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FACULTY OF LIFE SCIENCES SECOND LEVEL HANDBOOK 2013-2014 IMPORTANT DATES IN 2013-2014 First Semester: Monday 16th September

2013 - Friday 24th January 2014 Degree Programme Registration: Tuesday 17th September 2013 Lectures begin: Monday 23rd September 2013 Christmas Break: Saturday 14th December 2013 - Sunday 12th January 2014 Second Semester: Monday 27th January 2014 - Friday 6th June 2014 Easter Break: Saturday 5th April 2014 - Sunday 27th April 2014 Examination Periods: 13 - 24 January 2014 (semester 1 exams) 12th May - 6th June 2014 (semester 2 exams)
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Examination Result publication dates: Thursday 27th February 2014 - Semester 1 exam results Friday 4th July 2014 Semester 2 exam results Resit examination period: 18th - 29th August 2014 Resit Examination Result publication date: Monday 8th September 2014 Report Submission Dates: EDM Phase I online assessment - Thursday 7th November 2013 via Blackboard no later than 16.00 EDM Phase II online assessment - Thursday 5th December 2013 via Blackboard no later than 16.00 EDM full write-up (online submission) -Thursday 12th December 2013 via Blackboard no later than 16.00 Dissertation -Thursday 20th March 2014 - online submission via Blackboard no later than 16.00 Talks/Meetings: What to expect from the Final Year (Senior Advisor) Wednesday 19th March 2014 13.00-14.00 (venue TBC) Course unit selection during PD Clinics - week commencing Monday 28th April 2014 Outgoing placement meeting - Tuesday 6th May 2014 14.00 (venue TBC) Careers Workshop: Career Options and Work Experience Thursday 19th September 2013, 09.00-12.00 Stopford Theatre 1 The information provided herein is of great importance to you, so please do READ IT. This handbook also provides you with a record of the overall structure and content of your degree programme and should therefore be kept for future information.

Please note that there is a live version of this handbook on the Faculty Intranet which you should check regularly for updates (highlighted in green) e.g. changes to second semester units (www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/handbooks/undergraduate.aspx). THE INTRANET VERSION OF THE HANDBOOK IS THE DEFINITIVE SOURCE FOR INFORMATION AS THE PRINTED HANDBOOK IS ONLY CORRECT AT THE TIME OF GOING TO PRESS. UPDATES ARE MADE ONLINE. August 2013

STUDENT CHARTER
One of the Universitys three core goals is To provide a superb higher education and learning experience to outstanding students, irrespective of their backgrounds, and to produce graduates distinguished by their intellectual capabilities, employability, leadership qualities, and their ability and ambition to contribute to society (from the University of Manchester Strategic Vision 2020). Our Student Charter, developed jointly by the University and the Students Union, is an important part of how we establish and maintain clear mutual expectations for the experience of all students: undergraduate, postgraduate taught and postgraduate research. It sets out what we can expect from each other as partners in a learning community. The Charter provides an overview of the Manchester experience and refers to regulations, policies and procedures. To access the Charter please go to: http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/enhancingmy-experience/charter/.

CONTENTS
Where to find People and Places A. MANAGEMENT OF THE FACULTY ........................................................................ 1

1. Administration of the Faculty ..................................................................................... 1 2. Your official contacts in the Faculty........................................................................... 1 3. Personal Advisors ..................................................................................................... 2 4. Academic Advisors ................................................................................................... 2 5. Programme Directors and where to find them .......................................................... 2 6. Employability skills .................................................................................................... 3 7. Safeguarding your work ............................................................................................ 4 8. Communication - email/noticeboards/mail ................................................................ 4 9. Guidelines on feedback to students .......................................................................... 5 10. Student feedback ...................................................................................................... 6 10.1 Representation on committees ................................................................................. 6 10.2 Unit evaluation .......................................................................................................... 7 10.3 Programme evaluation .............................................................................................. 7 10.4 Day-to-day problem solving and other ways of making your views known ............... 7 10.5 Complaints procedure ............................................................................................... 7 B. REGULATIONS OF THE FACULTY AND THE UNIVERSITY ................................. 8

11. Work and attendance regulations ............................................................................. 8 11.1 Permitted absences .................................................................................................. 8 11.2 Religious observance................................................................................................ 8 12. Guidelines on ill health .............................................................................................. 9 12.1 Absence due to illness affecting attendance at compulsory classes/tutorials ........... 9 12.2 Absence affecting submission of assessed work ...................................................... 10 12.3 Absence affecting eLearning assessments............................................................... 10 12.4 Absence due to illness affecting examinations ......................................................... 10 12.5 Illness not resulting in absence from examinations ................................................... 11 12.6 Mitigating Circumstances Committee........................................................................ 11 13. Degree regulations.................................................................................................... 12 14. Assessments and examinations................................................................................ 12 14.1 Second year examinations ........................................................................................ 12 14.2 Society of Biology accreditation ................................................................................ 13 14.3 Tutorial assessments ................................................................................................ 13 14.4 eLearning (Blackboard)............................................................................................. 14 14.5 Deadlines and document limits ................................................................................. 14 14.6 Extensions for coursework ........................................................................................ 15 14.7 Criteria & marking for answers on theory examination papers .................................. 15 14.8 Mid-semester one examination ................................................................................. 15 14.9 Multiple choice examinations .................................................................................... 15 14.10 Pass marks and compensation rules ...................................................................... 16 14.11 Progression to final year (MNeuroscience students only) ....................................... 18 14.12 Practical assessments ............................................................................................ 18 14.13 Lecture unit examinations ....................................................................................... 18 14.14 August / September resits....................................................................................... 19 14.15 Disclosure of marks and record of academic performance ..................................... 19 14.16 Examination feedback............................................................................................. 20 14.17 Examination timetables ........................................................................................... 20 15. Plagiarism, collusion and other forms of academic malpractice ................................ 20 16. Conduct and discipline of students ........................................................................... 24 17. Health and safety ...................................................................................................... 24

C.

SERVICES ................................................................................................................25

18. Computing facilities in the Stopford building ............................................................. 25 19. Intranet...................................................................................................................... 25 20. The University of Manchester Library ....................................................................... 25 21. The Manchester Museum ......................................................................................... 27 22. Student societies....................................................................................................... 28 23. Student support within the Faculty/University ........................................................... 28 24. The Student Services Centre .................................................................................... 29 25. Counselling ............................................................................................................... 29 26. Accommodation ........................................................................................................ 30 27. Students with additional support needs .................................................................... 30 28. Financial help ............................................................................................................ 31 29. Discrimination and harassment ................................................................................. 31 30. Health ....................................................................................................................... 32 31. International students................................................................................................ 32 32. Night-time telephone advice/listening service ........................................................... 32 33. Security on campus .................................................................................................. 33 34. Students Union Advice Centre ................................................................................. 33 35. The Careers Service ................................................................................................. 33 35.1 Accessing our services ............................................................................................. 33 35.2 Careers fairs and events ........................................................................................... 34 35.3 Just for Life Sciences students ................................................................................. 34 35.4 Making the most of your time at Manchester ............................................................ 34 35.5 Obtaining a reference for employment ...................................................................... 34 D. DEGREE PROGRAMME REQUIREMENTS ............................................................ 35

36. Field courses ............................................................................................................ 36 37. LEAP - Language Enhancement Access Programme .............................................. 37 38. Human subjects and animal tissues.......................................................................... 37 39. Choosing second year units ...................................................................................... 38 40. Changing units .......................................................................................................... 39 41. Academic calendar ................................................................................................... 40 41.1 Reading week ........................................................................................................... 40 41.2 Time management .................................................................................................... 40 E. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. THE UNITS ............................................................................................................... 41 Second level clash groups ........................................................................................ 41 Second level units with pre-/co-requisite units .......................................................... 42 Second level units that are pre-/co-requisites for Final Level units ........................... 43 Second level unit descriptions .................................................................................. 44 Compulsory and optional units .................................................................................. 45 Withdrawal of units.................................................................................................... 49 Transfer between programmes ................................................................................. 49 External Examiners ................................................................................................... 50 Course units .............................................................................................................. 51

Information contained in the back of this book: GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED BY THE STUDENT RECORD SYSTEM (CAMPUS SOLUTIONS) LIST OF UNITS - BY UNIT NUMBER / BY UNIT NAME

Where to find people and places There are maps showing room numbers posted in various corridors around the buildings you are likely to use. In the Stopford Building The first number or letter (G., 1., 2., 3.) indicates the floor. G = ground level. The second shows how far back in the Stopford building you need to go The final two figures indicate approximately the position across the Stopford building, where 1 is for left and 9 is for right. Lecture theatres are listed as T or LT, followed by a number e.g., LT1 stands for Lecture Theatre 1 Practical labs in Stopford are multi user labs MUL 1 is on the first floor, MUL 2 is on the second. There are 4 computer clusters for student use on the ground floor: Stopford PC Clusters 1-3 and the Student Project Room. Staff may have offices in the Michael Smith Building, the Core Technology Facility, the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, the Stopford Building or AV Hill Building. To gain access to these buildings, you must first report to the Reception desk in that building. Sometimes you will find the room you want inside another one. You will discover which ones by experience! During the free time in Welcome Week it would be wise to visit all of the locations for lectures, tutorials and practicals you are expecting to attend for the rest of the semester so that you feel confident about locating them in the short time between timetabled periods (sometimes less than 10 minutes).

