and change the polling time. then click Global and then click Parameters to open the list of parameters provided by the selected application class. perform one of these actions: I I (Windows) Select the Border. (UNIX) Double-click the parameter. or Alarm 2. Select an application class. Alarm1. and make changes. click on Attributes and then on Application Classes to open a list of the application classes. 4 To change the interval between polling cycles.Modifying parameter properties Modifying parameter properties The following procedure for modifying parameters employs the strengths of the KM and PATROL Configuration Manager: I I I I Make changes in one instance through the parameter property dialog boxes. I 2 Right-click (Windows) or click (UNIX) the parameter you want to access the parameter properties. Export the modified parameter changes to PATROL Configuration Manager. then click on Attributes and then on Parameters to open the list of parameters provided by the selected application class. Alarm1. 1 Navigate to the parameter properties for the parameter you want to change: I In the PATROL Console for UNIX. and double-click Border. Test the changes in that instance to make sure that the changes operate as expected. (UNIX) Click Alarm Ranges. In the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows. perform one of these actions: I I (Windows) Select the General tab and select or clear Active. and Alarm2 tabs and make changes. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 149 . select the KM tree tab and expand the appropriate application class. 5 To change the alarm thresholds and disable the alarms. and select or clear Active. and change the polling time. Deploy the modified parameter changes to other instances through the PATROL Configuration Manager.

DisableETF. you cannot deactivate them through the usual PATROL mechanisms. convert the parameters in the instance to a rule set in PATROL Configuration Manager. change the 2 to a 1 or remove this rule and reinitialize the agent for the instance when you want to apply the changes. you can modify the pconfig variable that determines which of the ETF consumer parameters the CollETF collector parameter sets. The rules that represent each parameter contain the _ANYINST_ for the instance name. and these parameters depart from traditional PATROL mechanisms.Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager 6 Save the configuration by choosing File => Save Configuration.cfg—using this rule. see the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide. 9 Drag and drop the rule set to any other AgentHostName where you want the changes applied. Therefore. For more information. you can disable all of the ETF consumer parameters and the CollETF collector parameter.cfg—using this rule. Because these parameters depart from the usual PATROL mechanisms. The _ANYINST_ designation allows you to apply these changes to any instance without adding specific instance name. we have provided the following rule sets that you can use to configure and deactivate the ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager: I ConfigureETF. 7 Test the changes on the instance until you are satisfied that they are working. NOTE The following rule forces the instance to apply parameter changes immediately: “/AS/EVENTSPRING/PARAM_SETTINGS/STATUSFLAGS/ paramSettingsStatusFlag” ={REPLACE = “2”} If you do not want the changes to take place immediately. Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager PATROL for Oracle provides Estimated Time to Failure or ETF parameters. I 150 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 8 Using the PATROL KM for Event Management.

Reports how long until the background dump directory runs out of space. Reports how long until the non-excluded tablespaces run out of free space. or mount point that contains the user dump directory runs out of space. Table 21 lists the ETF parameters. If the ETF is 24 hours or less. Reports how long until the file system. and provides a date and time when the monitored resource is expected to fail. each ETF parameter goes into a warning or an alarm state. then the ETF parameter goes into an alarm state. ETF parameters under the Availability application ArchFreeSpaceETF ArchFreeSpace Reports how long until the primary archive destination device can no longer accommodate a new archive log in the amount of free space remaining. the parameters that they monitor and a description of the resource that each ETF parameter monitors. When the estimated time to failure is imminent. Reports how long until the SYSTEM tablespace runs out of space. Reports how many additional user sessions are allowed by the instance in its current configuration. Reports how long until the core dump directory runs out of space.Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager Overview of ETF parameters Each ETF parameter monitors the data provided by a key parameter and goes into an alert state whenever that data indicates that a failure is likely to occur on the resource that the key parameter monitors. ExtentsLeftETF ExtentsLeft FreeSpaceETF SystemTSLeftETF FreeSpace SystemTSLeft ETF parameters under the Capacity application BGDumpLeftETF CoreDumpLeftETF ProcsLeftETF SessionsLeftETF BGDumpLeft CoreDumpLeft ProcsLeft SessionsLeft UserDumpLeftETF UserDumpLeft Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 151 . If the ETF is 1 to 7 days. Reports how long until a non-excluded object in a non-excluded user schema can no longer accept additional extents. the ETF parameter goes into a warning state. device. Reports how long until the instance can support no more processes. Table 21 ETF parameters Parameter Description ETF parameter CollETF—This standard collector parameter sets the values for the ETF parameters under the Availability and Capacity parameters.

Parameter rule to any instance. By default.Parameter rule._ANYINST_. Edit the rule set to remove the following rule from the rule set: 152 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . but it does work for most parameter modifications. 2 Copy the OracleETF. no longer sets values for the ETF consumer parameters that you removed from the CollETF configuration variable by using this procedure._ANYINST_.Parameter rule. NOTE You can apply the OracleETF.cfg file.Parameter rule. open the rule set folder that you created for the PATROL for Oracle instances where you want to modify the ETF collector. 7 In the Edit Rule/Variable dialog box._ANYINST_. The Rule Set Dialog box opens. This is not true for changes made to instance configuration.cfg file. 6 In the Rule Set Dialog box. The parameters icons are still displayed. To use DisableETF to disable all ETF parameters 1 Open the DisableETF._ANYINST_. 8 Drag and drop the rule set to any Agent host name where you want to apply the changes. 3 In PATROL Configuration Manager.Parameter rule into the PATROL for Oracle rule set folder. click Edit Value. The Edit Rule/Variable dialog box opens and displays the contents of the OracleETF. but the collector. 4 Paste the OracleETF. each preceded by an N._ANYINST_. you can also disable the consumer parameters that you removed from the CollETF collector parameter configuration.Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager To use ConfigureETF. 5 Select (highlight) and double-click on the OracleETF. change the N to Y in front of each ETF parameter for which you want the CollETF collector parameter to continue to collect data. CollETF. The _ANYINST_ designator works for all instances.cfg to limit the parameters set by CollETF 1 Open the ConfigureETF. this variable removes all of the ETF parameters from the CollETF collector. If you do not want the icons to appear. It contains the nine ETF parameters.

if you make changes by using the menu commands and parameter property dialog boxes provided by the KM. See “To use ConfigureETF.Using the rule and rule set examples /AS/EVENTSPRING/PARAM_SETTINGS/STATUSFLAGS/paramSettingsStatusFlag" = {REPLACE = “1”} 2 Copy the remaining rules contained in this file. the CollETF collector parameter notates the System Output Window with an error each time it attempts to send information to a deactivated consumer parameter.cfg to limit the parameters set by CollETF” on page 152. open the rule set folder that you created for PATROL for Oracle. WARNING When you make changes to a KM by directly modifying rules and rulesets in the PATROL Configuration Manager. All of the other rules and rule sets installed with PATROL for Oracle are examples that you can use as an example of how that particular rule or rule set should appear. the values you enter are validated by the KM. 5 Drag and drop the rule set to the AgentHostName where you want to disable the CollETF collector and all of the ETF consumer parameters. 6 Reinitialize the agent to apply the changes. You can avoid this by first removing the ETF consumer parameters from the CollETF collector configuration. and ConfigureETF and DisableETF (see “Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager” on page 150) provide a way for you to manage the ETF parameters. Using the rule and rule set examples Some of the rules and rule sets that are installed when you install PATROL for Oracle are required: POKKMConfigUpdated and the POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved (see “Using the ConfigUpdate parameter” on page 134) trigger the ConfigUpdate parameter. Alternatively. 3 In PATROL Configuration Manager. no validations are performed. 4 Paste all of the rules from DisableETF. NOTE If you disable the consumer parameters without disabling the CollETF collector. Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 153 .cfg into the PATROL for Oracle rule set folder.

The ConfigUpdate parameter is active by default.cfg provides rules that you can use to change the Always Online I I I and Categories configuration variables. The following are the optional rules and rule sets installed with PATROL for Oracle and a short description for each: I Blackout. ModifyInstance. Where to go from here Before making any changes to PATROL for Oracle. For more detailed information about each parameter. I DisableListener.cfg provides all of the Oracle parameters in rules that you can use to modify parameter settings and apply to any instance.cfg deactivates the ConfigUpdate parameter.cfg provides examples for the blackout variable. EnableListener. but if you deactivated the ConfigUpdate parameter.cfg provides a rule that you can use to enable a listener.cfg to reactivate. For more information on Blackout.Where to go from here NOTE If the example rule set does not contain the POKKMConfigUpdated rule. see “Modifying the blackout configuration variable” on page 143. you can reactivate it globally using this rule. You can use it to deactivate it throughout the enterprise. It is active by I default.cfg provides a rule that you can use to disable a listener. you must add the POKKMConfigUpdated rule before applying the rule set to an instance. I ConfigUpdate_DeActivate.cfg activates the ConfigUpdate parameter. ConfigUpdate_Activate. you might want to review “Parameter summary” in the PATROL for Oracle online Help and “Pconfig variables” on page 334. The following table suggests topics: 154 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . I Remove_All_ConfigInstance. GlobalParams. and use ConfigUpdate_Activate. see the PATROL for Oracle online Help.cfg provides a rule that you can use to remove one configured instance.cfg provides a rule that you can use to remove all configured instances. I Remove_One_ConfigInstance.

Appendix A. and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. “Monitoring instance health” on page 225 Chapter 8. InfoBoxes. and InfoBoxes Appendix C. parameters. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 PATROL for Oracle online Help Chapter 4 Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration 155 . “Monitoring tablespaces. “Accessing menu commands. “Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle” on page 157 Chapter 6. and online Help InfoBoxes. and SQL statements” on page 179 Chapter 7. “Monitoring Oracle options” on page 271 Chapter 9. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 instructions about installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls detailed descriptions of the applications.Where to go from here Topic how to use Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle how to monitor the tablespace capacity and user activity on an Oracle instance using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor instance health using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor Oracle options using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor the the RAC environment Source of information Chapter 5. menu commands. “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293 how to access the KM menu commands. users.

Where to go from here 156 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Explain Plan from PATROL . Starting and stopping a listener. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Listener Password configuration menu option. . . . . . . . . . . Shutting down instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . Setting the time zone variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling blackouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing Oracle’s job queue from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debugging blackouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 157 . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing ORANET reports . . . . . . . . . . Setting blackout periods for categories and parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ORANET requirements . . Monitoring ORANET alarms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring Oracle Net from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling unending blackouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring multiple listeners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 5 158 158 159 159 160 163 164 164 165 167 170 170 171 173 173 173 174 175 175 175 176 176 177 177 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 5 This chapter presents the following topics: Using Oracle utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Server Manager and SQL*Plus from PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting blackout periods . . . . . . . Starting instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nesting blackout periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and shutting down instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Issuing SQL commands to Oracle from PATROL . Configuring a listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

I I To use Server Manager Access Server Manager by choosing Oracle Server Admin => Server Manager from the INSTANCE menu. Using Server Manager and SQL*Plus from PATROL You can access Server Manager and SQL*Plus from PATROL. To close the window. After you have entered the user name and password. If you are using the PATROL Console for UNIX. type exit at the Server Manager prompt.Using Oracle utilities Using Oracle utilities You can access and use the following Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle: I I I I Server Manager SQL*Plus Explain Plan SQL command entry You can also manage Oracle’s job queue from PATROL. you must have an xterm program installed and configured on the console computer. you can use any valid Server Manager commands in the xterm window that opens. NOTE Server Manager is not accessible on a Microsoft Windows local instance. you must have an xemulator program configured and running on the console computer. 158 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . You must enter the user name and password of a valid account for the instance. the following requirements must be met: I You must have Server Manager or SQL*Plus installed and running on the Oracle instance. However. If you are using the PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows.

and the dialog box is closed. click Help for instructions for using the command dialog box. This information predicts the performance of the SQL statement. The SQL statement executes in the account that you used to log in. When you enter the SQL command into the dialog box. you can exit SQL*Plus and close the xterm window. The resulting report appears in a task output window. Issuing SQL commands to Oracle from PATROL You can use either the SQL Command or SQL Task menu commands to input an SQL statement to the instance from PATROL. After the account is accepted. Any output appears in the system output window. a command dialog box appears. Using Explain Plan from PATROL You can run the Explain Plan utility from PATROL to review how the Oracle optimizer intends to process a specific SQL statement. the command is sent to the instance where it is executed. Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 159 . You must enter the user name and password of a valid account for the instance. Click Apply to submit the SQL statement to the utility. On Microsoft Windows. After the session is completed.Using Explain Plan from PATROL To use SQL*Plus Access SQL*Plus by choosing Oracle Server Admin => SQL*Plus from the INSTANCE menu. NOTE SQL*Plus is not accessible on a remote Oracle instance or on a Microsoft Windows local instance. Access the Explain Plan utility by choosing Oracle Server Admin => Explain Plan from the INSTANCE menu. You can then enter the SQL statement and any arguments into the command dialog box. You can use any valid SQL*Plus commands in the xterm window. You can also use any of the tools on the command dialog box toolbar. you must enter a user name and password for an account on the instance. To issue SQL Commands After choosing Oracle Server Admin => SQL Command from the Instance menu.

Managing Oracle’s job queue from PATROL You can use PATROL to view and manage the job queue in the Oracle instance. you must activate the JOBS application by choosing KM Admin => Monitor Settings Modify from the INSTANCE menu. and remove jobs from the job queue. Before you can manage the job queue. The JOBS icon should appear within two polling cycles. An icon is displayed on the navigation area that shows the total execution time. the command is sent to the instance where it is executed. Once the account is accepted. with the following information for each job: Table 22 Item Job Owner Job Number Broken Failures Job Definition Next Run All jobs report Description name of the owner of the job number of the job whether the job is broken or not how many times the job failed to run PL/SQL code that defines the job time when the job is set to run next 160 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Any output from the statement is displayed in the task output window. You can also use this function to deactivate job queue monitoring. You can choose Destroy to delete the task output window. You can repeat the SQL task by right-clicking on the task output window icon and choosing Repeat. The CollJobs parameter starts collecting information and populates the consumer parameters during the next polling cycle. You can run jobs manually. a command dialog box appears. Viewing all jobs in the queue To view all the jobs in the job queue. and enabling the JOBS category. flag jobs as broken or not broken. All the jobs currently in the job queue are listed in the report. and the dialog box is closed. you must enter a user name and password for an account on the instance. choose Reports => All Jobs from the JOBS menu or Reports => Jobs => All Jobs from the INSTANCE menu.Managing Oracle’s job queue from PATROL To issue a SQL Task After choosing Oracle Server Admin => SQL Task from the INSTANCE menu. When you enter the SQL task into the dialog box.

Table 23 lists the information included in the Failed Jobs report. The FailedJobs parameter reflects this Oracle problem. it is flagged as a broken job). A column in the dba_jobs table in Oracle does not increment the number of times that a job fails. and it appears in the Broken Jobs Report. Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 161 . You can also run the Failed Jobs Report by choosing Jobs => Failed Jobs from the JOBS menu or Reports => Jobs => Failed Jobs from the INSTANCE menu.Managing Oracle’s job queue from PATROL Finding failed jobs A failed job is an Oracle task that has not executed properly 15 or fewer times (if it fails to execute properly 16 times in a row. it is removed from the Failed Jobs Report. it is flagged as broken. The FailedJobs parameter graphs the number of jobs that have failed to run. An overdue job may be a broken job or a failed job. The OverdueJobs parameter graphs the number of jobs that have not run at their proper time. Table 23 Item Job Owner Job Number Broken Failures Job Definition Next Run Failed jobs report Description name of the owner of the job number of the job whether the job is broken or not how many times the job failed to run PL/SQL code that defines the job time when the job is set to run next If a job fails to run 16 times in a row. NOTE If you are monitoring an Oracle 8. the Failed Jobs report might not correctly report the number of times that a job has failed to run. Finding overdue jobs An overdue job is a job that is more then two minutes overdue.0. or it may simply be blocked from running at its appointed time.4 database on an AIX host.

2 Select the user name of the owner of the job from the list. 3 Select one or more of the jobs that you want to flag. Table 25 Field Job Owner Job Number Failures Job Definition Broken jobs report Description name of the owner of the job number of the job how many times the job failed to run PL/SQL code that defines the job Flagging jobs You can manually flag a job as broken if you do not want the job to run again until you have corrected a problem. the task output window displays a message saying that no unbroken or broken jobs exist. You can view all broken jobs by choosing Jobs => Broken Jobs from the JOBS menu or Reports => Jobs => Broken Jobs from the INSTANCE menu. and click OK. type the owner's password. and click OK. 1 From the JOBS menu. 162 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . If no unbroken or broken jobs exist. All overdue jobs are listed in a text window. choose Jobs => Flag Job => As Broken or Jobs => Flag Job => As Not Broken. it is automatically flagged as broken and does not run again. and it will run again during its next scheduled execution time. After you have corrected the problem. you can flag the job as not broken. Table 24 lists the information in the report. Table 25 lists the information in the report.Managing Oracle’s job queue from PATROL You can see all overdue jobs by choosing Jobs => Overdue Jobs from the JOBS menu or Reports => Jobs => Overdue Jobs from the INSTANCE menu. All broken jobs are listed in the text window. Table 24 Item Job Owner Job Number Broken Failures Job Definition Next Run Overdue jobs report Description name of the owner of the job number of the job whether the job is broken or not how many times the job failed to run PL/SQL code that defines the job time when the job is set to run next Finding broken jobs If a job has failed to run 16 times.

Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 163 . However. since the listener processes are up and running. Jobs that you remove are not executed. choose Run Job. ORANET automatically discovers the Oracle Net listeners that are running and periodically verifies their status. 1 From the JOBS menu. the job is not interrupted and continues to execute.Monitoring Oracle Net from PATROL Running jobs immediately Use the following task to manually execute a job immediately. type the owner's password. Oracle attempts to execute the job even if the job has failed or is broken. 3 Select the job you want to run. Monitoring Oracle Net from PATROL You can monitor Oracle Net listener processes from PATROL via the ORANET application. choose Remove Job. 3 Select the job you want to remove. it creates a LISTENER icon for it in the ORANET application. and click OK. and click OK. Oracle instances may be down while ORANET is up and running. Because the ORANET application is a separate . 2 Select the user name of the owner of the job from the list. You can remove all jobs that have not yet executed from the job queue. If you try to remove a job that is currently executing. type the owner's password. When you run a job manually from PATROL. you cannot remove a job that is currently executing. Removing a job from the job queue You can remove a job from the job queue.km file. 1 From the JOBS menu. and click OK. When ORANET discovers a listener. which prevents the job from being processed. and click OK. 2 Select the user name of the owner of the job from the list.

ora file. the LOCAL_OS_AUTHENTICATION_listenerName parameter is set to ON. error messages: 164 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . and configured. To monitor ORANET. you can disable it by setting the value of the parameter to OFF. — Read permission for the listener.ora file on local machine to monitor remote instance. You must configure the instance associated with the listener that you would like to monitor by PATROL for Oracle. Listener Password configuration menu option A major change to Listener security in Oracle 10g or later is the introduction of Local OS Authentication.ORANET requirements ORANET requirements To monitor Oracle Net listeners using ORANET. ensure that the system meets the following requirements: I Oracle Net is installed. in the listener. If you set the password through LSNRCTL and the LOCAL_OS_AUTHENTICATION_listenerName parameter value is set to OFF. you cannot start or stop the listener process. See the Oracle Network Manager Administrator's Guide and the Oracle installation guide for your system for more information. The PATROL user account is either in the DBA group or has permissions to write to the directory where the Oracle Net listener log files are located. The ORANET application does not appear until you have the Oracle instance configured. all related parameters for that listener below the ORANET icon will be offline. I I I I Consult your Oracle installation guide if you need more information about these requirements. If the PATROL user account lacks these privileges. The ORANET application is loaded and running. started. You may observe the following. or similar.ora file. following are the permission required for the PATROL OS account: — Executable permission to the lsnrctl utility. By default. However. — Read permission for the tnsnames.

Configuring a listener Before you can monitor a listener. If you have a clustered environment.Configuring a listener From the PATROL Console System Output Window (SOW) log: PatrolAgent-W-EUSER: Discovery/ prediscovery proc `ORANET_LISTENER' may be in an infinite loop . you must configure the specific listener. enter the ASCII password in the Password field and click Apply. NOTE When the value of the LOCAL_OS_AUTHENTICATION_<listener_name> parameter was set to ON. Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 165 . you need to perform an additional configuration.executed 5000047 instructions. From the ListenerStatus debug: TNS-01169: The listener has not recognized the password. Figure 13 on page 166 displays the tasks. a new configuration menu option is added and will need to be set: Right-click on the ListenerName => KM Commands => Password Configure. PATROL for Oracle correctly detected the status of the listener regardless of whether a password was set. To remedy this problem. A Listener Password dialog box.

You can use the Exit buttons to exit the box and function. use the following steps: 1 From the ORANET menu. NOTE If you want to stop monitoring a listener. 166 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 3 To start monitoring the listener. choose Configuration. select the Disable Monitoring check box in the listener information screen. select the listener to configure from the list of detected listeners. and click Apply. PATROL creates a LISTENER icon and begins monitoring the listener.Configuring a listener Figure 13 Listener configuration task flow Is listener part of a cluster? No Configure listener using Configuration command from ORANET menu Yes Does listener use cluster alias or logical host name in the listener.ora file? uses cluster alias Configure listener using Cluster Configuration command from ORANET menu and specify cluster alias uses logical host name Configure listener using Cluster Configuration command from ORANET menu and specify logical host name Non-clustered configuration To configure a listener that is not part of a cluster. select the Enable Monitoring check box and click Apply. 2 Ensure that the HOME for the listener in the Listener Home field is correct.

see “Using the default_auto_config. enter the following information into the dialog box and click Accept: Table 26 Field Physical Host Cluster Alias for <Physical Host> (Server Name or IP Address): Cluster configuration information Description Displays the name of the physical host Enter the Server Name or IP Address only if you are using a cluster alias in the listener.Configuring multiple listeners Cluster configuration To monitor a listener that is part of a cluster. you need to enter the value of the CUSTOMLISTENERCONFIGLOCS variable as 1 in the default_auto_conf_PortNumber.ora Host> (Host Names or IP Addresses separated by blank file. the default configuration file (default_auto_config. use the following steps: 1 From the ORANET menu. If you are using Logical Host Names.ora files. space(s)): PATROL creates a listener icon and begins monitoring the listener. PATROL for Oracle reads multiple. Cluster Configuration.txt file. If you are using cluster aliases.ora files. To use the default_auto_config.ora file. leave this field blank. By activating this script through the new default configuration file. Using this method. However.txt file” on page 94. leave this field blank. arbitrarily located listener. ORANET monitors only those listeners for Oracle instances that are configured for monitoring by PATROL for Oracle. Before You Begin I If you have enabled the OS Authentication check box and are configuring an instance through the auto configuration process.txt file. Configuring multiple listeners PATROL for Oracle provides an external script that you can use to tell ORANET where to go to read the listener.kml file. Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 167 . Enter the logical host name(s) separated by blank space(s) Logical Hosts for <Physical only if you are using Logical Host Names in the listener.txt) is only available when you load the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG.

Configuring multiple listeners OR I If you have configured an instance through the interface. To configure multiple listeners in an unstructured directory on page 169 To configure multiple listeners in a structured directory 1 In a single file system /qa/products/user that is running three instances Test1.ora NOTE Each listener.ora file locations. 2 From $PATROL_HOME/oracle/oranet. you can still use this discovery method by creating the /OracleConfig. To resolve these locations.ora Test2 — listener.ora file might have multiple listeners defined in it. set the TNS_ADMIN environment variable before you start the Patrol Agent. EXAMPLE TNS_ADMIN needs to be set to /qa/products/user 168 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Once the CUSTOMLISTENERCONFIGLOCS pconfig variable is set. the locate_lsnr_configs script is used to resolve the listener. Test2. Test3. create a directory structure and drop the necessary listener.CUSTOMLISTENERCONFIGLOCS pconfig variable and setting its value to 1. you must complete one of the following tasks: I I To configure multiple listeners in a structured directory.ora files in the specified location: /qa/products/user I I I Test1 — listener.ora Test3 — listener.

Configuring multiple listeners Discovery process identifies the listener. this method has the following limitations: I Works only on UNIX platform. ORANET monitors only those listeners for Oracle instances that are configured for monitoring by PATROL for Oracle.ora file there is only one listener defined in it.ora files are located in different locations across different file systems and in each listener.ora files from the above locations and starts monitoring the listeners. clear the contents of the locate_lsnr_configs script. However.ora files: I I I /qa/products/test1/listener. EXAMPLE The following are the location of listener. I I To configure multiple listeners in an unstructured directory When the listener. and echo the paths in locate_lsnr_configs script as follows: I I I echo /qa/products/test1 echo /dev/products/test2 echo /export/products/test3 The above paths are temporarily stored in a variable and executed through a loop to discover the listeners.ora /export/products/test3/listener. However. I Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 169 .ora From $PATROL_HOME/oracle/oranet of the agent computer. ORANET monitors only those listeners for Oracle instances that are configured for monitoring by PATROL for Oracle.ora /dev/products/test2/listener. PATROL for Oracle uses the highest configured $ORACLE_HOME/bin/lsnrctl to determine the status of all the listeners. this method has the following limitations: I Works only on UNIX platform.

I After you have filtered the error messages. If the PATROL user account lacks these privileges. See “Deactivating parameters” on page 124 for information about activating and deactivating parameters.Starting and stopping a listener Starting and stopping a listener You can stop and start a listener process from within PATROL. To start or stop listeners. Monitoring ORANET alarms PATROL monitors the listener process for the following items: I I I error messages written to the listener alert log the size of the listener trace and log files status of the listener Monitoring the listener alert log If a TNS. the PATROL user account must either be in the DBA group or have permissions to write to the directory where the Oracle Net listener log files are located.error message or user-defined string is written to the listener alert log. You can remove an excluded error string from the exclusion list. and the specific listener process is stopped. Filtering the error messages that the ListenerLog parameter monitors You can filter the error messages that trigger the ListenerLog parameter by using the Listener Log Filters menu command. choose Stop Listener from the LISTENER menu. you cannot start or stop the listener process. the ListenerLog parameter goes into an alarm state. choose Start Listener from the LISTENER menu. and the specific listener process is started. To stop a listener. Any confirmation messages appear in a task output window. 170 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Any confirmation messages appear in a task output window. You can perform the following actions: I Enter a search string that puts the ListenerLog parameter into a warning state if it is written to the log file Enter a search string that the ListenerLog parameter does not monitor nor detect. To start a listener. you must deactivate and reactivate the ListenerLog parameter in the LISTENER application class. The annotation for the parameter displays the text of the error that was written to the log file.

log file. This report displays the following types of services: I I I dedicated servers from listener. To view only the most recent error messages. To view all error messages that have been entered into the listener error log file. The last 40 lines of the listener. choose Listener Services Info from the LISTENER menu. you can double-click the annotated data point created when the error occurred to display the text of the alarm. In the text box. The report appears in a text window and lists all error messages in the listener. To find a specific error message that may be in the listener. To run this report.log file are displayed in a text window. choose Reports => Enter Search String from the LISTENER menu. choose Reports => All Error Messages from the LISTENER menu. enter the string to search for and click Apply. This information contains how many connections have been established and how many connections have been refused. The error message and description appear in a text window.Viewing ORANET reports Viewing the error messages that the ListenerLog parameter detects If the ListenerLog parameter is in an alarm state. Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 171 .ora dispatcher information prestarted or prespawned dedicated server processes The Services summary describes the service name and the service handlers count. choose Reports => Show Tail from the LISTENER menu.log file. Viewing ORANET reports The ORANET application provides the following reports: I I Listener Services Info report Listener Status Info report Viewing a report on listener services This report provides detailed information about the services for which the listener listens.

you can have only one password I I I whether the network listener can respond to queries from an Simple Network Management Protocol-based (SNMP) system the addresses the listener is listening on I The report provides the information shown in Table 27. Table 27 Item Alias Version Start Date Listener Status Info report Description alias of the listener process version of the listener program date and time that the listener started. Use this report to check I the current settings of the logging and tracing options the list of database SIDs that are available through this listener. If the listener password is encrypted.ora file.Viewing ORANET reports Viewing a report on listener status This report displays basic information about the listeners. defined in the SID mapping section in the listener. choose Listener Status Info from the LISTENER menu. 172 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . in the following formats: I I DD-Mon-YY HH:MM:SS Uptime Trace Level the total amount of time that the listener has been running the level of trace: I I I I I OFF ON USER (User trace information) ADMIN (Administration trace information) SUPPORT (WorldWide Customer Support trace information) Security SNMP Listener Parameter File Listener Log File Services Summary whether security is ON or OFF whether SNMP is ON or OFF the directory and filename of the parameter file the directory and filename for the listener log file the service name and service handler count To run this report.ora file whether a password is encrypted in the listener.

Shutting down instances From the INSTANCE menu. After the instance is started. any messages appear in a task output window. ListenerTraceSize.Debugging listeners Debugging listeners To debug the ListenerStatus. 1). mounted. and open for normal operations. Starting instances From the INSTANCE application. You can select one of the following startup options: Startup mode Open No Mount Mount Description The database is initialized. ListnerLog. The database is created and initialized. choose Oracle Server Admin => Instance Startup. Starting and shutting down instances You can start and shut down instances from within PATROL if you are a member of the DBA group. The instance icon displays in the offline. Only DBAs can access the database at this point. or ListenerLogSize parameter. No menu items are accessible from the instance until you restart the instance. type the following command in the system output window: %PSL set(“/ORANET/DEBUG_PARAM_STAT”. choose Oracle Server Admin => Instance Shutdown. If you shut down an instance. You can select one of the following shutdown options: Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 173 . The database control files are read and opened. all parameter and report information is suspended. dimmed state. Only DBAs can access the database at this point.

The blackout function does not use specific dates for scheduling. stops parameter collection and alarms for a specified amount of time. and shuts down the instance. The instance is aborted. or for days. Instance recovery might be necessary on startup. closes and dismounts the database. for four hours. When you set a blackout period. Until the blackout period is deleted.m. The database cancels current calls like a system interrupt. No instance recovery is needed upon instance startup. A suspended state. Scheduling blackouts You can use PATROL to schedule suspended states for applications and parameters. 174 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . You can use this feature to ensure that maintenance or backups to the instance do not trigger erroneous alarms or reports. you can schedule it to last for a few minutes. or blackout period. July 21. the instance is blacked out every Tuesday at 2200 for four hours.). closes and dismounts the database. but uses the day of the week and the time of the day. at 2200 (10 p.Scheduling blackouts Shutdown mode Normal Description The instance shuts down normally. for hours. The instance shuts down immediately. the ORACLE_ETSM instances are turned off and the icons for ETSM disappear. During a Blackout period. NOTE Blackouts can be overridden or terminated from outside PATROL for Oracle. prohibits new connections. and shuts down the instance. EXAMPLE You cannot schedule the blackout for Tuesday. PMON (Process Monitor) gracefully shuts down the user processes. Immediate Abort All currently connected users and the number of sessions that they are running are listed for your reference. The database waits for all users to disconnect. but you can schedule the blackout for Tuesday at 2200 for four hours. The databases are closed immediately.

the emergency blackout period is activated. If you have a set regular maintenance blackout period.m. Figure 14 shows the overlapping blackout periods. In this example. you are putting the instance in an unending blackout. on the following Monday the blackout function sees the event that triggers the blackout period and again triggers the blackout. This cycle repeats until the blackout period is deleted. However. if the regular maintenance blackout period is deleted.m.) to Tuesday 0300 (3 a. However. you can also set an emergency blackout period that begins during the maintenance blackout period.) is not activated because the maintenance blackout period covers the emergency blackout period. For example.Nesting blackout periods Nesting blackout periods You can also nest blackout periods. Figure 14 Blackout period priority Tuesday 0600 Monday 0600 Regular Maintenance Monday 2100 to Tuesday 0500 Emergency Maintenance Monday 2300 to Tuesday 0300 Scheduling unending blackouts If you set a blackout period for seven days. you must insert the following variable and value in the INSTANCE application class: I I variable name = ORABOTZ value = GMT hours +_difference_from_your_time zone Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 175 . Setting the time zone variable The blackout function attempts to determine the time zone that you are in. if the maintenance blackout period covers the emergency blackout period. the emergency blackout period scheduled from Monday at 2300 (11 p. if you set the blackout period to run on Monday for a duration of seven days. the emergency blackout period is not activated. If it cannot.

to specify the difference from Houston in the U. 2 Select Delete a Blackout Period. you must set each instance separately. 2 Select the instances for which you want to set this blackout period if you selected the menu command from the ORACLE menu. If you select more than one instance. To set blackout periods for categories and parametersfor an Oracle instance 1 Choose Blackout Instance(s) from the ORACLE menu. all the selected instances are set for the blackout period. To set blackout periods by using PATROL Configuration Manager. all parameters in all categories for that instance do not collect any information or raise any warnings or alarms. central time zone. You can set this variable using a developer console only. Deleting blackout periods 1 Choose Blackout Instance(s) from the ORACLE menu. or KM Admin => Blackout from the INSTANCE menu for the instance that you want to black out. The blackout period is entered as an event. For example. If you want different blackout periods for multiple instances. 176 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . select the blackout period from the Blackout period(s) to delete list box and click Accept. 3 Select the day of the week when you want the blackout period to start. or KM Admin => Blackout from the INSTANCE menu. 4 Click Accept. see “Modifying the blackout configuration variable” on page 143.Setting blackout periods for categories and parameters You must calculate the number of hours difference between your time and Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Setting blackout periods for categories and parameters When you add a blackout period. you would enter GMT +0600. Enter the duration of the blackout period and select the time units from the menu.S. and click Add a Blackout Period.

“Monitoring Oracle options” on page 271 Chapter 9. InfoBoxes. “Monitoring tablespaces. Where to go from here The following table suggests topics: Topic how to monitor the tablespace capacity and user activity on an Oracle instance using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor instance health using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor Oracle options using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor the the RAC environment Source of information Chapter 6. and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. and SQL statements” on page 179 Chapter 7. “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293 how to access the KM menu commands. and online Help InfoBoxes.Debugging blackouts Debugging blackouts To debug a blackout. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 Chapter 5 Using Oracle utilities from PATROL for Oracle 177 . right-click the Oracle instance icon and choose KM Commands => KM Admin => Debug and set the Debug option to YES. “Accessing menu commands. users. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 Instructions about installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls Appendix C. Appendix A. “Monitoring instance health” on page 225 Chapter 8.