A. MANAGEMENT OF THE FACULTY 1. Administration of the Faculty The Faculty of Life Sciences is constituted as a single University School (department). Although your main contacts in the Faculty will be your Personal Advisor and Programme Director (see Sections 3 and 5), some aspects of your course will be dealt with by the Student Support Office within the Faculty. 2. Your official contacts in the Faculty Student Support Office - Opening hours: 08.30 - 17.00 Monday to Friday Room G.483 Stopford Building Email: studentsupportoffice.fls@manchester.ac.uk Telephone number: 0161 2751487 Fax number: 0161 2751488 Senior Advisor - Dr Nicky High Room G.554 Stopford Building Email: nicky.high@manchester.ac.uk Telephone number: 0161 2755749 Deputy Senior Advisor - Dr Emmanuel Pinteaux Room 2.002 AV Hill Building Email: emmanuel.pinteaux@manchester.ac.uk Telephone number: 0161 2751825 In addition, the following academic roles support the Faculty: Associate Dean for Teaching, Learning and Students Professor Cathy McCrohan Deputy Associate Deans for Teaching, Learning and Students Dr Clair Baldock Dr Caroline Bowsher Professor Liz Sheffield Finally, the Faculty has a Writer in Residence, Mr Chris Simms, who is funded by The Royal Literary Fund. Chris offers students one-on-one tutorials on effective writing which last 45 minutes. These run on Tuesdays and Thursdays and can be booked online at http://www.wejoinin.com/writer.lifesciences@manchester. Chris is based in room 2.532 in the Stopford Building. Previous students have found this service invaluable and the feedback has been excellent: Chris truly is an asset to the faculty! As a result of my meeting with him, I got some great feedback from my supervisor when I showed him my work. Chris is really friendly and approachable, and I would definitely recommend organising a meeting with him if you can. Leonnie Students can also email Chris at writer.lifesciences@manchester.ac.uk.

3. Personal Advisors Your Personal Advisor (normally the same person throughout your course) offers you advice on academic matters, personal problems (if needed), and is your main link to the Faculty and the University. You must meet your Personal Advisor at regular intervals (at least once per semester) during your programme and should prepare for each meeting by starting to fill in the appropriate meeting form on your intranet. When you are making applications for summer work, placements, jobs, or further degrees, your Personal Advisor should know you well enough to write an informed reference. It will help if you give your Personal Advisor a CV, which you update each year, especially towards the end of your degree programme. Please see Section 6 on Employability skills. You should speak to your Personal Advisor about any problems that you are having that are affecting your work (see also Section 11 on Work and Attendance Regulations and Section 12 Guidelines on Ill Health). There is also a Senior Advisor for the Faculty who is available (via the Student Support Office) to discuss any particularly serious problems, or anything you would rather not discuss with your Personal Advisor (including the situation where you may feel it necessary to request a change in Personal Advisor). 4. Academic Advisors You will have regular small-group tuition in groups of about eight students with an Academic Advisor. You will see several Academic Advisors with different areas of expertise during your undergraduate career. Attendance at ALL of the academic tutorials and the production of satisfactory work are requirements of all Degree Programmes (see Section D). 5. Programme Directors and where to find them The Programme Director oversees the content of your degree programme, agrees your choice of optional course units during Welcome Week and assists your Personal Advisor in giving you advice on academic matters. Email: Degree Programme Programme Director Room @manchester.ac.uk
Dr Niggy Gouldsborough Dr Martin Pool Dr Holly Shiels Dr Vladimir Jankovic Dr Tracey Speake Dr Michelle Keown Biotechnology Dr Lubomira Stateva Cell Biology Dr Jon Pittman Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology Dr Ingo Schiessl Developmental Biology Professor Keith Brennan Genetics Dr Ray OKeefe Medical Biochemistry Dr Christian Heintzen Microbiology Dr Jen Cavet Molecular Biology Dr Sue Crosthwaite Neuroscience (BSc) Dr Ingo Schiessl Neuroscience (MNeuroSci) Dr Ken Grieve Pharmacology Dr Richard Prince Pharmacology & Physiology Dr Richard Prince Physiology Dr Peter Brown Plant Science Dr Jon Pittman Zoology Dr Jonathan Codd
Rooms starting 'A', 'B', 'C', D Rooms starting 'S' Smith Building Stopford Building

Anatomical Sciences Biochemistry Biology Biology with Science & Society Biomedical Sciences

S.3.239 A.4035 CTF 2.18C Simon 2.22 S.1.104 S.1.102 A.2034 D.4515 S.3.806 A.3035 A.2035 B.2016 C.1246 B.2018 S.3.806 S.3.801 S.1.100 S.1.100 A.1019 D.4515 A.4028

niggy.gouldsborough@ Martin.r.pool@ Holly.shiels@ Vladimir.jankovic@ Tracey.speake@ Michelle.e.keown@ Lubomira.stateva@ Jon.pittman@ i.schiessl@ Keith.brennan@ rokeefe@ Christian.heintzen@ Jennifer.s.cavet@ Susan.crosthwaite@ i.schiessl@ Ken.grieve@ Richard.prince@ Richard.prince@ Peter.d.brown@ Jon.pittman@ Jonathan.codd@

Rooms starting MIB Rooms starting CTF Rooms starting AV

Manchester Institute of Biotechnology Core Technology Facility AV Hill Building

6. Employability skills During the course of your degree programme, you should develop a range of transferable skills. These include skills in written and oral communication, organisation of information, presentation skills, teamwork and leadership. The unit descriptions in the second part of this handbook outline the employability skills that have been identified in each unit. Your tutorial unit (BIOL20000) is another important unit for developing your employability skills. A detailed list of employability skills and how you can develop them through the tutorials is provided in your tutorial handbook. You have your own, online Employability Skills Record which is located on the FLS intranet against your personal profile. Your personal advisor can also view this record. The aim of this record is to help you monitor and take an active part in the development of your employability skills. You should update your Employability Skills Record on a regular basis, and at least once per semester. The skills record offers you links to useful suggestions to help you to develop your employability skills. You should discuss your Employability Skills Record with your personal advisor during your one to one meetings. There is space on your record to set targets and you should review these regularly to chart your progress and think of strategies to develop your skills further. What you write in your Employability Skills Record should prove extremely valuable if you apply for industrial/professional placements, summer internships, further study or graduate jobs, as the topics covered will often reflect those you may be asked about in many application processes. Within the tutorial unit on Blackboard (BIOL20000), you will find a folder entitled Developing your Employability Skills. This folder contains lots of useful information about: Careers Resources Employability Skills Writing a good CV (including template and example CVs) Writing a personal statement for your CV Interview guidance Writing a covering letter Choosing a referee

These resources will become increasingly important as you progress on your degree programme and begin applying for placements, internships and jobs. You will also find useful resources about revision and exam technique and about career options and work experience in the tutorial unit on Blackboard. Two of the Year 2 tutorials will focus specifically on employability (CV-writing and interview skills). Your academic advisor will inform you about when these tutorials will take place. Further information is available in the tutorial handbook and on the tutorial unit on Blackboard. The Faculty organises a number of events during the year to help you to enhance your employability and you are encouraged to take part in these. Information about these events will be issued via email and will appear on the Careers and Employability noticeboard on the corridor outside the Student Support Office.

7. Safeguarding your work You must ensure that you back up your work on a regular basis to safeguard against loss, machine failure or theft. In addition to saving your work regularly to the secure University system in your my documents/P: drive (for further information on P:drives please see http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/it-services/saving-your-work/), you should back up your work on an external hard drive, USB memory stick, etc. (which you are advised to keep secure and separate from your computer). Do not save your work on the hard disc of Stopford PC cluster or other networked computers. Loss of data (i.e. your work) will not be accepted as a valid reason for extension requests or for late submission of work as this is deemed to be a preventable occurrence. Do you need more space to save your files? As academic submission deadlines approach, you may find that you need additional space in your "My Documents" area. Should you find that this is the case then please contact the IT service desk. NOTE: Access to "My Documents" will cease when you leave the University. 8. Communication - email/noticeboards/mail The Student Support Office is open 08.30 -17.00 Monday to Friday and should be your first stop for queries relating to teaching and general student support. Occasionally the opening times may vary, but we will inform you of this via the email announcement service (see below). Effective communication between you, the staff of the Faculty and the central administration of the University is vital. There will be many important official notices (including those on timetables, examinations and course assessment marks) for you to read and act upon during the year. There are three important channels of communication: electronic (email, announcements, the intranet and Blackboard); paper (e.g. notices on boards, letters in mailboxes in Stopford or to your postal address); verbal (e.g. announcements in lectures and practicals). Electronic communication: as part of registration you will be provided with a University email address and will be given a username and password. You must not pass on your username or password to anyone else and must not divulge email addresses of fellow students or staff to anyone else without their permission. Verbal communication: staff may occasionally make verbal announcements in lectures and practicals that do not appear in any other fashion, so if you are late, or unable to attend something, be sure to check with a fellow student or the staff member concerned that you did not miss an important announcement. This is especially important for practical work, as if you are late you may miss health and safety announcements and may be denied entry to the lab. Email and the Faculty Intranet Announcement Service are the standard methods used to communicate with students so you must ensure that you check your University email messages (including "Announcements" emails) on a regular and frequent basis - at least once a day. If you do not regularly check your email, your inbox may become full and important messages will not then get through to you. Failure to respond to notices and mail means that you may miss lectures, tutorials or meetings, or it may even cost you money (e.g. library fines). Email will be the main medium for communication with academic staff, including your Advisor. You will find their addresses, and those of your fellow students, in the email address books on the University network and on the Faculty of Life Sciences Intranet. 4

PLEASE NOTE: email communication will only occur via your University email address and staff will not use or respond to any other email address except in very exceptional circumstances. Furthermore, you should not autoforward University email to a personal email address. Once personal email folders are full, new messages are deleted. Paper communication: you should also check the notice boards (especially those specific for your Degree Programme, the First Year notice board and the timetable and examination boards) and the mailboxes located in the corridor leading to the Student Support Office on a regular basis. Notice boards: including those specific to each Degree Programme and one for each year of the course, are to be found along the ground floor corridors that lead to the Student Support Office and PC Clusters in the Stopford Building. Find out where they are in Welcome Week. If your personal details change (term-time or home postal addresses, phone numbers, etc.) you must update your student record promptly or notify the Student Support Office if you are unable to make the changes on the Student Record System. It is also your responsibility to ensure that your programme and unit information are correct and to notify the Student Support Office if changes are required. Any difficulties obtaining emails should be reported to the Facultys computer helpdesk - telephone: 0161 275 1688 or go online at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/facilities/is/default.aspx. As a rule, it is advisable to have mail sent to your local accommodation rather than to the Faculty. However, if you need to quote a University address for mail, the correct form is: Undergraduate Mail Box Faculty of Life Sciences G.483 Stopford Building The University of Manchester Oxford Road Manchester M13 9PT All mail will be delivered to the mailboxes on the corridor leading to the Student Support Office in the Stopford Building. The mailboxes are located next to G.554. 9. Guidelines on feedback to students Feedback is a broad term, which can be interpreted in different ways. The purpose of this section is to define the activities associated with feedback mechanisms, as they relate to lecture-based BIOL or HSTM units so that you are aware of the feedback available for any unit which you decide to take. MANDATORY On request, lecturers are expected to provide general guidance to students on appropriate reading material and other learning resources for the unit. This can be through personal contact (e.g. in person or by email), or via the Bulletin Board/Blackboard. We encourage you to ask questions both during lectures or later during the year when, for example, you are revising for exams. However, if the lecture course has finished, then we ask that you seek confirmation of the answer to your own question. What do we mean by this? Lecturers are busy throughout the year and do not always have time to answer questions phrased along the lines of Can you tell me the answer to this? Thus, if you want to ask a question, particularly by email, please make sure you include your own interpretation of the answer, including the literature sources that you used, and ask only for confirmation that you are correct. For example: 5

Wrong format: Can you tell me the primary role of voltage-gated sodium channels? Correct format: It is my understanding that voltage-gated sodium channels are primarily responsible for the depolarising phase of the action potential. I used Kandels Principles of Neuroscience to obtain this information. Is this correct? NB: The Faculty does not publish marking schemes or answers to examination questions - you are expected to deduce these yourself using text books, peers, and second year discussion groups. DISCRETIONARY In addition to providing the mandatory level of feedback, unit co-ordinators may provide more detailed, feedback on your work. Students should consult the feedback entry within the unit description in this handbook for further details on the additional feedback provided. 10. Student feedback 10.1 Representation on committees The structure of the Faculty of Life Sciences is intended to give you opportunities to express your views and to influence Faculty and University policy. Specific problems should be dealt with by the unit coordinator or your Personal Advisor, but from time to time matters of a general nature may arise which need to be discussed in a wider, more formal setting. In addition, the Faculty values your views on academic and organisational matters and welcomes the contributions you can make to the work of its committees. You also have established rights to participate in the work of certain Faculty and University committees. So if you feel you could serve as a student representative for your degree programme please discuss this important and rewarding role with your Programme Director as early as possible. Training is provided by the Students Union for Student Representatives. The Student/Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) is the main student-focused forum for discussion of matters related to teaching. The committee consists of the Programme Director and one student representative from each year of every Degree Programme. This committee usually meets three times during each academic year and considers questions and concerns of a general nature (rather than those specific to a particular Degree Programme). The name of the SSLC representative for your programme can be found through the Faculty Intranet. You can access the list of representatives, dates of meetings and minutes of previous meetings online at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/studentsupport/studentreps/default.aspx. The Education Board in the Faculty meets about five times a year and is open to all members of the academic staff in the Faculty (about 250 people). The Education Board reports directly to the Education Management Team, chaired by the Associate Dean for Teaching, Learning and Students, who reports to the Dean of the Faculty. The Board consists of academic teaching staff and a final year student representative from each Degree Programme. In the University more widely, your representation is co-ordinated by the Students Union. This is run by students who are elected annually, and guided by policy that is passed at referendums twice a year. The structure of the Students Union provides a number of different forums, groups and assemblies for students to raise any type of issue, whether specific or general. These can then be acted upon by an elected officer, taken to a referendum or you could be supported in taking an issue forward yourself, for instance with the backing of an action group on a specific issue. The Executive runs the Union on a day-to-day basis. Executive members sit on various committees within the University, from University wide committees such as Senate (the highest academic body in the University), through to committees specific to Life Sciences. 6

If you wish to be a representative in the union at any level (i.e. Volunteer or paid) you can stand in the elections which usually take place in the second semester. Please visit http://manchesterstudentsunion.com/ for more information in these areas. There is provision, therefore, for you to be represented from your specific degree programme all the way through to the university wide level. Students are elected to the Faculty committees at the beginning of each academic year at the first student/staff liaison committee meeting. 10.2 Unit evaluation Towards the end of each semester, students will be asked to complete an anonymous Unit Survey about the content and delivery of each Faculty-run unit on which they are enrolled. Unit Surveys are part of the University's commitment to listen to students and to seek annual improvements in the quality of the students teaching and learning experience. The process seeks to highlight units that achieve high levels of satisfaction so that the Faculty can identify and disseminate best practice; the process also seeks to identify units that achieve low levels of satisfaction so that the causes of dissatisfaction can be remedied. The academic staff involved in coordinating the units will review the survey results and individual comments for their specific unit(s) and are required to complete a comments and response form to address any issues raised. Links to the forms for each unit surveyed can be found at http://elwiki.ls.manchester.ac.uk/groups/unitevaluation/. Action taken as a result of the issues raised in the unit surveys may also be reported back to students via the Student/Staff Liaison Committee. 10.3 Programme evaluation During the year your Programme Director will seek your views on the year as a whole. You will have the opportunity to comment on all aspects of your year of study. 10.4 Day-to-day problem solving and other ways of making your views known You are welcome to make comments about any aspect of your degree programme at any time. If you have difficulties or suggestions please be aware that they should be raised promptly, and that the resolution of problems is likely to be most effective via face-to-face interaction. You should feel free to comment on unit content, delivery or assessment direct to the lecturer or practical coordinator in the first instance. If you feel this is not appropriate, you are encouraged to discuss matters with the unit-coordinator. If you are still not satisfied, you should seek advice from your Personal Advisor or contact the Senior Advisor. 10.5 Complaints procedure If you have a complaint against the Faculty or any of its staff which you do not want to air via any of the above mechanisms, or if you have brought up an issue but are not satisfied with the outcome, the University has a procedure which can be viewed in the online Crucial Guide at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/formal-procedures/complaints/. Copies of this procedure and the Complaints Form are available from the Student Support Office.

B.

REGULATIONS OF THE FACULTY AND THE UNIVERSITY

Important information including University Regulations, Appeals and Complaints Procedures, Finance, Health and Welfare, and learning resources can be found via the Crucial Guide Live at www.manchester.ac.uk/crucialguide. Other information specific to the Faculty of Life Sciences can be found at www.ls.manchester.ac.uk. 11. Work and attendance regulations Your Personal Advisor, monitors your work and attendance throughout the course. This monitoring is for your own benefit (to make sure that you are coping with your programme and keeping up with any continuous assessment elements) as well as to confirm that you are actually attending the University. In practice, only a small number of students contravene these regulations and are called to account for their actions. You are expected to attend all the lectures for the units for which you are registered, and to be familiar with their content. Attendance at all practical classes and tutorials is compulsory and is always monitored. You must submit all associated work (e.g. data handling assessments, essays, practical reports) by the dates stipulated. You will also be required to fulfil any special requirements e.g. attendance at Field Courses and submission of appropriate reports. Attendance at all appropriate examinations is compulsory. If your work or attendance gives cause for concern you will, in the first instance, be asked to explain your position to your Personal Advisor. If you continue failing to meet the work and attendance requirements, you will be issued with a written warning informing you that should your work and attendance not come up to the required standard, you will not be allowed to sit University examinations. On receipt of a warning letter you will be given the opportunity of meeting with the Senior Advisor or to explain your position. Additionally, the receipt of this warning letter may impact on your ability to undertake a final year laboratory-based project. The issuance of a warning letter may exclude you from taking such a project, whilst the issuance of two such letters during your University undergraduate career will automatically preclude you from a project of this type. You will, instead, be required to undertake a non-laboratory-based project. If you are refused permission to sit an examination or undertake a final year laboratory-based project, you have the right to appeal. Information on Academic Appeals can be found in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/formalprocedures/academic-appeals/. 11.1 Permitted Absences If you need to be absent from a practical class or tutorial, for reasons other than ill health you must supply documentary evidence to your unit co-ordinator strongly supporting your reasons for absence well in advance of the occasion in question. If you are granted leave of absence your attendance will be recorded as a permitted absence. For practicals, the unit co-ordinator MAY be able to make arrangements for you to attend a replacement session. DO NOT JUST TURN UP AT A SESSION FOR WHICH YOU ARE NOT TIMETABLED. 11.2 Religious Observance If religious observance affects your attendance at normal teaching and learning activities in ways that will cause problems, you should discuss the issue with the Senior Advisor. The Faculty will give sympathetic consideration to your problems and will try to make reasonable adjustments. However, adjustments can only be made provided they maintain the standard of 8