Where to go from here 178 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining tablespace types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the ETSM applications to monitor tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selecting users or user sessions for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 6 180 180 182 183 183 184 188 189 192 189 192 192 192 193 194 196 197 197 199 200 202 209 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 217 218 179 Monitoring tablespaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Activating user monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SQL Snapshot overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the TABLESPACES application to monitor tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exclusion examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and SQL statements 6 This chapter presents the following topics: Tablespace monitoring overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Space Expert to monitor tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using SQL Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . USERS_INSTANCE parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the ETSM reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debugging the ETSM application . . . . . . . Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. . . . . . Viewing other reports on users . . . . . . . users. . Excluding users from space monitoring . . . . . . Selecting tablespaces for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Excluding objects . . . . . . . Activating the ETSM applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and SQL statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the monitoring settings . . . . . Excluding parameter alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBSP_INSTANCE parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . USERS parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the All Problem Users report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ETSM parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Excluding tablespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing reports on tablespaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring SQL statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Differences between exclusion types . . . Activating TABLESPACES application monitoring. . . . . . . . . User monitoring overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring problem users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . 220 Archiving SQL Viewer data . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Terminating SQL Viewer sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Using Space Expert to monitor tablespaces” on page 192 —requires that you have Space Expert installed and configured. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Activating SQL Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Using the ETSM applications to monitor tablespaces” on page 188 —monitors all tablespaces that are not excluded from monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . 180 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . . . . . . . . 220 Starting and stopping SQL Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . when installed. . . If the tablespace you selected is running. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . You can select to use one or all methods. . . . . . . . For details on each. . . . . For example. . . . . . 220 Viewing SQL Viewer reports . . . . . . . . 223 Where to go from here . . . . . You can select a particular tablespace on the instance for PATROL to monitor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the TABLESPACES application to monitor tablespaces PATROL monitors all tablespaces on an Oracle server for availability and space issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . I I NOTE PATROL for Oracle does not support blank space within a tablespace name. . . . if you are concerned about a specific tablespace or if reports show that a tablespace is heavily used. . . . . . . . . . . . . . “te st” is not a valid tablespace name. . . . . However. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . also provides a method for monitoring tablespaces. . . . . . . . . The AVAILABILITY application shows the resources remaining in the instance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see the following topics: I “Using the TABLESPACES application to monitor tablespaces” on page 180 — does not monitor any tablespaces until you activate tablespace monitoring and select tablespaces for monitoring. you can activate the TABLESPACES application as a diagnostic or troubleshooting tool for your Oracle environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Space Expert. . . . . . . . .Tablespace monitoring overview SQL Viewer tables . . an instance within the TABLESPACES container appears as an TBSP_INSTANCE icon. . . . . . 224 Tablespace monitoring overview PATROL for Oracle provides two methods for monitoring tablespaces. . . . . . .

Using the TABLESPACES application to monitor tablespaces Use the parameters in the TBSP_INSTANCE application to see how busy and how full the tablespace is. it will provide physical input-output information if the tablespace is autoextensible. NOTE I To prevent performance problems. Set warnings or alarms in the PctUsed or the SpaceLeft parameter to warn you when the space in the tablespace is becoming limited. Use the parameters in the TBSP_INSTANCE application to see how busy and how full the tablespace is. Otherwise. users. and SQL statements 181 . A TBSP_INSTANCE icon may not appear in the TABLESPACES container if the tablespace is not running or has not been selected for monitoring. including all tablespaces in the instance TABLESPACES application: reports on status and storage of all tablespaces in the instance NOTE: only appears if the TABLESPACES category has been enabled TBSP_INSTANCE application: reports on file I/O and space for a specific tablespace NOTE: only appears if a tablespace has been selected for monitoring Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. The SpaceLeft and PctUsed parameters are inactive for autoextensible tablespaces. The TBSP_INSTANCE application provides the PctUsed and the SpaceLeft parameter to warn you when the space in the tablespace is becoming limited and physical input-output information if the tablespace is non-autoextensible. You can use the TBSP_INSTANCE application as a diagnostic or troubleshooting tool for your Oracle environment. Figure 15 TABLESPACES hierarchy INSTANCE application: reports on all tablespaces in the instance AVAILABILITY application: reports on availability of resources in the instance. I I Figure 15 displays the hierarchy of the applications that deal with tablespaces. The information that each application or category provides is also displayed. you should monitor no more than 30 tablespaces at one time.

but many reads and writes are occurring in the tablespace.TBSP_INSTANCE parameters If you do not want a tablespace to go into an alarm state if space or extent problems occur. you must exclude the tablespace. TBSP_INSTANCE parameters The information that the TBSP_INSTANCE parameters provides is described in “Parameter summary” in the PATROL for Oracle online Help. Table 28 Parameter AutoExtended TBSP_INSTANCE parameters Description signals when a tablespace has automatically extended one or more of its data files Note: If the autoextend option is not enabled for the tablespace. Table 28 lists a brief description of each parameter. You can monitor this tablespace to determine if the storage parameters should be changed or if the data should be divided into other tablespaces. this parameter does not appear. See “Excluding parameter alarms” on page 209 for information and instructions. EXAMPLE The Tablespace Storage and Status Report informs you that the Data99 tablespace does not have much free space left. BlkReads BlkWrites PctUsed PhyReads PhyWrites SpaceLeft reports the total number of logical block reads performed per second on the monitored tablespace during the previous polling interval reports the total number of logical block writes performed per second on the monitored tablespace during the previous polling interval shows the percentage of space that is allocated in the monitored tablespace reports the total number of physical reads performed per second on the monitored tablespace in the previous polling interval reports the total number of physical writes performed per second on the monitored tablespace in the previous polling interval shows the amount of free space in megabytes in the monitored tablespace 182 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

use ts*11? To select the tablespaces that starts with ts and has one character after 11. and no tablespace monitoring is performed. type search name with regular expression to add/stop tablespaces from monitoring with PATROL. and SQL statements 183 . NOTE To prevent performance problems. and activate the TABLESPACES category to start monitoring tablespaces. choose KM Admin => Monitoring Settings. For example. I You can combine the regular expressions. 1 From the TABLESPACES menu. you should monitor no more than 30 tablespaces at one time. If this category is not activated. Selecting tablespaces for monitoring After you have enabled the TABLESPACES application. ts* to select the tablespaces that start with ts. You can use this function to deactivate tablespace monitoring as well. the TABLESPACES category must be activated. ts?11 to select ts011 or tsa11. ? indicates single position of a character. The TABLESPACES application icon appears within two polling cycles. The CollTablespaces collector parameter collects information and populate the consumer parameters during the next polling cycle. For example. Supported characters are * and ?: I * indicates 0 or more positions of a character. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. you can select specific tablespaces to monitor. 3 In the Regular Expression box. the TABLESPACES icon does not appear. For example. users.Activating TABLESPACES application monitoring Activating TABLESPACES application monitoring Before you can selectively monitor tablespaces. choose KM Admin => TableSpace Monitoring. 2 Select the tablespace or tablespaces you want to monitor from the Tablespaces Available list and click Apply. From the INSTANCE menu.

Viewing reports on tablespaces PATROL provides reports that give you the following information: I I I I tablespace free space tablespace size tablespace segments tablespace status and storage These reports are described in the following sections. You can also use this function to stop monitoring a tablespace. Run the report choosing Reports =>Free Space from the TABLESPACES menu. Viewing the Tablespace Free Space report The Tablespace Free Space report displays the amount of used and free space for all tablespaces. the tablespace information appears on reports and is reflected in the parameter values in the AVAILABILITY category. The parameters and reports gather information during the next polling cycle. 5 Choose Deselect and then click Apply to stop the tablespaces from monitoring with PATROL. However. or Reports =>Tablespaces =>Tablespace Free Space from the INSTANCE menu. Table 29 shows the information that the report provides. After you stop monitoring a tablespace. Table 29 Item Tablespace name Size Bytes Used Bytes Free Bytes %Used Tablespace Free Space report Description name of the tablespace size of the tablespace in bytes amount of used space in bytes amount of free space in bytes percentage of the total space that is used 184 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . the TBSP_INSTANCE icon disappears in the next polling cycle.Viewing reports on tablespaces 4 Choose Select and then click Apply to add the tablespaces to start monitoring with PATROL. The tablespace appears as a TBSP_INSTANCE application icon.

the tablespace is flagged. choose Reports => Database =>Tablespace Information and select the tablespace from the list. From the TBSP_INSTANCE menu. I Table 30 shows the information that the report provides.Viewing reports on tablespaces Viewing information about tablespaces The Tablespace report lists file. If a tablespace has the autoextend feature or is not currently used. and I/O information about the specified tablespace or tablespaces. choose Tablespace. you may want to move the datafiles in the tablespace to another tablespace. Table 30 Item Tablespace name Autoextend Monitoring Phys Writes Phys Reads Blk Writes Blk Reads File Name Tablespace name % Free Bytes Free Blocks Free Max Bytes Free Max Blk Free Total Size (Bytes) Total Size (Blks) Init Trans Init Extent Next Extent Min Extents Tablespace report (part 1 of 2) Description File I/O name of the tablespace whether the autoextend option is YES or NO whether state of monitoring for the tablespace is INCLUDED or EXCLUDED number of physical writes on the tablespace number of physical reads on the tablespace number of physical blocks written on the tablespace number of physical blocks read on the tablespace file name of the tablespace Storage name of the tablespace the percentage of free space in the tablespace number of free bytes in the tablespace number of free blocks in the tablespace size of largest free extent in bytes size of largest free extent in blocks the total size of the tablespace in bytes the total size of the tablespace in blocks Parameters initial transactions size of the initial extent in the table size of the next extent to be allocated to the segment minimum number of extents allowed in the segment Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. storage. users. If a tablespace shows too much I/O activity. To run the report perform one of following steps: I From the INSTANCE application menu. and SQL statements 185 .

or choose Reports =>Tablespaces =>Tablespace By Size from the INSTANCE menu. Table 31 Item Tablespace name Segment Name Type Owner Size Extents Tablespace Segments report Description name of the tablespace name of the segment type of segment the owner of the segment the size of the segment in bytes the number of extents in the segment View a report on tablespaces sorted by size The Sorted by Size and the Tablespaces By Size reports list the tablespaces in the instance that exceed the criteria you select: I I I number of extents number of blocks number of bytes Run the report by choosing Reports => Sorted by Size from the TABLESPACES menu. Table 31 shows the information that the report provides. or choose Reports =>Tablespaces =>Tablespace Segments from the INSTANCE menu. 1 Choose Reports => Segments from the TABLESPACES menu. 2 Select a tablespace from the list or select ALL TABLESPACES. and click Accept. or READ ONLY Max Extents % Inc Status View a report on tablespace segments The Tablespace Segment report provides information on the segments in the tablespace. Table 32 shows the information that the report provides. 186 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . OFFLINE.Viewing reports on tablespaces Table 30 Item Tablespace report (part 2 of 2) Description maximum number of extents allowed in the segment percentage to use to increase the size of the next allocated extent tablespace status: ONLINE.

Table 33 Item Tablespace Name AutoExtend Exclusion Tablespace Status and Storage report (part 1 of 2) Description File I/O name of the tablespace whether the autoextend option is enabled for the tablespace whether the tablespace is excluded from PATROL parameter monitoring “Excluding parameter alarms” on page 209 Phys Writes Phys Reads Blk Writes Blk Reads File Name Tablespace Name % Free Bytes Free Blocks Free Max Bytes Free number of physical writes on the tablespace number of physical reads on the tablespace number of block writes on the tablespace number of block reads on the tablespace file name and location of the database file for the tablespace Storage name of the tablespace percentage of free space in the tablespace number of bytes that are free in the tablespace number of free blocks in the tablespace size of largest free extent in bytes Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. users. and SQL statements 187 .Viewing reports on tablespaces Table 32 Item Tablespaces by Size report Description name of the tablespace owner of the tablespace segment type of tablespace segment number of blocks in the tablespace segment number of bytes in the tablespace segment number of extents in the tablespace segment maximum extents allowed in the tablespace segment Tablespace Name Owner Type Blocks Bytes Extents Max Extents Viewing a report about tablespace storage and status Use this report to obtain storage and tablespace status information on selected tablespaces. or choosing Reports =>Tablespaces =>Tablespace Information from the INSTANCE menu. Table 33 shows the information that the report provides. Run this report by choosing Reports => Status and Storage from the TABLESPACES menu.

This method of monitoring tablespaces uses an exception-based approach that monitors tablespaces at one level and initiates additional monitoring only when a problem is detected. For more information. ORACLE_ETSM automatically sorts tablespaces into logical application containers. 188 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . The SpaceLeft and PctUsed parameters consider the maximum size of a datafile and actual space available on the disk. It places the tablespaces in ETSM_ tablespaceType applications according to types that are defined by you in the default_auto_config. ETSM monitors the autoextensible tablespaces correctly only when the PATROL Knowledge Module for the operating system is loaded. Autoextensible tablespaces are supported in ETSM monitoring. The ORACLE_ETSM application discovers and monitors the percent used (PctUsed) and space left (SpaceLeft) for all tablespaces. This new method of monitoring tablespaces does not replace the original ORACLE_TABLESPACE application monitoring. see “Defining tablespace types” on page 189.Using the ETSM applications to monitor tablespaces Table 33 Item Tablespace Status and Storage report (part 2 of 2) Description size of largest free extent in blocks total size of the tablespace in bytes total size of the tablespace in blocks Parameters name of the tablespace number of initial extents minimum number of extents allowed by Oracle maximum number of extents allowed by Oracle percentage of the extents that were increased the status of the tablespace Max Blk Free Total Size (Bytes) Total Size (Blks) Tablespace Name Next Extents Min Extents Max Extents % Inc Status Using the ETSM applications to monitor tablespaces The ORACLE_ETSM application supports the monitoring of both autoextensible and non-autoextensible tablespaces in the database except for those that are excluded. except those that are excluded from monitoring.txt file or by a default sorting method.

This collector parameter does not have an icon. and SQL statements 189 . tablespaces identified as undo. When a tablespace exceeds the thresholds set for PctUsed and SpaceLeft. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. you can define the tablespace types for the ETSM applications in the default_auto_config. If you do not have ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. and the remaining tablespaces are monitored by the ETSM_REGULAR application.kml loaded or if you do not have the tablespace types defined in the default_auto_config. To modify the tablespaces to be in different containers or to exclude tablespaces from monitoring. the ETSM application performs the following actions: I creates an ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE for that tablespace places that ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE under the appropriate ETSM_tablespaceType application monitors that ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE with the same set of parameters used in the original tablespace monitoring (except for the AutoExtended parameter) I I ETSM parameters Table 34 lists a brief description of the parameter provided by the ETSM application.Defining tablespace types Defining tablespace types When you also load the ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. Table 34 Parameter CollPopulateContainers ETSM application parameter Description identifies the ETSM tablespaces and sorts them into the correct ORACLE_ETSM_ tablespace type applications.txt file.txt file. For more information. Table 35 lists a brief description of the parameters provided by the ETSM_tablespace type applications. rollback. use the PATROL Configuration Manager. or temp are monitored by the appropriate ETSM_tablespaceType application. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration” on page 131. read-only.kml file. users. see Chapter 4.

? represents a single character. see the PATROL for Oracle online Help. 190 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .Using regular expressions to choose tablespaces Table 35 Parameter ETSM_tablespaceType application parameters Description collects the data for and calculates the SpaceLeft and PctUsed for the tablespaces monitored by the ETSM_tablespace type application classes shows the percentage of space that is allocated in the monitored tablespace shows the amount of free space in megabytes in the monitored tablespace ColSpaceLeft PctUsed SpaceLeft Table 36 lists a brief description of the parameters provided by the ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE application. including the following wildcard (meta) characters: I I * represents 0 or more characters. Using regular expressions to choose tablespaces PATROL for Oracle enables you to use regular expressions to add and remove tablespaces under ETSM. Table 36 Parameter BlkReads BlkWrites PctUsed PhyReads PhyWrites SpaceLeft ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE application parameters Description shows the total number of logical block reads performed per second on the monitored tablespace during the previous polling interval shows the total number of logical block writes performed per second on the monitored tablespace during the previous polling interval shows the percentage of space that is allocated in the monitored tablespace shows the total number of physical reads performed per second on the monitored tablespace in the previous polling interval reports the total number of physical writes performed per second on the monitored tablespace in the previous polling interval shows the amount of free space in megabytes in the monitored tablespace For more information about parameters. You can also combine these meta-characters to form a regular expression.

I From the host.oracle-sid.“T*E?”)).DefaultTablespaces /OracleConfig. “RegularExpression“)).oracle_sid.ReadonlyTablespaces Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. and add a variable. PATROL for Oracle excludes all the tablespaces that have the T*E? string in their name from ETSM monitoring. right-click and choose Development => Agent Configuration => Edit => Add Variable. EXAMPLE print(pconfig(“REPLACE“.“/OracleConfig. you can use regular expressions in the following tablespace variables: I I I I I I I oracle-sid|EXCLUDE_TBS|CLASSIC TS*| oracle-sid|DEFAULT_TBS|S?STE*| oracle-sid|LARGE_TBS|TS_*| oracle-sid|READONLY_TBS|| oracle-sid|ROLLBACK_TBS|| oracle-sid|TEMPORARY_TBS|| oracle-sid|UNDO_TBS|| To set these pconfig variables with regular expressions.Using regular expressions to choose tablespaces For auto-configuration. You can set the agent pconfig variables in the following ways: I Execute the following command in the system output window: print(pconfig(“REPLACE“. You can also manually set the agent configuration variables to exclude or sort the tablespaces into different containers by using the regular expressions. For manual database configuration.ExcludeTablespaces“. use the Agent Configuration option and then add a variable from the PATROL Configuration Manager.oracle-sid. and SQL statements 191 .oracle-sid.“/OracleConfig.LargeTablespaces /OracleConfig.RollbackTablespaces /OracleConfig. you can set the following agent pconfig variables by using the* and ? characters in regular expressions: I I I I I I I /OracleConfig.UndoTablespaces /OracleConfig.oracle-sid. After executing the command.kol920db.oracle-sid.ExcludeTablespaces“.VeryLargeTablespaces /OracleConfig. users.oracle-sid. kol920db is the database name and T*E? is the regular expression for the ETSM tablespaces.oracle-sid.TemporaryTablespaces /OracleConfig.

which lists the tablespaces that are excluded from monitoring. The StorageProblems parameter in the SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_OBJ application displays a description of the problem and the object with the problem. for example. If the problem is in a tablespace object. the StorageProblemsCnt parameter in the SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_TS application goes into alarm. ETSM_VERY_LARGE. The ETSM_tablespaceType applications provide the Monitored Tablespaces report. the find_problems collector for Space Expert determines if the problem is in a tablespace or a tablespace object. The StorageProblems parameter in the SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_TS application displays a description of the problem and the tablespace with the problem. Viewing the ETSM reports The ETSM application provides the Excluded Tablespaces report. Using Space Expert to monitor tablespaces NOTE The SPACE_EXPERT_ORA application requires that you have Space Expert installed and configured on the monitored instance. For more information on loading KMs. If you do not want to use the new ETSM monitoring. When a space problem is found by PATROL for Oracle. which lists the tablespaces monitored by the ETSM_tablespaceType instance whose parameters are in an alarm or warning state. and choose KM Commands => Force Execution with Debug. do not load the ORACLE_ETSM. see Chapter 3. right-click a sub-application.kml file. Debugging the ETSM application In the ETSM application. “Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle” on page 69.kml file. If the problem is a tablespace. the StorageProblemsCnt parameter in the SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_OBJ application goes into alarm.Activating the ETSM applications Activating the ETSM applications The ETSM applications appear only when you load the ORACLE_ETSM. 192 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

users. Figure 16 displays the hierarchy of the applications that monitor users. If you need more detail about a user or user session. you can set thresholds that declare a user who exceeds the threshold as a problem user. The USERS parameters shows you a general overview of user activity on the instance. block other users. If you select a to monitor a user that is logged in. if you find that the user is blocking other users or taking too many resources. The resources left for users are reflected in the CAPACITY parameters. you can terminate the user session. a USERS_INSTANCE icon appears within the USERS application. The information that each application provides is also displayed. or are blocked by other users. you can select to monitor the user and run the User Session Detail Report or the Active SQL Statements Report. the ProblemUsers parameter goes into an alarm state. To determine why ApplicationAdmin uses too many CPU resources. and SQL statements 193 . EXAMPLE The user ApplicationAdmin periodically exceeds the excessive CPU threshold and becomes a problem user. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. NOTE A USERS_INSTANCE application icon may not appear in the USERS container if the user is not logged in or the user session is not running or has been terminated. When a user exceeds the threshold.User monitoring overview Once you find the description of the problem. For example. If your environment has users that use too many CPU resources. User monitoring overview PATROL monitors all users on an Oracle server for resource issues. you can use Space Expert to solve the space problem. You can use the USER_INSTANCE application as a diagnostic or troubleshooting tool for your Oracle environment. you can monitor a specific user or user session. are idle too long.

including resources for all users on the instance USERS application reports on status and resources for all users in the instance NOTE: This icon appear only if the USERS category has been enabled. USERS parameters The parameters contained in the USERS category show many users are active and how many resources those users are using.USERS parameters Figure 16 USERS hierarchy INSTANCE application reports on all users in the instance CAPACITY application reports on availability of resources in the instance. Table 37 lists a brief description of each parameter. A complete description of the USERS parameters is provided in “Parameter summary” in the PATROL for Oracle online Help. USERS_INSTANCE application reports on CPU resources and file I/O consumed by the user NOTE: This icon appears only if a user has been selected for monitoring. 194 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

examine the server’s performance. and SQL statements 195 . users. the network’s performance.USERS parameters Table 37 Parameter ActiveCalls USERS parameters Description reports the number of users with a call to the server currently in process If this number is too high. you may want to terminate some user sessions. ProblemUsers reports the session detail for each problem user discovered during the current polling interval A problem user is defined as a session that is: I I I I I waiting too long for a lock (BLOCKED or BLOCKEE) using too much CPU as a percentage (CPUHOG) blocking other users by holding a lock (BLOCKER) doing nothing (IDLE) running too long without returning any data (RUNAWAY) Users Reports the total number of user sessions that are currently running Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. or consider redistributing the users to use different servers. IDsInUse reports the number of SIDs that are currently connected to the database If this number is too high.

USRDiskSorts displays the percentage of sorts not in memory This parameter is based on the Oracle statistic sorts (disk). To retrieve CPU data. USRMemoryUsed displays the amount of available memory used by the user session This parameter is based on the Oracle statistic session memory used. you must shut down the database.USERS_INSTANCE parameters USERS_INSTANCE parameters The parameters in the USERS_INSTANCE application show many resources a particular user or user session is consuming. USRLogicalReads displays the number of logical reads performed by the user session This parameter is based on the Oracle statistic session logical reads. change the parameter in the init. USROpenCursors displays the number of current cursors opened by the user session This parameter is based on the Oracle statistic opened cursors current. the TIMED_STATISTICS parameter in the init. 196 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . and restart the database. USRPhysWrites displays the number of physical writes performed by the user session This parameter is based on the statistic physical writes. the USRCpuSeconds parameter does not retrieve any CPU data. Table 38 provides a brief description of each parameter. USRPhysReads displays the number of physical reads performed by the user session This parameter is based on the statistic physical reads. If the parameter is not set to TRUE. A complete description of the USERS_INSTANCE parameters is described in the PATROL for Oracle online Help.ora file must be set to TRUE (TIMED_STATISTICS=TRUE). To change the parameter.ora file. Table 38 Parameter USRCpuSeconds USERS_INSTANCE parameters Description displays the CPU seconds consumed by the user session This parameter is based on the statistic CPU used by this session.

Choose KM Admin => Monitoring Settings from the INSTANCE menu. type search name with regular expression to add/stop users from monitoring with PATROL. The CollUsers parameter collects information during the next polling cycle and populates the consumer parameters. 2 Select the user or users you want to monitor from the Users Available list and click Apply. 3 In the Regular Expression box. you can select specific users or user sessions to be monitored. monitoring the applications account may overload your system. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. a USERS_INSTANCE icon appears in the USERS container. users. the USERS icon does not appear and no user monitoring is performed. If you are using an application such as Oracle Applications or Peoplesoft. The USERS icon should appear within two polling cycles. Selecting users for monitoring Select a specific user for monitoring by following these steps: 1 Choose KM Admin => Users Monitoring from the USERS menu. you must select the USERS category. you should monitor no more than thirty users at one time. You may want to monitor a specific session instead. and enable the USERS category to start monitoring users. You can also use this menu command to deactivate user monitoring. Once a user or user session is monitored. and SQL statements 197 . NOTE To prevent performance problems.Activating user monitoring Activating user monitoring Before you can selectively monitor users. If this category is not selected. Selecting users or user sessions for monitoring Once the USERS application has been activated. and the parameters for the USERS_INSTANCE instance become active.

The parameters and reports gather information during the next polling cycle. the USERS_INSTANCE icon disappears during the next polling cycle. Once a user is removed from monitoring. 5 Choose Deselect and then click Apply to stop users from monitoring with PATROL. However. ts?11 to select ts011 or tsa11. For example. the information about the user appears on reports and is reflected in the values of the parameters in the AVAILABILITY category. However. You can also use this function to remove a user from monitoring by PATROL. 198 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . use ts*11? To select the tablespaces that starts with ts and has one character after 11. ts* to select the users that start with ts. The session or sessions appear in the Sessions To Be Monitored list. The parameters and reports gather information during the next polling cycle. I You can combine the regular expressions. The sessions appears as a USER_INSTANCE application icon. 2 Select the users you want to monitor from the Sessions Available list and click Apply. For example. the USERS_INSTANCE icon disappears during the next polling cycle. For example.Selecting users or user sessions for monitoring Supported characters are * and ?: I * indicates 0 or more positions of a character. 4 Choose Select and then click Apply to add users to start monitoring with PATROL. The user appears as a USERS_INSTANCE application icon. You can also use this function to remove a user session from monitored by PATROL. Once a user session is removed from monitoring. the information about the session appears on reports and is reflected in the values of the parameters in the AVAILABILITY and CAPACITY categories. Selecting user sessions for monitoring 1 Choose User Monitoring => Sessions Monitoring from the USERS menu. ? indicates single position of a character.

doing nothing. Table 39 lists the thresholds that you can set. From the USERS menu. Once you have configured the threshold ranges. The parameter displays the name of the user or user session and the threshold that the user exceeded. users. choose User Monitoring=> Problem User Settings. choose User Monitoring => Problem User Settings Config. running too long without returning any data using too much CPU as a percentage of total CPU use If a user or user session exceeds the threshold. From the USERS menu. blocking other sessions by holding a block too long. the ProblemUsers parameter goes into an alarm state. NOTE The parameter TIMED_STATISTICS in the init. you can set the actual thresholds.Monitoring problem users Monitoring problem users You can set thresholds to determine when a user or user session becomes a problem user.ora file must be set to TRUE to monitor and determine excessive CPU users Setting problem user thresholds You can set the minimum and maximum values to use for each threshold setting. Table 39 Item User Idle User Blocked Problem User Settings dialog box Description how many minutes the user session must remain idle before the session is declared a problem user how many minutes the user session must remain blocked from completing a process before it is declared a problem user Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. and move the slider to set the thresholds. Problem users are sessions that exhibit one of the following performance behaviors: I I I I I waiting too long to obtain a lock. and enter the minimum and maximum values you want to use for the threshold ranges. and SQL statements 199 .

the user does not appear as a problem user even if the user exceeds a problem user threshold. you can exclude those users from problem user monitoring. if the user exceeds a problem user threshold. or from the INSTANCE menu. NOTE You can also use this function to include a user you have previously excluded.Viewing the All Problem Users report Table 39 Item Problem User Settings dialog box Description how many minutes the user session must run a process without returning any data before it is declared a problem user percentage of CPU time the user session must use before it is declared a problem user User Runaway User CPU Usage Excluding users from problem user monitoring Some Oracle users. however. To exclude a user from problem user monitoring. from the USERS menu. If you do not want to have some users appear as problem users. choose User Monitoring => Problem User Exclusion from the USERS menu. You can still monitor the user with the User Monitoring function. choose KM Admin => Reports => Users => All Problem Users. and select the users you want to exclude. and the user continues to appear on the user reports. The information shown in Table 40 is displayed for each user. such as applications or department users. After you exclude the problem user. choose Reports => All Problem Users. Viewing the All Problem Users report The All Problem Users report lists all users that were detected as problem users. Table 40 Item User ID Session ID User Name Reason All Problem Users report Description ID of the user ID of the session user name with which the user is logged in reason that the user is a problem user 200 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . regularly exceed the thresholds you want to set for most users. After you include the user. To run this report. the ProblemUsers parameter goes into an alarm state.

This command generates a report that lists the process that is blocking the problem user and the user running the process. and SQL statements 201 . You must enter an authorized user name and password. and instance of the alert explanation of the ProblemUser alert user name auditing session ID (AUDSID) SID of the session that caused the alert current threshold settings thresholds for the problem user SQL text that exceeded the threshold You can save the annotation report to a file for later reference. you can find the process that is blocking the user. the problem user can complete its task. Finding the process that is blocking a problem user If a user is blocked. After you terminate the user session that is blocking.Viewing the All Problem Users report The ProblemUsers parameter also creates an annotation that contains the following information: I I I I I I I I time. choose Find Blocking Process. If you want to terminate the session that is blocking. choose Kill Session from either the INSTANCE application menu or a specific USERS_INSTANCE application menu. date. From the USERS_INSTANCE menu for a problem user. users. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces.

Table 41 Item OS User Oracle User Session ID Statistic Name Statistic Value Oracle User Session ID Active Sessions report (part 1 of 2) Description Session Statistics name of the user for the operating system name of the user in Oracle ID of the user session in Oracle name of the statistic that is currently active value of the currently active statistic Session Locks Held name of the user in Oracle ID of the user session in Oracle 202 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Viewing the Active Sessions report The Active Sessions report lists information about all active user sessions.Viewing other reports on users Viewing other reports on users PATROL contains the following reports that provide further information about users and user sessions: I I I I I I I I I I I Active Sessions SQL Statements Display Oracle Users Profiles Role Information User Account Info User Role/Column Privilege User Session and User Session Data User Session SQL and User Session Detail Users/Objects in SYSTEM Users with DBA Role These reports are described in the following sections. Run the report by choosing KM Admin => Reports => Users => Active Sessions from the INSTANCE menu. Table 41 shows the information that the report provides. or Reports => Active Sessions from the USERS menu.

Table 42 Item Username SID Name Memory Runtime Memory Sorts Disk Reads Buffers Read SQL Statements report Description user name that the SQL statement ran under Oracle SID for the session SQL statement that was run memory that the SQL statement used runtime memory that the SQL statement used number of sorts retrieved by the SQL statement number of disk reads the SQL statement generated number of buffers that were read as a result of the SQL statement Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. type of lock that is held lock identifier 1 for the type of lock lock identifier 2 for the type of lock user who is holding the lock user who is requesting the lock Session Details name of the user for the operating system name of the user in Oracle ID of the user session in Oracle amount of time in minutes the user has been connected Serial Number Type Resource_id1 Resource_id2 Lock Held Lock Request OS User Oracle User Session ID Connect Time in Minutes Viewing the SQL Statements report The SQL Statements report lists information about SQL statements that were issued by the current sessions. It guarantees that session-level commands are applied to the correct objects if the session ends and another session begins using the same session ID. Run the report by choosing Reports => SQL Statements from the USERS menu. Table 42 shows the information that the report provides. and SQL statements 203 . users. or KM Admin => Reports => Users => SQL Statements from the INSTANCE menu.Viewing other reports on users Table 41 Item Active Sessions report (part 2 of 2) Description Session serial number This number uniquely identifies the objects of a session.

no thresholds are set for that resource for the profile. Table 43 Item OS User Username SPID SID Program Display Oracle Users report Description the username for the operating system the username for Oracle the system ID number for the session the session identifier for the session the program that is running for the SID Viewing the Profiles report The Profiles report displays all profiles that are available on the instance. 204 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Run this report by choosing Reports => Display Oracle Users from the USERS menu. Run this report by choosing Reports => Profiles from the USERS menu. Viewing the Role Information report The Roles report displays the currently used roles in the instance. the thresholds are the default settings that were set by the system administrator. or KM Admin => Reports => Users => Role Information from the INSTANCE menu. Table 44 shows the information that the report provides. or KM Admin => Reports => Users => Display Oracle Users from the INSTANCE menu. or KM Admin => Reports => Users => Profiles from the INSTANCE menu. Run this report by choosing Reports => Role Information from the USERS menu. Table 45 on page 205 shows the information that the report provides. If the value is DEFAULT. Table 44 Item Profile Resource Name Limit Profiles report Description name of the profile name of the database or system resource threshold of the resource that is available to the profile If the limit is UNLIMITED. Table 43 shows the information that the report provides.Viewing other reports on users Viewing the Display Oracle Users report The Display Oracle Users report displays all Oracle users on the instance.

Table 46 Item Username Default Tablespace Temporary Tablespace Profile Username Tablespace Quota (Bytes) User Account Info report (part 1 of 2) Description User Default/Temporary Tablespaces Report name of the Oracle user default tablespace assigned to that user temporary tablespace assigned to the user profile assigned to the user User Tablespace Quotas Report name of the Oracle user tablespace assigned to the user amount of space that the user can use on the tablespace A value of -1 indicates there is no limitation. and SQL statements 205 . Run this report by choosing Access this report by choosing Reports => User Account Info from the USERS menu.Viewing other reports on users Table 45 Field Role Information report Description Roles Granted user name or name of the role granted role given to the user name whether the username can act as an administrator for that granted role whether the granted role is the default Role System Privileges Report name of the role privilege granted to the role whether the role can act as administrator User or Role Granted Role Admin Option Default Role Role Name Privilege Admin Option Viewing the User Account Info report The User Account Information report displays statistics and information for the user accounts that you select on the instance. users. Table 46 shows the information that the report provides. Used (Bytes) Pct Used Username number of bytes that the user has used on the tablespace percentage of the allotted space that the user has used User System Privileges Report name of the Oracle user Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. or KM Admin => Reports => Users => User Account Info from the INSTANCE menu.

Table 48 Field OS User Oracle User Session ID SQL Statement User Session report (part 1 of 2) Description Current SQL Commands Report operating system user name Oracle user name ID of the session SQL statement that was used in the session 206 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Select a user or ALL USERS. or KM Admin => Reports => Users => User Role/Column Privilege from the INSTANCE menu. or KM Admin => Reports => Users => User Session Data from the INSTANCE menu. Table 47 Item Username Table Name Column Name Privilege Admin User Column/Role Privilege report Description name of the Oracle user name of table that the column is in name of the column that has the object privileges privilege granted to the user whether the privilege granted to the user includes the ADMIN option Viewing the User Session and User Session Data reports The User Session and User Session Data reports list information about the selected user or users. Table 48 shows the information that these reports provide. Table 47 shows the information that the report provides.Viewing other reports on users Table 46 Item Privilege User Account Info report (part 2 of 2) Description privilege granted to the user whether the privilege granted to the user includes the ADMIN option Admin Option Viewing the User Role/Column Privilege report The User Role/Column Privilege report displays the column and table privileges for the user roles you select. and then click Accept. Run this report by choosing Reports => User Session from the USERS menu. Run this report by choosing Reports => User Role/Column Privilege from the USERS menu.

and SQL statements 207 .Viewing other reports on users Table 48 Field OS Users User Session report (part 2 of 2) Description User Statistics operating system user name Oracle user name ID of the session name of the statistic that is reported in this report: I I I I I I I I I I I I I Oracle User Session ID Stat Name CPU used by this session execute count physical reads physical writes session logical reads sorts (disk) sorts (memory) table fetch continued row table scan rows gotten table scans (long tables) table scans (short tables) user commits user rollbacks Stat Value Oracle Username Session ID Serial # Type Resource_id1 Resource_id2 Lock Held value of the statistic Locks Held/Session Report Oracle user name ID of the session serial number for the user session type of lock held by the user session first resource that is locked by the user session second resource that is locked by the user session the type of lock held : I I I I I I I None Null RS .Exclusive Lock Request user who requested the lock Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. users.Row Share RX .Share Row Exclusive X .Share SRX .Row Exclusive S .

choose User Session Detail.Viewing other reports on users Viewing the User Session SQL and User Session Detail reports The User Session SQL report provides the SQL command that was issued by the user in the current session. For more detailed information about a specific user session. choose Reports =>User Session SQL. Table 49 Field OS User ID Oracle User ID Session ID Statistic Name User Session Detail report Description Oracle User Statistics report user name for the operating system account user name for the Oracle account ID of the session for the username name of the statistic that is reported in this report: I I I I I I I I I I I I I CPU used by this session execute count physical reads physical writes session logical reads sorts (disk) sorts (memory) table fetch continued row table scan rows gotten table scans (long tables) table scans (short tables) user commits user rollbacks Statistic Value OS User ID Oracle User ID Session ID Connect Time in Minutes value of each statistic Oracle Connect Time/Session report user name for the operating system account user name for the Oracle account ID of the session for the username how long the user has been logged in and running 208 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . From the USERS_INSTANCE menu. from the USERS_INSTANCE menu. Table 49 shows the information that the User Session Detail report provides.

The following information about the objects is displayed: I I I I I Owner of the object Object name Object Type Status of the object Object creation date Run this report from a USERS application menu by choosing Reports => Users/Objects in SYSTEM.Excluding parameter alarms Viewing the Users/Objects in SYSTEM report The Users/Objects in SYSTEM report lists the objects and their owners that are in the SYSTEM tablespace. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. but the tablespace or object is not scheduled to receive anymore data. Viewing the Users with DBA Role report The Users with DBA Role report lists all users in the instance that can have DBA privileges. Excluding parameter alarms The PATROL space parameters go into an alarm state when a tablespace or tablespace object is full. users. you can exclude it from being monitored by the space parameters. and SQL statements 209 . If a tablespace or object does not have available free space or extents. Run this report from a USERS application menu by choosing Reports => Users with DBA Role.

only that partitioned part of the table is excluded.Excluding parameter alarms Table 50 lists the tablespace or tablespace object conditions that cause the listed space parameters in the AVAILABILITY application to go into a warning or alarm state. Table 50 Condition I I AVAILABILITY alarm conditions Parameter I I I I I I I I I I I I I less than 10% of free space left has less than two extents that can be added does not have enough rollback segment space left does not have enough extents left for a rollback segment cannot allocate its next extent because the object does not have enough free space I I I ExtentsLeftETF ExtentsLeftPct ExtentsLeft FreeSpaceDeficit FreeSpace (tablespaces only) FreeSpaceETF (tablespaces only) RSExtentsLeftPct RSExtentsLeft RSSpaceLeftPct RSSpaceLeft CannotExtend TempTSLeft TempTSLeftPct You can exclude the following types of objects: I I I I I I I tables cluster index schemas partitions tablespaces (Locally Managed Tablespaces—UNIFORM extent size) temporary tablespaces (both Dictionary Managed Temporary Tablespaces and Locally Managed Temporary Tablespaces) When you exclude an object in a tablespace. I If you exclude a tablespace. only that object is excluded from setting off parameter alarms. only that object is not monitored by the space parameters. wherever they are located in the instance. all objects in that tablespace is not monitored by the space parameters. If you exclude an object in a tablespace. are not monitored by the space parameters. you must exclude all partitions that create that table. If you exclude a schema. I I I 210 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . If you exclude a partition. all objects that are owned by the user. To exclude all of a partitioned table from being monitored.

However. users. you must exclude all partitions contained the table) Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. but the space parameters do not go into alarm. and SQL statements 211 . Partition2. Index3. Index2. the information about the tablespace or tablespace object still appears on relevant reports. Differences between exclusion types You can exclude a tablespace. Table5 Cluster1. Index4 Only the objects that are owned by the specified user Partition1. or the schema for a selected user. and the tablespace is still monitored for file input and output. Cluster2 Index1. Figure 17 and the accompanying table describe the differences between the exclusion types: Figure 17 Exclusion types Object Tablespace Table Cluster Index User schema Partitions Menu command Exclusion => Tablespace Exclusion Exclusion => Object Exclusion Exclusion => Object Exclusion Exclusion => Object Exclusion Exclusion => User Exclusion Exclusion => Partition Exclusion Affected objects Tablespace1 and all objects inside Table1. Partition3. Partition4 (to exclude Table2 or Table4. PATROL still monitors the tablespace. selected objects in a tablespace.Differences between exclusion types If you exclude a tablespace or tablespace object. Table3.

EXAMPLE Excluding the Sales96 tablespace The Sales96 tablespace is 99% full but you know that nothing new will be added to it. and Example 2 describes excluding a tablespace object. To prevent unnecessary alarms.Exclusion examples Exclusion examples Example 1 describes excluding a tablespace. 212 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . the tablespace appears on all reports that list the tablespaces in the instance. you exclude the tablespace. The following parameters do not go into an alarm state even though the tablespace is nearly full: I I I I I I I I I I I I I CannotExtend ExtentsLeftPct ExtentsLeftETF FreeSpaceDeficit ExtentsLeft FreeSpaceETF (Tablespaces only) FreeSpace (Tablespaces only) RSExtentsLeft RSExtentsLeftPct RSSpaceLeft RSSpaceLeftPct TempTSLeftPct TempTSLeft However.

users. Excluding tablespaces Use this task to exclude a permanent or temporary tablespace from triggering the space parameter alarms. You do not anticipate adding any new information to the Flex99 table. 2 Select a tablespace or tablespaces you want to exclude from the Tablespaces Available list. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. A few tables in the tablespace are 99% full.Excluding tablespaces EXAMPLE Excluding the Flex99 table You want to monitor the space left in the Personnel tablespace. You do not want to see space alarms on the Personnel tablespace if the only object in the tablespace that is running out of room is the Flex99 table. You exclude the Flex99 table object in the Personnel tablespace from being monitored by the following parameters: I I I I I I I I I I I I I CannotExtend ExtentsLeftPct ExtentsLeftETF FreeSpaceDeficit ExtentsLeft FreeSpaceETF (Tablespaces only) FreeSpace (Tablespaces only) RSExtentsLeft RSExtentsLeftPct RSSpaceLeft RSSpaceLeftPct TempTSLeftPct TempTSLeft If these parameters go into an alarm state on the Personnel tablespace. and SQL statements 213 . and click Apply. 1 Choose Tablespace Exclusion from the AVAILABILITY menu. you now know that the alarm is for another tablespace object that is running out of room.

Excluding objects Use this task to exclude certain objects in a tablespace from being monitored by the following parameters: I I I I I I I I ExtentsLeftETF ExtentsLeftPct ExtentsLeft FreeSpaceDeficit RSExtentsLeftPct RSExtentsLeft RSSpaceLeftPct RSSpaceLeft 1 Select Object Exclusion from the AVAILABILITY menu. and click Apply. 2 Select a tablespace whose objects you want to exclude. 4 Click Exit to exit the function. select the tablespace from the Tablespaces Being Excluded list.Excluding objects The tablespaces are added to the Tablespaces Being Excluded list and are excluded from monitoring by the following parameters in the next polling cycle: I I I I I I I I I I I I ExtentsLeftETF ExtentsLeftPct ExtentsLeft FreeSpaceDeficit FreeSpace FreeSpaceETF RSExtentsLeftPct RSExtentsLeft RSSpaceLeftPct RSSpaceLeft TempTSLeftPct TempTSLeft 3 To include a tablespace that you have excluded. and click Accept. 214 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

The schema of the user you have selected is now excluded from monitoring by the following parameters: I I I I I I I I ExtentsLeftETF ExtentsLeftPct ExtentsLeft FreeSpaceDeficit RSExtentsLeftPct RSExtentsLeft RSSpaceLeftPct RSSpaceLeft 3 To include a user that you have excluded from space monitoring. 5 Select the objects to exclude from the dialog box that lists the object that the user owns in the tablespace. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. select the user from the Users to Be Excluded list.Excluding users from space monitoring 3 Select the type of object from the tablespace that you want to exclude. The user is moved to the Users To Be Excluded list. 1 Choose Exclusion => User Exclusion from the AVAILABILITY menu. and click Apply. then select the user who owns the type of object you want to exclude. and click Accept. Excluding users from space monitoring Use this task to exclude a particular user schema from being monitored by the space parameters. You can also use this function to include objects you have previously excluded from monitoring. 2 Select a user whose objects you want to exclude from the Users Available list. and click Apply. The objects are now excluded from monitoring by the space parameters. users. and SQL statements 215 . You can select from the following: I I I I I Non-partitioned Table Non-partitioned Index Cluster Partition in a Table Partition in an Index 4 Click Accept. The user is now included in space monitoring.

and select the the schema or user that owns objects in that partition. To exclude partitions from monitoring 1 Choose Partition Exclusion from the AVAILABILITY menu to display the Partition Exclusion dialog box. 4 Select an table or index that belongs to the schema you selected. NOTE The FreeSpace parameter does not take into account whether the segment is a partition or a table. to exclude the table you must exclude all the partitions that create that table. and click Apply. and click Apply. Viewing the List Monitoring Settings report for a specific instance Choose KM Admin => List Monitoring Settings from the INSTANCE menu. 2 Select a type of partition you want to include or exclude. including the tablespaces that have been excluded. Since a partition is part of a table. The Monitoring Settings report lists all monitoring settings. These partitions are excluded from the parameter in the next polling cycle. Viewing the monitoring settings Use these tasks to view the tablespaces and objects that have been excluded in an instance.Excluding partitions from monitoring Excluding partitions from monitoring You can exclude specific partitions from being monitored by PATROL. 216 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 5 Select the partitions to be added or removed from the exclusion list. 3 Click Apply.

The following information is displayed: I I I I I I I I I name and service of the instance whether the instance is being monitored if the instance should be always online home path of the instance what tablespaces are being excluded what tablespaces are being monitored problem user settings categories that have been selected to monitor the instance blackouts scheduled for the instance Monitoring SQL statements From PATROL for Oracle. and SQL statements 217 . users. you can use the following functions to obtain information about SQL commands used in Oracle processes: I SQL Snapshot displays the last SQL statement sent by a client process. You can use SQL Viewer to examine all SQL statements in a polling cycle to find trends or continuous problems. You can use SQL Snapshot to examine the SQL statements being currently executed by a problem process. If the process is currently executing an SQL statement. SQL Snapshot overview SQL Snapshot displays the current SQL statement sent by a user or process in the polling cycle. SQL Snapshot displays the name of the SQL statement and the text of the currently executing line within the SQL statement.Monitoring SQL statements Viewing the List Monitoring Settings report for instances on a server Choose Configuration => List Monitoring Settings from the ORACLE menu. SQL Viewer captures all SQL statements that are sent in the instance during a time I interval. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces.

consider using SQL Viewer. Using SQL Snapshot To capture a long-running SQL statement. 4 Choose any of the following actions: I I I run Oracle's Explain Plan utility quit SQL Snapshot cancel and view another SQL statement 5 To run Oracle's Explain Plan utility. Session CPU sorts by the session number. 218 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . For these types of statements. the PID. You must enter the user's name and the password for that username. The maximum number is 20. and click Accept. Session Block Gets sorts by the block gets of a session. select Run Explain Plan and then click Accept. and click Accept. The user name for the session is displayed in the SQL Text dialog box. 3 To view the SQL statement. choose SQL => Snapshot and select the sorting criteria you want to use: I I I I Statement CPU sorts by the SQL statement. and the value of the sorting criteria. 2 Move the slider to select the number of users whose SQL statements you want to see. The SQL Text dialog box displays the SQL statement for the user or session. and the list includes the user name. Session Physical I/O sorts by the physical input and output of a session. the SID. and the default is 10. The current active users or sessions are listed in descending order.Using SQL Snapshot NOTE Some SQL statements run too rapidly to be captured by SQL Snapshot. NOTE You may need to enter the SYS user name and the password. select the user or session whose SQL statement you want to see. perform the following steps: 1 From the INSTANCE menu.

click Cancel to return to the SQL Text dialog box. see your Oracle documentation.SQL Viewer tables The console window displays the actions for the Explain Plan utility. SQL Snapshot does not retrieve any CPU data. and executed and provides history and trend information. For more information about the Explain Plan utility. The table is always appended. SQL Viewer captures information in the following tables: I I P$SQL P$SQL_TEXT You can access reports about SQL statements through the SQLVIEWER menu. change the parameter in the init. NOTE To retrieve CPU data. you must shut down the database. that statement is listed in the P$SQL table only once. To change the parameter. users. SQL Viewer tables The SQL Viewer utility captures SQL statements submitted to the Oracle server. the TIMED_STATISTICS parameter in the init. P$SQL table The P$SQL table stores history and trend information about each SQL statement. values are not updated. If the parameter is not set to true. You can also access the tables through SQL*Plus or Server Manager to create your own reports. and restart the database. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces.ora file. However. and SQL statements 219 . SQL statements are captured at certain intervals that you set by specifying the scheduling of the CollSqlViewer parameter in the COLLECTORS application. The SQL Viewer stores information about the activities that occur on an SQL statement and the statistics related to the statement. The table is emptied during the archive and truncate process. If a SQL statement is executed more than once by the same Oracle user.ora file must be set to TIMED_STATISTICS=TRUE. parsed. invalidated. 6 To view another SQL statement. SQL Viewer keeps track of the total number of times that the SQL is reloaded. or quit SQL Snapshot by selecting Quit Snapshot. The information includes the date that the SQL was first loaded.

Activating SQL Viewer Before you can begin capturing SQL statements. choose Start Recording from the SQLVIEWER menu and click Accept. you must activate the SQLVIEWER application.Activating SQL Viewer P$SQL_TEXT table The P$SQL_TEXT table collects the text of each unique SQL statement. To start SQL Viewer. change the schedule of the CollSqlViewer parameter. SQL Viewer begins recording all SQL statements sent in the monitored database. Starting and stopping SQL Viewer After you activate the SQLVIEWER application. you can start capturing SQL statements from the V$SQL dynamic view. To change the time interval at which SQL statements are captured from the SGA. 220 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Viewing SQL Viewer reports You can use the SQL Viewer reports to determine if the SQL statements being processed on the instance should be tuned. From the INSTANCE application. The SQL is readable text. choose Stop Recording from the SQLVIEWER menu. run the SQL Viewer reports. and the number of text characters that the table can store is unlimited. choose KM Admin => Monitoring Settings. To see the SQL information. You can run a standard report or a detail report. To stop SQL Viewer. and click Accept. The default polling time for CollSqlViewer is 30 minutes.

A standard report ordered by disk reads identifies the statements that are generating the most I/O activity on the system. A standard report ordered by executions identifies the most frequently executed SQL statements. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. Table 51 shows the statistics that this report can provide. and SQL statements 221 .Viewing SQL Viewer reports Use any of the following reports to identify statements that should be pinned in the SGA: I A standard report ordered by buffer identifies high CPU use by a SQL statement. choose Reports => Standard Report from the SQLVIEWER menu. users. I I NOTE You must stop the SQL Viewer collection before you can run any reports. Table 51 Statistic Buffer Gets Disk Reads Executions Invalidations Loads Parse Calls Persistent Memory Runtime Memory Sharable Memory Sorts SQL Viewer statistics Description number of buffer gets read for this SQL statement to approximate CPU utilization for the statement number of disk reads for this SQL statement number of times this SQL statement has been executed number of times this SQL statement has been invalidated number of times this SQL statement has been loaded number of times this SQL statement has been parsed persistent memory in bytes used by this SQL statement runtime memory in bytes used by this SQL statement sharable memory in bytes used by this SQL statement number of sorts that was done for this SQL statement To view this report. Then select the following items from the dialog box: I I I I statistic to display in the report user to report on beginning and end date range number of rows for the report to return. Viewing the SQL Viewer Standard report The SQL Viewer Standard report lists the SQL statements in the SQL Viewer and the accompanying statistics that you select.

choose Reports => Detail Report from the SQLVIEWER menu. sorted by the sort criteria you specify. Table 52 Item SQL Text Statistic Parsing User SQL Viewer standard report Description text of the SQL statement statistic that you selected for the SQL statement user who originally ran this SQL statement Viewing the SQL Viewer Detail report The SQL Viewer Detail report lists the SQL statements in the SQL Viewer and the all statistics for each statement.Viewing SQL Viewer reports The report is sorted by the criteria that you selected and is displayed in a text window. Table 53 Item SQL Text First Loaded Statistics SQL Viewer Detail report Description text of the SQL statement time and user who first loaded the statement values for the following statistics for each SQL statement are listed: I I I I I I I I I I I I Sharable_mem Persistent_mem Runtime_mem Buffer_gets Executions Users_executing Sorts Loaded Versions Invalidations Disk reads Loads Parse Calls 222 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Table 52 shows the information provided in the report. Then select the following items from the dialog box: I I I I sort order to use for the report user or users to report on beginning and end date range number of rows for the report to return The report is sorted by the criteria that you selected and is displayed in a text window. To view this report. Table 51 on page 221 shows the statistics that you specify. Table 53 shows the information provided in the report.

To terminate a use session. The following files are created: I I psql. click View SQL and click Accept. To archive the SQL statements. and then click Accept to delete the information from the database tables and save to the flat files. which contains the statistics about the SQL statements psqltest. The data is deleted from the current SQL Viewer tables. users. To view the text of a user session. Click Accept to close the response box and return to the Current Active Users dialog box.dat. choose SQL => Viewer => Kill Session from the INSTANCE menu. You can now open the file and view the SQL information in a text editor. leaving them empty for another collection. Terminating SQL Viewer sessions You can view the SQL statements for a particular user session. or click Cancel to close the dialog box. Select the user session whose SQL statement you want to see. and SQL statements 223 . choose SQL => Viewer => Kill Session from the INSTANCE menu. click Kill Session.dat. You can change the directory where the files are created. NOTE The SQL Viewer must be stopped before you can archive the data.Archiving SQL Viewer data Archiving SQL Viewer data After you have collected the SQL statements. If a session’s SQL statement is taking more CPU or resources than necessary. and click Accept. choose Archive Data from the SQLVIEWER menu. Chapter 6 Monitoring tablespaces. you can delete the data that has been collected from the SQL Viewer tables and save it in flat files for later viewing in a text editor. The SQL statement for the selected user session appears in a response box. which contains the text of the SQL statements The data is deleted from the tables. you can terminate the session. Analyze the statement to determine whether the user session should be terminated. Select the user session that you want to kill.

and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. The session is immediately terminated. InfoBoxes. Appendix A. “Monitoring instance health” on page 225 Chapter 8. “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293 how to access the KM menu commands. “Accessing menu commands. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 224 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . and online Help InfoBoxes. Where to go from here The following table suggests topics: Topic how to monitor instance health using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor Oracle options using PATROL for Oracle how to monitor the the RAC environment Source of information Chapter 7. “Monitoring Oracle options” on page 271 Chapter 9. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 Instructions about installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls Appendix C.Where to go from here Enter the authorized user name and password (SYS or DBA) in the entry fields and click Accept.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specifying the time the job or report should run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Batch Scheduler examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting a job from the scheduler . . . . . . . . Compressing or moving log files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SGA reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Backup and recovery reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Database reports . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring HTML reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Capacity reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing and modifying HTML reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Availability reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the settings for a job or report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a report to the scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the status of a scheduled job or report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automated recovery actions. . . . . . . . . . . HTML reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Batch reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure FTP information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 7 226 226 228 234 237 240 246 249 250 251 253 254 254 255 255 255 256 256 256 257 258 260 260 262 263 268 270 7 Monitoring instance health This chapter presents the following topics: Reports and tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up HTML reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alerts parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . Updating the server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xml file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the Scheduler log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resizing the next extent . . . . . . . . . Adding a job to the scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

By default. the Alerts parameter ignores the ORA-00608 testing error. you must deactivate and reactivate the Alerts parameter so that the changes can take effect. you can make those changes using the Error Log Filter menu command from the AVAILABILITY application. To view the error. and if an error occurred. the Alerts parameter goes into alarm when it detects one of the ORA006XX errors in the error log. or objects need any adjustments or tuning: I I I I I I Alerts parameter Availability reports Backup and Recovery reports Capacity reports Database reports SGA reports Alerts parameter You can use PATROL to determine if any Oracle errors occurred on the instance. tablespace. After making changes to the error strings. the Alerts parameter goes into a warning state each time it detects an error message that contains tablespace name. If you enter tablespace name as a string that you want monitored. If you want the Alerts parameter to monitor the error log for other errors or exclude from monitoring one or more of the ORA-006XX errors. view the error message. if one occurs. When an Oracle error occurs.Reports and tuning Reports and tuning Use the following parameters and reports from PATROL for Oracle to determine if the Oracle server. Using the Error Log Filter menu command. open the parameter. and does not go into an alarm state when it detects this error in the error log. 226 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . The error text is displayed in an annotated data point on the parameter graph. the Alerts parameter in the AVAILABILITY application goes into warning or alarm. EXAMPLE If you enter testing error as a string that you want excluded from monitoring. you can specify new error strings that you want monitored and specify error strings that you want excluded from monitoring.

for example. choose Reports => Alert Log => Privilege Violations from the INSTANCE menu. To view ORA-006XX error messages. choose Reports => Alert Log => Show Tail from the INSTANCE menu. enter the prefix for the error message and click Apply. Any violations of privileges by users or user sessions are listed. The report prints to a text window. search for a specific error message if you think the error occurred in the instance. choose Reports => Alert Log => All Error Messages from the INSTANCE menu. Any error messages that were generated on the instance are listed. Any critical 006XX error messages that were generated on the instance are listed. To view privilege violations. enter the number of the error message and click Apply. You might. Choose Oracle Server Admin => Oracle Error Code Lookup from the INSTANCE menu. I Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 227 . The default is ORA. The report prints to a text window. choose Reports => Alert Log => All ORA-006XX Messages from the INSTANCE menu. If you select Error Number. The report prints to a text window. The report prints to a text window. To view the last 40 lines of the alert log. Any violations of privileges by users or user sessions are listed. Search the alert log for a search string by using Reports => Alerts =>Enter Search String from the INSTANCE menu. You can also use the Oracle Error Code Lookup facility from PATROL to find the meaning of an error message.Alerts parameter Viewing error messages You can view error messages of the following types: I I I I all error messages ORA-006XX error messages privilege violations messages in the last 40 lines of the alert log To view all error messages. I If you select Facility Name. Searching and determining the meaning of error codes You can also search the alert log for a specific error message string.

lock and extent availability on the instance: I I Space and lock information — Free Space — Lock Conflicts — Object Space Analysis — Space Usage by Object Extent information — Auto Extend DBFiles — Free Space Deficit — Maximum Extents — Temporary Extents Getting space and lock information Use the reports in this section to determine space availability and lock information. Choose Reports => Availability => Free Space from the INSTANCE menu. The report appears in a text window. or Reports => Free Space from the AVAILABILITY menu. Table 54 Item Tablespace Name Total Space Space Used Space Left Percent Free Free Space report Description name of the tablespace total space allocated to the tablespace space used in the tablespace free space in the tablespace percentage of free space available in the tablespace 228 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Table 54 shows the information that the report provides. Determining free space in tablespaces The Free Space report provides free space information for all tablespaces on the instance.Availability reports Availability reports PATROL provides the following reports to determine space.

or Reports => Space Usage by Object from the AVAILABILITY menu for that instance. Table 55 shows the information that the report provides. 3 Select the object for which you want information and click Accept. 2 Select the type of object for which you want the space analysis and the schema for that object. Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 229 . Table 55 Item Object Name Size (bytes) Size (blk) Extents Next Extent Min Extents Max Extents % Inc Object Space Analysis report description Description name of the object size of the object in bytes size of the object in blocks number of extents in the rollback segment size of the next extent to be allocated to the segment minimum number of extents that are allowed in the segment maximum number of extents that are allowed in the segment percentage to use to increase the size of the next allocated extent Determining if objects are using too much space The Space Usage by Object report provides information about the size and space of the object. Click Accept. 1 Choose Reports => Availability =>Object Space Analysis from the INSTANCE menu. Click Accept.Availability reports Determining how much space an object is using The Object Space Analysis report provides information about the size of the object and the number and size of its extents. or Reports => Object Space Analysis from the AVAILABILITY menu for that instance. 2 Select the type of object for which you want the space analysis and the schema for that object. 1 Choose Reports => Availability =>Space Usage by Object from the INSTANCE menu.

either DIRECT LOAD or INVALID uniqueness status of the index.Availability reports Table 56 shows the information that the report provides. Table 56 Item Tablespace Name % Free % Used Init Trans Init Extent Next Extent Min Extents Max Extents % Inc Blocks Tablespace Name Table Name Table Type Status Uniqueness Init Extent Next Extent Min Extents Max Extents % Inc Tablespace Name Cluster Type % Free % Used Init Trans Init Extent Next Extent Min Extents Max Extents % Inc Space Usage By Object report Description Report for table name of the tablespace minimum percentage of free space in a block minimum percentage of used space in a block initial transactions size of the initial extent in the table size of the next extent to be allocated to the segment minimum number of extents allowed in the segment maximum number of extents allowed in the segment percentage to use to increase the size of the next allocated extent size in blocks of the table Report for index name of the tablespace that the index is in name of the table that the index exists on type of the table status of the index. either UNIQUE or NONUNIQUE size of the initial extent in the table size of the next extent to be allocated to the segment minimum number of extents allowed in the segment maximum number of extents allowed in the segment percentage to use to increase the size of the next allocated extent Report for cluster name of the tablespace that the cluster exists in type of the cluster minimum percentage of free space in a block minimum percentage of used space in a block initial transactions size of the initial extent in the table size of the next extent to be allocated to the segment minimum number of extents allowed in the segment maximum number of extents allowed in the segment percentage to use to increase the size of the next allocated extent 230 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

with their SID and serial number.Availability reports Determining lock conflicts The Lock Conflicts report provides information about current conflicting locks. you are informed via a response box. are listed in the report. or Reports => Lock Conflicts from the AVAILABILITY menu. Table 57 Item Wait User Name Wait UID Lock Type Lock Object Wait Lock Mode Hold User Name Hold UID Hold Lock Mode Lock conflicts report Description name of the user that is waiting for a lock ID of the user that is waiting for a lock type of lock the object is waiting for object that is locked mode of waiting that the object is using name of the user that is holding the lock ID of the user that is holding the lock mode of the holding lock Getting extent information The following parameters monitor extent problems with tablespaces and tablespace objects: I I I I I I I CannotExtend ExtentsLeft ExtentsLeftETF ExtentsLeftPct FreeSpaceDeficit RSExtentsLeft RSExtentsLeftPct You can also run the following reports: I I I I Auto Extend DBFiles Report Free Space Deficit Report Maximum Extents Report Temporary Extents Report Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 231 . All sessions. If no conflicting locks exist. Table 57 shows the information that the report provides. Choose Reports => Availability => Lock Conflicts from the INSTANCE menu.

Table 58 Item Tablespace Name DB File Name Next Extent Max Extent Header File AutoExtend DB Files report description Description tablespace name database file name size of the next extent maximum number of extents header file for the database file Running the Free Space Deficit report The Free Space Deficit report lists all database objects which have insufficient space to allocate their next extent. Choose Reports => Availability => Auto Extend DBFiles Report from the INSTANCE menu.Availability reports Running the AutoExtend DBFiles report The AutoExtend DBFiles report lists the database files that have the autoextend feature enabled. Table 58 shows the information that the report provides. or Reports => Availability => Free Space Deficit from the INSTANCE menu. and click Accept. The report appears in a text window. The report displays in a text window. 1 Choose Reports => Free Space Deficit from the AVAILABILITY menu. or Reports => Auto Extend DBFiles Report from the AVAILABILITY menu. Table 59 shows the information that the report provides. Table 59 Item Next Extent Max Available Deficit Type Segment Name Tablespace Owner Free Space Deficit report Description size of the next extent size of the largest extent that is available difference between the size of the next extent and the size of the largest extent that is available type of segment that does not have enough extent space segment name that does not have enough extent space tablespace that the segment is in owner of the tablespace that the segment is in 232 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 2 Select the type of object or select all objects.

or select ALL TABLESPACES. 2 Enter the Maximum Extents Threshold setting. If you select ALL TABLESPACES. 2 Select the tablespace or tablespaces you want information about. 1 Choose Reports => Availability => Temporary Extents from the INSTANCE menu or Reports => Temporary Extents from the AVAILABILITY menu. and click Accept. When an object reaches this threshold. extent information for all tablespaces on the instance is displayed. the object appears on the report.Availability reports Finding the maximum extents for all tablespaces The Maximum Extents report lists the extent information for tablespaces in the instance. This setting is the threshold for extents. or Reports => Maximum Extents from the AVAILABILITY menu for that instance. Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 233 . Click Accept. 1 Choose Reports => Availability => Maximum Extents from the INSTANCE menu. Table 60 Item Segment Type Tablespace Current Extents Max Extents Extents Left Pct Max Maximum Extents report Description name of the segment that has reached the threshold type of segments tablespace that the segment is in current number of extents that the segment has maximum number of extents that the segment can have number of extents that the segment has left percentage of the maximum number of extents that the segment has reached Getting tablespace temporary extent information The Temporary Extents report lists all temporary segments which have reached 50 percent or more of their maximum extents limit. select a tablespace. Table 60 shows the information that the report provides.

234 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 2 Select a datafile or select ALL DATAFILES.Backup and recovery reports The following information is displayed for each segment: I I I I I I name of temporary segment associated tablespace name current number of extents maximum number of extents specified for this segment system limit of maximum extents for a segment percent of maximum extents currently allocated Backup and recovery reports The following reports give information about the backup status and recovery settings of the instance: I I I I I Archiving State Backup Status Log History Media Recovery Redo Log Files Viewing backup status information The Backup Status report provides the backup status of all datafiles in the instance. 1 Choose Reports => Backup and Recovery => Backup Status from the INSTANCE menu. and click Accept.

Table 61 Item Enabled Status Backup Status report Description mode that is enabled for the datafile type of file (system or user) and its status: I I I I I OFFLINE ONLINE SYSTEM RECOVER SYSOFF (an offline file from the SYSTEM tablespace) Last Checkpoint SCN Start Time File SCN at last checkpoint timestamp of the datafile creation datafile path and file name Viewing the archiving state of the instance The Archiving State report shows the archiving status of the database and the database files. Table 62 shows the information that the report provides. Table 62 Item Database log mode Archiving State report description Description log mode of the database: I I ARCHIVELOG NOARCHIVELOG Automatic archival Archive destination whether the automatic archival option is set to TRUE or FALSE directory the archive should be saved to Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 235 . Choose Reports => Backup and Recovery => Archiving State from the INSTANCE menu.Backup and recovery reports Table 61 shows the information that the report provides.

Table 63 shows the information that the report provides. Table 63 Item Thread Sequence Archive Name Time Media Recovery report description Description number of the redo thread used by the instance log sequence number name of the archive time the archive log was last written to Viewing redo log file information The Redo Log Files report shows the status and size of the redo logs. Table 64 shows the information that the report provides. Choose Reports => Backup and Recovery => Redo Log Files from the INSTANCE menu. The name of the archived log file for every log in the database is listed in a text window. Viewing media recovery information Choose Reports => Backup and Recovery => Media Recovery from the INSTANCE menu.Backup and recovery reports Viewing recovery information Use the following reports to view information necessary for successful recovery of a database. Table 64 Item Group Redo Log File Name Status Size (Bytes) Archived Redo Log report description Description group the redo log file is in name of the redo log file status of the redo log file size in bytes of the redo log file whether the redo log file is archived 236 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Viewing log History information Choose Reports => Backup and Recovery => Log History from the INSTANCE menu.

Table 65 shows the information that the report provides. and enabling the CAPACITY category. The CollCapacity parameter starts collecting information on the next polling cycle. The following reports give information about the availability of the instance: I I I I I Access Statistics Locks Outstanding Resources Used Trace Files Analysis Wait State Analysis Before you can manage the job queue. Table 65 Item Owner Name Type Access Statistics report (part 1 of 2) Description owner of the object name of the object type of database object Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 237 . or Reports => Access Statistics from the CAPACITY menu for the instance. and processes on the instance. processes. The report appears in a text window. The CAPACITY icon should appear within two polling cycles. Choose Reports => Capacity => Access Statistics from the INSTANCE menu. and then populates the consumer parameters. transactions. Accessing statistics for the instance The Access Statistics report lists the numbers and types of access on the database objects. you must activate the CAPACITY application by choosing KM Admin => Monitor Settings Modify from the INSTANCE menu.Capacity reports Capacity reports Instance capacity is defined by the Oracle resources that are used by the users. You can also determine the statistics on the DB object cache and the shared SQL area. and transactions on the instance. Determining capacity use on an instance Use the reports in this section to determine how much of the Oracle resources have been used by the users.