your degree (e.g. you will not simply be excused from parts of the programme affected by your religious observance or from satisfying overall attendance requirements). If religious observance means that you miss a lecture or other class, supporting material may be provided via Blackboard. However, if you want further notes from the lecture you must make your own arrangements to copy them from another student. Similar principles apply if religious observance affects your attendance at assessments (e.g. presentations or practical tests). You should discuss the issue with the Unit Co-ordinator well before the assessment date, and the Faculty will use its best efforts to reschedule the assessment to accommodate your needs (e.g. by changing your scheduled slot in a programme of assessed presentations). Because lectures, practicals and assessments for the semester are scheduled in advance, you must notify the Senior Advisor of your requests for allowances for religious observance by the Thursday before the start of teaching each semester. Deadlines for handing in assessed work will not normally be extended to allow for religious observance, and you must therefore schedule your work accordingly. For guidance on the Universitys examinations and religious observance policy please see https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/exams/timetable/religiousobservance/ where you can also download an Examinations & Religious Observance form. 12. Guidelines on ill health You should register with a local General Practitioner who is willing to provide evidence in the form of letters, or comments and a signature on a self-certification document. A list of GP practices can be obtained from the Student Occupational Health Services, any University Hall of Residence and some pharmacies. According to guidance issued by the General Medical Council it would not be regarded as good practice for a family member to be the registered GP or to offer treatment, except in the case of an emergency. You should always consult your GP (or for emergencies the Accident and Emergency Department of a hospital) if your illness is severe, if it persists, or if you have any concerns about your health. Your Personal Advisor will give you guidance on the effect of any absence from your studies and your options if you consider your illness has affected your studies. If you have repeated episodes of ill health that are affecting your attendance and/or studies, the Faculty may refer you to the Student Occupational Health Services. 12.1 Absence due to illness affecting attendance at compulsory classes/tutorials If you are unwell and feel unable to attend the University to take a compulsory class or attend a tutorial then you must inform the Student Support Office immediately and they will complete a Notification of Absence form for you. You can inform the office in person, through a friend or family member*, by telephone (0161 275 1487) or by email (studentsupportoffice.fls@manchester.ac.uk). If you send an email you must ensure that you keep a copy of both the email itself and the confirmation of reading the email, as there may be serious implications of being absent and consequences for your academic progress. You must do this as soon as possible, so that all options can be considered, and certainly no later than the day and start time of your compulsory class. If you do not do this then you will normally be considered to have been absent from the class without good reason in which case you will be recorded as having an unauthorised absence. Until your return to University you must also inform us of any further missed compulsory classes. On your return you must report to the Student Support Office to complete a Self Certification Form. This MUST be completed within 7 days of your initial absence. 9

If illness keeps you away from the University for more than 7 days including weekends, you must consult your GP. If you do consult a GP and he/she considers that you are not fit for attendance at the University, then you should obtain a note from the doctor to that effect or ask him/her to complete Part III of the University form Certification of Student Ill health copies of which are available at local GP surgeries. You should hand this certificate to the Student Support Office as soon as you return to University and no later than 7 days after your return. The use of the Certification of Student Ill Health form by GPs, as described above, has been agreed by the Manchester Local Medical Committee. A GP may make a charge for completing the form. * If you are so unwell that a friend or family member has to contact the Student Support Office on your behalf it will only normally be possible for them to provide information for you they will not be able to learn of the implications of your absence on your academic progress, which you must discover for yourself on your return to health. The Faculty staff will not engage in any dialogue with third parties regarding your studies without your explicit, written consent. 12.2 Absence affecting submission of assessed work If, as a consequence of illness or other mitigating factor, you wish to seek an extension to a deadline for submitting assessed coursework or a tutorial assignment, you must submit an Extension request form with appropriate supporting evidence to the relevant member of staff. The application for extension must be made BEFORE the deadline and not retrospectively. See Section 14.6 Extensions for Coursework for further information. 12.3 Absence affecting eLearning assessments Note that eLearning assessments are open for at least one week and close at 4.00pm on the published end date. Students should anticipate a possible period of illness during this time and complete the assessments as soon as they open. Students failing to submit by the deadline will receive a mark of zero for that assignment. Only in exceptional circumstances, such as prolonged illness, will a request for an extension to the deadline be considered. Students must inform the Student Support Office of their illness as per the instructions in paragraph 12.1. They should then contact the eLearning team via the eLearning Enquiries form in Blackboard to request an extension to the submission date. The eLearning team will check with the Student Support Office that the correct reporting procedures have been followed before granting an extension. The decision of the Senior Advisor will be final. 12.4 Absence from examinations due to illness You should make every effort to attend all examinations; it is often surprising how well candidates who are ill can perform in written examinations, and a mark of just 40% will avoid the automatic resit in August/September. If necessary (e.g. contagious diseases), special arrangements can be made to take the exam in isolation from other candidates; if you cannot write (e.g. due to a broken arm), it may be possible for someone to write for you. If you feel you might experience any examination difficulties, you must inform the staff in the Student Support Office at the earliest opportunity. If you are so ill you are unable to take an exam you must contact the Student Support Office as soon as possible, and certainly no later than the day and start time of your examination. You should complete a Mitigating Circumstances Form which must be accompanied by appropriate independent third-party supporting or collaborative documentation such as a Doctors note or letter signed by your GP or a letter from your health care professional. If the information is of a highly confidential nature, you may submit your evidence in a sealed envelope, marked for the attention of the Senior Advisor. Students who attend a hospital 10

Accident and Emergency (A&E) Department must obtain written confirmation of attendance either from the hospital or subsequently from their GP confirming their attendance and stating the nature of the emergency. A hospital attendance card alone will not be accepted as appropriate evidence of illness. Submission must be made to the Student Support Office before noon of the Monday immediately after the end of the relevant examination period. Requests for mitigation submitted after this date for the end of an examination period cannot be considered without a credible and compelling explanation as to why the circumstances were not known or could not have been shown beforehand (and in no circumstances after results have been released). If you miss a unit examination through illness, you will be required to take the examination again in the resit examination period. Provided that you have followed the procedures described above, this re-examination will normally be counted as your first attempt and the resit fee will be waived. Mitigating Circumstances Forms are available from the Student Support Office or can be downloaded from the Faculty intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/studentsupport/supportforms/default.aspx. 12.5 Illness not resulting in absence from examinations You may be unwell but able to proceed with an examination, but feel that your performance will have been impaired. If you wish this to be taken into account you must follow the same procedures as in paragraph 12.4 above. Note that long-term chronic conditions or suffering from stress, anxiety or feelings of panic would not normally be considered a mitigating circumstance. If you anticipate or experience any of the latter problems you are strongly encouraged to contact the counselling service (see Section 25 and see further information available in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/personal-life/emotional-problems/). 12.6 Mitigating Circumstances Committee

In reaching their decision on academic results, The Board of Examiners may take account of certain circumstances brought to their attention. For the Universitys Mitigating Circumstances Policy please see the Faculty intranet: www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/studentsupport/supportforms/default.aspx. There is a small Faculty Mitigating Circumstances Committee chaired by the Senior Advisor which considers all such mitigating circumstances. The Committee meets before the Board of Examiners and will make recommendations on appropriate compensation. All cases are presented anonymously by the Senior Advisor for consideration by the committee. It is in your best interests to make the Mitigating Circumstances Committee aware of any unforeseen/unpreventable circumstances beyond your control that have severely interfered with your ability to perform at your usual level. Please read carefully the rules and guidelines for submission of mitigating circumstances cases which are available on the examination noticeboard outside the Student Support Office and on the Student Support pages of the Faculty intranet. Submission of a mitigating circumstances claim in respect of one or more units will normally result in the resitting of those units regardless of the mark obtained in January/May-June. Only if the claim is accepted by the Mitigating Circumstances Committee will the resit be counted as a first attempt, otherwise it will constitute a second attempt, for which a resit fee will be payable, so it is very much in your best interests to read the guidance on what constitutes mitigating circumstances carefully!

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Your Personal Advisor will give you guidance on the effect of any absence from your studies and your options if you consider your illness has affected your studies. If you have repeated episodes of ill health that are affecting your attendance and/or studies, the Faculty may refer you to the Student Occupational Health Services. If you are found to have been deceitful or dishonest in completing the Faculty Self-Certification form or the Mitigating Circumstances form you could be liable to disciplinary action under the Universitys General Regulation XVII: Conduct and Discipline of Students see https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/formal-procedures/conduct-anddiscipline/. 13. Degree Regulations The degree regulations for students registered on an undergraduate programme since 1 September 2012 can be found on the University website at http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/protected/display.aspx?DocID=13147. Any students returning from interruption or resit without attendance should refer to the degree regulations for students registered on an undergraduate programme on or after 1 September 2010 (but prior to 1 September 2012) which can be found on the University website at http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/DocuInfo.aspx?DocID=7324. 14. Assessments & examinations 14.1 Second year examinations Second-year examinations are important because the marks obtained contribute 33% towards your final degree mark (though please note that this figure will be 25% for any students returning from interruption or resit without attendance - please see degree regulations above). Allocation to projects in the final year and eligibility for post-graduate study in the Faculty will also be based on second year performance. At the end of both Semester 1 and Semester 2 of the second year (January and May/June) you will take examinations for the Faculty of Life Sciences second level units completed in that semester. Units taken outside the Faculty may be examined at a different time. Generally there will be a 1 hour theory examination for each lecture unit, although there are exceptions. Please take note of the following important points: Degrees with industrial/professional experience and with Language. To continue on a programme with industrial/professional experience or with language you must: obtain at least a pass mark (40%) in each of your units in both the January and May/June examination periods including the practical and tutorial units. have attended the compulsory meeting for prospective students in May of Semester 2 have submitted your CV to the placement office by September 1, 2013 attend the two compulsory meetings for prospective students in Welcome Week of Semester 3 (Yr 3). Information about these meetings will be given to you as part of your welcome pack. not divulge information about the placements offered to any other students in this Faculty, other Faculties or other Universities. 12