The report is displayed in a text window.ora file: I I I I I OpenCursors LocksUsed ProcsUsed SessionsUsed TransactionsUsed Choose Reports => Capacity => Resources Used from the INSTANCE menu.Capacity reports Table 65 Item Access Statistics report (part 2 of 2) Description library cache namespace of the object: I I I I I I Namespace TABLE/PROCEDURE BODY TRIGGER INDEX CLUSTER OBJECT Memory Loads amount of memory the object uses number of times the object has been loaded This count also increases when an object has been invalidated Executions Locks Pins Buffers number of executions on the object number of users currently locking this object number of users currently pinning this object number of buffers on the object Viewing resources used on the instance The Resources Used report lists the current values of the following parameters compared with the maximum value defined in each init. or Reports => Resources Used from the CAPACITY menu. 238 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

or Reports => Trace Files Space Analysis from the CAPACITY menu. The following values are displayed in the report: I I Background dump space left Background dump space used BACKGROUND_DUMP_DEST specifies the path name for a directory where debugging trace files for the background processes (LGWR. Table 66 shows the information that the report provides. or the last statement parsed schema user name operating system client user name operating system client process ID Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 239 . I I User dump space left User dump space used USER_DUMP_DEST specifies the pathname for the directory where the server writes debugging trace files on behalf of a user process. and so on) are written during Oracle operations. or Reports => Wait State Analysis from the CAPACITY menu for the instance. I I Core dump space left Core dump space used CORE_DUMP_DEST specifies the directory where core files are dumped. DBWR. Choose Reports => Capacity => Trace Files Space Analysis from the INSTANCE menu.Capacity reports Tracing files space analysis for the instance Use this report to determine if trace files are taking up too much space on the instance. Wait State Analysis report The Wait State Analysis report shows information about wait events in the database. Table 66 Item User Name Command Schema Name OS User OS PID Wait State Analysis report (part 1 of 2) Description name of the user session command in progress. Choose Reports => Capacity => Wait State Analysis from the INSTANCE menu.

ora) Schema Table Information 240 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . I For all user sessions. select List all user sessions sorted by.Database reports Table 66 Item Wait Event Wait State Analysis report (part 2 of 2) Description resource or event for which the session is waiting. and select the sort order to use. session. I The locks for specific users. and click Accept. 2 Select one of the following options. 1 Choose Reports => Capacity => Locks Outstanding from the INSTANCE menu. For an individual user session. Table 67 Item User Name Session ID Lock Object Locks Outstanding report Description name of the user with a lock that is outstanding SID of the user with the outstanding lock object that the outstanding lock is for Database reports Use the following reports to get information about the database files: I I I I Database Files Oracle License Limits Parameter File (init. column containing one piece of the SQL text SQL Statement Determining lock problems Use the Locks Outstanding report to determine if there are any outstanding locks on the instance. or Reports => Locks Outstanding from the CAPACITY menu.Table 67 shows the information that the report provides. The locks that are waiting are also listed. and objects are listed. select the user session from the User Name list.

Select a table in the schema or select ALL TABLES. Choose Reports => Database => Database Files from the INSTANCE menu. Table 68 Item Constraint Name Type Owner Table Name Schema Table Information report (part 1 of 2) Description name of the constraint type of constraint owner of the table name of the table Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 241 Report 1 . redo files. Table 68 shows the information that the report provides. and storage allocation for the tables in a schema. 1 Choose Reports => Database => Schema Table Info from the INSTANCE menu. storage parameters. packages. and click Accept. and init. the schema information. Viewing schema table information The Schema Table Info report provides constraints. procedures. and control files used in the instance.Database reports Use the following reports to get information about the functions.ora parameter settings for the database.lists all table constraints ordered by owner and table name . and triggers used in the database: I I I I Schema Functions Schema Packages Schema Procedures Schema Triggers Use the following reports for information about activity in the database: I I Rollback Segments Statistic Summary Getting basic database information Use the following reports to get database file information. 2 Select a schema and click Accept. Database file information Use this report to obtain information about the data files.

Database reports Table 68 Item Status Schema Table Information report (part 2 of 2) Description status of the table name of the table name of the tablespace that the table is in the size of the initial extent in the tablespace the size of the next extent in the tablespace minimum number of extents allowed in the segment maximum number of extents allowed in the segment percentage to use to increase the size of the next allocated extent name of the table name of the tablespace that the table is in number of bytes in the table number of extents in the table owner of the table name of the table name of the column ID of the column Report 2 . and column_id Report 5 . table_name.lists storage allocated for all table segments ordered by owner and table name Report 4 .lists storage allocated for all segment types. ordered by owner and segment name Table Name Segment Type Tablespace Name Bytes Extents name of the table name of the segment in the table name of the tablespace the table is in number of bytes in the tablespace number of extents in the tablespace Oracle license information The Oracle License Limits report displays the current values of the following Oracle parameters: I I I license_max_sessions license_max_users license_sessions_warning Choose Reports => Database => Oracle License Limits from the INSTANCE menu. except Table.lists the storage parameters for all tables ordered by owner and table name Table Name Tablespace Name Init Extent Next Extent Min Ext Max Ext Pct Table Name Tablespace Name Bytes Extents Table Owner Table Name Column Column ID Report 3 . 242 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .lists table column information ordered by owner.

ora) from the INSTANCE menu. package. Table 69 shows the information that the report provides. Choose Reports => Database => Parameter File (init. Table 69 Item Name Type Parameter File init.ora) report displays the current value of selected init. 1 From the INSTANCE menu. packages.Database reports Oracle init. or select ALL SCHEMAS. and click Accept. Select the parameters that you want to view or select Select All Parameters.ora information The Parameter File (init. and click Accept. procedure and trigger information Use the following reports to get information about the functions. procedures.ora parameters.ora report Description name of the parameter type of the parameter: I I I string boolean integer Value value or setting of the parameter Getting function. choose one of the following reports: I I I I Reports => Database => Schema Function Info Reports => Database => Schema Package Info Reports => Database => Schema Procedure Info Reports => Database => Schema Trigger Info 2 Select a schema. The report appears in a text window. The following items are displayed on each report: I I I I owner of the object name of the object status of the object date and time that the object last executed Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 243 . and triggers used in the database.

1 Choose Reports => Database => Rollback Segments from the INSTANCE menu. 2 Select a rollback segment or select ALL SEGMENTS. Viewing rollback segment activity information The Rollback Segment report displays information about the rollback segments in the database.Database reports Getting database activity information Use the following reports to get information about the rollback segment activity and statistic activity on the instance. Table 70 Item Segment Name Tablespace Name Owner Status Bytes Blocks Extents Init Extents Min Extents Max Extents % Inc Segment Name Writes Gets Waits Wraps Extends Ave Shrinks Ave Active Rollback Segments report Description Report 1 name of the segment tablespace that the segment is in the owner of the tablespace the status of the segment the size in bytes of the segment the size in blocks of the segment the number of extent to the segment the size of the initial extent in the tablespace minimum number of extents allowed in the segment maximum number of extents allowed in the segment percentage to use to increase the size of the next allocated extent Report 2 name of the segment number of writes to the segment number of header gets number of header waits number of times rollback segment is wrapped number of times rollback segment size is extended average number of times the size of a rollback segment decreased average number of active extents 244 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . and click Accept. Table 70 shows the information that the report provides.

Table 71 Item Name Statistic Summary report (part 1 of 2) Description System Wide Values name of the statistic class: I I I I I I I I User Redo Enqueue Cache OS Parallel Server SQL Debug Statistics of Rollback Segments Value Rollback Segment Status Extents RS Size Writes Transactions Gets Waits Shrinks Wraps Extends Event Name Total Waits Total Timeouts value of the statistic rollback segment number rollback segment status number of extents in rollback segment size in bytes of rollback segment number of bytes written to rollback segment number of active transactions number of header gets number of header waits number of times the size of a rollback segment decreases number of times that the rollback segment is wrapped number of times that the rollback segment size is extended System Events name of the wait event total number of waits for this event total number of timeouts for this event Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 245 . Table 71 shows the information that the report provides. and rollback segments in the database. block contentions.Database reports Instance statistics information The Statistic Summary report displays information about system values. 1 Choose Reports => Database => Statistic Summary from the INSTANCE menu. system events. 2 Select a statistic type that you want reported and click Accept: 3 Select a class of system-wide statistics from the list of Statistics of system-wide values and click Accept.

The CollSGA parameter starts collecting information on the next polling cycle. I I SGA Information — SGA Memory Analysis Report — Shared Pool Report Buffer Pool Information — Buffer/Lib/Dict Cache Info Report — Buffer Cache Contents Report Redo Log Cache Report Before you can manage the job queue. and then populates the consumer parameters. you must tune the SGA as well. SGA memory information The SGA Memory Analysis report shows how the SGA components are using memory. in hundredths of a second average amount of time waited for this event Block Contentions class of block number of waits by this operation for this class of block sum of all wait times for all the waits by this operation for this class of block Time Waited Average Wait Class Wait Count Wait Time SGA reports Because tuning any part of the Oracle server or database involves the system global area (SGA). The SGA icon should appear within two polling cycles.SGA reports Table 71 Item Statistic Summary report (part 2 of 2) Description total amount of time waited for this event. Getting SGA memory information Use the following reports to get information about the components that are in the SGA and the activity in the shared pool in the SGA. You can use the following reports to view the current memory usage in the SGA. you must activate the SGA application by choosing KM Admin => Monitor Settings Modify from the INSTANCE menu and enabling the SGA category. 246 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

SGA reports Choose Reports => SGA => SGA Memory Analysis from the INSTANCE menu. Table 73 shows the information that the report provides. or Reports => Shared Pool from the SGA menu. or Reports => SGA Memory Analysis from the SGA menu. Table 72 shows the information that the report provides. Table 72 Item SGA Component Name Size (bytes) SGA Memory Analysis report Description SGA component name Size of the SGA memory in bytes SGA shared pool information The Shared Pool report shows how memory is being used in the SGA shared pool. Choose Reports => SGA => Shared Pool from the INSTANCE menu. Table 73 Item Name Space Gets Get Hits Get Hit Ratio Pins Pin Hits Pin Hit Ratio Shared Pool report Description name of the library cache namespace number of times a lock was requested for this namespace number of times a lock was requested and granted for this namespace percentage of all attempts to lock library cache entries that were immediately successful number of times a library cache entry was executed in this namespace number of times a library cache entry was successfully executed percentage of all attempts to access a library cache entry that were immediately successful because the entry was present in its entirety number of times a library cache entry was reloaded into the cache total number of times library cache entries were marked invalid because a dependent object was modified Reloads Invalidations Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 247 .

Table 74 Item Object Name Object Type Header Blocks Data Blocks CR Blocks Data dictionary headers Data dictionary data Data dictionary consistent read Free buffers Rollback segment headers Rollback segment entries Unknown segment general User objects headers User Objects Data User objects consistent read Total Buffer Cache Contents report Description name of the object currently in the buffer cache type of the object currently in the buffer cache number of headers in the buffer cache number of data blocks in the buffer cache number of consistent blocks in the buffer cache Summary Section number of headers from the data dictionary number of data dictionary blocks in the buffer cache number of consistent reads in the data dictionary number of free buffers number of rollback segment headers in the buffer cache number of rollback segment entries number of unknown segments number of user object headers in the buffer cache number of user objects data in the buffer cache number of consistent reads on user objects total number of objects.SGA reports Getting buffer pool and buffer cache information The following reports provide information about buffer pool use. headers. Viewing buffer cache information Choose Reports => SGA => Buffer Cache from the INSTANCE menu. All objects that are currently in the buffer cache except those owned by SYS are reported. Table 74 shows the information that the report provides. and segments in the buffer cache Unknown segment consistent read number of consistent reads for unknown segments 248 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . or Reports => Buffer Cache from the SGA menu.

dictionary. Choose Reports => SGA => Redo Logs Buffer Cache from the INSTANCE menu. Viewing redo log cache information This report lists the ratio of gets to misses for the redo log buffer cache. not the console computer. Use this report to ensure there are no wait conditions in the redo log buffer cache. A job is one of the following items: I I I SQL Script—a script file that runs a SQL script OS Command—an operating system command or an executable file PSL Script—a script file that runs a PSL script All scripts and commands are stored and run on the host computer.Batch reporting Viewing buffer. Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 249 . You can also schedule more than one report to run on the instance. The results of the job are not displayed by the Batch Scheduler. or Reports => Buffer/Lib/Dict Cache Info from the SGA menu. dictionary. or Reports => Redo Log Buffer Cache from the SGA menu. Batch reporting You can schedule jobs to run at specific times from PATROL for Oracle using the Batch Scheduler. You can schedule to run any of the reports contained in PATROL for Oracle. and library cache information This report lists buffer. NOTE Selecting the PSL Script option does not generate any output. The values for the following parameters are listed: I I I I I BuffHitRatio BuffBusyRate DictHitRatio LibGetHitRatio LibGetPinRatio Choose Reports => SGA => Buffer/Lib/Dict Cache Info from the INSTANCE menu. and library cache information for the instance.

The log file is stored in the $PATROL_HOME/oracle/log directory on the agent. You can view the output for the job using the View Log File Admin commands. EXAMPLE OS command file You have a batch file on your Oracle NT computer that periodically cleans out the trace file directories.m. You create a SQL script file that contains the commands. The axis gives the time and date that the job ran. Output is sent to the parameter SchedulerOutput. Output is sent to the Scheduler Log File. You can schedule this batch file to run every morning at 5:00 a.Batch Scheduler examples You can set the following types of schedules: I Once—the job or report runs once at the specified time Daily Once—the job or report runs every day at the specified time Daily Recur—the job or report runs every day at a specified time interval Weekly Once—the job or report runs every week at the specified time and day of the week Weekly Recur—the job or report runs every week on the specified day and at the specified time interval I I I I You can select the following types of output for the Scheduler: Output Mode Text Window Annotation Description Output is sent to a text window. 250 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . All reports are appended to the text window. You select the output type Log File so that you can easily save the results for later use.m. You select the output type Annotation so that you can quickly check that the job ran on schedule by viewing the SchedulerOutput parameter. to be displayed as an annotation report. and schedule the SQL script to run every Friday at 3:00 p. Log File Batch Scheduler examples EXAMPLE SQL script You want to periodically pull data from a view.

Job Completes—PATROL sends the results when the job completes. starting at 8:00am. enter a unique name for the job. and run every 30 minutes until the end of the day.Adding a job to the scheduler EXAMPLE Report You want to examine the redo log cache throughout one day. 1 Choose Scheduler Admin => Schedule Jobs => Add Job from the INSTANCE menu. You select the output type Text Window so that you can view the results every time the report runs. Job Fails—PATROL only sends the results when the job fails. 2 In the Job Name field. you must enter the information about the job and the schedule to use for the job. 5 Select the type of output for PATROL to use when it displays the results of the job. It does not capture the return codes from the batch job itself. NOTE The Scheduler Admin menu command captures only the status of the last executed statement. You can set the Redo Log Cache Report to run on Monday. and select when PATROL sends the results: I Always—PATROL always sends the results to the output type you specified. Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 251 . 4 Select the type of notification for PATROL to send when the job runs. and select the category for the job from the Category menu: I I I PSL Script SQL Script OS Command 3 Select a Schedule Type option to specify how often the script or command runs. whether it I I I succeeds or fails. Job Succeeds—PATROL only sends the results when the job succeeds. Adding a job to the scheduler To schedule a job to the Batch Scheduler.

Adding a job to the scheduler

NOTE
A job is flagged as a failed job if it fails to execute. Jobs fail for several reasons: an invalid statement from the OS command; invalid PSL file permissions; compilation or process errors; or ORA- errors from the SQL statement. Since a PSL job returns no output, select the No output option, and use the Job Fails option to catch any privilege or file errors.

6 (Optional) If the job requires certain criteria, select the number of parameters to use
for this job from the Number of Parameters list. The default value is None. Enter the criteria for the job once you complete this screen. You can specify any criteria’s that are relevant to the script or the command. PATROL does not perform any check on the job criteria’s.

7 (Optional) In Actions When Done, select whether to delete the job when it has
completed.

8 Enter the command-line instructions to use in Command Text, and if applicable, a
description of the job in Description. If you are running a batch file on Microsoft Windows, you must place double quotation marks (“) around any directories with spaces in them.

9 Click Apply. NOTE
You can modify a job by choosing Scheduler Admin => Schedule Jobs => Modify Job from the INSTANCE menu.

Where to go from here
After you have entered the job or report to run, specify the time and day that it should run. See “Specifying the time the job or report should run” on page 254.

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Adding a report to the scheduler

Adding a report to the scheduler
To add a report to the Scheduler, you must select the report, enter information about the report, and create the schedule to run the report.

1 Choose Scheduler Admin => Schedule Jobs => Add Report from the INSTANCE
menu.

2 Select the report from the Select a Report list.
If you select a report that requires more specific information, such as a user name or the name of a tablespace or object, the appropriate selection boxes are displayed.

3 Select a Schedule Type option to specify how often the report runs and the type of
notification that PATROL sends when the report runs.

4 Select the type of output for PATROL to use when it displays the results of the
report and when PATROL sends the results:
I

Always—PATROL always sends the results of the report to the output type you

specified.
I

Job Succeeds—PATROL only sends the results of the report when the job succeeds. Job Fails—PATROL only sends the results of the report when the job fails. Job Completes—PATROL sends the results of the report when the job completes, whether it succeeds or fails.

I

I

5 Optional. Select whether to delete the report when it has completed in the Actions
When Done check box.

6 Click Apply. 7 “Specifying the time the job or report should run” on page 254 NOTE
You can modify a report by choosing Scheduler Admin => Schedule Reports => Modify Report from the INSTANCE menu.

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Specifying the time the job or report should run

Specifying the time the job or report should run
After you have entered the job or report to run, you need to specify the time and day that it should run.

TIP
The Time field uses the 24-hour clock. A job or report cannot be scheduled to run sooner than 10 minutes from the current time.

Specify the time and day for the job or report to run:
I

If you selected to run the job or report only once, select the date and time that the job or report should run, and click Apply. If you selected to run the job or report Daily or Weekly Recur, select the time interval to run the job or report, select the start and end time for the time interval, and select the date to start and stop running the job or report. Click Apply. If you selected to run the job or report Weekly Once, select the day of the week and the time of the day. Select the start and end date of the job or report, and click Apply.

I

I

Using the Scheduler log file
If you specify Log File Output for any job or report, the results are sent to a log file on the agent. The log file stores all results so that they can be filtered. For instance, if you wanted to look at the results from a SQL script that you scheduled to run, you can look at only those results. To view the log file, choose View Log File Admin => List Log File from the INSTANCE menu. Select the job whose results you want to view, or select All jobs, and click Apply. You can move only certain results from the log file into another text file. Once moved, the resulting file can be viewed with any text editor. To move the log file to another directory, choose View Log File Admin => Move Log File from the INSTANCE menu and click Apply. Enter the new directory for the log file. The log file must always be on the agent. Because the results from each iteration of a job are saved in the log file, you may want to periodically move records out of the log file. Otherwise, the log file can become too large to filter quickly.

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Checking the status of a scheduled job or report

To delete results from the log file, choose View Log File Admin => Delete Log File from the INSTANCE menu. Select the job whose results you want to delete, or select All jobs, and click Apply.

Checking the status of a scheduled job or report
You can check the overall status of a scheduled job or report by choosing Scheduler Admin => Schedule Status from the INSTANCE menu. The following table describes each status:
Status Successful Abort Finished Failed Outdated Active Skipped Description the job ran with no problems the job was stopped through the scheduler no more iterations are scheduled the job failed to run, generally because of privilege problems the starting or end date was incorrect the job has not run yet, but it is scheduled to run in the future the job was skipped due to instance exceptions such as blackout periods or monitoring suspension

Checking the settings for a job or report
To check the settings for a particular job or report, choose Scheduler Admin => Schedule Settings from the INSTANCE menu. Select the job or report from the list and click Apply. The settings for the job or report are displayed.

Deleting a job from the scheduler
To delete a job from the scheduler, choose Scheduler Admin => Terminate Schedule from the INSTANCE menu. Select the job to delete from the scheduler and click Apply.

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Automated recovery actions

Automated recovery actions
You can set an automated recovery to compress or move archive files. If the ArchFreeSpace or the FreeSpaceDeficit parameter goes into an alarm state, the recovery action that you set is executed.

NOTE
The Compress Log Files and Move Log Files recovery actions are not available on an OpenVMS host or a Microsoft Windows host.

Compressing or moving log files
You can set the recovery action to either to compress or to move the log files on the server you are monitoring. To check on the recovery actions that have been set, select Recovery Admin => Display Recovery Settings to list the automated recovery action settings.

1 Choose Recovery Admin => Log File Recovery Admin from the AVAILABILITY
menu.

2 Select one of the recovery action radio buttons, and click Accept:
I

Compress Logs automatically compresses the log files into a compressed file

when no more space is left in the log file directory.
I

Move Logs automatically moves the log files to another directory on the

monitored server. You must specify the directory on the monitored server to move the log files to. The PATROL operating system account must have permission to read and write the files to this directory.

3 You can remove an already-set recovery action by selecting the Do not move or
compress logs option.

Resizing the next extent
Use the Resize Next Extent automated recovery option to resize the next extent when a tablespace runs out of extents. This option is executed when the FreeSpaceDeficit parameter goes into alarm an alarm state. You can set this option for tables, indexes, and clusters. When the FreeSpaceDeficit parameter goes into alarm, the specified object’s next extent is resized.
256 PATROL for Oracle User Guide

HTML reporting

1 Choose Recovery Admin => Resize Next Extent from the AVAILABILITY menu 2 Select an object type and schema from the Resize Next Extent dialog box, and click
Accept.

3 Select an object from the list, and select Enable to set the recovery action.
You can remove this type of recovery action by selecting Disable.

4 Enter the SYS password to grant the PATROL account for Oracle the privileges to
alter the object, and click Apply. If you do not enter the password, the PATROL account for Oracle cannot set the recovery action.

HTML reporting
HTML Reporting allows you to create a web page that displays the state of PATROL for Oracle parameters and application classes. While you cannot take any action from the web page, you can monitor the state of your Oracle environment from any web browser behind your firewall. Figure 18 on page 258 describes the architecture of HTML Reporting.

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257

Requirements

Figure 18

HTML reporting overview
Host 1 PATROL console Oracle Instance 1 Oracle Instance 2

PATROL Agent

FTP Connection

Web Server
Index Page lists all instances monitored by HTML Reporting Oracle Instance 1 Oracle Instance 2

Click Oracle Instance 1 to display Oracle Instance 1 Instance Page

Click Oracle Instance 2 to display Oracle Instance 2 Instance Page

Instance page for Instance 1 displays parameters and states

Instance page for Instance 2 displays parameters and states

Requirements
You must configure the web server that hosts the HTML Reporting web pages. If you have installed a web server for PATROL Central-Web Edition, you can use the same versions of the web server and the Tomcat servlet engine for HTML reporting.

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x. 3. Web Server I I I For Microsoft Windows NT and Windows 2000 computers.1.sun. 3. I Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 259 . 2000 UNIX (any UNIX platform that See Chapter 2.2. and you must be able to read and write to the default FTP directories.com Tomcat servlet engine I I 3. or want to install a separate web server for HTML reporting.x. which is stored in the TOMCAT_HOME/conf directory. Microsoft IIS Windows 2000 Apache Web Server JAVA2 Platform Standard Edition I FTP communication I PATROL Agent host must be able to communicate via FTP to the web server.0x. “Installing and migrating PATROL for Oracle” on page 45. the DNS address must be static.xml file for the Tomcat servlet engine.11 4.Web Edition. is supported by PATROL for Oracle) FTP Publishing service must be run on the web server. During the FTP setup from PATROL for Oracle you must update the server. 4.Requirements If you are not using the PATROL Central-Web Edition. you must ensure that the web server fulfills the following requirements: Resource Operating system Requirements I I Comments HTML Reporting is not supported on OpenVMS. JAVA I set the new environment variable JAVA_HOME to point to the root directory of the JDK hierarchy add JAVA_HOME/bin directory to your PATH environment variable I JAVA2 is available from http://java.x I Set the new environment variable TOMCAT_HOME to point to the root directory of your Tomcat hierarchy if you are not using the Tomcat that is installed as part of PATROL Central . Microsoft Windows NT.3.

select the Choose default catagories and Their parameters option and click Apply. The HTML Reporting for Instances dialog box displays the instances for which you can set up HTML reporting. 3 If you want to view the default categories and parameters.xml file for the Tomcat servlet engine. Configure FTP Info Setup from the ORACLE menu. 2 Select the instances that you want reported by HTML reporting. you must perform the following tasks: Table 75 Task 1 2 3 HTML reporting setup task flow Description Configure HTML Reporting Setup from the ORACLE menu. To set up HTML reporting 1 Choose HTML Configuration => HTML Reporting Setup from the ORACLE menu. Page 260 262 263 Configuring HTML reporting You must select the instances and the parameters that are displayed on the web server. you must configure PATROL to send all information to the web server. Update the server. and the option to select the default categories and parameters. 260 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Once you have started the FTP Publishing service and the Tomcat servlet engine on the web server.Setting up HTML reporting Setting up HTML reporting After you have set up the web server. Go to step 9.

select the categories that you want to monitor. clear the Choose default catagories and Their parameters option and click Apply. and click Apply. Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 261 . and click Apply. NOTE The categories and their parameters to display must be active before you can select them. 6 Select the parameters you want to monitor from the Available Params list. The Customized Configuration for <instance> displays the parameter in that category. go to step 4. 5 From the HTML Reporting for Selected Instances dialog box.Configuring HTML reporting If you want to customize the categories and parameters. Category AVAILABILITY Parameters Alerts ArchFreeSpace CannotExtend ExtentsLeft FreeSpaceDeficit FreeSpace InstanceStatus LockConflict RSExtentsLeft RSSpaceLeft SystemTSLeft BGDumpLeft ProcsLeft LibGetHits LatchGetRatio RedoArchDelay RedoNotArch BGChkPntRate DiskSorts BuffHitRatio DictHitRatio ProblemUsers Users CAPACITY LOG PERFORMANCE SGA USERS 4 If you want to select the categories and parameters. 7 You can select parameters from the Selected Params list and click Apply to remove them from the HTML reporting.

Repeat Steps until all categories that you have selected have been displayed. Go to “Configure FTP information” on page 262. the Customized Configuration for <instance> dialog box will appear for each category. you must set up the FTP information.Configure FTP information 8 Click Exit to close the parameter box for the category. 262 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . If you have selected more than one category. Click OK. 10 Click Exit on all remaining dialog boxes. Configure FTP information After you have selected the parameters and the instances you want to view. 9 Click Exit on the HTML Reporting for Selected Instances dialog box. Where to go from here Set up the FTP information so PATROL knows where to place the files for HTML reporting. 11 You are reminded to set up FTP configuration before HTML Reporting can start. To set up FTP information 1 Choose HTML Configuration => FTP Info Setup from the ORACLE menu. the IP address should be a static address. You will need to enter the following information: Table 76 Field Web Server (Name or IP Address) FTP information items Description name or IP address of the web server If the web server is running on Windows NT or Windows 2000. This information tells PATROL where to install the files on the web server so that the files can be used to display the HTML Reports.

and have entered the FTP information. I “To update the server.x or 4.xml file After you have selected the parameters and instances.Web Edition” on page 265 “To update the server. 2 Click Apply.xml file in the TOMCAT_HOME/conf directory. you must update the server.xml file by using Apache Web Server and PATROL Central Web Edition” on page 266 I I I Before you begin Ensure that you know the locations of the following directories: Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 263 .xml file by using Tomcat and PATROL Central .0.xml file for Tomcat version 3. Where to go from here Once you have entered the information you must update the server.Updating the server. Updating the server.xml file in the TOMCAT_HOME/conf directory.xml file for a stand-alone Tomcat environment” on page 264 “To update the server. User Name/Password user name and password that has FTP access to the web server This account must have read and write permissions to the ftproot directory. and should be under the ftproot directory for your web server.3.x stand-alone environment” on page 265 “To update the server.xml file Table 76 Field FTP information items Description Destination for PATROL files directory that you want PATROL to send the HTML (Destination Directory) reporting files to This directory must already exist. you can use the existing Tomcat or Apache Web Server files. If you are using PATROL Central-Web Edition.

and the HTTPD user name that was specified during installation of the PATROL Central . This file is found in the TOMCAT_HOME/conf directory. If you are using the Apache Web Server.Updating the server.Web Edition must be the same. To update the server. PATROL Installation directory The directory that PATROL has been installed into. This directory is also the directory specified in “Configure FTP information” on page 262. UNIX default: $BMC_ROOT\webcentral Microsoft Windows default: $BMC_ROOT\WebCentral TOMCAT_HOME The directory that the version of Tomcat you are using has been installed into.xml file Variable ftproot directory Description the root directory for your FTP server Microsoft Windows: drive:\full path for ftprootdirectory UNIX: absolute path for ftproot destination directory directory that you want PATROL to send the HTML reporting files to This directory must already exist.xml in a text editor.xml file for a stand-alone Tomcat environment 1 Open the file server. and should be under the ftproot directory for your web server. 2 Search for the Special webapps section near the end of the file. the owner of the files under the PATROL Installation directory. 3 Enter the following lines exactly as shown (context sensitivity applies) before the </ContextManager> tag: <Context path="/patrolpok" docBase="<ftproot directory>\<destination directory>\patrol" debug="0" reloadable="true"> </context> Microsoft Windows Example: docBase="c:\inetpub\ftproot\htmlreporting\patrol" UNIX Example: docBase="/apps/useraccount/htmlreporting/patrol" 264 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

x or 4.xml file by using Tomcat and PATROL Central . The destination directory is the directory for the PATROL files that you entered in the HTML Reporting FTP Info Setup dialog box . 4 Enter the following lines exactly as shown (context sensitivity applies) before the </ContextManager> tag: <Context path="/patrolpok" docBase="<ftproot directory>\<destinationdirectory>\patrol" debug="0" reloadable="true"> </context> Microsoft Windows Example: docBase="c:\inetpub\ftproot\htmlreporting\patrol" UNIX Example: docBase="/apps/useraccount/htmlreporting/patrol" These lines must be added before the </ContextManager> tag. The changes are applied without having to stop and start Tomcat. 2 Open the apps-patrolpok. 3 Search for the Special webapps section near the end of the file.xml file in a text editor.x stand-alone environment 1 Rename the apps-admin.xml file in a text editor. Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 265 .xml by copying it or renaming it.0. 3 Search for the Special webapps section near the end of the file. 2 Open the server. To update the server.3.xml file in the BMC_ROOT/PATROL Installation Directory/tomcat401/conf directory.xml file for Tomcat version 3.xml file 4 Save your changes in a text only format.xml file in the $TOMCAT_HOME/conf directory to appspatrolpok.Updating the server. To update the server. The changes are applied without having to stop and start Tomcat. 5 Save the file in a text only format.Web Edition 1 Back up the server.

To update the server. 6 Change directory to BMC_ROOT/PATROL Installation Directory/bin.Updating the server. You do not need to change directories. This will restart the Tomcat servlet engine and make it use the modified server./pwcctl stop to shut down Tomcat.xml file 4 Enter the following lines exactly as shown (context sensitivity applies) before the </ContextManager> tag: <Context path="/patrolpok" docBase="<ftproot directory>\<destination directory>\patrol" debug="0" reloadable="true"> </context> Microsoft Windows Example: docBase="c:\inetpub\ftproot\htmlreporting\patrol" UNIX Example: docBase="/apps/useraccount/htmlreporting/patrol" 5 Save your changes in a text only format.xml file in a text editor. 3 Search for the Special webapps section near the end of the file. 8 Once all the ports are not in use and Tomcat has been shut down./pwcctl start in the BMC_ROOT/PATROL Installation Directory/bin directory.xml file. and log in as root. 7 Execute . 2 Open the server.xml file by using Apache Web Server and PATROL Central Web Edition 1 Back up the server. execute . 4 Enter the following lines exactly as shown (context sensitivity applies) before the </ContextManager> tag: <Context path="/patrolpok" docBase="<ftproot directory>\<destination directory>\patrol" debug="0" 266 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .xml file in the BMC_ROOT/PATROL Installation Directory/tomcat401/conf directory. It may take a few moments before the ports are no longer in use.

Where to go from here Open your web browser and enter the following command into the address URL field: Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 267 .1.3. 14 Change directory to BMC_ROOT/PATROL Installation Directory/bin./pwcctl start in the BMC_ROOT/PATROL Installation Directory/bin directory. 12 Right above the JkMount /patrol/* ajp13 line./pwcctl stop to shut down Tomcat and the Apache Web Server.xml file reloadable="true"> </context> Microsoft Windows Example: docBase="c:\inetpub\ftproot\htmlreporting\patrol" UNIX Example: docBase="/apps/useraccount/htmlreporting/patrol" 5 Save your changes in a text only format. and make the modified server.conf file in a text editor. 6 Change directory to BMC_ROOT/PATROL Installation Directory/bin.Updating the server. 10 Open the httpd.xml and httpd. and log in as root (if you are not currently logged in as root).conf files take effect. It may take a few moments before the ports are no longer in use.26/<platform directory>/conf 9 Back up the httpd. 15 Execute . enter the following line: JkMount /patrolpok/* ajp13 13 Save your changes in a text only format. 8 Change directory to BMC_ROOT/PATROL Installation Directory/common/apache/apache. 7 Execute . This will restart the Tomcat servlet engine and the Apache Web Server. 11 Search for the line JkMount /patrol/* ajp13. and log in as root.conf file.

If you change the setting of the refresh rate on the index page. and is refreshed every 20 minutes by default. As soon as you close the web browser. Click an instance name to display the instance page. Changing the list of parameters Change the list of parameters that are displayed by choosing HTML Configuration => HTML Reporting Modify from the ORACLE menu. The index page is sorted by the current state of the instances. the refresh rate returns to the default setting of 20 minutes. Click a parameter to view the online help for the parameter. You can sort the list of instances by clicking the table column title. the change is active only for the web session. You can also remove instances from HTML Reporting or list the current HTML Reporting settings. Viewing HTML reports After you have set up HTML reporting. Modifying HTML reporting You can change the instances and parameters that are displayed and the refresh rates used by the HTML reporting function. Viewing and modifying HTML reporting This section discusses viewing the HTML Reports on the web server and modifying the HTML Reporting settings.Viewing and modifying HTML reporting http://localhostname:8080/patrolpok/dbReport You are able to see the HTML reports for the instances that you selected in the task “Configuring HTML reporting” on page 260. An annotated parameter will have the phrase "More Info" next to the value. Your changes are applied to the HTML reporting index page. The instance page displays all the selected parameters and their current value. Select the instances and parameters that you want to look at. open your web browser and enter the following command into the address URL field: http://localhostname:8080/patrolpok/dbReport The browser displays the index page listing all instances that you configured for HTML reporting. 268 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

You can change the following refresh rates: Table 77 HTML reporting refresh cycles Description number of minutes you want to delay generating the HTML reports after the agent is started. Once you close the web browser. The instance is removed from the HTML Reporting index page once the page refreshes. You can change the refresh rate for the current HTML reporting session as you view the HTML reports. number of minutes to generate and send the HTML files to the web server for the index and the instance pages. Select the instance whose information you want to view. Refresh Cycle Initial Delay HTML Reporting Refresh Cycle Instance Page Refresh Cycle When you configure HTML Reporting. and click Change. Choose HTML Configuration => HTML Reporting Remove from the ORACLE menu. The categories and the parameters that were selected for HTML reporting are listed. select the number of minutes to automatically refresh the instance page on the web server. you must also remove that instance from HTML reporting.Viewing and modifying HTML reporting Changing the refresh rates Change the default HTML Reporting refresh rates by choosing HTML Configuration => HTML Update Timings from the ORACLE menu. Removing an instance from HTML reporting NOTE If you remove an instance from the list of those configured for monitoring by PATROL. you specify the refresh rate for all HTML Reporting. however. Select the instance whose information you want to remove. On the HTML Reports index page. Chapter 7 Monitoring instance health 269 . the refresh rate returns to the default you selected when you first configured HTML reporting. choose HTML Configuration => HTML Reporting View from the ORACLE menu. select the number of minutes you want to use as the refresh rate for the HTML pages. The HTML reports for the instances are refreshed at the new refresh rate. Viewing configuration information To view a list of the categories and parameters that were selected for HTML reporting. This allows PATROL to gather enough information to display the parameter values.

Appendix A. and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293 how to access the KM menu commands. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 PATROL for Oracle online Help 270 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .Where to go from here Where to go from here The following table suggests topics: Topic how to monitor the following Oracle options using the PATROL for Oracle how to monitor the the RAC environment Source of information Chapter 8. parameters. and online Help InfoBoxes. “Monitoring Oracle options” on page 271 Chapter 9. InfoBoxes. menu commands. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 Instructions about installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls detailed descriptions of the applications. “Accessing menu commands. and InfoBoxes Appendix C.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting dispatcher information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting PQO server statistics information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting PQO operations statistics information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MTS reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 272 273 275 276 276 279 279 280 281 282 283 283 284 286 289 290 290 291 291 Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 271 . Activating the ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting PQO session statistics information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . Replication activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting PQO system statistics information . . . . . . . . ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring database links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This chapter presents the following topics: Distributed database monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enhanced monitoring of the Oracle archive logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting replication information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debugging the ARCHIVE application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting information about distributed databases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting transaction and snapshot information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 8 8 Monitoring Oracle options This chapter discusses how to monitor the following Oracle options using the PATROL for Oracle product: I I I I I Distributed Database Multithreaded Server Parallel Query Option Replication Archive Logs Step-by-step instructions are available in the online Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PQO reports . . . . . . . Getting dispatcher information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Because each Oracle database instance is controlled by both the Oracle server and the consistency of the distributed database system. but the database cooperates to be consistent with the other databases in the global distributed database. In a distributed database system. and the links between the database in the distributed system. but appears to applications as a single database. In a distributed database system. The following reports provide information about the distributed database structure of the instance: I I I I Commit Point Strength Database Links Pending Transactions Snapshot Getting information about distributed databases PATROL provides information about the structure of a distributed database. Choose Reports => Distributed Database => Commit Point Strength from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. Oracle uses links between the databases for application requests. A database link creates and defines a one-way path for communication from one Oracle database to another database. Each database in the distributed database system is controlled by its local Oracle server. you can use PATROL to monitor both the specific database instance and the structure and transactions in the distributed database system.Distributed database monitoring Distributed database monitoring A distributed database is a database set that is stored on many computers. an application can access and modify the data simultaneously in several databases in a network. 272 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Getting commit point strength information The Commit Point Strength report provides information about the commit strength parameter. You can get information about the commit point strength parameter that selects the commit point site.

Getting pending transaction information The Pending Transaction reports provides information about the transactions that are pending. Getting database links information The Database Links report provides information about the database links on the instance. If the value is 0.com owner of the database link user name to use as a login to access the database link tnsnames. Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 273 .division3. sales. for example. Table 79 Item Database Link Owner Username Connect String Database Links report Description description of the database link.Getting transaction and snapshot information Table 78 shows the information that the report provides. the database instance can never be a commit point site.acme. Choose Reports => Distributed Database => Database Links from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. Choose Reports => Distributed Database => Pending Transactions from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. Table 79 shows the information that the report provides.ora name used to get to the host that the database is on Getting transaction and snapshot information You can obtain information about pending transactions and snapshots in a distributed database system. Table 78 Item Name Type Value Commit Point Strength report Description name of the commit_point_strength parameter type of parameter value of the commit_point_strength parameter.

Table 81 shows the information that the report provides.Getting transaction and snapshot information Table 80 shows the information that the report provides. Choose Reports => Distributed Database => Snapshot Information from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. Table 80 Item Local Txn ID Global Txn ID State Pending Transactions report Description transaction ID number transaction ID number that is globally unique state that the transaction was in: I I I I I collecting prepared committed forced commit forced rollback Mixed whether the transaction was partially committed and partially rolled back: I I YES NO Advice advice for completing the transaction: I I I C for commit R for rollback NULL for no advice (transaction was not mixed) Getting snapshot information The Snapshot Information report provides information about the snapshot used by the distributed database. Table 81 Item Snapshot Name Snapshot Owner Master Table Type Snapshot report Description view used by users and applications for viewing the snapshot owner of the snapshot name of the master table of which this snapshot is a copy type of refresh for all automatic refreshes: I I I complete fast force 274 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

Any active dispatchers are discovered. Before you can monitor multithreaded server activity. and then populates the consumer parameters. you must activate the MTS application by choosing KM Admin => Monitor Settings Modify from the INSTANCE menu. The CollMTS collector parameter starts collecting information in the next polling cycle. Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 275 . and enabling the MTS category. The following reports provide information about the multithreaded server structure of the instance: I I I I I Dispatcher Dispatcher Busy Rates Dispatcher Wait Times MTS init. The number of shared server processes are dynamically adjusted according to the following items: I I I length of the request queue MTS_SERVERS initialization parameter value MTS_MAX_SERVERS initialization parameter value Because Oracle enables you to make changes to the number of shared server and dispatcher processes. The MTS icon should appear within two polling cycles. and MTS_DISP icons appear for each dispatcher inside the MTS application.MTS reports MTS reports The Oracle MTS (multithreaded server) option enables many user requests to share a small number of server processes by using dispatcher processes.ora parameters Shared Servers The following parameters monitor the processes and dispatchers for the MTS: I I I I I I I I MTSProcsIdle MTSProcsLeft MTSProcsUsed MaxBusyRate MaxWaitTimes BusyRate QueueLength QueueWaitTime PATROL for Oracle online Help provides information about the MTS parameters. you can use the parameters and reports in the MTS application to determine what the changes should be. You must also ensure that the CollMTS collector parameter is activated.

Table 83 Item Protocol No of Disps Busy (secs) Dispatcher busy rates report (part 1 of 2) Description network protocol supported by this dispatcher number of dispatchers for the particular protocol dispatcher busy time in seconds 276 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Choose Reports => Dispatcher Busy Rates from the MTS menu. Table 83 shows the information that the report provides. CONNECT (establishing a connection) DISCONNECT (handling a disconnect request) BREAK (handling a break) OUTBOUND (establishing an outbound connection) Accept whether the dispatcher process is accepting any more connections Getting dispatcher busy rate information The Dispatcher Busy Rates report provides information about the dispatchers and how busy the dispatchers are. Getting general dispatcher information The Dispatcher reports provides information about the dispatchers used in the MTS processes.Getting dispatcher information Getting dispatcher information The following reports display information about the dispatcher processes used in the MTS in the instance. Choose Reports => Dispatcher from the MTS menu. Table 82 shows the information that the report provides. Table 82 Item Network Name Status Dispatcher report Description network protocol supported by this dispatcher name of the dispatcher process dispatcher status: I I I I I I I WAIT (idle) SEND (sending a message connection) RECEIVE (receiving a message).

and information about the shared servers.ora file. Choose Reports => Dispatcher Wait Times from the MTS menu.Getting MTS configuration information Table 83 Item Idle (secs) Dispatcher busy rates report (part 2 of 2) Description dispatcher idle time in seconds percentage of the time that the dispatcher was busy Percent Busy Getting dispatcher wait times information The Dispatcher Wait Times report provides information about the waiting time spent by the MTS processes on the dispatcher. Table 84 Item Protocol No of Disps Wait Time (secs/100) Queued Reqs Avg Wait Time (secs/100) Dispatcher Wait Times report Description network protocol supported by this dispatcher number of dispatchers for the particular protocol wait time for the dispatcher in hundredths of a second number of queued requests for the dispatcher average amount of time a request spent waiting for a dispatcher. in hundredths of a second Getting MTS configuration information You can run reports to display information about the MTS parameters in the init. Table 84 shows the information that the report provides. Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 277 .

ora parameter information The MTS init.ora parameters report displays the current values for the following init. Table 85 Item Shared Server Status Shared Servers report Description name of the server server status: I I I I I I EXEC (executing SQL) WAIT (ENQ) (waiting for a lock) WAIT (SEND) (waiting to send data to user) WAIT (COMMON) (idle.Getting MTS configuration information Getting MTS init.ora parameters from the MTS menu. Choose Reports => Shared Servers from the MTS menu. waiting for a user request) WAIT (RESET) (waiting for a circuit to reset after a break) QUIT (terminating) Idle Busy % Busy total idle time in hundredths of a second total busy time in hundredths of a second percentage of the time that the shared server was busy 278 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Getting shared server process information The Shared Server report provides information about the shared servers used in the MTS processes. Table 85 shows the information that the report provides. choose Reports => MTS init.ora parameters: I I I I I I I I I mts_dispatchers mts_listener_address mts_max_dispatchers mts_max_servers mts_multiple_listeners mts_rate_log_size mts_rate_scale mts_servers mts_service To run this report.

You must also ensure that the CollPQO collector parameter is activated. you must activate the PQO application by choosing KM Admin => Monitor Settings Modify from the INSTANCE menu. and enabling the PQO category.PQO reports PQO reports You can use PATROL to monitor the parallel query option (PQO) activity on the instance. The CollPQO collector parameter starts collecting information on the next polling cycle. Before you can monitor the PQO. and then populates the consumer parameters. The following reports provide information about statistics for the PQO: I I I I Operation Statistics Server Statistics Session Statistics System Statistics The following parameters also provide information about the PQO: I I I I I QueriesInitiated SlavesCPUUsed SlavesLeft SlavesPctBusy SlavesUsed PATROL for Oracle online Help provides information about the PQO parameters. The PQO icon should appear within two polling cycles. The report appears in a task output window and shows the number of rows that were processed through each parallel query server at each stage of execution: Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 279 . Getting PQO operations statistics information The Operations Statistics report helps you determine any problems in a query’s execution. Choose Reports => Operation Statistics Report from the PQO menu.

Table 87 shows the information that the report provides. The report appears in a task output window. Table 86 Item SID DFONum TQID SvrType NumRows Bytes Open Time Avg Latency Waits TimeOuts Process ID Instance ID Operation Statistics report Description SID of the Oracle session data flow operator (DFO) tree number of each query table queue ID in the query that represents the connection between two DFO nodes role in table queue: producer. or ranger number of rows produced/consumed number of bytes produced/consumed time (seconds) the table queue remained open time in milliseconds for a message to leave the queue after it enters the queue number of waits encountered during leaving the queue number of timeouts when waiting for a message ID of the process ID of the instance Getting PQO server statistics information The Server Statistics report provides you with transaction statistics on the server. Choose Reports => Server Statistics Report from the PQO menu. consumer. either BUSY or IDLE total number of sessions that have used this parallel query server amount of idle time spent while processing statements in the current session amount of busy time spent while processing statements in the current session amount of CPU time spent while processing statements in the current session 280 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Table 87 Item SLAV STAT TOTALSESSI IDLETIMECU BUSYTIMECU CPUSECSCUR Server Statistics report (part 1 of 2) Description name of the parallel query server current status of the parallel query server.Getting PQO server statistics information Table 86 shows the information that the report provides.

Getting PQO session statistics information Table 87 Item Server Statistics report (part 2 of 2) Description number of messages sent while processing statements for the current session number of messages received while processing statements for the current session total amount of time that this parallel query server has been idle total amount of time that this parallel query server has been busy total amount of CPU time that this parallel query server has used to process statements total number of messages that this parallel query server has sent total number of messages that this parallel query server has received MSGSSENTCU MSGSRCVDCU IDLETIMETO BUSYTIMETO CPUSECSTOT MSGSSENTTO MSCSRCVDTO Getting PQO session statistics information The Session Statistics report provides information about the session. Table 88 shows the information that the report provides. Table 89 Statistic Queries Parallelized DML Parallelized DFO Trees Server Threads Allocation Height Session Statistic report statistic names (part 1 of 2) Description number of queries that were run in parallel number of DML operations that were run in parallel number of executed data flow operator (DFO) trees total number of parallel servers used requested number of servers per instance Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 281 . Choose Reports => Session Statistics Report from the PQO menu. Table 88 Item STATISTIC LASTQUERY SESSIONTOTAL Session Statistics report Description name of the statistic value used for the last operation for this statistic value of the statistic for the entire session up to the point that this report runs The statistics in this report are described in Table 89.

Getting PQO system statistics information Table 89 Statistic Session Statistic report statistic names (part 2 of 2) Description requested number of instances number of local (intra-instance) messages sent number of remote (inter-instance) messages sent number of local (intra-instance) messages received number of remote (inter-instance) messages received Allocation Width Local Msgs Sent Distr Msgs Sent Local Msgs Recv'd Distr Msgs Recv'd Getting PQO system statistics information The System Statistics report provides information on the system statistics for a parallel query system. Table 91 Statistic Servers Busy Servers Idle Servers Highwater Server Sessions Servers Started Servers Shutdown Servers Cleaned Up Queries Initiated DML Initiated DFO Trees Sessions Active 282 PATROL for Oracle User Guide System Statistics report statistic names (part 1 of 2) Description number of currently busy servers on this instance number of currently idle servers on this instance number of active servers on this instance that have partaken in one or more operation so far total number of operations executed in all servers on this instance total number of servers started on this instance total number of servers shutdown on this instance total number of servers on this instance cleaned up due to process death total number of parallel queries initiated on this instance total number of parallel dml operations that were initiated total number of dfo trees executed on this instance total number of active sessions . Table 90 Item STATISTIC VALUE System Statistics report Description name of the statistic value of the statistic The names statistics in this report are described in Table 91. Table 90 shows the information that the report provides. Choose Reports =>System Statistics Report from the PQO menu.

For example. Monitoring database links You can monitor a selected database link and view the time it takes to ping through the PingTime parameter. you must select it from within PATROL for Oracle. select the link to monitor from the Available list. you must activate the DB_LINKS and REPLICATION applications by choosing KM Admin => Monitor Settings Modify from the INSTANCE menu and enabling the DB_LINKS and REPLICATION categories. you can run the Database Links report to ensure that the connect string is the same for all database links. The replication activity on an instance and the links from the instance are monitored. Selecting a database link to be monitored Before you can monitor a database link. and then populate the consumer parameters. you can display the information for all database links on the instance. You must also ensure that the CollDbLinks and CollReplication collector parameters are activated. The DB_LINKS and REPLICATION icons should appear within two polling cycles. Choose Select Database Link from the DB_LINKS menu.Replication activities Table 91 Statistic System Statistics report statistic names (part 2 of 2) Description total number of local (intra-instance) messages sent on this instance total number of remote (inter-instance) messages sent on this instance total number of remote (inter-instance) messages received on this instance total number of remote (inter-instance) messages received on this instance Local Msgs Sent Distr Msgs Sent Local Msgs Recv'd Distr Msgs Recv'd Replication activities You can use PATROL for Oracle to monitor the replication activities and the database links used in your replication environment. The CollDbLinks and CollReplication collector parameters start collecting information on the next polling cycle. To monitor database links and replication. and click Update. Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 283 . If you have a problem with a database link in your replication environment.

The replication reports provide information about conflicts. you must select it from within PATROL for Oracle. Choose Select Replication Groups from the REPLICATION menu. and click Update. deferred calls. The report appears in a text window. and pending transactions for the replication environment. Table 92 Item Database Link Owner Username Connect String Link Information report Description name of the database link owner of the database link user name that is currently using the database link connect string for the database link Monitoring replication You can monitor replication activities on the Oracle instance. and monitor specific replication groups. select the replication group to monitor from the Available list. You can also use this function to stop monitoring a replication group. You can also view information about conflict resolution methods. and replicated objects in a specific replication group. You can also suspend and resume replication. PATROL begins monitoring the replication group after the next polling cycle. Selecting replication groups to be monitored Before you can monitor a replication group. A DB_LINKS_INSTANCE application icon is created under DB_LINKS. Getting database link information The Link Information report provides information about the database link. Choose Link Information Report from the DB_LINKS menu. Table 92 shows the information that the report provides.Monitoring replication PATROL will now monitor the link. 284 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . database links. You can also use this function to remove a database link from being monitored.

the master site must be monitored with a PATROL Agent and must be online. SQL Command. I I If the query returns QUIESCED. If an unexpected conflict is detected and not resolved. Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 285 . SQL Task.Monitoring replication Suspending and resuming replication Suspending and resuming replication must be done from the master site for the replication group. SQL Task. you may want to suspend master activities and manually perform queries and updates on the replicated sites to resynchronize the data between sites. If the query returns NORMAL. choose Administration => Resume from the REPLICATION_INSTANCE menu from the master instance for the replication group. use the following SQL query in SQL*Plus. To resume replication. You must suspend master activities before calling any of the Oracle procedures that trigger or alter replication. To suspend or resume replication from within PATROL. replication has been suspended. or Server Manager: select status from dba_repcat where gname=group in question. or Server Manager: select dblink from dba_repsites where masterdef='Y'. replication is running normally. Determining replication status To determine whether replication is running or suspended. choose Administration => Suspend from the REPLICATION_INSTANCE menu from the master instance for the replication group. To suspend replication. The dblink returned is the database link to the master site for this replication group. use the following SQL query in SQL*Plus. To determine the master site. SQL Command.

Table 94 shows the information that the report provides. Choose Reports => Deferred Calls from the REPLICATION menu. Table 94 Item Copy ID Call ID Dest Link Error Time Err Num Error Message Conflicts report Description ID of the deferred transaction unique ID of the call of the deferred transaction database link used to address the destination time and date that the conflict occurred Oracle error number Message text of the error Deferred Calls report Run the Deferred Calls report for information about any deferred calls.Getting replication information Getting replication information Table 93 lists the reports that you can run to get information about replication and replication activities: Table 93 Replication reports summary Report to run DB Links Conflicts Conflicts Resolution Deferred Calls Pending Transaction Replicated Objects Type of information Database Links for a replication group Conflicts in the replication environment. 286 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Choose Reports => Conflicts from the REPLICATION menu. or automatic methods for resolving conflicts for a replication group Transactions and calls in the replication environment Objects that are replicated in a replication group Conflicts report Run the Conflicts report for information about any replication conflicts.

n.n where n is a number globally unique transaction id state that the transaction was in: I I I I I collecting prepared committed forced commit forced rollback Mxd Fail Tm. Retry Tm. and the time and date that the row was inserted. Table 95 Item Call No Tran ID Schema Package Procedure Arguments Deferred Calls report Description unique ID of call within a transaction unique ID of the associated transaction schema name of the deferred call package name of the deferred call procedure name of the deferred call number of arguments to the deferred call Pending Transactions report Run the Pending Transactions report for information about any two-phase commit pending transactions. whether the transaction was partly committed and partly rolled back (YES or NO).Getting replication information Table 95 shows the information that the report provides. time of manual force decision (null if not forced locally) time automatic recovery (RECO) last tried to recover the transaction Force Tm. Table 96 shows the information that the report provides. Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 287 . Choose Reports => Pending Transactions from the REPLICATION menu. Table 96 Item Local ID Global ID State Pending Transactions report Description id of the transaction using the format: n. Conflict Resolution report Run the Conflict Resolution report for information about the automatic conflict resolution methods set up for the instance.

Choose Reports => Replicated Objects from the REPLICATION_INSTANCE menu. Table 98 shows the information that the report provides. for uniqueness conflicts. this is the table name. Table 98 Item Database Link Owner Username Connect String Database Link DB Links report Description name of the database link owner of the database link user name that is currently using the database link connect string for the database link name of the database link Replicated Objects report Run the Replicated Objects report for information about replication objects. this is the constraint name. 288 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Table 97 shows the information that the report provides. for update conflicts. Choose Reports => DB Links from the REPLICATION_INSTANCE menu. this is the column group name. DB Links report Run the DB Links report for information about database links.Getting replication information Choose Reports => Conflict Resolution Methods from the REPLICATION_INSTANCE menu. Table 97 Item Schema Name Object Name Conflict Type Conflict Resolution Methods report Description name of the schema containing the replicated table name of the table for which you have defined a conflict resolution method type of conflict that the conflict resolution method is used to resolve: I I I Delete Uniqueness Update Reference Name object to which the routine applies: I I I for delete conflicts.

I I monitor mandatory and optional destinations take into account all three methods for configuring log archiving The ARCHIVE application is installed with. For enhanced monitoring of the archive logs. use the ArchFreeSpace parameter in the AVAILABILITY application. and requires the presence of. Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 289 . Table 99 Item Group Link Object Type Replicated Objects report Description name of the replicated object group to which the object belongs name of the schema containing the replicated object name of the replicated object type of replicated object: I I I I I I I I I I Table View Package Package body Procedure Function Index Synonym Trigger Snapshot Enhanced monitoring of the Oracle archive logs Oracle archive logs are monitored by the LOG application. the ARCHIVE application class enables you to: I monitor one or more archive log destinations when using the log_archive_dest_N syntax NOTE If you are the log_archive_dest syntax and have only one destination. PATROL for Oracle and the appropriate operating system KM files to operate.Enhanced monitoring of the Oracle archive logs Table 99 shows the information that the report provides.

the ArchFreeSpace parameter in the AVAILABILITY application goes offline. “Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle” on page 69.kml file. see the PATROL for Oracle online Help.kml.ora file. do not load the ORACLE_ARCHIVE. For more information about loading KMs. ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC parameters Table 100 describes the parameters that the ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC application provides.ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC parameters NOTE When you load ORACLE_ARCHIVE. Activating the ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC parameters The ORACLE_ARCHIVE application appears only when you load the ORACLE_ARCHIVE. If you do not want to use ORACLE_ARCHIVE to monitor the Oracle archive logs. 290 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . NOTE Mandatory and optional destinations are defined in the init.kml file. see Chapter 3. Table 100 ORACLE_ARCHIVE_SPEC application parameters Parameter ArchFreeSpaceColl ArchFreeSpace ArchFreeSpaceOptional Description a collector parameter that gathers archive free space data and sends it to the ArchFreeSpaceOptional and ArchFreeSpace consumer parameters a consumer parameter that provides the total number of archive logs that can be created in this mandatory destination a consumer parameter that provides the total number of archive logs that can be created in this optional destination For more information about parameters.

Debugging the ARCHIVE application Debugging the ARCHIVE application In the ARCHIVE application. and online Help InfoBoxes. “Accessing menu commands.1). and InfoBoxes Appendix C. Appendix A. InfoBoxes. and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 PATROL for Oracle online Help Chapter 8 Monitoring Oracle options 291 . “Monitoring the RAC environment” on page 293 how to access the KM menu commands. type this command in the system output window: % PSL set("/ORACLE_INSTANCE/<instance_name>/ArchFreeSpaceColl_DEBUG_STAT". parameters. Where to go from here The following table suggests topics: Topic how to monitor the the RAC environment Source of information Chapter 9. menu commands. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 Instructions about installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls detailed descriptions of the applications.

Where to go from here 292 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

. . . . . . . . WARNING Do not load the ORACLE_RAC application if you are using the Oracle Parallel Server. . . . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of RAC environment monitoring The ORACLE_RAC application identifies and monitors instances and nodes in the Oracle Real Application Cluster (RAC) setup when at least one RAC instance is configured in PATROL for Oracle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ORACLE_RAC parameter . . . . . . . . Debugging the RAC application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring RAC monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Activating the ORACLE_RAC parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 9 Monitoring the RAC environment 293 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 9 293 294 298 299 299 300 300 9 Monitoring the RAC environment This chapter presents the following topics: Overview of RAC environment monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rulesets that manage database-specific alerts in a RAC environment . . . . . . .

even if the configured RAC database instance goes down. PATROL for Oracle uses a TNS Service string to connect to the individual RAC instance. You can configure an RAC instance by choosing ORACLE_RAC => RAC DB Configure from the host. see the PATROL for Oracle User Guide and online Help. PATROL for Oracle uses the Server Control (SRVCTL) utility to identify the RAC instances that are in the cluster. the KM creates an agent configuration variable /AgentSetup/ORACLE_RAC_DATABASE/RACInstanceName. all the RAC instances must be running to validate the TNS Service string.Configuring RAC monitoring Configuring RAC monitoring PATROL for Oracle now monitors all the RAC database instances in an RAC cluster.ora file: remote_os_authent = TRUE Because the remote connection is made by the TNS Service string. this variable is required. you must update all the initialization parameter files of RAC instances. you must add the following variable to the initInstanceName. This default account is used by the MemberStatus parameter. For an instance to be configured successfully by the autoconfiguration process. Also. which polls every 5 minutes to connect to each RAC instance through the TNS Service string to determine the member status. To monitor the status of all the instances running in a Oracle 9i or 10g RAC cluster. To check the status. To configure an RAC database and add the RAC instances.defaultAccount. 294 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . For each configured RAC instance. Action To identify the existence of a RAC database and its RAC instance To check the status of the instance Command SRVCTL config database –d RACDatabaseName PATROLDatabaseUser/ PATROLDatabaseUserPassword@ TNSServiceString NOTE During RAC database configuration.

I Chapter 9 Monitoring the RAC environment 295 .Configuring RAC monitoring The hierarchy of the RAC implementation is as follows: ORACLE_RAC I DatabaseName — RAC configured instance1 — RAC configured instance2 — RAC configured instance3 — MemberStatus parameter Figure 19 displays the nested hierarchy for RAC: Figure 19 Icon hierarchy for RAC Requirements for an RAC environment Following are the requirements in an RAC environment: I I The PATROL Agent must be installed on at least one of the RAC cluster node. You must configure at least one of the RAC database instances through the PATROL for Oracle KM. The listener related to the RAC database instance must be running.

you must update the /RACConfig. Limitations in an RAC environment Following are the limitations of PATROL for Oracle in an RAC environment: I I I I I I I The OpenVMS operating system is not supported.ora file. I I To configure instances for RAC monitoring 1 Load ORACLE. following are the permission required for the PATROL OS account: — Executable permission of srvctl utility for RAC configuration on an RAC environment. or modify an RAC database instance. The ORACLE_RAC icons are displayed in the PATROL console. You cannot add. you must remove the RAC database and stop RAC monitoring. For any changes in the TNS Service string after configuration. Common TNS Service string name is not supported.kml on at least one node in the RAC environment. you must reconfigure the RAC database.kml and ORACLE_RAC. The ORACLE_FAILOVER application does not work. 2 Configure an instance on the node to be monitored. Otherwise. To remove an RAC instance from the PATROL for Oracle KM. Remote instance configuration is not supported. the debug output is written to the system output window (SOW) and not to a separate window. To update an RAC database instance. NOTE The Debug menu command provides a way to turn debug on and off for the RAC instance represented by the ORACLE_RAC application class instance. When debug is turned on for ORACLE_RAC.TNSService pconfig variable.RACInstanceName.Configuring RAC monitoring I To monitor RAC. delete. you must to remove the RAC database from monitoring and reconfigure it. 296 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . — Read permission for the tnsnames. The Microsoft Windows operating system is not supported. The blackout function does not work.

the TEST database icon is visible. If you have provided valid information and the instance is running. 2 In the RAC DB Name field. 3 In the RAC DB Home field. all the member nodes are visible. 2 In the TNS Service String field. PATROL for Oracle will configure the RAC database instance. If the ORACLE_RAC_MEMBER_INSTANCE application is in an alarm state. and 3) on database TEST. enter the RAC database home directory. Use this dialog box to add TNS Service string for each RAC instance. enter the RAC instance name. Configure instance a on node 1 for RAC monitoring as described in “To configure instances for RAC monitoring” on page 296. the following conditions are true: I I The ORACLE_RAC icon is displayed in the PATROL console. enter the TNS service string. Chapter 9 Monitoring the RAC environment 297 . enter the RAC database name. EXAMPLE Three instances (a. and c) are running on three nodes (1.Configuring RAC monitoring The following example describes different scenarios in a monitored RAC. and under that database level. the MemberStatus parameter is also in a warning state. Under the ORACLE_RAC application. After configuration. the RAC Instance Information dialog box appears. The annotation report that is generated shows which node instance is down. I To configure a RAC database 1 Select ORACLE_RAC => RAC DB Configure from the host. Once you click Exit. The RAC DB Configure dialog box appears. To add the RAC instances 1 In the RAC Instance Name field. Use the RAC Instance Information dialog box to add the RAC instances and a TNS Service string for each RAC instance. b. 3 Click Apply. 4 Click Exit. 2.

I I 298 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .ORACLE_RAC parameter PATROL for Oracle validates the TNS Service string for each RAC instance by connecting to the instance. If the status of a RAC instance is down. I If the status of a RAC instance is mount. If the status of the RAC instance is a combination of mount and alarm states. Table 101 ORACLE_RAC_DATABASE application parameter Parameter MemberStatus Description a standard parameter with a stoplight icon that checks the membership status of all instances in the RAC database collectively The MemberStatus parameter checks the status of the configured RAC instances running in an Oracle RAC database cluster environment. then the parameter considers the highest state and goes into the alarm state with a value of 2. If you have provided valid information. the parameter goes into the alarm state with a value of 2. enter the RAC database name. 3 Click Apply. It uses the following command: PATROLDatabaseUser/PATROLDatabaseUserPassword@TNSServiceString 4 Click Exit. 2 In the RAC DB Name field. 4 Click Exit. the parameter goes into the warning state with a value of 1. the RAC database will be removed from monitoring. To remove a RAC database 1 Select ORACLE_RAC => RAC DB Remove from the host. ORACLE_RAC parameter Table 101 describes the parameter that the ORACLE_RAC_DATABASE application provides.

except for the one instance for which you want to see the databasespecific parameters go into an alarm state. but for which you now want to see the database-specific parameters go into an alarm state. EXAMPLE If the listener related to the RAC instance RAC922 is not running. Chapter 9 Monitoring the RAC environment 299 . Activating the ORACLE_RAC parameters The ORACLE_RAC application appears only when you load ORACLE_RAC. the database-specific parameters go into an alarm state in all of the instances. databases are accessed by multiple instances. if the RAC instance collection has any errors.cfg—Apply this ruleset to all instances in a RAC I environment.cfg—Apply this ruleset to an instance for which the DeActivateDBParmThresholds. resulting in multiple alarms for the same problem.Activating the ORACLE_RAC parameters The annotation report for this parameter lists the status of the RAC instances that are in the down and mount states. then the MemberStatus parameter goes into the alarm state. When a problem occurs in a database accessed by multiple instances. “Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle” on page 69. Rulesets that manage database-specific alerts in a RAC environment In a RAC environment. If you do not want to use ORACLE_RAC to monitor the RAC environment.cfg ruleset was applied earlier. then MemberStatus goes into the alarm state with the following error in the annotation report: RAC922 ----------ERROR: ORA-12541: TNS:no listener For more information about parameters. ActivateDBParmThresholds. see the PATROL for Oracle online Help.kml. see Chapter 3. do not load ORACLE_RAC. Also. For more information about loading KMs. you can suppress and reactivate the database-specific parameters for selected instances in a RAC environment: I DeActivateDBParmThresholds. Using the following rulesets.kml.

“Monitoring the dataguard environment” on page 301 how to access the KM menu commands. and online Help InfoBoxes. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 Instructions about installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls Appendix C. “Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 300 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Debugging the RAC application To debug the RAC application. Appendix A. For more information about rules and rulesets and how to use them.Debugging the RAC application The rulesets are stored in $PATROL_HOME/oracle/rulesets/. Where to go from here The following table suggests topics: Topic how to monitor the the dataguard environment Source of information Chapter 10. and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL for Oracle online Help PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. Debug information is displayed in the system output window. see the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide and Chapter 4. “Accessing menu commands. InfoBoxes. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration” on page 131. right-click the RAC application icon and select KM Commands => Debug.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring standby instance for monitoring . . Limitations in the dataguard KM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removing standby instance from monitoring . . . . . . . . . Where to go from here. . . . . . . including indexes. . . . . are the same. . . . Overview of dataguard environment monitoring The Oracle dataguard feature ensures high availability. . . . Dataguard provides a comprehensive set of services that creates. . . . . manages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . maintains. . . . and monitors one or more standby databases to enable production Oracle databases to survive disasters and data corruptions. . . Dataguard configuration requirements . . . . . . . with on-disk database structures that are identical to the primary database on a block-for-block basis. . . . . data protection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A physical standby database is kept synchronized with the primary database by recovering the redo data received from the primary database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The database schema. . . . . . . . . . . . Parameters to monitor standby instance . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 10 301 302 304 305 305 306 306 311 311 312 Monitoring the dataguard environment 10 This chapter presents the following topics: Overview of dataguard environment monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshooting the dataguard KM . . and disaster recovery for the enterprise data. . . . . . . . . . . . . A standby database can be either a physical standby database or a logical standby database: I Physical standby database . . . . . . . . . Activating the ORACLE_DATAGUARD parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 10 Monitoring the dataguard environment 301 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .provides a physically identical copy of the primary database. . . . . . . . . . Debugging the ORACLE_DATAGUARD application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A logical standby database can be used for other business purposes in addition to disaster recovery requirements. After selecting a primary instance. The initial configuration window displays the particular instances as primary instances and lets you select one of them. the KM supports only the default protection mode. Once you enter the information. for example. you need to enter the information of the standby instance. During standby configuration. a logical standby database can be used concurrently for data protection and reporting. Using the ORACLE_DATAGUARD KM.kml. It is kept synchronized with the primary database by transforming the data in the redo logs received from the primary database into SQL statements and then executing the SQL statements on the standby database. but we can still configure its standby using the ORACLE_DATAGUARD.kml In the Data Guard broker feature. The ORACLE_DATAGUARD KM monitors the dataguard instance configured through the KM command. both physical and logical. the ORACLE_DATAGUARD KM queries to all the configured instances of PATROL for Oracle. ALTERNATE. Thus. Dataguard configuration requirements To configure a primary instance for monitoring in ORACLE. the instance must be in open stage.Contains the same logical information as the production database. you can monitor the log gap parameters and status of the configured standby instances. The ORACLE_DATAGUARD KM monitors a configured standby instance in any state.log_archive_dest_4='service="(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS_LIST=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL =tcp)(HOST=mogra)(PORT=1521)))(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=site2_XPT)(INS TANCE_NAME=dg3)(SERVER=dedicated)))"'. the OracleStatus parameter of the ORACLE km goes into an alarm state .Dataguard configuration requirements I Logical standby database . although the physical organization and structure of the data can be different. Although there are three protection modes. This allows users to access a logical standby database for queries and reporting purposes at any time. you need to change to simple “service=” format to monitor it in ORACLE_DATAGUARD km. EXAMPLE *.primary_role)' If you have set the log_archive_dest_n to a dataguard broker format. you can directly write listener entry as log_archive_dest_n. maximum performance mode. validation is done for that standby instance and the dataguard instance is configured. log_archive_dest_state_x = DEFERED. 302 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . After configuration if it changes from open to mount stage.'LGWR ASYNC NOAFFIRM delay=0 OPTIONAL max_failure=0 max_connections=1 reopen=300 db_unique_name="site2" register net_timeout=180 valid_for=(online_logfile.