Students who fail to meet any of these requirements will be transferred to the appropriate three-year degree by the Board of Examiners at the next appropriate Exam Board, and will be unable to undertake a placement. You will be required to resit, in August/September any units you fail (after operation of compensation rules - see Section 14.10). However, the board reserves the right to exclude you from further study in the Faculty for a number of reasons. These may include absence from all exams in a given examination period; poor work and attendance (see Section 11) and generally poor academic performance over the year resulting in failure of more than 80 credits worth of assessments. Students on with industrial/professional experience or with Language degrees who are required to resit exams in August will be required to defer the start of their placement or make arrangements to return to Manchester to sit them even if their placement has already started. Any student unable to obtain a placement will be transferred to the appropriate three-year degree at the end of the second year. If you feel that you no longer wish to continue on a programme with industrial/professional experience and would like to transfer to a standard three-year degree, please discuss this with your Programme Director and/or Personal Advisor. A completed Degree Programme Change form should be submitted to the Student Support Office if you do decide to transfer off the placement programme. The resit examination is only provided to allow you to gain sufficient credits. The aggregate mark carried forward to the Finals Examination is derived only from the marks you gain at the first attempt of the examination. Note that it will be the mark that you obtain in the resit examination that will determine whether you obtain a pass in a unit (we do NOT take the better of marks obtained on the first or any subsequent attempt). 14.2 Society of Biology accreditation All four-year with industrial/professional experience and with language degrees have been accredited by the Society of Biology. Degree accreditation by the Society recognises academic excellence in the biosciences, and highlights degrees that educate the research and development leaders and innovators of the future (for more information see https://www.societyofbiology.org/education/accreditation/degree-accreditation). The accreditation criteria require evidence that graduates from the programme meet defined sets of learning outcomes, including gaining a substantial period of research experience. Our Faculty has been successful in demonstrating that these programmes meet these criteria. In recognition of your time spent on industrial/professional, or with language placement, as a graduate of an accredited programme, you can apply for membership of the Society of Biology at Member (MSB) level after just one year of practice, rather than the usual three years. This will allow you to attain the qualifications of Chartered Biologist or Chartered Scientist two years sooner than graduates from other degree programmes. Further information is available from the Society of Biology at https://www.societyofbiology.org/membership/table. 14.3 Tutorial assessments There are two components contributing to the assessment of the second year tutorial unit: (i) Assignments set by your Advisor during the year. You must obtain a mean mark no less than 40% on these assignments over the year and attend ALL tutorials to pass the tutorial unit. 13

(ii)

Obtaining a pass mark in the Data Handling and Critical Writing Skills units (BIOL20701 and BIOL21701).

Failure of any of the tutorial unit components listed above will result in you resitting in August all units where the mark is <40% (i.e. loss of compensation See Section 14.10) in January and May/June and being required to complete appropriate tutorial resit work during the summer vacation. 14.4 eLearning (Blackboard) As a student at the University of Manchester, you will find that most of your units contain sections of work that you have to complete online (known as electronic (e)Learning). The University uses a website-like environment for this called Blackboard. Online eLearning support for your course means that it is easy to fit your learning into your everyday life, as you can complete the work from almost any computer in the world with an internet connection. Your eLearning work will often have strict deadlines and marks will be awarded for successful completion of assessments. Every Blackboard course is different, so read the rules regarding the course before you start, to ensure that you dont miss any work. Technical support from the eLearning team is available between 9am and 5pm on all working days. This is accessible by selecting eLearning Support and then eLearning enquiries from the menu bar on the left of your online courses; the eLearning team will reply to your University email address. More information on eLearning in the Faculty of Life Sciences will be available in Welcome Week and on the Blackboard area of individual courses. 14.5 Deadlines, penalties and document limits Items of coursework, such as essays and write-ups, will normally have strict deadlines. It is YOUR responsibility to ensure that you know both when the deadline for each submission is, and how the work has to be submitted (e.g. on paper to a particular office; electronically to a particular person or site). As your programme is preparing you for the world of graduate employment, where deadlines are often very strict indeed, you should treat Faculty deadlines like train departure times (just a few seconds after the time has passed, it is very likely you will have missed the train!). Unless specifically exempted or mitigated, late submission of any piece of assessed coursework, including Dissertations and the EDM final write-ups, will result in a deduction of 10 marks per day or part thereof beyond the deadline. Exceeding the specified page limit will result in a deduction of 20 marks per page or part thereof. Coursework will normally have a specified content limit. This will normally be a number of pages, but in some cases may be a number of words - it is YOUR responsibility to ensure that you understand exactly what the limits are and how they are to be achieved. Again, in postgraduate work you will usually find that documents, such as applications for grants, reports etc., have stringent word or page limit requirements - with line spacing, font, margins etc. specified. The standard Faculty of Life Sciences instructions for coursework including essays, reports and write-ups follow, but it is YOUR responsibility to ensure that you are aware of any alternative requirements for a particular piece of work: The [submission] must not exceed [x] pages of text excluding the list of references. Text must be in Arial, 10 point, one and a half line spacing, with margins of at least 2.5 cm all around the text. ALL supporting material, such as figures, tables, text boxes etc. 14

must be included in the page limit, and you are advised to ensure that any such items are sufficiently large enough to be read and understood with ease. If you prefer to prepare your work in a different font, font size or format you are advised to check frequently that the material will convert to the above for submission, as penalties will normally be imposed for exceeding the limits (e.g. a percentage of marks lost for each page over the limit or part thereof). If the work needs to be converted to a pdf for submission you should check very carefully that the conversion is accurate and conforms to the guidelines well in advance of the submission deadline. 14.6 Extensions for coursework If you will be unable to complete a piece of coursework by the stipulated deadline due to mitigating circumstances (see Section 12.6) you must seek an extension BEFORE THE DAY of the deadline by filling in an extension request form and sending it to the Unit Coordinator (or your Academic Advisor in the case of tutorial work). Forms are available from the Student Support Office or can be downloaded from the intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/exams/guidelines.aspx. The academic staff member concerned may require supporting information (e.g. medical certificate) and you should not assume that an extension has been approved until you receive written (e.g. email) confirmation from the member of staff. If you have been granted an extension to a deadline it is normally not possible to claim further mitigation for this work unless it is for a different reason. 14.7 Criteria and marking for answers on theory examination papers Criteria for marking theory papers will be published on the intranet examinations page www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/exams/guidelines.aspx. 14.8 Mid semester one examination You are required to take a computer-based mid-semester one examination during November. The examination will consist of questions for EACH of the BIOL lecture units you have attended during the semester. It has been set so that both you and we can assess your progress. It is important, therefore, that you prepare yourself as for any other examination. You will not be monitored (invigilated) when you complete the questions. Nevertheless, it is important that you take this examination seriously, as it will give important indications of your progress and will be valuable practice for the real thing. These examinations are formative they provide feedback on your work and are designed to inform you of your progress. You will receive further details of this examination approximately two weeks before you are due to take it. 14.9 Multiple choice examinations A few units in the second-year examination may be examined wholly or partly by Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs). Two things to remember are: (a) If your answer to a question is illegible you will be given a score of zero for that question. Answers must be marked on the answer sheet provided and if you decide to change your answer you must erase the original answer completely and write your new answer in its place. A pencil must be used (make sure you have an eraser and a pencil sharpener!). You must also mark your University ID number (on your student card) as directed and write your name on the answer sheet. Full instructions on using these answer sheets are distributed with relevant examination papers. 15

(b) All MCQs in the Faculty are marked by a technique that includes a negative correction for wrong answers. The correction that is subtracted for each wrong answer is 1/(n-1), where n is the number of options. This correction is intended to ensure that if you guess at random you will get a score of zero. (c) Examples of the computer-readable MCQ answer sheet and full instructions on how to use them are available at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/exams/guidelines.aspx NB. Short note and essay-type examinations are NOT negatively marked. You will not lose any marks for incorrect answers. To prepare for examinations, you are encouraged to use any quizzes and practice exercises posted on Blackboard and to look at copies of past examination papers. These can be obtained from the Crucial Guide Live website at http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/pastpapers.aspx, where you can search for papers by Faculty, School, exam name or code, year or semester. If the unit has no past papers the Unit Coordinator should make questions available at least 6 weeks before the exam which will be representative of the kind that will be set in the examination. Occasionally the format of examination papers will not be the same in the current year as in previous years. Students will be informed of any format changes by the unit co-ordinator and documents outlining the format of all examination papers will be published on the intranet (www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/exams/guidelines.aspx) in advance of the examination periods. Additionally there are many other important documents related to examinations and preparation for examinations to read on the Faculty intranet and It is in your interest to make yourself familiar with those which are relevant to you (see www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/exams/default.aspx). You must also read those indicated to you by staff via email and/or intranet announcements. Failure to do this when given adequate notice may result in considerable inconvenience to you. 14.10 Pass marks and compensation rules The Pass mark for each unit examination is 40%, and ideally you should pass all the units for which you are registered. However, the Examiners realise that not all students will achieve this ideal, and some students may pass most of their units, getting good marks in some, but just failing others. The following compensation rules have therefore been devised, whereby good marks can compensate for some fail marks. To obtain a compensated pass in the Second Year Examination as a whole you must:

pass all elements of the tutorial assessment (see section 14.3) and have satisfactory attendance at tutorials and practical classes (see section 14.12) gain a mark of at least 40% in the Tutorial unit BIOL20000, Dissertation unit BIOL21092 and in all designated non-compensatable units for your degree programme (see (a) below) achieve marks of at least 40% in 80 credits and at least 30% in the remaining 40 credits. For a single subject programme this means you will have to achieve a mark of 40% or greater in units worth 70 credits (plus the tutorial) and a mark of at least 30% in all of the remaining 40 credits worth of units.