Do not append “as sysdba” or “as sysoper” to the SYS password. The hierarchy of the dataguard implementation is as follows: ORACLE_DATAGUARD I Primary instance database name — Configured standby instance name — LogTransferGap parameter — LogApplyGap parameter — StandbyStatus parameter Figure 20 displays the nested hierarchy for dataguard: Figure 20 Icon hierarchy for dataguard Chapter 10 Monitoring the dataguard environment 303 .Dataguard configuration requirements EXAMPLE for Oracle 9i. LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_2=’SERVICE=payroll2’ for Oracle 10g.PRIMARY_ROLE) DB_UNIQUE_NAME=boston’ During standby instance configuration. SYS user and its password is required. LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_2= ‘SERVICE=boston LGWR ASYNC VALID_FOR=(ONLINE_LOGFILES.

2 In the Standby SYS Password field. 304 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . select the primary instance. 2 From the DataGuard Instance Configure dialog box. 4 Click Exit to close the dialog box. The DataGuard Instance Configure dialog box lists the local primary instances available on the corresponding host based on the following criterias: — Instances that are running and enabled for monitoring in the ORACLE KM. NOTE I The entered TNS service entry must be present in one of the log_archive_dest_n parameters of the primary instance. The type should be either logical or physical standby. the database name of standby and primary must be same. 4 Click Exit to close this dialog box. To select a primary instance whose standby needs to be configured 1 Select the ORACLE_DATAGUARD => KM Command => DataGuard Instance Configure menu command. — The standby instances are associated with the primary instances.Configuring standby instance for monitoring Configuring standby instance for monitoring The following section describes the steps required to configure a standby instance for monitoring. I The standby instance type will be checked. enter the SYS user password for connecting to the standby instance. To provide information for the standby instance 1 In the Standby TNS Entry field. Do not configure a standby instance through the Oracle KM. 3 Click Apply to accept the information and configure the standby instance. enter the TNS service entry name that you will use to connect to the standby instance. However. 3 Click Apply to accept the primary instance and to go to the standby instance dialog box. do not append “as sysdba” to the password. — “service = “entry is set for the archive destinations. For a physical standby.

ORACLE_DATAGUARD => KM Commands => Debug => DataGuard Instance Discovery => ON/OFF I DataGuard instance configuration . 4 From the DataGuard Instance Removal dialog box. When none of the standby instance is available for monitoring. all the dataguard parameters will go into an offline state. NOTE If the primary instance is removed from monitoring the Oracle KM then you must remove all its configured standby instances from the dataguard KM using the ORACLE_DATAGUARD => KM Command => DataGuard Instance Remove menu command. 5 Click Apply. the parent level database name icon disappears from the PATROL console along with the corresponding agent pconfig variables.Removing standby instance from monitoring Removing standby instance from monitoring Use the following steps to remove a standby instance from monitoring: 1 Select the ORACLE_DATAGUARD => KM Command => DataGuard Instance Remove menu command from the host. Debugging the ORACLE_DATAGUARD application The following debugs are available in the dataguard monitoring: I Dataguard instance discovery . Else. The selected standby instance.ORACLE_DATAGUARD => KM Commands =>Debug => DataGuard Instance Configuration => ON/OFF Dataguard gap parameters collector . 3 Click Apply. select the primary database name whose standby you want to remove. select the standby instance that you want to remove. along with its corresponding parameters and related pconfig variables are cleared from the PATROL console. 2 From the DataGuard Instance Remove dialog box.ORACLE_DATAGUARD_DATABASE => KM Commands =>DataGuard Collector Debug => ON/OFF I Chapter 10 Monitoring the dataguard environment 305 .

The CollDataGuard collector in the ORACLE_DATAGUARD database runs every 10 minutes to collect the data for the LogTransferGap and LogApplyGap parameters. a consumer parameter with a stoplight icon that checks the status of the configured standby database running on a dataguard environment. I I I I I I Parameters to monitor standby instance Table 102 describes the parameters that the ORACLE_DATAGUARD application provides. Table 102 ORACLE_DATAGUARD application parameters Parameter LogTransferGap LogApplyGap StandbyStatus Description a consumer parameter that displays a gap during redo transfers from a primary to a standby destination.Limitations in the dataguard KM I Dataguard status collector . The primary instance requires to be in the logging mode. VMS platform is not supported.ORACLE_DATAGUARD_DATABASE => CollStandbyStatus => ON/OFF Limitations in the dataguard KM Following are the limitations of PATROL for Oracle in the dataguard KM: I Switch over and failover of a standby instance is not supported. 306 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . Enable or disable monitoring feature for configured standby instance is not available. The dataguard environment that has cascaded standby destinations is not supported. ASM and RAC-based standby instance is not supported. You cannot configure the standby instance for a primary instance which is remotely monitored in the ORACLE KM. a consumer parameter that displays a gap during the redo applies at the standby destination.

either in the redo logs or the archive logs. Standby TNS service entry is deactivated. the LGWR process of the primary instance simultaneously tries to write redo information to the standby redo log files. or removed from the primary LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_n parameter. for example. the LogTransferGap parameter displays a gap. When the LGWR process is used. I Chapter 10 Monitoring the dataguard environment 307 . see the PATROL for Oracle online Help. The primary instance is unable to resolve the service name when the TNS service entry of a standby instance is removed from the tnsnames. Primary instance is unable to identify the standby site. the archive redo logs are simultaneously generated on the standby destination.Parameters to monitor standby instance For information about the default parameter attributes. EXAMPLE log_archive_dest_n = ‘<tns-service_entry> LGWR/ARCH …. LogTransferGap parameter During the transfer from a primary to a standby destination. when — the standby listener is down. The redo gap at the standby site can be for the following reasons: I Problem in the primary instance. — the standby instance is down. deferred. Problems in the standby instance.ora file at the primary site. — there is an error at the standby destination. I I I I I The primary instance’s LGWR or ARCH process is unable to write to the standby site. When the ARCH process is used. Network between the primary and the standby instance is slow. The log_archive_dest_n parameter of a primary instance can either have a LGWR or an ARCH process to transfer redo data to the standby site.

Logs missing in between ....Parameters to monitor standby instance There are two types of gaps at a standby site: I I Logs missing in between during transfer Logs missing sequentially during transfer The following example explains the sequential gaps for logical and physical standy: Sequence at the primary site 16 17 18 19 20 Sequence at the standby site 16 . the query uses the v$archive_gap from the standby instance and it displays high_sequence# low_sequence# 14 12 308 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .Logs missing sequentially The sequential gap formula for both logical and physical standby is: max (last archived sequence on primary destination) – max(last archived sequence on standby destination) When you apply the above formula to the example and subtract the highest sequence number at the standby site (16) from the highest sequence number at the primary site (20).Logs missing in between ..Logs missing in between 15 In this example.Logs missing sequentially . The following example explains the in between gaps for physical standy: Sequence at the primary site 10 11 12 13 14 15 Sequence at the standby site 10 11 . the result is 4.Logs missing sequentially ...Logs missing sequentially ..

NOTE The v$archive_gap view displays rows only when the recovery process is running on the physical standby instance. the result is 3. the query uses the v$archive_gap view and it displays a high sequence value of 14 and a low sequence value of 12. The total LogTransferGap for physical standby = sequential gap calculation plus the v$archive gap calculation (4 + 3 = 7) The following example explains the formula to find in between gap for a logical standby: Sequence# return 4 rows from first query 91 103 105 108 Sequence# return 4 rows from second query 85 93 105 108 4 rows are selected. and add 1 to the result of that calculation. The view displays only one gap that appears to be stopping the recovery process from applying log files. When you apply the formula to the example. Sequence# from first query output Sequence# from second query output Operation 85 (ignore this sequence# ) 91 103 105 108 (ignore this sequence# ) 93 105 108 93 – 91 – 1 = 1 105 – 103 – 1 = 1 108 – 105 – 1 = 2 Chapter 10 Monitoring the dataguard environment 309 .Parameters to monitor standby instance In this example. subtract the lowest unmatched sequence number at the standby site (12) from the highest unmatched sequence number at the standby site (14).

When the standby instance did not get the log files from the Primary site. When the standby instance is unable to apply the next log due to missing logs. Also. I I I StandbyStatus parameter The StandbyStatus parameter queries to the standby instance to get the status. The annotation report for this parameter lists the status of the standby instance. Table 103 explains the status of the standby database: Table 103 Status of the standby database Standby database type Physical Mode Mount Open read only Open read write Down Nomount Logical Open read write Mount Open read only Down Nomount ORATNSTNS Error ORATNSTNS Status/Value Ok/0 Warning/1 Alarm/2 Alarm/2 Alarm/2 Ok/0 Warning/1 Alarm/2 Alarm/2 Alarm/2 The StandbyStatus parameter will go into an offline state when primary instance is removed from the Oracle KM monitoring. The gap displayed at the standby site is due to following reasons: I When the standby instance has purposely stopped the log apply process.Parameters to monitor standby instance The in-between gap for above scenario is 1+1+2 = 4 The total LogTransferGap for logical standby = sequential gap + in-between gap (3 + 4 = 7) LogApplyGap parameter The LogApplyGap parameter displays a gap in the number of applied logs from the available log files. the corresponding StandbyStatus parameter goes into an alarm state. When the standby instance is down or log apply issues at standby destination. 310 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . if the CollStandbyStatus collector has any standby connection issue.

— The instance is configured but disabled for monitoring PATROL for Oracle. When you change the sys password for the standby instances.Activating the ORACLE_DATAGUARD parameters Activating the ORACLE_DATAGUARD parameters The ORACLE_DATAGUARD application appears only when you load ORACLE_DATAGUARD. If you do not want to use ORACLE_DATAGUARD to monitor the DATAGUARD environment. “Loading and configuring PATROL for Oracle” on page 69. do not load ORACLE_DATAGUARD. a primary instance might not be displayed in the primary instance list due to the following reasons: — The instance is not configured in PATROL for Oracle.kml. you need to remove and configure the standby instance.kml. I I I I Chapter 10 Monitoring the dataguard environment 311 . the standby instance changes from a physical to a logical standby. If the connection is not successful. you need to remove and reconfigure the standby instance. In such mode change. for example. you must remove and reconfigure the standby instance. — The instance is configured but it is not in open or in mount stage. The ORACLE_DATAGUARD KM does not detect change of standby type. During the standby configuration. For more information about loading KMs. For any changes of the standby TNS entry at a primary instance. Troubleshooting the dataguard KM The following section provides dataguard troubleshooting information: I The connection to standby instance is always made with sys/<Standby SYS Password>@<Standby TNS Entry> as sysdba. see Chapter 3. you will get a corresponding error message. — The instance does not have the “service=” entry in any of the log_archive_dest_n destinations.

“Firewall and port-forwarding considerations” on page 353 PATROL for Oracle online Help 312 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . and online Help InfoBoxes. “PATROL database objects” on page 317 Instructions about installing and using PATROL for Oracle with firewalls Appendix C. “Accessing menu commands. InfoBoxes. and online Help” on page 313 definitions and default values for parameters consumer and collector parameter dependencies PATROL Agent configuration variables Appendix B. Appendix A.Where to go from here Where to go from here The following table suggests topics: Topic Source of information how to access the KM menu commands.

. Right-click the application icon. . . . . . InfoBoxes. . . . . . . . Click MB2 on the instance icon. 313 Accessing online Help . . . . . and online Help A In this appendix. . . . . . 314 Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes Table 104 provides information about how to access KM commands and InfoBoxes in the various PATROL consoles. . . . . . . . . . . . . InfoBoxes. . . . . . . . . Appendix A Accessing menu commands. . . . . . . . .Appendix A Accessing menu commands. . . . . display its pop-up menu and then choose InfoBox. . . . . . . . . . . . the following topics are discussed: Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Table 104 Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes (part 1 of 2) Console PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows PATROL Console for UNIX To access menu commands To access InfoBoxes Right-click the application icon and Right-click the application icon to choose KM Commands. . . . and online Help 313 . .

314 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . To view the InfoBox for an application. PATROL Central Operator . right-click a PATROL object and choose InfoBox from the pop-up menu. To access InfoBoxes In either Tree View or Work Area. click KM Commands. drill down into a Monitored System until you can click the application instance that you want. and click the Infobox tab. click the Infobox tab to view the InfoBox for that system. choose Knowledge Module click the system that you want. you may want to refer to the PATROL Installation Guide for specific instructions on how to install and setup a browser in the UNIX environment. Accessing online Help Table 105 on page 315 provides information about how to access Help on each console. and Commands. NOTE If you are trying to access Help from a UNIX console.Web Edition Right-click the application icon and From the Monitored Systems page.Accessing online Help Table 104 Accessing KM commands and InfoBoxes (part 2 of 2) Console PATROL Central Operator Microsoft Windows Edition To access menu commands From an application’s page.

and choose Help On from the pop-up menu.Accessing online Help Table 105 Accessing online Help Console PATROL Console for Microsoft Windows To access product help From the console menu bar. and then click KM. Then click Show Help in the Application Definition dialog box. Then click the Help tab and Show Help in the Application Properties dialog box. and online Help 315 . choose Help => Help Topics. choose Help On => Knowledge Modules. Click the What’s this? Help button Right-click the parameter icon. the Page Help link. then click the ? icon or Help button in the parameter display window. Click the Help button. To access application class help Double-click the application class in the KM tab of the console.Microsoft Windows Edition From the console menu bar. Double-click the parameter icon. Double-click the parameter icon to open its display window.Web Edition Click the Help link. PATROL Central Operator . expand or collapse the list to find the application class. InfoBoxes. Double-click the parameter in the KM tab of the console. and Click the link for the Click the link for the then click the link for your application class. PATROL Console for UNIX From the console menu bar. and then click the application class name. Choose Attributes => Application Classes and double-click the application name. and click Help On. then click the Help tab and Show Help in the properties dialog box. To access parameter help Right-click the parameter icon. Appendix A Accessing menu commands. Then double-click the name of your KM. From the Operator tab of the console. PATROL Central Operator . choose Help => Help Topics => PATROL Knowledge Modules. click the Page Help link. and then parameter.

Accessing online Help 316 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

. . Grants and privileges for the PATROL account The following tables describes all the grants and privileges that are given to the PATROL account when an instance is configured. . . . . . . . . . . PATROL for Oracle views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Table 106 PATROL account grants and privileges (SYS) (part 1 of 4) Type of grant Analyze Create Create Create Create Create Create Grant GRANT ANALYZE ANY GRANT CREATE PROCEDURE GRANT CREATE PUBLIC SYNONYM GRANT CREATE SEQUENCE GRANT CREATE SESSION GRANT CREATE SYNONYM GRANT CREATE TABLE Appendix B PATROL database objects 317 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pconfig variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PATROL for Oracle tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appendix B 317 321 321 322 331 332 334 B PATROL database objects In this appendix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where are PATROL objects installed? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Table 106 lists the grants given to the PATROL account when a SYS or SYSTEM account is specified Table 107 on page 320 lists the grants given to the PATROL account when a DBA account is specified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PATROL for Oracle database objects . . . . . . Storage parameters for PATROL tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the following topics are discussed: Grants and privileges for the PATROL account . . .

Grants and privileges for the PATROL account

Table 106 PATROL account grants and privileges (SYS) (part 2 of 4)
Type of grant Create Drop Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Grant GRANT CREATE VIEW GRANT DROP PUBLIC SYNONYM GRANT SELECT ON CCOL$ GRANT SELECT ON CDEF$ GRANT SELECT ON CLU$ GRANT SELECT ON COL$ GRANT SELECT ON DBA_2PC_PENDING GRANT SELECT ON DBA_CLUSTERS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_COL_PRIVS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_CONSTRAINTS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_DATA_FILES GRANT SELECT ON DBA_DB_LINKS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_FREE_SPACE GRANT SELECT ON DBA_IND_PARTITIONS (8.x and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON DBA_IND_SUBPARTITIONS (8.1.xx and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON DBA_INDEXES GRANT SELECT ON DBA_JOBS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_OBJECTS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_PART_INDEXES (8.x and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON DBA_PROFILES GRANT SELECT ON DBA_ROLE_PRIVS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_ROLES GRANT SELECT ON DBA_ROLLBACK_SEGS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_SEGMENTS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_SNAPSHOTS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_SYS_PRIVS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_TAB_COLUMNS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_TAB_PARTITIONS (8.x and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON DBA_TAB_SUBPARTITIONS (8.1.xx and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON DBA_TABLES GRANT SELECT ON DBA_TABLESPACES GRANT SELECT ON DBA_TEMP_FILES (8.1.xx and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON DBA_TRIGGERS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_TS_QUOTAS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_UNDO_EXTENTS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_USERS GRANT SELECT ON DBA_VIEWS GRANT SELECT ON FET$

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Grants and privileges for the PATROL account

Table 106 PATROL account grants and privileges (SYS) (part 3 of 4)
Type of grant Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Grant GRANT SELECT ON FILE$ GRANT SELECT ON FILE_LOCK GRANT SELECT ON FILE_PING GRANT SELECT ON IND$ GRANT SELECT ON OBJ$ GRANT SELECT ON ROLE_TAB_PRIVS GRANT SELECT ON SEG$ GRANT SELECT ON SYS.SYS_DBA_SEGS (8.x and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON TAB$ GRANT SELECT ON TS$ GRANT SELECT ON UET$ GRANT SELECT ON UNDO$ GRANT SELECT ON USER$ GRANT SELECT ON V$ROLLNAME GRANT SELECT ON V_$ACCESS GRANT SELECT ON V_$ARCHIVE_DEST_STATUS GRANT SELECT ON V_$BACKUP GRANT SELECT ON V_$DATABASE GRANT SELECT ON V_$DATAFILE GRANT SELECT ON V_$DB_OBJECT_CACHE GRANT SELECT ON V_$DBFILE GRANT SELECT ON V_$DISPATCHER GRANT SELECT ON V_$FILESTAT GRANT SELECT ON V_$INSTANCE GRANT SELECT ON V_$LATCH GRANT SELECT ON V_$LATCH_CHILDREN GRANT SELECT ON V_$LATCHNAME GRANT SELECT ON V_$LIBRARYCACHE GRANT SELECT ON V_$LICENSE GRANT SELECT ON V_$LOCK GRANT SELECT ON V_$LOG GRANT SELECT ON V_$LOG_HISTORY GRANT SELECT ON V_$LOGFILE GRANT SELECT ON V_$NLS_PARAMETERS GRANT SELECT ON V_$OPEN_CURSOR GRANT SELECT ON V_$PARAMETER GRANT SELECT ON V_$PQ_SESSTAT GRANT SELECT ON V_$PQ_SLAVE

Appendix B

PATROL database objects

319

Grants and privileges for the PATROL account

Table 106 PATROL account grants and privileges (SYS) (part 4 of 4)
Type of grant Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Select Grant GRANT SELECT ON V_$PQ_SYSSTAT GRANT SELECT ON V_$PROCESS GRANT SELECT ON V_$QUEUE GRANT SELECT ON V_$RECOVERY_LOG GRANT SELECT ON V_$RESOURCE_LIMIT GRANT SELECT ON V_$ROLLNAME GRANT SELECT ON V_$ROLLSTAT GRANT SELECT ON V_$ROWCACHE GRANT SELECT ON V_$SESSION GRANT SELECT ON V_$SESSION_WAIT GRANT SELECT ON V_$SESSTAT GRANT SELECT ON V_$SGASTAT GRANT SELECT ON V_$SHARED_POOL_RESERVED GRANT SELECT ON V_$SHARED_SERVER GRANT SELECT ON V_$SORT_SEGMENT GRANT SELECT ON V_$SQL GRANT SELECT ON V_$SQLAREA GRANT SELECT ON V_$SQLTEXT GRANT SELECT ON V_$STATNAME GRANT SELECT ON V_$SYSSTAT GRANT SELECT ON V_$SYSTEM_EVENT GRANT SELECT ON V_$TABLESPACE (8.1.xx and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON V_$TEMP_EXTENT_POOL (8.1.xx and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON V_$TEMPFILE (8.1.xx and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON V_$TEMPSTAT (8.1.xx and 9.1.xx instances) GRANT SELECT ON V_$TIMER GRANT SELECT ON V_$TRANSACTION GRANT SELECT ON V_$VERSION GRANT SELECT ON V_$WAITSTAT

Table 107 PATROL account grants and privileges ( NON-SYS DBA) (part 1 of 2)
Type of grant Create Create Create Create Create Grant GRANT CREATE SESSION GRANT CREATE TABLE GRANT CREATE SEQUENCE GRANT CREATE VIEW GRANT CREATE SYNONYM

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PATROL for Oracle database objects

Table 107 PATROL account grants and privileges ( NON-SYS DBA) (part 2 of 2)
Type of grant Create Drop Create Select Select Grant GRANT CREATE PUBLIC SYNONYM GRANT DROP PUBLIC SYNONYM GRANT CREATE PROCEDURE GRANT SELECT ANY DICTIONARY GRANT SELECT ANY TABLE

PATROL for Oracle database objects
This section describes the database objects that are installed when you configure PATROL for Oracle.

Where are PATROL objects installed?
PATROL database objects are installed in two places: the tables owned by the PATROL account, and the SYS table. The only object that is installed in the SYS table is the view P$BH. Refer to Table 135 on page 332 for a description of this view. The objects listed in the following table are installed in the tables owned by PATROL: Table 108 PATROL database objects (part 1 of 2)
Object Name P$ARCHDEST P$AUTOEXT P$AUTOEXTEND P$AUTOEXTTS P$BUFFCACHE P$BUFFCACHE P$BUFFERCACHE P$CANTEXTFILE P$CANTEXTMAXFILE P$CANTEXTMAXTBSP P$CURSOR P$CURSOR P$DATA_OS_SPACE P$DATA_TS_SPACELEFT P$EXTENTMAP Object type VIEW TABLE TABLE TABLE PACKAGE PACKAGE BODY TABLE TABLE TABLE TABLE PACKAGE PACKAGE BODY TABLE TABLE TABLE Appendix B See page 332 322 323 323 not applicable not applicable 324 324 324 324 not applicable not applicable 325 325 325 PATROL database objects 321

PATROL for Oracle tables

Table 108 PATROL database objects (part 2 of 2)
Object Name P$JOBACTION P$JOBACTION_UK P$JOBGENERAL P$JOBGENERAL_UK P$JOBHISTORY P$JOBSCHEDULE P$JOBSCHEDULE_UK P$LOCKCONFLICTTX P$LOCKCONFLICTUSER P$OBJ_EXCLUSION P$POK_CFG the owner of this table is the first DBA user to configure the instance P$QUERY P$QUERY P$REPORT P$REPORT P$RPT P$RPTLIB P$RPTLIB P$SQL P$SQLTEXT P$SQLTEXT_NDX P$SQLNDX P$TBSP_DATA_FILES P$TEMP_TS_SPACELEFT P$TEMP_OS_SPACE Object type TABLE INDEX TABLE INDEX TABLE TABLE INDEX TABLE TABLE TABLE TABLE See page 325 not applicable 326 not applicable 326 326 not applicable 327 327 328 328

PACKAGE BODY PACKAGE PACKAGE BODY PACKAGE PACKAGE PACKAGE PACKAGE BODY TABLE TABLE INDEX INDEX VIEW TABLE TABLE

not applicable not applicable not applicable not applicable not applicable not applicable not applicable 329 330 not applicable not applicable 334 331 331

PATROL for Oracle tables
The PATROL tables are described in Table 109–Table 130. Table 109 P$AUTOEXT table (part 1 of 2)
Name TABLESPACE_NAME FILE# Null? NOT NULL NOT NULL Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER Definition name of the tablespace absolute file number

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PATROL for Oracle tables

Table 109 P$AUTOEXT table (part 2 of 2)
Name AUTOEXTEND MONITORING Null? Data type VARCHAR2(5) VARCHAR2(10) Definition whether the tablespace has autoextended or not whether the tablespace is INCLUDED or EXCLUDED from monitoring

Table 110
Name

P$AUTOEXTEND table
Null? Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER Description name of the tablespace maximum size (in bytes) of the next extent for the segments in the tablespace size (in bytes) of the largest free extent maximum available space (in bytes) in an autoextensible file of the tablespace maximum number of free operating system bytes size (in bytes) that the file can allocate when more space is required ID of the file name of the file

TABLESPACE_NAME MAX_SEG_NEXT_EXTENT

MAX_FREE_BYTES MAX_FILE_AVAIL

NUMBER NUMBER

OS_AVAIL FILE_INC_BYTES FILE_ID FILE_NAME

NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER VARCHAR2(513)

Table 111
Name FILE# BYTES FILE_TYPE

P$AUTOEXTFILE table
Null? NOT NULL Data type NUMBER NUMBER NOT NULL NUMBER Description number of the file file size (in bytes) of the autoextensible data/temp files decides the type of the file: datafile (0) or tempfile (1)

Table 112
Name

P$AUTOEXTTS table
Null? Data type VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(9) Description name of the tablespace name of the tablespace allocation type

TABLESPACE_NAME ALLOCATION_TYPE

Appendix B

PATROL database objects

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Table 113
Name

P$BUFFERCACHE table
Null? NOT NULL NOT NULL NOT NULL NOT NULL NOT NULL Data type VARCHAR2(60) VARCHAR2(16) NUMBER(38) NUMBER(38) NUMBER(38) Definition name of the object currently in the buffer cache type of the object currently in the buffer cache number of headers in the buffer cache number of data blocks in the buffer cache number of consistent blocks in the buffer cache

OBJECT_NAME OBJECT_TYPE HEADER_BLOCKS DATA_BLOCKS CR_BLOCKS

Table 114
Name FILE_ID

P$CANTEXTFILE table
Null? Data type NUMBER VARCHAR2(513) VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER NUMBER Description ID of the file name of the file name of the tablespace size (in bytes) that the file can allocate when more space is required available space (in bytes)

FILE_NAME TABLESPACE_NAME FILE_INC_BYTES FILE_AVAIL

Table 115
Name

P$CANTEXTMAXFILE table
Null? Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER Description name of the tablespace maximum available space (in bytes) in an auto extensible file of the tablespace

TABLESPACE_NAME MAX_FILE_AVAIL

Table 116
Name

P$CANTEXTMAXTBSP table
Null? Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER Description name of the tablespace maximum size (in bytes) of the next extent for the segments in the tablespace size (in bytes) of the largest free extent

TABLESPACE_NAME MAX_SEG_NEXT_EXTENT

MAX_FREE_BYTES

NUMBER

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PATROL for Oracle tables Table 117 Name P$DATA_OS_SPACE table Null? N/A N/A Data type VARCHAR2(513) NUMBER Description name of the file system space left according to the operating system FILESYSTEM OSAVAIL Table 118 Name P$DATA_TS_SPACELEFT table Null? N/A N/A N/A Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER NUMBER Description name of the permanent tablespace free space left in table total amount of space in table TABLESPACE_NAME FREESPACE TOTALSPACE Table 119 Name FILE# LOWB HIGHB EXT# P$EXTENTMAP table Null? NOT NULL NOT NULL NOT NULL NOT NULL NOT NULL NOT NULL NOT NULL Data type NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(12) NUMBER Definition number of the file block number block number plus the length of the extent (in blocks) minus 1 number of the extent name of the object name of the owner of the object kind of object number of the object OBJ_NAME OWN_NAME KIND OBJ# Table 120 P$JOBACTION table (part 1 of 2) Name JOBNAME CATEGORY Null? NOT NULL NOT NULL Data type VARCHAR2(64) VARCHAR2(12) Definition unique name of the job type of job: I I I PSL SQL OS OUTPUTMODE NUMBER how to output the job: I I I Text Window Annotation Log File Appendix B PATROL database objects 325 .

PATROL for Oracle tables Table 120 P$JOBACTION table (part 2 of 2) Name WHENTONOTIFY Null? Data type NUMBER Definition criteria to use for notifying the job results: I I I I Always Job Succeeds Job Fails Job Completes JOBTERMINATE PARAM1 PARAM2 PARAM3 LOGNAME TEXT NUMBER VARCHAR2(1024) VARCHAR2(32) VARCHAR2(32) VARCHAR2(16) VARCHAR2(2000) time the job is supposed to terminate parameter to use for the job parameter to use for the job parameter to use for the job name of the log file on the agent computer text of the job results Table 121 P$JOBGENERAL table Name JOBNAME CREATED LASTMODIFIED OWNER DBNAME Null? NOT NULL Data type VARCHAR2(64) NUMBER NUMBER VARCHAR2(20) VARCHAR2(32) Definition unique name of the job timestamp showing when the job was created timestamp showing when the job was last changed owner of the job database where the job is set to run Table 122 P$JOBHISTORY table Name JOBNAME RUNAT NOTIFMODE DURATION RESULT Null? NOT NULL Data type VARCHAR2(64) NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER VARCHAR2(32) Definition unique name of the job timestamp that shows when the job should run mode to use to notify of any errors number of iterations the job is supposed to run whether the job ran successfully Table 123 P$JOBSCHEDULE table (part 1 of 2) Name JOBNAME ENABLED Null? NOT NULL Data type VARCHAR2(64) NUMBER Definition unique name of the job whether the job is set to run 326 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

PATROL for Oracle tables Table 123 P$JOBSCHEDULE table (part 2 of 2) Name SCHTYPE Null? NOT NULL Data type NUMBER Definition type of schedule the job is set to: I I I I I Once Daily Once Daily Recur Weekly Once Weekly Recur SCHOCCURS SCHDAY SCHFREQ STARTING ENDING STARTDATE ENDDATE DESCRIPTION NOT NULL NUMBER CHAR(3) NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER VARCHAR2(256) number of iterations the job is supposed to run day of the week the job is scheduled to run how frequently the job is supposed to run time the job is scheduled to start time the job is scheduled to stop date the job is scheduled to start date the job is scheduled to end description of the job Table 124 P$LOCKCONFLICTTX table Name WAIT_USERNAME WAIT_UID LOCK_TYPE LOCK_OBJECT HOLD_USERNAME HOLD_UID LOCK_FILE# LOCK_BLOCK LOCK_ROW Null? N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER VARCHAR2(5) VARCHAR2(40) VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER Definition name of the user that is waiting for a lock ID of the user that is waiting for a lock type of lock the object is waiting for object that is locked name of the user that is holding the lock ID of the user that is holding the lock the file that the lock is on the block in the file that has the lock the row in the file that has the lock Table 125 P$LOCKCONFLICTUSER table (part 1 of 2) Name WAIT_USERNAME WAIT_UID LOCK_TYPE LOCK_OBJECT WAIT_LOCK_MODE HOLD_USERNAME Null? N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER VARCHAR2(5) VARCHAR2(40) VARCHAR2(16) VARCHAR2(30) Definition name of the user that is waiting for a lock ID of the user that is waiting for a lock type of lock the object is waiting for object that is locked mode of waiting the object is using name of the user that is holding the lock Appendix B PATROL database objects 327 .

including the service name if the instance is a remote instance hostname of the Oracle instance PATROL Agent port number PatrolAgentHost PatrolAgentPort VARCHAR2(15) VARCHAR2(8) 328 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .PATROL for Oracle tables Table 125 P$LOCKCONFLICTUSER table (part 2 of 2) Name HOLD_UID HOLD_LOCK_MODE Null? N/A N/A Data type NUMBER VARCHAR2(16) Definition ID of the user that is holding the lock mode of the holding lock Table 126 P$OBJ_EXCLUSION table Name TS# FILE# BLOCK# OWNER OBJECT_TYPE OBJECT_NAME Null? NOT NULL N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Data type NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(30) file identifier Definition tablespace identifier starting block location name of the owner of the object type of object that is excluded name of the object Table 127 P$POK_CFG table (part 1 of 2) Name OraUser OraDB Null? Data type VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(25) Definition Oracle Username in uppercase Oracle instance name.

the password is stored in the PATROL encrypted form IF the security level is 0 . it uses the default value of POKBMCNA. For the PatrolAgentEUI attribute. the password is stored at PATROLSecurityLevel3 or PATROLSecurityLevel4. I Table 128 P$SQL table (part 1 of 2) Name ADDRESS HASH_VALUE TIME_STAMP PARSING_USER_ID FIRST_LOAD_TIME SHARABLE_MEM PERSISTENT_MEM RUNTIME_MEM Null? Data type RAW(4) NUMBER DATE NUMBER VARCHAR2(19) NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER Definition address of the handle to the parent for this cursor hash value of the parent statement in the library cache time stamp of the SQL command ID of the first user that parses the SQL date and time that the SQL was first loaded amount of sharable memory in the shared pool consumed by the object amount of persistent memory. in bytes used by this child cursor size of the ephemeral frame used by this child cursor Appendix B PATROL database objects 329 . Otherwise.PATROL for Oracle tables Table 127 P$POK_CFG table (part 2 of 2) Name Name Null? Data type VARCHAR2(128) Definition Attribute Name holder I I I I I PatrolRTServers PatrolForOracleVersion PatrolAgentUser PatrolAgentEUI PatrolHome Value VARCHAR2(256) Value of the corresponding attribute name I If any of the attributes does not have a value or is not applicable. depending on which PATROL security level the PATROL Agent uses.2.

when there is inadequate Shared Global area. INSERT.PATROL for Oracle tables Table 128 P$SQL table (part 2 of 2) Name SORTS LOADED_VERSIONS EXECUTIONS USERS_EXECUTING LOADS Null? Data type NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER Definition number of sorts that was done for this child cursor 1 if context heap is loaded. etc. The number of reloads increases.) being executed number used to order the pieces of SQL text line of SQL text 330 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . for example. 0 otherwise number of times that a SQL statement is executed number of users executing the statement number of times that a SQL statement is reloaded into cache. number of times this child cursor has been invalidated number of times that a SQL statement is parsed number of disk reads for this child cursor number of buffers that are read for a SQL statement current number of cursors (whether they are in use or not) INVALIDATIONS PARSE_CALLS DISK_READS BUFFER_GETS CURSOR_COUNT NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER Table 129 P$SQLID table Name SQL_ID ADDRESS HASH_VALUE Null? Data Type NUMBER RAW(4) NUMBER Definition ID of the SQL statement used with HASH_VALUE to identify uniquely a cached cursor hash value always unique Table 130 P$SQLTEXT table Name ADDRESS HASH_VALUE COMMAND_TYPE PIECE SQL_TEXT Null? Data Type RAW(4) NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER VARCHAR2(64) Definition used with HASH_VALUE to identify uniquely a cached cursor hash value always unique A code for the type of SQL statement (SELECT.

psl pconfobj. pctincrease 0 initial 20k. pctincrease 0 initial 256K. next 20k. pctincrease 0 initial 256K.psl ORAGetOSSpaceDataL. next 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K.psl ORAGetOSSpaceDataL. next 20k.sql pbatchjobs. next 40k. next 256K.sql Storage parameter initial 40k. next 256K.sql pbatchjobs. pctincrease 0 initial 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K. next 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K.sql ORAGetOSSpaceDataL.sql ORAGetOSSpaceDataL. next 256K.sql pbatchjobs. next 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K.Storage parameters for PATROL tables Table 131 P$TEMP_TS_SPACELEFT table Name TABLESPACE_NAME FREESPACE TOTALSPACE Null? N/A N/A N/A Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER NUMBER Definition name of the temporary tablespace free space left in table total amount of space in table Table 132 P$TEMP_OS_SPACE table Name FILESYSTEM OSAVAIL Null? N/A N/A Data type VARCHAR2(513) NUMBER Definition name of the file system space left according to the operating system Storage parameters for PATROL tables The following table lists the storage parameters used by the database objects that are installed by PATROL: Table 133 PATROL tables storage parameters Table/index name P$AUTOEXT P$AUTOEXTEND P$AUTOEXTTS P$BUFFERCACHE P$CANTEXTFILE P$CANTEXTMAXFILE P$CANTEXTMAXTBSP P$EXTENTMAP P$JOBACTION P$JOBACTION_UK (index) P$JOBGENERAL Added by function pconfobj.psl ORAGetOSSpaceDataL. pctincrease 0 initial 20k. next 256K. pctincrease 0 See page 322 323 323 324 324 324 324 325 325 not applicable 326 Appendix B PATROL database objects 331 . next 256K.psl pconfobj.

next 256K.sql pbatchjobs.psl ORASqlViewerL.sql pconfobj. next 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K.sql pconfobj.psl ORASqlViewerL. next 20k. pctincrease 0 initial 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K. next 50k. pctincrease 0 See page not applicable 326 326 not applicable 327 327 328 329 not applicable 330 330 not applicable PATROL for Oracle views The PATROL views are described in Table 137. pctincrease 0 initial 20k.psl Storage parameter initial 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K.PATROL for Oracle views Table 133 PATROL tables storage parameters Table/index name P$JOBGENERAL_UK (index) P$JOBHISTORY P$JOBSCHEDULE P$JOBSCHEDULE_UK (index) P$LOCKCONFLICTTX P$LOCKCONFLICTUSER P$OBJ_EXCLUSION P$SQL P$SQL_NDX (index) P$SQLID P$SQLTEXT P$SQLTEXT_NDX (index) Added by function pbatchjobs. next 256K. next 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K.sql pconfobj.sql ORASqlViewerL. next 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 50k. next 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K. next 256K. next 20k. Table 134 P$ARCHDEST view Name ARCHIVE_DEST Null? Data type VARCHAR2(256) Definition Destination text string for the archive logs Table 135 P$BH view (part 1 of 2) Name FILE# BLOCK# Null? Data type NUMBER NUMBER Definition Data file identifier number block number for the data file 332 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . pctincrease 0 initial 256K.psl ORASqlViewerL. pctincrease 0 initial 20k. next 256K. next 256K. pctincrease 0 initial 256K.sql pbatchjobs.sql pbatchjobs.psl ORASqlViewerL.

then these buffers are covered by the same PCM lock. If more than one buffer has the same address. This column is obsolete but is retained for historical compatibility. Y if the block has been modified Y if the block is temporary Y if the block is pinged Y if the block is stale Y if the block is a direct block Always set to N. This column is obsolete but is retained for historical compatibility LOCK_ELEMENT_ADDR RAW(4) CLASS NUMBER DIRTY TEMP PING STALE DIRECT NEW VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) Appendix B PATROL database objects 333 . The address of the lock element that contains the PCM lock that is covering the buffer. the address of the lock element that contains the PCM lock that is locking this buffer.PATROL for Oracle views Table 135 P$BH view (part 2 of 2) Name STATUS Null? Data type VARCHAR2(4) Definition status of the data file: I XCUR is held exclusive by this instance SCUR is held shared by this instance CR is only valid for consistent read READ is being read from disk MREC is in media recovery mode IREC is in instance (crash) recovery mode I I I I I XNC NUMBER Number of PCM x to null lock conversions due to contention with another instance.

Some variables are created for internal use only. Use the agent configuration utility to view these variables. do not modify or delete. These variables are used by Product Short and alteration of these variables harms the operation of Product Short. WARNING Do not change variables that are designated For internal use only.Pconfig variables Table 136 P$DBA_TABLESPACES view Name TABLESPACE_NAME INITIAL_EXTENT NEXT_EXTENT MIN_EXTENTS Null? NOT NULL N/A N/A NOT NULL Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER Definition name of the tablespace size of the initial extent (in blocks) size of the next extent (in blocks) maximum number of extents allowed as specified in segment creation or alteration number of extents allocated during segment creation percentage of extent increase minimum extent length in blocks status of tablespaces whether logging is on or off MAX_EXTENTS PCT_INCREASE MIN_EXTLEN STATUS CONTENTS LOGGING NOT NULL NOT NULL N/A N/A N/A N/A NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER VARCHAR2(9) VARCHAR2(9) VARCHAR2(9) Table 137 P$TBSP_DATA_FILES view Name TABLESPACE_NAME BYTES BLOCKS Null? N/A N/A N/A Data type VARCHAR2(30) NUMBER NUMBER Definition name of the tablespace total number of bytes in the tablespace total number of blocks in the tablespace Pconfig variables Table 138 on page 335 lists and describes variables that are set in the PATROL Agent for Product Short. Modification or deletion of these variables harms the operation of PATROL for Oracle. 334 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

make sure that the Backup Agents Before Apply option remains selected. do not modify or delete. stop time of the SQLViewer collector For internal use only. Create a record of the original setting for a variable before you change it. If you use the PATROL Configuration Manager to change variables. stores the sys user password of the configured standby instance /AgentSetup/ORACLE_SQLVIEWER. do not modify or delete. stores the PATROL database user password of the configured primary instance in Oracle KM /AgentSetup/ORACLE_DATAGUARD_DATABASE. flag that indicates whether the collector for SQL Viewer is running /AgentSetup/ORACLE_SQLVIEWER. ORACLE_SID.collStartTime /AgentSetup/ORACLE_SQLVIEWER.collStopTime /AgentSetup/ORACLE. ORACLE_SID.temp. stores the sys user password of the configured standby instance /AgentSetup/ORACLE_DATAGUARD_DATABASE. see Chapter 4. For more information.archDest location of data files to which SQL Viewer writes I I I default on UNIX: /tmp default on Windows: c:\\ default on VMS: some$disk: /AgentSetup/ORACLE_SQLVIEWER. “Using PATROL Configuration Manager to modify and migrate configuration” on page 131 and the PATROL Configuration Manager User Guide. ORACLE_SID. temporary default account Appendix B PATROL database objects 335 .defaultAccount For internal use only. standbyInstanceName. primaryInstanceName.defaultAccount Description For internal use only. do not modify or delete. standbyInstanceName.defaultAccount For internal use only. follow these guidelines: I I I Make sure that you are aware of the implications before changing a variable. do not modify or delete. do not modify or delete.defaultAccount For internal use only.defaultAccount For internal use only.collectorRunning For internal use only. do not modify or delete. ORACLE_SID.Pconfig variables When changing variables. ORACLE_SID. Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 1 of 17) Variable /AgentSetup/ORACLE_CATEGORY. default username/password combination for the application class (ORACLE_CATEGORY) in its name. do not modify or delete. start time of the SQLViewer collector For internal use only. do not modify or delete. /AgentSetup/ORACLE_DATAGUARD_INSTANCE.

ArchFreeSpace. do not modify or delete. stores the type of standby.sid. flag that indicates that the p$temp_os_space table exists.DBHome For internal use only.monDGDBList For internal use only. do not modify or delete. do not modify or delete.ORACLE_SID. do not modify or delete. and the collector can count on the presence of this table 336 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .monDGInstList For internal use only. flag that indicates whether the temp tablespaces were deactivated by the KM /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY. do not modify or delete.primaryInstanceName. it can be physical or logical /DGConfig. stores the list of configured database names of the primary instances /DGConfig.active.ORACLE_SID. /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY. For internal use only.tempTSparams.monDGInstType For internal use only. indicates the TNS entry of a standby instance /DGConfig.standbyInstanceName.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 2 of 17) Variable /AgentSetup/ORACLE_RAC_DATABASE/ RACInstanceName.primaryDatabaseName.defaultAccount Description default account of the Real Application Clusters (RAC) instance This account information is used by RAC for opening a channel and connecting to the RAC instance to check its status.standbyInstanceName.TNSService For internal use only.DBName For internal use only. do not modify or delete. stores the names of the standby instances configured for a primary database /DGConfig.primaryInstanceName. /DGConfig. do not modify or delete. the collector need not create this table. flag that indicates whether archive logging is active for the monitored instance /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY. do not modify or delete. ORACLE HOME of primary instance /DGConfig. stores the database name of primary instance This pconfig gets created only when primary instance is configured with auto db configuration in ORACLE.kml. do not modify or delete. deactivatedByKM For internal use only. tempOSTableExists For internal use only.

ORACLE_LISTENER. temp. do not modify or delete. Appendix B PATROL database objects 337 . SCHEMA NAME. flag that indicates that the p$temp_ts_space table exists. last time the alert log was modified For internal use only. FreeSpaceDeficit. do not modify or delete. the collector need not create the table. AlertFileInfo_modtime /OracleConfig. AlertFileInfo_size /OracleConfig.kmactive For internal use only. AlertFileInfo_eof_pos /OracleConfig. do not modify or delete. do not modify or delete.OBJECT NAME For internal use only. flag that indicates whether the named listener is a part of the Failover Configuration /OracleConfig. do not modify or delete.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 3 of 17) Variable /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY. do not modify or delete.Listener. end of the file for the alert log For internal use only.ALTERNEXT. flag that indicates whether an instance is monitored locally or remotely /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. localInstance For internal use only. do not modify or delete. size of the Alert Log For internal use only.FailoverMonitoring.kmactive For internal use only. FreeSpace.ORACLE_SID. flag that indicates whether the FreeSpaceDeficit parameter is active /ORACLE_INSTANCE.TableExists Description For internal use only.ORACLE_SID. flag that indicates whether the FreeSpace parameter is active /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY. and the collector can count on the presence of this table /ORACLE_AVAILABILITY. do not modify or delete.ORACLE_SID. do not modify or delete.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID.Active For internal use only. flag that indicates whether the KM will alter the next extent of the object in the schema if there is a space problem.

1 = AlwaysOnLine selected during configuration of the instance.ORACLE_SID. do not modify or delete. 338 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .ARCHIVELOG. DIRECTORY /OracleConfig.AvExUsers For internal use only. You can change this variable by using the Exclusion => User Exclusion menu command in the AVAILABILITY menu. InstanceStatus parameter goes into a warning state if the instance goes down.AlwaysOnLine Description flag that indicates whether the InstanceStatus parameter goes into a warning or an alarm state when the instance is offline This variable uses the following values: I 0 = AlwaysOnLine not selected during configuration of the instance.ORACLE_SID.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 4 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID. I /OracleConfig. InstanceStatus parameter goes into an alarm state if the instance goes down. archive log directory list of users who are excluded from monitoring by the following space parameters: I I I I I I I I I I I I CannotExtend ExtentsLeft ExtentsLeftETF ExtensLeftPct FreeSpace FreeSpaceETF FreeSpaceDeficit RSExtentsLeft RSExtentsLeftPct RSSpaceLeftPct TempTSLeft TempTSLeftPct Values for this variable are the users selected in the Users Excluded dialog box.

DBName /OracleConfig. /OracleConfig. do not modify or delete. ConfigTime For internal use only.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 5 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig. do not modify or delete. You can select some or none of the other categories by using Configuration => Advanced => Instance Configuration from the ORACLE menu.ORACLE_SID. database name For internal use only.ORACLE_SID. do not modify or delete. time of last configuration or reconfiguration activity for the ORACLE_SID instance /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. dbObjectsDeinstalled For internal use only. do not modify or delete. DBAUsername For internal use only. Categories Description categories (application classes) that are selected to monitor this instance Values for this variable are the following: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I AVAILABILITY COLLECTORS CAPACITY DBLINKS ENVIRONMENT JOBS LOG MTS NETWORK PERFORMANCE PQO REPLICATION SGA SQLVIEWER TABLESPACES USERS The default categories are AVAILABILITY and COLLECTORS. username of the dba account used to configure the KM for ORACLE_SID /OracleConfig. flag that indicates whether the database objects have been deinstalled Appendix B PATROL database objects 339 .

ORACLE_SID. FailoverMonitoring. accessed by using the Failover Monitoring => Configure menu command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID. filling in all fields.Active flag that indicates whether failover monitoring is active or inactive for the instance This variable uses the following values: I I 1 = Failover monitoring is active 0 = Failover monitoring is not active Also. FailoverMonitoring. alternate listener for failover monitoring 340 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . You can change this variable by selecting the Failover Monitoring => Configure menu command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. do not modify or delete.instance is excluded. Exclusion Description flag that indicates whether the instance is excluded from monitoring by PATROL This variable uses the following values: I 0 = instance is not excluded. the instance is monitored by PATROL 1 .AlternateListenerName For internal use only. /OracleConfig. failover monitoring is not active for the instance.ORACLE_SID. you must reinitialize the agent.ORACLE_SID. and clicking Accept. alternate host for failover monitoring Alternate Host name entered in the Configure ORACLE_SID for Failover Monitoring dialog box. the instance is not monitored by PATROL I You can change this variable by selecting Configuration => Advanced => Monitoring Enable/Disable from the ORACLE menu. Warning: If you update this variable via PATROL Configuration Manager. /OracleConfig. FailoverMonitoring. if the variable does not exist.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 6 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig.AlternateHost computer name for the backup instance.

do not modify or delete.ORACLE_SID. /OracleConfig. Home ORACLE_HOME for data base identified by ORACLE_SID The following are sample values by platform: I I I UNIX: /usr/oracle/9/0/1 Windows: c:\\OraHome1 OpenVMS: disk$disk1: [oracle8] Appendix B PATROL database objects 341 .ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID. You can change this variable by using the Error Log Filters menu command from an AVAILABILITY menu.AlternateORASid Description SID for the backup computer designated for failover monitoring Backup Oracle SID entered in the Configure ORACLE_SID for Failover Monitoring dialog box.LocalFailoverListenerName /OracleConfig. /OracleConfig. FilterIncl strings in the Alert Logs that are included for monitoring Values for this variable are the strings entered in the Enter a New String to Monitor for: text box in the Error Log Filters dialog box. You can change this variable by using the Error Log Filters menu command from the AVAILABILITY menu. FailoverMonitoring. FailoverMonitoring. local listener name for failover monitoring strings in the Alert Logs that are excluded from monitoring Values for this variable are the strings entered in the Enter a New String to Exclude from Monitoring text box in the Error Log Filters dialog box. FilterExcl For internal use only. /OracleConfig.AlternatePort port number for the PATROL Agent on the backup computer designated for failover monitoring Backup Agent Port entered the Configure ORACLE_SID for Failover Monitoring dialog box.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 7 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID. accessed by using the Failover Monitoring => Configure menu command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu. FailoverMonitoring. accessed by using the Failover Monitoring => Configure menu command from the ORACLE_INSTANCE menu.

InSessions sessions that are selected for Users monitoring This variable is created the first time you use the Sessions Monitoring menu command. and ORA3 are user names: ORA4-10 SYS-0 ORA3-5 You can change this variable by using User Monitoring => Sessions Monitoring menu command from the USERS instance menu. You can change this variable by using User Monitoring => Problem User Exclusion menu command from the USERS instance menu. InUsers Description list of users (other than problem users) that are selected for monitoring The values for this variable are the users who are selected for monitoring. For each session selected. as in the following example where ORA4. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Users Monitoring menu command from the USERS instance menu. /OracleConfig. InProbUsers list of users excluded from Problem User monitoring The values for this variable are the users who are selected for exclusion from problem user monitoring. 342 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .ORACLE_SID.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 8 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID. the value includes the name of the user and the session number. separated by a dash. A value of “ “ means that no sessions are selected. /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID. SYS.

The number entered here changes the threshold in the Problem User Settings dialog box. number of privileges granted to patrol user maximum threshold for determining a problem user The value of this variable is the number of minutes entered in the Problem User Settings Config dialog box as the maximum number of minutes that you can set for user idle.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 9 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig. NumPrivs /OracleConfig. and EXAMPLE are tablespace names: TEST1. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings Config menu command from a USERS instance menu. along with a numeric identifier for each tablespace. /OracleConfig.0 EXAMPLE. name of database. do not modify or delete.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. identical to SID For internal use only. ProbUserMaxBlocked For internal use only.ORACLE_SID.31 SYSTEM.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. do not modify or delete. The names and numeric identifier are separated by a comma. The number entered here changes the threshold in the Problem User Settings dialog box. as in the following example where TEST1. Appendix B PATROL database objects 343 . ProbUserMaxIdle maximum threshold for determining a problem user The value for this variable is the number of minutes entered in the Problem User Settings Config dialog box as the maximum number of minutes that you can set for idle user. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings Config menu command from a USERS instance menu. InTablespaces Description list of the tablespaces selected for tablespace monitoring The value for this variable contains the names of the tablespaces that you selected for monitoring. /OracleConfig. SYSTEM. Name /OracleConfig.4 You can change this variable by using Tablespace Monitoring menu command from a TABLESPACE instance menu.

Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 10 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig. This number must exceed the polling cycle of the CollUsers collector. which is 30 minutes by default. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings Config menu command from a USERS instance menu. which is 30 minutes by default. The number entered here changes the threshold in the Problem User Settings dialog box. /OracleConfig. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings Config menu command from a USERS instance menu.ORACLE_SID. ProbUserMaxRunaway Description maximum threshold for determining a problem user The value for this variable is the number of minutes entered in the Problem User Settings Config dialog box as the maximum number of minutes that you can select for runaway user. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring Config => Problem User Settings menu command from a USERS instance menu. ProbUserMinBlocked minimum threshold for determining a problem user The value for this variable is the number of minutes entered in the Problem User Settings Config dialog box as the minimum number of minutes that you can select for the user blocked threshold. 344 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . /OracleConfig. This number must exceed the polling cycle of the CollUsers Collector. The number entered here changes the threshold in the Problem User Settings dialog box. ProbUserMinIdle minimum threshold for determining a problem user The value for this variable is the number of minutes entered in the Problem User Settings Config dialog box as the minimum number of minutes that you can use for the user idle threshold.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. The number entered here changes the threshold in the Problem User Settings dialog box.

action that PATROL for Oracle performs when the archive log destination gets full.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 11 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig. Service /OracleConfig. ProbUserMinRunaway Description minimum threshold for determining a problem user The value of this variable is the number of minutes entered in the Problem User Settings Config dialog box as the minimum number of minutes that you can use for the user runaway threshold. which is 30 minutes by default.1. /OracleConfig. RdbmsVersion Oracle version If the instance is properly configured.ORACLE_SID. RECOVERY. flag that indicates whether recovery is set For internal use only. do not modify or delete. A value of compress indicates that the log files would be compressed and MOVE indicates where the log files would be moved to.0 /OracleConfig.ARCHIVELOG For internal use only. do not modify or delete.0. The number entered here changes the threshold in the Problem User Settings dialog box.ORACLE_SID. RECOVERY /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID. This value must exceed the polling cycle for CollUsers collector. UserBlocked Oracle Net service name specified at instance configuration number of seconds a user can remain blocked before it is detected as a problem user The output for this variable is in seconds. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings Config menu command from a USERS instance menu.ORACLE_SID.ORACLE_SID. this variable contains the version number for the Oracle instance.ORACLE_SID. The value of this variable takes the form of a dot-separated version number. /OracleConfig. it equals the number of minutes you selected for User Blocked in the Problem User Settings dialog box multiplied by 60.0. as in the following example: 9. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings menu command from a USERS instance menu. Appendix B PATROL database objects 345 .

ORACLE_SID. UserCpu Description percentage of CPU a user can use before it is detected as a problem user The output for this variable is a percentage. /OracleConfig.ORACLE_SID. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings menu command from a USERS instance menu. The second value indicates whether Blocked is active (1) or inactive (0). I I I You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings menu command from a USERS instance menu.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 12 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings menu command from a USERS instance menu. I The first value indicates whether Idle is active (1) or inactive (0).ORACLE_SID. it equals the number of minutes you selected for User Idle in the Problem User Settings dialog box multiplied by 60. /OracleConfig. 346 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . The third value indicates whether Runaway is active (1) or inactive (0). UserCriteria flags that indicate which criteria are active for monitoring problem users Four values in some combination of 1s and 0s. UserIdle number of seconds a user can remain idle before it is detected as a problem user The output for this variable is in seconds. The fourth value indicates whether Cpu Hog is active (1) or inactive (0).

/OracleConfig.blackout list of scheduled blackouts Each scheduled blackout is expressed as follows: I I I I server_name day-of-the-week starting time in seconds after midnight duration expressed in minutes For example. if you set a blackout period on a server called Oracle1 for Monday.Debug flag that indicates whether debug is active for discovery This variable uses the following values: I I 0 = inactive 1 = active (displays all debug messages generated during discovery in a task output window) You can change this variable by using the Debug command from the ORACLE menu. the following value would display for this variable: Oracle1 Monday 3600 60 See also “Modifying the blackout configuration variable” on page 143 Warning: Blackout periods set by using PATROL Configuration Manager are not verified. You can change this variable by using the User Monitoring => Problem User Settings menu command from a USERS instance menu. /OracleConfig. it equals the number of minutes you select for User Runaway in the Problem User Settings dialog box multiplied by 60.m. and lasting for 60 minutes. UserRunaway Description number of seconds a user can perform a process without returning any data before it is detected as a problem user The output for this variable is in seconds. Appendix B PATROL database objects 347 ..ORACLE_SID.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 13 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig. starting at 1:00 a.

If instances are configured. time of completion of last activity for User settings 348 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . then no instances are configured. synonyms) created by instance configuration /OracleConfig.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 14 of 17) Variable /OracleConfig. do not modify or delete. do not modify or delete. views.Active /OracleConfig.DebugConf Description flag that indicates whether debug is active for instance configuration This variable uses the following values: I I 0 = inactive 1 = active (displays all debug messages generated during instance configuration in a task output window) You can change this variable by using the Debug command from the ORACLE menu. as in the following example: rhe901d1 rhe901d2 /OracleConfig.ObjectsList For internal use only. time of completion of last activity for session settings /OracleConfig. ORACLE_LISTENER. do not modify or delete.FailoverMonitoring. list of packages created by instance configuration /OracleConfig. /OracleConfig.PackageList For internal use only.UsrTimeStamp For internal use only.Listener. do not modify or delete. time of completion of last instance configuration or reconfiguration activity /OracleConfig.PackageBodyList For internal use only. list of database objects (tables. do not modify or delete.TimeStamp For internal use only. do not modify or delete. list of package bodies created by instance configuration /OracleConfig.SessTimeStamp For internal use only. the value should contain the names of the configured instances.Instances flag that indicates whether the named listener is a part of the Failover Configuration list of Oracle instances that are configured If the value for this variable is null or contains “ “.

When discovery completes. /OraNetConfig. which forces ORANET to go through a FULL discovery (reading the listener. the value of this variable is reset to 0.LISTENER NAME.monitorflag /OraNetConfig. /OraNetConfig.ConfigHome /OraNetConfig.ORACLE_SID.virtualServers list of Oracle Net listeners being monitored by ORANET list of logical hosts for ORANET list of virtual servers for ORANET Appendix B PATROL database objects 349 . /AgentSetup/ORANET_LISTENER.listener_name. /OraNetConfig. Holds a value of 1 if the user modifies the Listener Home for the listener from the Configuration menu command of the ORANET application class.LsnrConfigHomeFlag Stores Oracle Home to check the status of the listener.LISTENER NAME.localosauthn indicates the value of the local os authentication flag for the listener This pconfig variable is created when the 10g or later password protected listener with the local OS authentication flag set to OFF is disabled from ORANET monitoring.listener_name. /OraNetConfig.logicalHosts /OraNetConfig. the value of this variable is set to 1.home /OraNetConfig.listener_name.Parameters Description list of the consumer parameters that are set by the ETF collector See “Modifying ETF parameters through PATROL Configuration Manager” on page 150.listener_name.clusterConfigChanged Oracle Home directory holding the Oracle Net installation under which this listener runs flag that indicates whether monitoring of the listener specified by LISTENER NAME is enabled flag that indicates whether a value was entered through the Cluster Configuration command from the ORANET menu If values are entered through the Cluster Configuration menu command.defa This account information is used by ORANET to ultAccount check the status of a 10g or later passwordprotected listener with the LOCAL_OS_AUTHENTICATION_listenerName = OFF.ora files).Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 15 of 17) Variable /OracleETF.Instances /OraNetConfig.

/RACConfig.Monitoring lists instances that are in the mount state indicates the success of monitoring the RAC database If the value is 1. /RACConfig.RACDatabaseName. /RACConfig. the P$DATA_TS_SPACELEFT table is not created. the P$DATA_OS_SPACE table is created.RACDatabaseName. the P$DATA_OS_SPACE table is not created. /ORACLE_ETSM .oracle_sid. /RACConfig.dataOSTableExists Description indicates existence of the database table P$DATA_OS_SPACE If the value is 0. 350 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .RACInsList lists the RAC instances that are monitored under the RAC database This pconfig variable is created for each monitored RAC database. If the value is 1. /RACConfig. the P$DATA_TS_SPACELEFT table is created.DownInstList lists the RAC instances that are down This pconfig variable is created for each monitored RAC database.DBHome stores the RAC database home path This pconfig variable is created for each monitored RAC database. If the value is 1.RACDatabaseName.MountInstList /RACConfig.Databases lists the configured and monitored RAC databases This pconfig variable is created for each monitored RAC database.RACDatabaseName. this pconfig variable is also removed from the pconfig database This pconfig variable is created for each monitored RAC database.oracle_sid. When the RAC database has been removed from monitoring.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 16 of 17) Variable /ORACLE_ETSM. the RAC database is monitored successfully.dataTableExists indicates existence of the database table P$DATA_TS_SPACELEFT If the value is 0.RACDatabaseName.

/RACConfig.RACInstanceName.rdbmsVersion Description stores the RDBMS version of the RAC instance This pconfig variable is created for each RAC instance that is monitored under the RAC database.Pconfig variables Table 138 pconfig variables set by PATROL for Oracle (part 17 of 17) Variable /RACConfig. Appendix B PATROL database objects 351 .TNSService stores the TNS service name of the monitored RAC instance This pconfig variable is created for each RAC instance that is monitored under the RAC database.RACInstanceName.

Pconfig variables 352 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

. . .Appendix C Firewall and port-forwarding considerations C Because PATROL for Oracle connects directly to your production databases. and blocking . . . . 354 Benefits of VPNs A VPN allows two or more private networks (protected by various security mechanisms such as encryption and authentication) to be connected over a publicly accessed network such as the Internet. . . . While a VPN can support the same intranet and extranet services as a Wide Area Network (WAN). . 354 Configuring a firewall for PATROL for Oracle . . . . . . . See the PATROL Security User Guide for a further discussion of the security techniques that PATROL uses. . . . . . . . . . . 353 Protocols. PATROL provides some VPN functionality within the product in the capability to configure the Security Socket Layer (SSL) protocol for connections between clients and servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VPNs can also support secure remote access services. . . In this appendix. . especially if any tier lies outside your internal network. . SSL uses several network security techniques including public and private cryptographic keys and trusted authority certificates. port numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . be handled through virtual private networking (VPN) connections for the strongest security. . . . . . . . . . BMC Software recommends that communication between tiers of the product. . Appendix C Firewall and port-forwarding considerations 353 . . . . . . . . . This appendix provides information about setting up those communications in your environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the following topics are discussed: Benefits of VPNs. . . . . . . Employees working remotely can then call in to a local service provider to access their company’s internal intranet. . .

If the server computer accepts inbound connections on a port from the outside world and a firewall is not protecting the port. all port requirements have been met (unless you want to deploy the product to other servers). and SMTP. please contact Customer Support. if you choose port 2049 for a BMC Software application. Ports greater than 49. I I Configuring a firewall for PATROL for Oracle While it is common to have both the PATROL Agent and PATROL for Oracle components on the database server host. If a port is generally known to be used by other applications. port numbers. anyone can connect to the port and use its services. and blocking Protocols. this may inadvertently open up NFS to an attack from outside the firewall on other computers. In this scenario. Well-known ports are port numbers that the industry has agreed to reserve for specific services such as telnet. Therefore. and blocking If your environment requires communication between product tiers through a firewall or port-forwarding device. For example. it is important to carefully choose a port for a new application that is not already used for something else by another application. 354 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . the PATROL console could reside outside the firewall (yet protected by another firewall) while the PATROL Agents are behind the firewall. See your firewall documentation for detailed information about using the firewall with the TCP/IP and UDP protocols. FTP.Protocols. Each port is specified for a particular service (for example. Port numbers enable multiple processes to use TCP/IP or UDP services on the same host.151. If you require more detailed assistance. I PATROL uses both UDP and TCP/IP communications protocols.151 are considered dynamic ports because they are not associated with any specific service. Well-known ports are numbered 1 through 49. In general. opening this port will allow your application to work. the following list describes some basic considerations. After a database connection has been established between the PATROL console and the PATROL Agent. the PATROL console can reside on a client host for system administrator tasks. A server makes its services available to the network using numbered ports. but it will also allow other applications to use the port as well. a firewall administrator sets up a firewall by first blocking all incoming and outgoing traffic and then selecting what types of traffic to allow. port numbers. port 80 can be used for a Web server and port 21 can be used for an FTP server).

139 135 . Note that day-to-day operations involving only the Distribution Manager and executing distributions requires only one connection protocol and port— HTTP:80 or HTTPS:443. ensure that the following ports are open: I port 8160 for TCP/IP. RT) Command Line Interface Distribution Server PATROL (pexec) Command Line Interface WIN MAP (SMB) WIN Remote Reg FTP Telnet SFTP SSH Distribution (pull files) Distribution (pull files) Distribution (wake up) HTTP / HTTPS HTTP / HTTPS TCP 2059 3181 135 . port 21 for FTP For UNIX only. Table 139 Protocols. and connections Feature Distribution Manager (web interface) Distribution Server COS (TCP. both computers must be members of the same domain. depending on the security level. port 23 for Telnet I See the PATROL Installation Reference Manual for details about configuring a firewall for communication between the PATROL Agents and the PATROL console. which is the only communication protocol used For Windows only. ports. and connection directions required for each major feature.139 21 23 115 22 80 / 443 80 / 443 50005 Distribution Client => Distribution Server CLI => Distribution Server Distribution Server => target system Protocol HTTP/HTTPS (TCP) Default port 80 / 443 Connection Web browser => Web Server Appendix C Firewall and port-forwarding considerations 355 . ports. I For UNIX only.Configuring a firewall for PATROL for Oracle To deploy Knowledge Modules (KMs). Table 139 lists the protocols.

Configuring a firewall for PATROL for Oracle 356 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

can be changed for an application class or instance. This attribute must be defined for a parameter command. this means that in addition to gathering its own value. command type The designation assigned to a command according to its manner of execution. a menu command. a setup command. PATROL KMs provide other command types. or launch recovery actions.0. and standard parameter. the parameter gathers other values for consumer parameters to display. A collector parameter does not display any value.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Glossary O7_DICTIONARY_ACCESSIBILITY parameter The O7_DICTIONARY_ACCESSIBILITY initialization parameter controls whether to continue Oracle7 data dictionary behavior. a category is similar to an application class. An application account is commonly used to connect to an RDBMS on a server where the database resides or to run SQL commands. Glossary 357 . collector parameter A type of parameter that contains instructions for gathering values for consumer and standard parameters to display. The PATROL console provides two command types: operating system and PSL. and no parameters will alarm or warn in the blacked out application. blackout A scheduled suspended state for application classes and parameters. Use of this initialization parameter is only a temporary expedient. the default value of this initialization parameter is false. an InfoBox command. Only a PATROL Developer Console can be used to add or change command types. or a state change action. a parameter recovery action. In this PATROL KM. See also instance. issue alarms. parameter cache. category A group of parameters that monitor specific areas of an Oracle installation. An application instance contains the information and attributes of the application class that it belongs to.1. application instance A system resource discovered by PATROL.) See also consumer parameter. application account An account that you define at KM setup. (A standard parameter can have collector properties. Starting with the release of Oracle version 9. No information is collected for parameters or reports.

A consumer parameter never issues commands and is not scheduled for execution. deactivating a parameter stops parameter commands and recovery actions and deletes the parameter icon from the application instance window without deleting the parameter definition in the KM tree. however. disabled application See disable a KM. A PATROL user can disable a PATROL console’s ability to commit KM changes. (Most KMs are composed of individual application files with a . A deactivated parameter can be reactivated at any time. See also shared server. dedicated server A database server that is configured so that a server process handles requests for a single user process. When a KM is disabled (added to the disabled list) in the agent configuration file. A deactivated application class can be reactivated at any time. the KM files are not deleted from the PATROL Agent computers. The default is that no KMs are disabled. either no connection is established to the object (for a computer icon) or the object is not active (for an application instance).) 358 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . it has alarm definitions and can run recovery actions. but the PATROL Agent stops using the KM to collect parameter data and run recovery actions. consumer parameter A type of parameter that only displays a value that was gathered by a collector parameter or a standard parameter with collector properties. CPU hog The user that has used the highest percentage of CPU cycles over the most recent collection interval. disable a KM To temporarily or permanently block an application or KM from loading and to block the PATROL Agent from using that KM. In the PATROL Console for Windows NT. parameter cache. In the PATROL Console for Windows NT.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z commit The process of saving to PATROL Agent computers the changes that have been made to a KM by a PATROL Developer Console. See also preloaded KM. deactivate a parameter To stop running a parameter for selected computer or application instances. and standard parameter. dimmed A condition indicating an offline or a void state. See also collector parameter. deactivating an application class deletes the application class and all of its instance icons from the computer window without deleting the application class or definition in the KM tree. See also snooze an alarm and suspend a parameter.km extension. See also deactivate a parameter. When an icon is dimmed. deactivate an application class To stop monitoring an application class and all of its instances on selected computer instances.