N.B. There are four important provisos to these compensation rules. (a) For most degree programmes, at least one core non-compensatable unit has been designated in which you must attain a mark of at least 40%. If a mark of less than 40% is obtained, the unit examination must be resat even if it would otherwise be compensated. However, failure of these units may not necessarily result in overall loss of compensation. 16

Please also note that resits of these units cannot be avoided by changing to a programme where they are not compensatable, unless the change is authorised before the release of exam results. A list of these units follows: Level 2 Non-compensatable units BSc Anatomical Sciences BIOL20912 Human Anatomy RSM BIOL21291 Human Anatomy and Histology BIOL21402 Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs BSc Biochemistry BIOL21111 Proteins BSc Cell Biology BIOL21121 The Dynamic Cell BSc Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology BIOL20922 Neuroscience RSM BSc Developmental Biology BIOL21172 Principles of Developmental Biology BSc Genetics BIOL21371 Organismal Genetics BSc Medical Biochemistry BIOL21351 Cells & Tissues in Human Disease BSc Microbiology BIOL21181 Prokaryotic Microbiology BIOL21192 Principles of Infectious Diseases MNeuroscience BIOL20922 Neuroscience RSM BSc Molecular Biology BIOL21101 Genome Maintenance & Regulation BIOL21152 Omic Technologies & Resources BSc Neuroscience BIOL20922 Neuroscience RSM BSc Pharmacology BIOL21412 Drugs: Models & Mechanisms BSc Pharmacology and Physiology Students must pass both units at Level 2 BIOL21261 Endocrinology BIOL21302 Clinical Drug Development BSc Physiology BIOL20942 Physiology RSM BIOL21071 Physiology & Biomedical Sciences EDM BSc Plant Sciences BIOL21202 Plants for the Future BSc Zoology BIOL20552 Tropical Ecology & Conservation(RSM Field Course) * BIOL20682 Tropical Biology (RSM Field Course)* BIOL20872 Urban Biodiversity & Conservation RSM* BIOL21422 Alpine Biodiversity & Forest Ecology (RSM Field Course)* * Students will take only one of these units 17

(b) Tutorial assignments, attendance and the dissertation BIOL21092 are not considered in the compensation arrangements. Failure, either due to poor attendance or unsatisfactory work in either (or both) of these units, will automatically require you to resit ALL other failed units in August/September. (c) Some second-year field courses do not take place until after the date that we are required to hold the Second Year Examiners meeting. Therefore, marks for second-year field course units will be excluded and the compensation rules will be applied only to the units that have been taken. However, you should note that: (i) If you obtain a fail mark in a field course and no compensation is available after applying the compensation rules across ALL your units, you will be required to complete a substantial assignment in lieu of resitting the field course. the field course marks WILL be included in the calculation of your mean secondyear mark that will contribute 33% towards the Finals Examination.

(ii)

(d) The University gives the Examiners the right to refuse a resit to a student whose Work and Attendance has been unsatisfactory and who has received an official warning letter. If you have failed overall but have passed 40 or more credits at the first attempt the examination board will specify which unit assessments you are required to resit in order to gain at least a compensated pass in the resit examinations. If you have not passed a minimum of 40 credits on the first attempt, including any compulsory and non-compensatable units then you will have failed the level. The examination board may choose to exclude you from further study in the Faculty or offer you the opportunity to resit the year. This latter option is at the discretion of the Board of Examiners and will normally only be available where you can demonstrate that your current academic performance is likely to improve in the following year. 14.11 Progression to final year of Master of Neuroscience The Master of Neuroscience programme is a four year degree course. In order to progress from year two to year three, students must gain an overall average of no less than 50%. 14.12 Practical assessments If your practical work is usually assessed by marking several pieces of work that have to be handed in and you miss part of this assessment through illness, the Examiners may base your overall mark for the unit on the marks for the remaining pieces of work that you did complete, or you may be asked to submit an alternative assessment (consult your practical handbooks for further information). It is imperative, therefore, that the procedures described under 'Guidelines on Ill Health' (Section 12) are followed, so that compensation can be made at the appropriate time. 14.13 Lecture unit examinations Absence from any of your Second Year Examinations, for whatever reason, will score 0% for that examination, and you will automatically be required to resit that examination in August/September (see front page for provisional dates). If the absence is due to documented illness, however, your resit in August/September may be counted as your first attempt at the examination (and the fee may be waived), rather than your second. Again, it is essential that the procedures described under 'Guidelines of ill health' (Section 12 are followed). 18

14.14 August/September resits If you do not achieve the minimum standards indicated in Section 14.10, you must pay a resit fee and resit (in August/September) each individual failed unit examination as directed by the Board of Examiners in order to obtain a minimum compensated pass. Please note the following a) No more than 80 credits can be resat b) It will be the mark that you obtain in the resit examination that will determine whether you obtain a pass in a unit (we do NOT take the better of marks obtained on the first or second attempt). The mark will be derived solely from the resit examination and will not include any coursework/eLearning component carried over from the first sitting, unless the exam is being taken as a first attempt. c) To give credit for passing resit examinations, any passed resit mark will be capped at 30% for the purposes of progression and will be recorded on academic transcripts. d) Should you still not pass the Second Year Examination on this resit (when the compensation rules will again be applied) the following decisions by the Board of Examiners may be taken. You may be (i) excluded from your Degree Programme (ii) permitted to resit the year. This option is at the discretion of the Board of Examiners. It will normally only be available where you can demonstrate that your current academic performance is likely to improve in the following year and will be dependent on availability of places for the following year. (iii) permitted to carry forward up to 20 failed credits to the next year. This decision is at the discretion of the Board of Examiners and will be based on your academic standing and any mitigating circumstances. Whole units must be repeated in attendance, with assessment taken in full and marks are capped to the lowest compensatable mark. Failed compulsory units cannot be carried over to subsequent levels. Dates for the resit examination period are printed at the front of this handbook. Please bear this in mind when making plans for the summer. Should you be ill and be unable to take an examination in January or May/June you will need to be in Manchester for the resit opportunity. It is NOT possible to take resit examinations at another location or to reschedule them. 14.15 Disclosure of marks and record of academic performance Marks for practical assessments and unit examinations will be made available to you via the Faculty intranet. Examination results will be published on 27th February 2014 (for semester 1 examinations) and 4th July 2014 (for semester 2 examinations). Practical assessment marks may be published on an on-going basis. At the end of the academic year, examination marks and decisions on progression to the next year will be communicated to you via the intranet during the summer vacation - log in to the intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk then go to My Intranet and then My Messages. In some circumstances a letter will also be sent to you at your home address. It is entirely your responsibility to ensure that you learn the contents of these important messages in a timely manner.

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Any queries about your marks should be made to the Unit Coordinator or your Personal Advisor, NOT the Student Support Office. 14.16 Examination feedback Students have a right to receive feedback on their examination performance from Unit Coordinators. This may be done in a number of ways. A Unit Coordinator may publish a general feedback document outlining how questions were answered, addressing general strengths and weaknesses of students and giving a general indication of how well the questions were answered. hold a feedback session, to which students are invited. Individualised feedback on MCQ exam performance will be published online. Additionally, a student may seek individual feedback, in which the Unit Coordinator will obtain their exam scripts and report feedback on their answers including, where appropriate, any written comments recorded on the manuscript. A student does not, however, have the right to challenge any academic judgements on the quality of the answer. This means there is NO opportunity for papers to be re-marked. 14.17 Examination timetables It is essential that you inform the Student Support Office of any changes in optional units (see Section 40) by completing a Course Unit Change form, so that your registration for University examinations is kept up-to-date. If you do not do this there is a serious risk that you will have a clash of examinations and therefore score zero on one. A personalised copy of your examination timetable will be provided shortly before the relevant examination period and you will receive a communication from the University in December and April informing you of how to obtain your personalised exam timetable. It is your responsibility to: check that there are no timetable clashes between any of your examinations (there should not be any if you have kept your registration up-to-date). ensure that you know when and where a particular examination will take place.

Misreading of the timetable or failure to locate an examination room is not a valid excuse for absence from an examination. As examinations may be held in a huge variety of locations, some of which are off campus, you are urged to check very carefully before the day in question that you know exactly where and when each exam will be. Campus maps and advice about locations can be sought from the Student Support Office. Closely spaced examinations (e.g. 2 per day on consecutive days) may occur for many students and are not a mitigating circumstance. If you have any queries regarding your timetable, please seek advice from either the Student Support Office, or the Student Services Centre. If you are required to take August/September examinations, a personalised copy of your examination timetable will be provided shortly before the examination period (see provisional dates at front of handbook). It will not be possible to find out the exact date of the exam before this and the Faculty does not control the scheduling of examinations. 15. Plagiarism, collusion and other forms of academic malpractice These topics form an important part of the first stage of the Critical Writing Skills module (BIOL21701) but general guidelines and advice are given hereunder. 20

Plagiarism is a serious offence - it is treated as seriously as cheating in exams. a) As a student, you are expected to cooperate in the learning process throughout your programme of study by completing assignments of various kinds that are the product of your own study or research. Coursework, dissertations and essays submitted for assessment must be your own work, unless in the case of group projects a joint effort is expected and this has been indicated by the unit coordinator. For most students this does not present a problem, but occasionally, whether unwittingly or otherwise, a student may commit what is known as plagiarism, or some other form of academic malpractice, when carrying out an assignment. This may come about because students have been used to different conventions in their prior educational experience or through general ignorance of what is expected of them, or of what constitutes plagiarism. b) This guidance is designed to help you understand what we regard as academic malpractice and hence to help you to avoid committing it. You should read it carefully, because academic malpractice is regarded as a serious offence and students found to have committed it will be penalized. At the very least a mark of only 30% would be awarded for the piece of work in question, but it could be worse; you could be awarded zero (with or without loss of credits), fail the whole unit, be demoted to a lower class of degree, or be excluded from the programme, depending on the severity of the case. Academic malpractice includes plagiarism, collusion, fabrication or falsification of results and anything else intended by those committing it to achieve credit that they do not properly deserve. You will be given exercises and guidance on plagiarism/academic malpractice in tutorials and if you are unsure about any aspect of this you should ask your Personal Advisor for advice. In addition, further guidance is available on the intranet (see Plagiarism - Resources for avoiding Plagiarism at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/exams/plagiarism.aspx) which includes helpful exercises and explanations relating to plagiarism and referencing on the web. It is well worth visiting these sites in your spare time to ensure that you fully understand. All students are required to confirm that they have read and agree to the Universitys declaration on Academic Malpractice as part of the online registration process. The University uses electronic systems for the purposes of detecting plagiarism and other forms of academic malpractice and for marking. Such systems include TurnitinUK, the plagiarism detection service used by the University. As part of the formative and/or summative assessment process, you may be asked to submit electronic versions of your work to TurnitinUK and/or other electronic systems used by the University (this requirement may be in addition to a requirement to submit a paper copy of your work). If you are asked to do this, you must do so within the required timescales. The School also reserves the right to submit work handed in by you for formative or summative assessment to TurnitinUK and/or other electronic systems used by the University. Please note that when work is submitted to the relevant electronic systems, it may be copied and then stored in a database to allow appropriate checks to be made. Different types of academic malpractice are explained over the next few pages.

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Plagiarism Plagiarism is presenting the ideas, work or words of other people without proper, clear and unambiguous acknowledgement. The most obvious examples of plagiarism would be to copy another students work, or to copy text from a book or website. Even if you acknowledge the source in a citation, you must put the ideas or concepts into your own words, unless you are using a direct quote (although over-reliance on quotes is poor practice). It also includes self-plagiarism (which occurs where, for example, you submit work that you have presented for assessment on a previous occasion), and the submission of material from essay banks (even if the authors of such material appear to be giving you permission to use it in this way). It is as serious to use material from the internet or from a computer based encyclopaedia or literature archive as it is to use material from a printed source. Paraphrasing, when the original statement is still identifiable and has no acknowledgement, is plagiarism. Taking a piece of text, from whatever source, and substituting words or phrases with other words or phrases is plagiarism. It is not acceptable to put together unacknowledged passages from the same or from different sources linking these together with a few words or sentences of your own and changing a few words from the original text; this is regarded as over-dependence on other sources, which is a form of plagiarism. It is essential to make clear in your assignments the distinction between the ideas and work of other people that you may have quite legitimately used and developed, and the ideas or material that you have personally contributed. To assist you, here are a few important dos and donts: Do get lots of background information on subjects you are writing about to help you form your own view of the subject. The information could be from electronic journals, technical reports, unpublished dissertations, etc. Make a note of the source of every piece of information at the time you record it, even if it is just one sentence. Consider writing skeletal notes of your own rather than storing original text. Dont construct a piece of work by cutting and pasting or copying material written by other people, or by you for any other purpose, into something you are submitting as your own work. Sometimes you may need to quote someone elses exact form of words in order to analyse or criticize them, in which case the quotation must be enclosed in quotation marks to show that it is a direct quote, and it must have the source properly acknowledged at that point. Any omissions from a quotation must be indicated by an ellipsis () and any additions for clarity must be enclosed in square brackets, e.g. [These] results suggest that the hypothesis is correct. It may also be appropriate to reproduce a diagram from someone elses work, but again the source must be explicitly and fully acknowledged there. However, constructing large chunks of documents from a string of quotes, even if they are acknowledged, is another form of plagiarism. Do attribute all ideas to their original authors. Written ideas are the product that authors produce. You would not appreciate it if other people passed off your ideas as their own, and that is what plagiarism rules are intended to prevent. A good rule of thumb is that each idea or statement that you write should be attributed to a source unless it is your personal idea or it is common knowledge. (If you are unsure if something is common knowledge, ask other students: if they dont know what you are talking about, then it is not common knowledge!) As you can see, it is most important that you understand what is expected of you when you prepare and produce assignments and that you always observe proper academic conventions for referencing and acknowledgement, whether working by yourself or as part of a team. In practice, there are a number of acceptable styles of referencing depending, for 22

example, on the particular discipline you are studying, so if you are not certain what is appropriate, ask your Advisor or the course unit coordinator for advice. This should ensure that you do not lay yourself open to a charge of plagiarism inadvertently, or through ignorance of what is expected. It is also important to remember that you do not absolve yourself from a charge of plagiarism simply by including a reference to a source in a reference list that you have included with your assignment; you should always be scrupulous about indicating precisely where and to what extent you have made use of such a source. So far, plagiarism has been described as using the words or work of someone else (without proper attribution). However, it could also include a close paraphrase of their words, or a minimally adapted version of a computer program, a diagram, a graph, an illustration, etc., taken from a variety of sources without proper acknowledgement. These could be lectures, printed material, the Internet or other electronic/AV sources. Remember: no matter what pressure you may be under to complete an assignment, you should never succumb to the temptation to take a short cut and use someone elses material inappropriately. No amount of mitigating circumstances will get you off the hook, and if you persuade other students to let you copy their work, they will be disciplined as well. Collusion Collusion is any agreement to hide someone elses individual input to collaborative work with the intention of securing a mark higher than either you or another student might deserve. Where proved, it will be subject to penalties similar to those for plagiarism. Similarly, it is also collusion to allow someone to copy your work when you know that they intend to submit it as though it were their own and that will lay both you and the other student open to a charge of academic malpractice. On the other hand, collaboration is a perfectly legitimate academic activity in which students are required to work in groups as part of their programme of research or in the preparation of projects and similar assignments. If you are asked to carry out such group work and to collaborate in specified activities, it will always be made clear how your individual input to the joint work is to be assessed and graded. Sometimes, for example, all members of a team may receive the same mark for a joint piece of work, whereas on other occasions team members will receive individual marks that reflect their individual input. If it is not clear on what basis your work is to be assessed, to avoid any risk of unwitting collusion you should always ask for clarification before submitting any assignment. Fabrication or falsification of results For many students, a major part of their studies involves laboratory or other forms of practical work, and they often find themselves undertaking such activity without close academic supervision. If you are in this situation, you are expected to behave in a responsible manner, as in other aspects of your academic life, and to show proper integrity in the reporting of results or other data. Hence you should ensure that you always document clearly and fully any research programme or survey that you undertake, whether working by yourself or as part of a group. Results or data that you or your group submit must be capable of verification, so that those assessing the work can follow the processes by which you obtained them. Under no circumstances should you seek to present results or data that were not properly obtained and documented as part of your practical learning experience. Otherwise, you lay yourself open to the charge of fabrication or falsification of results. Finally If you commit any form of academic malpractice, teaching staff will not be able to assess your individual abilities objectively or accurately. Any short-term gain you might have hoped to 23

achieve will be cancelled out by the loss of proper feedback you might have received, and in the long run such behaviour is likely to damage your overall intellectual development, to say nothing of your self-esteem. You are the one who loses. For further guidance, please see the document Guidance to students on plagiarism and other forms of academic malpractice which can be found on the intranet in your My Independent Study area and at: www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/exams/plagiarism.aspx. 16. Conduct & discipline of students Regulations concerning Conduct and Discipline, including rights of appeal, are set out in University Regulation XVII, which can be found in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/formal-procedures/conduct-anddiscipline/. 17. Health & safety The work that you do this year will require knowledge of and conformity with health and safety rules. It is consequently important for you to gain a wide understanding of the legal and practical requirements for working safely. The University of Manchester is subject to British and European Community law on health and safety. The University has therefore, a duty to formulate health and safety policies and to promote these. From time to time the University issues its updated Health and Safety Policy Statement, as well as Codes of Practice and Guidance Notes. Following the requirements stipulated in the latter, the Faculty of Life Sciences is required to devise regulations that are suited to its work. These regulations apply to staff, students and visitors to the Faculty. Similar obligations and procedures apply to all employers in the UK, so that preparation and familiarity gained now could stand you in good stead for future employment. Please see the Health and Safety pages on the Faculty intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/hs/default.aspx. An important set of regulations that require close attention are those that relate to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health; the COSHH Regulations. Everyone is required by these regulations to make an assessment of the risks that might arise during the storage or use of the substances that they use in their work. You must ensure that no one will be adversely affected as a consequence of the decisions that you make. During your first year practicals you will find that this will usually have been done for you by the practical coordinators (bear in mind that the term substance covers a wide range in relation to risk - biological as well as chemical). See www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/hs/coshh/default.aspx. It should be understood that these rules are not designed to prevent potentially hazardous work from taking place, but that they are designed to make sure that the work is done safely. This means that substances that might be hazardous to health can continue to be used when due precautions are taken by those engaged in the work. You are thus obliged to take these things into account, yourself. You are entitled to expect that due care has been taken by those responsible for supervising your work, but it is important to remember that your willing cooperation for the implementation of safety measures is required. It is thus reasonable to expect that, so far as is reasonably practicable, you prepare in advance for the work that you will undertake. The first stage in the COSHH process is called risk assessment. You are required to refer to published information and, where appropriate, to ask for advice when carrying out this assessment. Manufacturers and suppliers are legally obliged to provide written information about the storage and use of substances. The range of examples to be considered is large, so that each individual substance must be considered, both alone and in conjunction with other substances to be found adjacently e.g. the same cupboard or in a mixture. The fact that a substance is within a container may not provide sufficient protection in all the circumstances 24

that might arise, i.e. you are required to anticipate what could happen in the event of an accident. Flammability is one example of the information to be provided but you would also need to know if a substance became hazardous or more hazardous upon heating (physically and/or chemically): i.e. would it become explosive; how it might react in combination with other things? Then, what safety precautions and remedies must be provided? The next stage is to decide how and in what circumstances a substance might be used safely, even if there is a risk. If there is a risk or the consequences of an accident could be serious, it would be necessary to consider the use of a satisfactory substitute. Someone in authority must decide this. The principles of Risk Assessment cover all forms of activity in the place of work, and every activity should be assessed before you start work. A person in authority will normally have carried out this assessment on your behalf, and it is important to adhere to the protocol you have been given. You must be familiar with the contents of the relevant Risk Assessment before you start any form of work, and you must not make any changes to work procedures without the permission of your supervisor. Risk Assessments for most common procedures can be found at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/hs/riskdocuments.aspx. Finally, a decision has to be made by a person in authority, e.g. your supervisor, about who should do the work and in what circumstances should the work be done. You can expect to be informed about any particular hazards and methods that apply in a laboratory.