This inactivity may indicate a client-side system crash that has left a process hanging in the database. See also application instance. The initialization parameter file is read by the client-side tool used to start the server (such as SQL*Plus). join In Oracle. The file is written in the default character set of the client. An application instance is discovered by PATROL. Refer to your operating system-specific Oracle documentation for the default locations and filenames for initialization parameter files on your operating system. a query that selects data from more than one table. application instances. initialization file An initialization file is a text file that contains a list of initialization parameters. For example. init. global channel A single dedicated connection through which PATROL monitors and manages a specific program or operating system. application classes. or it can have a logical name or a variation of the name init.ora. The PATROL Agent maintains this connection to minimize the consumption of program or operating system resources. A computer instance is a monitored computer that has been added to the PATROL console. instance A computer or discovered application that is running in the PATROL-managed environment. and task output window. and combines the data into a new database or table. the instance is made of up the System Global Area (SGA). and parameters. long idle A user that has been inordinately idle. the Oracle background processes. it can be in mixed case or lowercase. computer instances. The database administrator can choose a different filename for the initialization parameter file. for the environment in which PATROL runs. In Oracle. The name of the initialization file varies depending on the operating system.ora See initialization file. message window A window that displays command output and error messages from the PATROL console graphical user interface. and the data files that make up your database. An instance has all the attributes of the class that it belongs to. such as directories. Glossary 359 . You can set environment variables for computer classes.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z environment variable A variable used to specify settings. See also response window. system output window.

you can set the size of the cache. 360 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . recovery action A procedure that fixes a problem that caused a warning or alarm condition. OS account An account that is set up for the PATROL Agent at installation and that is used or can be changed in a configuration utility. See also disable a KM. All OS commands executed by the PATROL Agent use this account. and the interval (in seconds) for emptying the cache. A recovery action is defined within a parameter by a user or by PATROL and triggered when the returned parameter value falls within a defined alarm range. a file that contains a copy of all the data blocks that a data transaction has modified. PQO See parallel query option preloaded KM A KM that is loaded by the PATROL Agent at startup and runs as long as the agent runs. formerly SQL*Net in Oracle7 (7.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z MTS See multithreaded server or shared server architecture.x) and later. parallel query option (PQO) parameter cache The memory location where current parameter data is kept. the maximum number of data points that can be stored.1. redo log file In Oracle.x) and Net8i in Oracle8 (8.x). Oracle Net In Oracle9i (9. multithreaded server (MTS) See shared server architecture. the term Oracle Net is used throughout this book and refers to all Oracle Networking product versions. In the PATROL Agent's configuration file. the Oracle Networking product. Net8 in Oracle8 (8. This file is no longer necessary in current versions of Oracle.0. polling cycle The schedule on which a parameter starts running and the intervals at which it reruns. is now called Oracle Net Services.x). For consistency. oratab file In Oracle on UNIX platforms. the cycle is expressed in seconds. a file that contains the Oracle SIDs and whether to start the instance when the server is started.

and the Glossary 361 . Each Oracle instance has its own SGA. rollback In Oracle. regardless of their polling cycle. During the user-set snooze period. SID In Oracle. the parameter continues to run commands and recovery actions. and the shared pool. the redo log buffer. minimizing the number of server processes and maximizing the use of available system resources. rollback segment In Oracle. shared server A database server that is configured so that many user processes can share a small number of server processes. Also known as a multithreaded server or MTS. See also dedicated server. SGA System Global Area. Refreshing does not reset the polling cycle but gathers a new data point between polling cycles. See also system output window and task output window. the SGA is allocated when the instance starts. snooze an alarm To temporarily suspend an alarm so that a parameter does not exhibit an alarm state. undoing changes that were made by a transaction. a collection of objects associated with the database. the identifier for the instance or session. schema In Oracle. The SGA is comprised of the database buffers. and is de-allocated when the instance is shut down. the sort method for outputting system process IDs). instead of a PATROL Agent. session The set of events that occur from when a user connects to the Oracle RDBMS to when the user disconnects. a place in the database where the undo information is kept and can be obtained if a rollback is needed. remote Oracle Server An Oracle Server that is connected to the PATROL console through Oracle Net. The shared memory region that is used to store data and control information for one Oracle instance. response window An input and output display for many KM menu commands that provides a customizable layout of the information (for example.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z refresh parameter An action that forces the PATROL Agent to run one or more parameters immediately.

task output window A window that contains command output generated by a task (for example. A suspended parameter can be resumed at any time. outside of which a parameter is considered to be in a warning or alarm range. a KM menu command or a parameter warning or alarm). TNS See transparent network substrate. Some standard parameters can also execute commands and gather data for consumer parameters to display. TNS enables peer-to-peer application connectivity. common interface that functions over all industry-standard protocols. In a peer-to-peer architecture. two or more computers (called nodes when they are employed in a networking environment) can communicate with each other directly. See also collector parameter. In other words. consumer parameter. You can enter OS and PSL commands in the bottom part of the window. See also deactivate a parameter and snooze an alarm. transaction A set of database statements representing a logical unit of work or function. which usually appears in the PATROL Desktop or main window but may appear in an appropriate object window. standard parameter A type of parameter that collects and displays data as numeric values or text. and ends when the rollback or the commit has occurred. and parameter cache. suspend a parameter To stop running a parameter for selected computers or application instances. 362 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z parameter icon appears to be in an OK state. See also deactivate a parameter and suspend a parameter. without the need for any intermediary devices. A database transaction starts when the first SQL statement is submitted. You can suspend a parameter from its pop-up menu. each task has its own icon. Suspending a parameter stops parameter commands and recovery actions but does not delete the parameter icon from the application instance window and does not delete the parameter definition from the KM tree in the PATROL Console for Windows NT. PATROL displays a yellow triangle when there are unread messages in the system output window. while executing. transparent network substrate (TNS) A technology used by Oracle Net that provides a single. system output window A message window that displays the output of operating system (OS) and PSL commands and tasks that the PATROL console and the PATROL Agent submit to a particular computer. threshold A point or points that define a range of values.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z trigger A mechanism that allows procedures to automatically execute when an INSERT. or DELETE statement is executed on a table or view. UPDATE. Glossary 363 .

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 364 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

106. 99. 100. 106. 84. 160–163 list of 19 LISTENER 163 LOCKS 26 LOG 289 MTS 49. 89. 170. 192 SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_OBJ 192 SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_TS 192 SQLVIEWER 220 TABLESPACES 183 TBSP_INSTANCE 182 USERS 28. 91. 22 INSTANCE 23.km file 76. 87. 37 Availability 24 CAPACITY 25 COLLECTORS 25 container 19 DB_LINKS 25. 82. 208. 227. 123. 289 ASM 26 AVAILABILITY 24. 151.cfg files 133 . 164. 79. 89. 275 MTS_DISP 275 NETWORK 26 ORACLE_AVAILABILITY 146 ORACLE_DATAGUARD 25 ORACLE_TBS_INSTANCE 146 ORANET 163 PERFORMANCE 27 PQO 49. 36 alarm state 30 AlertLogSize parameter 37 Alerts parameter 37. 28 JOBS 26. 170.sh -serveronly 55 . 77. 78. 88. 163 discovery 19 ENVIRONMENT 25 functional 19 hierarchy 29. 101. 107. 101. 82. 151 ArchFreeSpaceOptional (ARCHIVE parameter) 37 ARCHIVE application 289 archiving archive log files 26 ARCHIVELOG option 26 recovery actions 256 archiving configuration settings 132 ArchLogCreated parameter 147 ASM command 128 configuring 126 monitoring 125 A accessing Explain Plan 159 Server Manager 158 SQL*Plus 159 account DBA 83. 283 SGA 27 SPACE_EXPERT_ORA 27. 257 SYSTEM 65. 88. PATROL 35. 164. 193 ArchFreeSpace (ARCHIVE parameter) 37 ArchFreeSpace parameter 37. 90. 218. 147. 100. 282 Activate parameter 93 ActiveCalls parameter 195 agent. 84. 86. 87. 283 DB_LINKS_INSTANCE 284 descriptions 22 Index 365 . 224. 113 $PATROL_HOME/lib/psl directory 22 $PATROL_HOME/oracle directory 22 $PATROL_HOME/oracle/log directory 250 $PATROL_HOME/patrol 60 $PATROL_INSTALL/oracle/conf directory 90 %PATROL_CACHE% 60 %PATROL_HOME% 60 . 173 NON -SYS DBA 320 PATROL 101. 279 RAC 27 REPLICATION 27. 170 privileged 91. 83. 261 application administrative 19 ARCHIVE 37. 100 SYS 48. 91./setup. 295 icons 19. 101. 91. 91. 248.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Index Symbols $ORACLE_HOME directory 84. 105. 261 ArchFreeSpaceColl (ARCHIVE parameter) 37 ArchFreeSpaceETF parameter 37. 226. 83. 90.

237. 261 BusyRate parameter 275 C C shell 64 CannotExtend parameter 37. 82. 146. ??–68. 261 CAPACITY application 25.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z parameter 127 removing an instance 127 ASM application 26 ASM hierarchy 126 AutoExtended parameter 146. 261 reports 228–234 Availability application description 24 icon 24 browser requirements 47 BuffBusyRate parameter 249 BuffHitRatio parameter 249. 231. 213. 261 channels debug 123 cluster alias 167 cluster environments 165. 190 BMC Software. 82. 279 REPLICATION 283 SGA 261 SQLVIEWER 220 TABLESPACES 183 USERS 194.tpl file 91 template file 86 batch configuration log file 120 batch scheduling 249–255 adding job 251 adding reports 253 deleting jobs 255 examples 250 jobs 249. 226. 107. 108 AVAILABILITY 102. 283 JOBS 160 LOG 261 MTS 49 PERFORMANCE 261 PQO 49. 261 COLLECTORS 102. contacting 2 Bourne shell 64 366 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 261 BGDumpLeftETF parameter 37. 107 DB_LINKS 25. 198. 184. 261 reports 237–240 categories 102. 182 automated recovery actions 256–257 automatic configuration log file 120 automatic recovery actions compressing log files 256 moving log files 256 AVAILABILITY application 24. ??–129 CollCapacity parameter 237 CollDbLinks parameter 283 collection commands 148 collection failure 30 collector parameters 30 COLLECTORS application 25. 190 BlkWrites parameter 182. 167 cluster monitoring 38–43. 261 CAPACITY 193. 210. 151. 212. 82 BGDumpUsedPct parameter 37. 197. 102. 147. 107 Collectors application description 30 CollETF parameter 151 CollJobs parameter 160 CollMTS parameter 275 CollPopulateContainers 189 CollPQO parameter 279 CollReplication parameter 283 CollSGA parameter 246 CollSqlViewer parameter 219 colormap option 65 ColSpaceLeft 190 commit point site 272 commit_point_strength init. 107. 147. 151 BGDumpUsed parameter 37. 37.ora parameter 273 components KM 20 ConfigUpdate parameter 147 configuration B backing up before migration 60 backup reports 234–237 batch configuration 86–92 creating file 89 file syntax 86 keywords 87 ora_batch_conf. 255 log file 254 PSL scripts 252 setting time 254 BGChkPntRate parameter 261 BGDumpLeft parameter 37. 82 blackout 174–176 configuration 176 debug 177 deleting periods 176 nesting 175 setting 176 string 143 time zones 175 unending 175 validating 143 variable 143 BlkReads parameter 182. 102.

273 pending transactions 273 reports 272–274 snapshots 273 transactions 273 D data history 32 data retrieval parameters 30 summary 30 database links 272. 82 Custom installation 56 customer support 3 customizations migrating manually 58 customized PSL migrating 59 account 84. 283 DB_LINKS_INSTANCE application 284 DBA E Edit Rule/Variable dialog box 152 Enable OS Authentication 97 ENVIRONMENT application 25 environment variables LANG 64 PATH 64 PATROL_BROWSER 64 setting for Help browser 64 setting for the browser 64 errors filter 170 lookup 227 Index 367 .A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z adding instances 98 advanced 97–112 batch 86–92 blackout 176 category monitoring 108 deleting instances 111 installing PATROL objects 123 instance 99–112 LISTENER application 165 listing settings 109 modifying 141 modifying configuration for an instance 105 monitoring instance 104 PATROL Configuration Manager 135 remote instance 98. 283–288 database reports 240–246 database SIDs 172 dataguard debugging information 305 icon hierarchy 303 instance removal 305 limitations 306 parameter 306 primary instance 304 standby instance 304 troubleshooting information 311 DB_LINKS application 25.txt 189 deleting instances 111 tablespaces 183. 197 deleting old version 60 DictHitRatio parameter 249. 151 CoreDumpLeftETF parameter 37. 100. 273. 152 ConnectCheck parameter 147 ConnectDB parameter 39. 151 CoreDumpUsed parameter 37. 147 consumer parameters 30 CoreDumpLeft parameter 37.txt 93 default_auto_config. 106 account grants 320 group privileges 173 DBWR (database writer) 27 debug blackout 177 channels 123 discovery 123 failover monitoring 117 graphical user interface 122 InstanceStatus parameter 122 options 120 query execution time 148 default_auto_conf_agent port number. 99 removing instances 111 requirements 83 restricted instances 103 uninstalling PATROL objects 123 Configure parameter 93 ConfigureETF rule 150. 101. 82. 41. 99. 82. 82 CoreDumpUsedPct parameter 37. 113 $PATROL_HOME/lib/psl 22 $PATROL_HOME/oracle 22 $PATROL_INSTALL/oracle/conf 90 TOMCAT_HOME 259 TOMCAT_HOME/conf 264 DisableETF 152 DisableETF rule 150 discovery debug 123 instance 98 disk space 47 DiskSorts parameter 261 distributed databases commit point site 272 links 272. 261 directories $ORACLE_HOME 84.

278 init. 238. 215. 278 mts_multiple_listeners 278 mts_rate_log_size 278 mts_rate_scale 278 368 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 100. 98. 215. resetting 119 GUI debug 122 H hierarchy dataguard 303 hierarchy. 215. 295 history files 32 HTML Reporting 257–269 configuration 260 FTP information configuration 262 modifying 268 refresh rates 269 requirements 269 viewing information 268 F FailedJobs parameter 161 failover monitoring 38–43. 215. 213. 263 tnsnames. 214. 196. 212. 83. 199. 213.km 22 ORACLEPARALLELSERVER. 261 ExtentsLeftETF parameter 151.dat 223 removing from PATROL_CACHE 60 server. 210. 231 filters listener error log 170 find_problems parameter 147.ora parameters 83.cfg 133 . 275. 241. 212. 199. 214.ora 171.ora file 49. 243. 212. 210.170 estimated time to failure (ETF) 150 ETF parameters 151 ETSM description 26 ETSM application 37 ETSM Application Parameter 189 ETSM_ tablespace type 188 ETSM_REGULAR application 189 ETSM_tablespace type Applications Parameters 190 ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE application 26. 241.ora 35. 261 FreeSpaceDeficit parameter 147. 189 ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE Application Parameters 190 eXceed 65 Excluded Tablespaces report 192 exclusion examples 212 objects 214 settings 216 tablespaces 182. 214. 241. ??–129 active/active environments 40 active/passive environments 38 configuring 112 debug 117 high availability environments 38 PATROL Agent 38 PATROL virtual agent 38 workload balancing environments 40 file . 231. 212. PATROL for Oracle 29.kml 75. 210. 275. 159. 76 psql. 83 I icons alarm state 30 types of 22 IDsInUse parameter 195 init. 277.km 46. 99. 243. 216. 98. 209–256 types 211 users 215 Explain Plan utility 159 ExtentsLeft parameter 151. 212. 256. 261 FreeSpaceETF parameter 151.dat 223 psqltest. 214 functions not available OpenVMS 256 remote instance 159 Windows NT 158.hist 32 FILESYSTEM. 213. 231 ExtentsLeftPct parameter 210. 82. 199.km 20 init.km 22 ora_batch_conf. 275.ora 83. 278 background_dump_dest 239 commit_point_strength 273 core_dump_dest 239 license_max_sessions 242 license_max_users 242 license_sessions_warning 242 mts_dispatchers 278 mts_listener_address 278 mts_max_dispatchers 278 mts_max_servers 275.tpl 91 ORACLEPARALLELSERVER. ??–68. 213. 196. 192 first time installation 53 FOMonitor parameter 116 FreeSpace parameter 151. 213. 196. 172 OPSINST.xml 259. 214. 210. 219. 243. 210.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ORANET 170 TNS. 231. 240. 273 files param. 214. 256 G global channel. 278 listener.

278 mts_service 278 timed_statistics 49. 295 NT_LOGICAL_DISKS 46. 86. 199. 289 LogApplyGap parameter 306 logical host names 167 logs archive 26. 261 debug 122 K kill session 223 KM customizations. 196. 90. 91. 170.ora file 171. replication 285 MaxBusyRate parameter 275 MaxWaitTimes parameter 275 MemberStatus parameter 298 migrating customized PSL 59 KM customizations manually 58 removing files from PATROL_CACHE 60 migration Index 369 . 98. 41. 100 removing 111 starting 173–174 stopping 173–174 uninstalling PATROL objects 123 INSTANCE application 23 InstanceCheck parameter 147 InstanceStatus parameter 39. 83 hierarchy 29. 83 knowledge module components 20 Korn shell 64 L LANG environment variable 64 LatchGetRatio parameter 261 LibGetHitRatio parameter 249 LibGetHits parameter 261 LibGetPinRatio parameter 249 license requirements 47 list configuration settings 109 LISTENER application 163 configuration 165 starting a process 170 stopping a process 170 listener. 219 user_dump_dest 239 installable image 52 installation backing up before migration 60 system requirements 46 verifying requirements 46 installing clearing cache 60 for the first time 53 online Help 63 remotely 51 rule sets 133 instance adding 98 blackout 173–176 category monitoring 108 configuration 99. 83. 82. 117. 261. 160–163 M manual migration of customizations 58 master activities. 172 ListenerLog parameter 147.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z mts_servers 275. 171 listeners 163 ListenerStatus parameter 147 local installation 51 local instance 35 LockConflict parameter 261 LOCKS application 26 LOG application 26. 256 batch reporting 254 enhanced monitoring 289 redo 26 Scheduler 254 LogTransferGap parameter 306 J JAVA_HOME variable 259 jobs batch reporting 249 broken 162 failed 161 flagging 162 job queue 160–163 overdue 161 removing 163 running 163 JOBS application 26. 114. migrating manually 58 FILESYSTEM 46. 147. 82. 105 configuration settings 109 deleting 111 disabling monitoring 104 discovery 98 enabling monitoring 104 excluding tablespaces 209–256 failover 112 installing PATROL objects 123 local 35 modify configuration 105 monitoring in restricted mode 103 remote 35.

82. 189 ORACLE_AVAILABILITY 146 ORACLE_DATAGUARD application 25 ORACLE_DATAGUARD. 99 utilities 158–163 Oracle account 48 Oracle account.kml 192 ORACLE_ETSM.tpl file 91 ORA_ROOT directory 88. 201 reports 208 moving rule sets 133 MTS application 26.kml 22 ORACLE_ASM_DGROUP. 256. 259 functions not available 256 ora_batch_conf.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM.km 22 ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG. 46. 91. 167 monitoring processes 163–173 multiple listeners 167 N Net8 18. 275. 188 deleting 183. 227 Oracle (server) ARCHIVELOG option 26 370 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 83 O O7_DICTIONARY_ACCESSIBILITY 49 online Help.ora 35.km 21 ORACLE_DATAGUARD_INSTANCE.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM_REGULAR. 231.Parameter rule 152 OracleStatus parameter 39. 91 ora_batch_conf. 172 alarms 170 cluster configuration 165.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM_READONLY. 199. 41. 35. 91 ora_batch_conf.err file 90. 35.km 21 ORACLE_DATAGUARD_DATABASE.km 21 ORACLE_RAC_MEMBER_INSTANCE. 163 Oracle Net Sercvices 35 Oracle Net Services 18. 35 Netscape Navigator 63 Netscape Navigator requirements 47 NETWORK application 26 NT_LOGICAL_DISKS.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM_TEMP. 203. 278 optimizer 159 server name 84 SQL commands 159 System Identifier 100. 91 ora_batch_conf.kml 21.km 21 ORACLE_AUTO_CONFIG.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM_VERY_LARGE.ora file 83.km 46.configuring file 90. installing 63 OpenVMS 35.kml file icon 26 ORACLE_ETSM_LARGE. 49.sql 92 ORAFailoverMonitor 21 ORANET application 23. 113.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM_UNDO. 197 monitoring users 193–209 problem users 200._ANYINST_. 243. 46 monitoring 163–170 Net8i 18. 240.km 22 ORACLE_ASM_DISK.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM application 188 ORACLE_ETSM. 98.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM_ROLLBACK. 98. 93. 201.km 22 ORACLE_ASM_INSTANCE.km 21 ORACLE_RAC_DATABASE. 46 Oracle objects.km 21 ORACLE_TBS_INSTANCE 146 OracleETF. 147 ORACreateUser. 91 ORA-006XX errors 226. 197 selecting 183. 196. 99 starting 105 stopping 105 monitoring tablespaces 180–187.km 22 ORACLE_ASM.km 21 ORACLE_RAC. 204. 88. 195.km 21 ORACLE_ETSM_TBSP_INSTANCE.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z backing up current installation before 60 modify configuration 105 modifying instances 136 Monitored Tablespaces report 192 monitoring logs 289 restricted instances 103 monitoring database links 283–288 monitoring instances category 108 disabling 104 enabling 104 excluding tablespaces 209–256 failover 112 remote Oracle instances 98. removing 135 ORACLE_ASM.done file 90. removing 135 ORACLE application 28 Oracle Net 18. 280 tnsnames. 275 reports 275–278 MTS_DISP application 275 MTSProcsIdle parameter 275 MTSProcsLeft parameter 275 MTSProcsUsed parameter 275 database writer 27 errors 227 Explain Plan 159 home directory 84 init. 241.

181 PingTime 283 ProblemUsers 147. 261 ArchFreeSpace 82. 151. 192 storing data 30 SystemTSLeft 146. 146. 149 MTSProcsIdle 275 MTSProcsLeft 275 MTSProcsUsed 275 OracleStatus 147 overview of 30 PctUsed 82.com file 88. 151 ExtentsLeft 151 ExtentsLeftETF 151 find_problems 147.hist file 32 parameter properties. 261 SystemTSLeftETF 151 SystemTSLeftPct 146 P P$AUTOEXTEND Table 323 P$AUTOEXTTS Table 323 P$CANTEXTFILE Table 324 P$CANTEXTMAXFILE Table 324 P$CANTEXTMAXTBSP Table 324 P$DATA_OS_SPACE table 325 P$DATA_TS_SPACELEFT table 325 P$LOCKCONFLICTTX Table 327 P$LOCKCONFLICTUSER Table 327 P$OBJ_EXCLUSIONS Table 328 P$POK_CFG Table 328 P$SQL table 219 P$SQL_TEXT table 220 P$TBSP_DATA_FILES View 334 parallel query option 279 param. 151. 147 changing poll times 148 changing thresholds 147 collector 30 CollETF 151 ConfigUpdate 147 ConnectCheck 147 ConnectDB 147 consumer 30 CoreDumpLeft 82. changing 149 parameters Alerts 147. 151 BGDumpUsed 82 BGDumpUsedPct 82 BuffHitRatio 261 BusyRate 275 CannotExtend 37. 226.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z reports 171–172 requirements 164 structured directory 168 unstructured directory 169 oratab file 98 orauser_. 151 CoreDumpUsed 82 CoreDumpUsedPct 82 data retrieval 30 deactivating 145 DictHitRatio 261 DiskSorts 261 Index 371 . 117. 192 StorageProblemsCnt 147. 151. 151 CoreDumpLeftETF 82. 91 ETF 150. 192 fixed thresholds 147 FreeSpace 151 FreeSpaceDeficit 147 FreeSpaceETF 151 history data 32 history file 32 InstanceCheck 147 InstanceStatus 86. 147 BGChkPntRate 261 BGDumpLeft 82. 181 standard 30 StorageProblems 147. 151 ArchLogCreated 147 AutoExtended 146. 261 ProcsLeftETF 151 QueriesInitiated 279 QueueLength 275 QueueWaitTime 275 reactivating 146 RedoArchDelay 261 RedoNotArch 261 reviewing data 30 RSExtentsLeft 146 RSExtentsLeftPct 146 RSSpaceLeft 146 RSSpaceLeftPct 146 SchedulerOutput 147. 147 LatchGetRatio 261 LibGetHits 261 ListenerLog 147 ListenerStatus 147 LockConflict 261 MaxBusyRate 275 MaxWaitTimes 275 modifying 145. 91. 250 SessionsLeft 151 SessionsLeftETF 151 ShutdownInProgress 147 SlavesCPUUsed 279 SlavesLeft 279 SlavesPctBusy 279 SlavesUsed 279 SpaceLeft 82. 261 BGDumpLeftETF 82. 261 ArchFreeSpaceETF 82. 261 ProcsLeft 151.

190 Pending Transactions Report 274 PERFORMANCE application 261 PERFORMANCE application application 27 PhyReads parameter 182. 150 PATROL product directory 56 PATROL security 50 PATROL virtual agent 38 PATROL_BROWSER environment variable 64 PATROL_CACHE 60 removing files from 60 PATROL_HOME 60 PctUsed 37 PctUsed parameter 37. 279 reports 279–283 privileges DBA group 173 privileges for DBA group 173 problem users blocking process 201 monitoring 199 parameter 195 solving 200 ProblemUsers parameter 147. migrating 59 psql. storing 30 PATROL Agent.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z UserDumpLeft 82.dat file 223 psqltest. 181.x Product Directory window 57 PSL. 49. 190 PhyWrites parameter 182. 211. 182. 195. 100 adding 98 configuring 98. 36. 216 PATH environment variable 64 PATROL account 101. 37 SQL*Net 36 removing instances 111 372 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 215.dat file 223 Q QueriesInitiated parameter 279 query execution time 148 QueueLength parameter 275 QueueWaitTime parameter 275 R RAC application 27 RAC hierarchy 295 RAC_DATABASE application 298 Real Application Cluster (RAC) application description 27 configuring 294 parameters 298 requirements 295 recovery actions automated 256–257 compressing log files 256 moving log files 256 recovery reports 234–237 redo logs 26 RedoArchDelay parameter 261 RedoNotArch parameter 261 Regular expression choosing a tablespace 190 selecting a user for monitoring 197 tablespace monitoring 183 remote installation 51 remote instance 35. 261 ProcsLeftETF parameter 151 product directory 57 product support 3 Profiles Report 204 Provide the PATROL 3. 107 installing objects for 123 KM tables storage parameters 331 uninstalling objects for 123 PATROL Agent 35. 105. 99 functions not available 159 menu items not available 36 parameters not available 36. virtual 38 PATROL Configuration Manager archiving 132 modifying instances 136 overview 132 removing instances 136 requirements 132 PATROL console 63 parameter data. reviewing 30 PATROL KM for Event Management 132. 261 ProcsLeft parameter 151. 151 UserDumpLeftETF 82. 151 UserDumpUsed 82 UserDumpUsedPct 82 USERS 194 Users 261 USERS_INSTANCE 196 with status set 146 partitions 210. 190 PingTime parameter 283 POKKMConfigInstanceRemoved rule removing 135 removing instance 141 using 134 POKKMConfigUpdated rule modifying instance 140 removing 135 using 134 poll times 148 polling cycles 148 ports 47 PQO application 27. 98. 99. 38 parameter data.

172 Listener Services Info report 171. 287 PQO 279–283 Privilege Violations 227 Profiles Report 204 recovery 234–237 Redo Log 236 Redo Logs Buffer Cache 249 Replicated Objects Report 288 REPLICATION 286 Resources Used 238 Roles 205 Rollback Segments 244 Schema Table Information 241 Server Statistics 280 Session Details 203 Session Locks Held 202 Session Statistics 202. 248 Buffer/Lib/Dict Cache Info 249 CAPACITY 237–240 Commit Point Strength 273 Conflict Resolution Methods Report 287 Conflicts Report 286 database 240–246 Database Files 241 Database Links 273 DB Links Report 288 Deferred Calls Report 287 Dispatcher 276 Dispatcher Busy Rates 276 Dispatcher Wait Times 277 Display Oracle Users 204 distributed databases 272–274 Failed Jobs Report 161 Free Space 228 Free Space Deficit Report 232 HTML 257–269 Link Information Report 284 Listener Services Info 171.ora Parameters 243 Oracle License Limits 242 ORANET 171–172 Overdue Jobs Report 162 Pending Transactions 274. 172 Listener Status Info 172 Listener Status Info report 172 Lock Conflicts 231 Locks Outstanding 240 Maximum Extents 233 Media Recovery 236 MTS 275–277 Object Space Analysis 229 Operations Statistics 280 Oracle init. 281 SGA 246–249 SGA Memory Analysis 247 Shared Pool 247 Shared Servers 278 Show Tail 227 Snapshot 274 Space Usage By Object 230 SQLVIEWER 220–222 Statistic Summary 245 Statistics Summary 245 Tablespace Free Space 184 Tablespace Segments 186 Tablespace Storage and Status 187 Temporary Extents 233 Trace Files Space Analysis 239 User Account Information 205 User Column/Role Privilege Report 206 User Session Detail 208 User Session Report 206 USERS 208 Wait State Analysis 239 requirements browser 47 HTML Reporting 258 Oracle MTS parameters 49 Oracle PQO parameters 49 Oracle software 49 overview 46 PATROL 82 PATROL KM dependencies 82 Index 373 . 283–289 reports Access Statistics 237 Active Sessions Report 202 Active SQL Statements Report 203 Alerts 226–228 All Error Messages 227 All Jobs Report 160 All ORA-006XX Messages 227 Archiving State 235 AutoExtend DB Files Report 232 AVAILABILITY 228–234 backup 234–237 Backup Status 235 batch 249–255 Broken Jobs Report 162 Buffer Cache Contents 101.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z replication automatic conflict resolution 287 conflict resolution 287 conflicts 286 database links 288 deferred calls 287 master activities 285 objects 288 pending transactions 287 replicated objects 288 replication groups 284 resuming 285 status 285 suspending 285 two-phase transactions 287 REPLICATION application 27.

210. 182. 261 RSExtentsLeftPct parameter 146. 204. 151. 91. 231. 100. 172. 263 sessions. 90. 214. 261 reports 246–249 shells Bourne 64 C 64 Korn 64 ShutdownInProgress parameter 147 SID 100. 214. 215. 159 SQLVIEWER application 220 standard collectors 30 standard parameters 30 standby instance configuring 304 removing 305 selecting primary instance 304 StandbyStatus parameter 306 storage parameters PATROL KM tables 331 StorageProblems parameter 147. 192 SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_OBJ application 192 SPACE_EXPERT_ORA_TS application 192 SpaceLeft parameter 37. 213. 231. 212. 201. 208. 213. 215 rule sets directory 133 installed 133 moving 133 SlavesUsed parameter 279 Space Expert 192 SPACE_EXPERT_ORA application 27. 192 StorageProblemsCnt parameter 147. killing 223 SessionsLeft parameter 151 SessionsLeftETF parameter 151 setting environment variables for Help browser 64 SGA application 27. 83. 218. 282 system global area 246 System Identifier 100. 46. 197 Server Manager 158 server. customer 3 SYS account 84. 235 SystemTSLeft parameter 146. 218. 261 SystemTSLeftETF parameter 151 SystemTSLeftPct parameter 146 S sample batch configuration template file 86 sample_config. 231. 204. 214. 192 storing parameter data 30 support.wri file 86 Scheduler 249–255 adding job 251 adding reports 253 deleting jobs 255 examples 250 job status 255 jobs 249 log file 254 parameter 250 PSL scripts 252 setting time 254 SchedulerOutput parameter 147. 210. 213. 250 security 50 security level 50 security levels requirements 47 Select Products and Components to Install window 56 Select System Roles window 56 Select Type of Installation window 56 selecting tablespaces 183. 215. 240. 212. 163 SQL*Plus 158. 83. 101. 113. 195.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z system 46 resetting global channel 119 retrieving data 30 Review Selections and Install window 57 RSExtentsLeft parameter 146. 212. 248. 195. 280 system requirements 46 SYSTEM tablespace 209. 210. 280 SlavesCPUUsed parameter 279 SlavesLeft parameter 279 SlavesPctBusy parameter 279 T tables 219 P$AUTOEXT 322 P$AUTOEXTEND 323 P$AUTOEXTFILE 323 P$AUTOEXTTS 323 P$BUFFERCACHE 324 P$CANTEXTFILE 324 P$CANTEXTMAXFILE 324 P$CANTEXTMAXTBSP 324 374 PATROL for Oracle User Guide . 240. 101. 213. 98. 214. 203. 106. 257 system requirements 46 SYSTEM account 65. 218–224 SQL Viewer 219–223 archiving data 223 kill sessions 223 reports 220–222 starting 220 stopping 220 tables 219–220 SQL*NET 35 SQL*Net 18. 224. 210. 203. 190 Specify Installation Directory window 56 SQL commands 159 SQL Snapshot 217. 201. 215. 212. 231 RSSpaceLeft parameter 146.xml file 259. 181. 261 RSSpaceLeftPct parameter 146.

197 excluding 182.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z P$EXTENTMAP 325 P$JOBACTION 325 P$JOBGENERAL 326 P$JOBHISTORY 326 P$JOBSCHEDULE 326 P$LOCKCONFLICTTX 327 P$LOCKCONFLICTUSER 327 P$OBJ_EXCLUSIONS 328 P$POK_CFG 328 P$SQL 219. 193. 75. 159.ora file 35. 49. choosing a procedure 53 user account 64 User monitoring regular expression 197 UserDumpLeft parameter 37. 235 TABLESPACES application 28. 99. 213. 79. 210. 183 TBSP_INSTANCE application parameters 182 technical support 3 temporary tablespaces 24. 261 USERS_INSTANCE application parameters 196 USRCpuSeconds parameter 49 V variable JAVA_HOME 259 PATROL_BROWSER 64 TOMCAT_HOME 259 Variables deploying 142 variables for internal use only 137 not in pconfig 136 views P$TBSP_DATA_FILES 334 PATROL for Oracle 332–?? W Windows NT functions not available 158. 80. 81 xterm 158. 82. 201 problem users 200. 159 xpconfig utility 74. 76. 104 X x-emulator 158. 98. 82 UserDumpUsedPct parameter 37. 91. 151 UserDumpLeftETF parameter 37. 213. 80.ora 49 tnsnames. 201 USERS application 28. 151 Index 375 . 264 Typical installation 56 UserDumpUsed parameter 37. changing for parameters 147 TIMED 49 TNS_ADMIN 49 tnsname. 212. 101. 84. 273 Tomcat servlet engine TOMCAT_HOME variable 259 TOMCAT_HOME/conf directory 259. 209–256 monitoring 180 selecting 183. 103. 256 wpconfig utility 74. 212. 213 TempTSLeft parameter 210. 180. 107. 329 P$SQL_TEXT 220 P$SQLID 330 P$SQLTEXT 330 PATROL for Oracle 322–330 SQL Viewer 219–220 storage parameters 331 Tablespace monitoring regular expression 183 tablespace name limitation 180 tablespaces deleting 183. 205. 261 parameters 194 using 193–209 Users parameter 195. 214 The 317 thresholds. 159 U upgrading removing files from PATROL_CACHE 60 upgrading and saving your customizations 59 upgrading. 88. 214 TempTSLeftPct parameter 210. 82. 197 SYSTEM 209. 100. 82 users monitoring 193–209 problem 200. 75.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 376 PATROL for Oracle User Guide .

Notes .

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