C. SERVICES 18. Computing facilities in the Stopford building Computing facilities are available to students within the Faculty of Life Sciences in four computer clusters situated on the ground floor: Stopford PC Clusters 1-3 and the Student Project Room. Although these clusters are used for scheduled classes, the Faculty tries to ensure significant free time on these computers for student use (email, word processing etc). Standard word processing, spreadsheet and database software is pre-installed (Microsoft Office Suite), as well as any software related to your studies. Printing facilities are available in each cluster and technical help can be obtained via the IT Service Desk (see www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/facilities/is/default.aspx for contact and further information). Guidance notes for students wishing to access their University email accounts outside the University can be found at www.itservices.manchester.ac.uk/studentemail. 19. Intranet The intranet (www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/public/Login.aspx) is a service provided for staff and students in the Faculty. Like any other electronic medium there may be occasional outages caused by power surges beyond the control of the Faculty and/or malfunctions, so its operation cannot be guaranteed. Any material on the intranet, as well as that on any other platform, should be accessed well in advance of any deadlines. Non-availability of the service for 48 hours or less would not be considered a circumstance to mitigate against non-completion of an assignment. 20. The University of Manchester Library The Main Library, which is located at the end of Burlington Street, has multiple copies of most of the books recommended for the units listed in this handbook. Most will be on the main shelves in the Blue 2 area, but some copies are held in the High Demand Collection for either 1 night or 2 night loan. Extra copies of some books will be found in the Stopford Library. The Library website, www.library.manchester.ac.uk, provides a wealth of 25

information about the Library and includes a Life Sciences subject page, www.library.manchester.ac.uk/academicsupport/subjects/lifesciences, which lists all the resources relevant to the Faculty of Life Sciences. In addition to the book stock, the Library subscribes to a wide range of electronic and printed life science and medical journals. The Library provides a reading list service called Link2Lists, which links either to the catalogue entry for items on your course reading lists or, where possible, to electronic full text versions of the list items - whether it is books, digitised readings, journal articles or websites www.library.manchester.ac.uk/searchresources/link2lists. The Library has long opening hours, with 24 hour opening during the exam periods. There is a customer service desk where you can ask for help, self-service facilities for issuing and returning books, as well as photocopying, printing and scanning. There is also a Document Supply Unit through which material not held in stock can be obtained from other libraries. The library search facility will let you know what items are available and where to find them including eBooks and online journals, and can be accessed using dedicated terminals in the Library and remotely through the Library website. It can also be used to renew and reserve items. There are about 250 computers in the Library in clusters in the Blue Area which can be used to access Library resources, word processing and other software, email and the Internet. The Library provides access to an extensive range of electronic resources including databases, journals, books and reference works. All the main life science databases are available including Web of Knowledge, Biosis Previews, the Cambridge Scientific Abstracts Biological Sciences Collection, Medline, Embase, Scopus and Zoological Record. These can be used to discover what has been published on a particular subject. The electronic resources can be accessed both on-campus and remotely. The My Library tab in My Manchester has quick links to the Librarys resources and services, including up-to-date pages for Life Sciences. You can also access Library Search, view your Library account or contact the Library online. The Stopford Library The Stopford Library is a smaller site library for Medicine, Pharmacy and Life Sciences and holds additional copies of new editions of core and useful texts. Full details of what is available can be found using library search or asking a member of customer service staff. In addition to books, Stopford Library also has half skeletons and iPads available for loan. The Stopford Library also has a computer suite, wifi and 6 group study rooms with a large table and 14 chairs, a 32 inch LCD monitor and a large sqwiggle board. Bookings can be made via My Manchester or at the customer service desk in the Stopford Library. Please check Locations and Opening Hours for full details on opening hours and facilities. The Alan Gilbert Learning Commons In addition to The Main Library and Stopford Library, students also have access to The Alan Gilbert Learning Commons, a state-of-the-art learning environment with 24/7 opening hours throughout term-time. The Learning Commons has flexible open learning spaces with multimedia facilities, computer clusters and 30 bookable group study rooms with whiteboards and media screens. There is a series of training workshops covering a variety of academic and transferable skills hosted in the training room at the Learning Commons. These workshops include training on revision/study skills, note-taking and other topics and have been developed by Learning Commons staff in partnership with other teams across the University. Full details of training sessions are available in the MyLearningEssentials Calendar.

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If you have any queries about the Library, or require any assistance in the selection or use of appropriate electronic resources, you can visit their website at www.library.manchester.ac.uk/academicsupport/subjects/lifesciences/ or contact them using the feedback and enquiries button available on each page of the website. 21. The Manchester Museum The Manchester Museum is part of The University of Manchester. It has a distinctive role in engaging the public with the work of the university. The Museum has the third largest natural sciences collection in the UK, with four million specimens, from birds and plants collected by Charles Darwin to specimens of new species collected and classified by present curators. Many of the collections can be searched from the Museums website (www.museum.manchester.ac.uk). There are also numerous additional resources, such as library materials and associated archives. The Museum has around 380,000 per year and over 20,000 visits by schoolchildren. Museum staff work to make the collection available for teaching, research and public engagement and are always keen to explore new opportunities to engage students with the collection. Many museum staff teach on lecture courses and field courses, practicals and research skills modules. They also offer a number of studying opportunities, including final year projects, industrial placements, use of the Museum resources in PhD and Post-Doctoral work and co-supervision of PhDs. These may involve the collections or the specialist interests of staff. Students are encouraged to contact museum staff to self-arrange projects. The Museum is heavily involved in local biodiversity and sustainability work and helps to deliver the Biodiversity Action Plan for Manchester. The Museum can help students develop employability through its many volunteering opportunities, particularly useful to those who wish to enter careers in public communication, education and, of course, museums. Anyonestaff or studentcan visit collections that are not on display. This is done by arranging a visit with the appropriate curator (details below) or by arranging to visit the Collections Study Centre. The collections are a wonderful source of inspiration and information for research on scientific subjects and the history of science. Entry to the Museum is free. It has fantastic galleries and a busy programme of temporary exhibitions and public events. The museum caf is a popular meeting place for both students and staff.

Zoology: internationally important collections of many groups of animals, particularly birds, mammals, skeletons, molluscs and many other invertebrates, around 250,000 specimens. Contact Henry McGhie, Head of Collections and Curator of Zoology, who has a particular interest in bird biology and ecology, email: henry.mcghie@manchester.ac.uk. Botany: an internationally important collection of over one million specimens of worldwide plants, mostly herbarium sheets. Contact Rachel Webster (email: Rachel.E.Webster@manchester.ac.uk), Curator of Botany. Entomology: internationally important collections of over two million insects from most taxonomic groups. Contact Dmitri Logunov, Curator of Arthropods, who has a particular interest in spiders, email: dmitri.v.logunov@manchester.ac.uk. Earth Sciences: one of the five regional Earth Science Collection centres in the UK; one of the largest mineral collections with over 30,000 specimens and important collections of fossil plants and animals, with over 100,000 specimens. Contact David Gelsthorpe, Curator of Palaeontology, email: david.gelsthorpe@manchester.ac.uk.

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Vivarium: a unique collection of live animals with over 270 specimens of 40 species. Contact Andrew Gray, Curator of Herpetology, who has a particular interest in tropical frogs, email: andrew.r.gray@manchester.ac.uk. Also humanities collections, notably an important Egyptology collection and Archaeology collection. To book a visit to the museum Collections Study Centre, telephone 0161 275 2643 or email museum@manchester.ac.uk. 22. Student societies A number of societies run by students and covering a range of interests are affiliated with the Students Union and several of these concern the life sciences, in particular the Faculty of Life Sciences Society (FOLSSoc). These societies are open to students and staff of the University. They usually provide a series of lectures, social or sporting events. You are likely to be canvassed for a subscription, and invited to participate in social and sporting activities, during Welcome Week. 23. Student support within the Faculty/University Second Year Discussion Groups The faculty has two student-led support schemes: In Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) volunteers from second and final year help first year students with their transition into higher education. In discussion groups second year students help each other to process, digest and expand on challenging lecture and further reading material. The aims are to: enable a clear view of course expectations promote a non-threatening environment provide an effective method to: - assist learning - develop interpersonal/transferable skills (communication, team working, problem solving) - develop self confidence - increase responsibility and motivation - increase peer interaction - obtain inside knowledge - allow students to give real-time feedback - generate real-time feedback for the teaching staff Groups of second and final year students will form if and when volunteers come forward to act as a student coordinator of a discussion group for a particular unit. If you would like to volunteer for this important and rewarding role, which will be supported by documentation and training from the Sabbatical Student Intern responsible for the scheme please email sabbatical.fls@manchester.ac.uk. Additional information on the PASS scheme can be found in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/support/pass/.

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SUPPORT AND WELL-BEING Although you have personal and academic advisors and access to all members of academic staff in the Faculty, there may be occasions when you need or would like to talk to someone else about issues that may be worrying you. The services listed below are able to offer you confidential help and advice on a number of matters. The Crucial Guide Live also provides additional information on support and services available https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/personal-life/. 24. The Student Services Centre The majority of the University's administrative services for students (except Accommodation Services) are available from our centralised Student Services Centre, off Burlington Street. Student Services Centre Burlington Street The University of Manchester Oxford Road Manchester M13 9PL Telephone enquiries: 0161 275 5000 Email: ssc@manchester.ac.uk Website: https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/ssc-contact-details/ 25. Counselling The University Counselling Service offers you help in understanding, dealing with, or overcoming the many sorts of difficulties that may prevent you getting the most out of your life and studies at university. These may include problems at home, pressures from personal relationships, and difficulties in coping with stressful events, now or in the past, such as examinations, separation, bereavement or forms of abuse. There are also some group sessions/workshops on specific issues, e.g. confidence and self-esteem, managing low mood, managing exam stress, coping better with academic pressure, speaking out in groups, etc. Please see the counselling service website at www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/counselling for more details and up-to-date information. For any enquiries or to make an appointment to see a counsellor, please phone or call in to the Counselling Service between 9am and 4pm, Monday to Friday. The Service aim to offer an appointment within 10 days of an enquiry, but at busy times there may be a longer wait. You can call their reception desk for available appointment times on 0161 275 2864. At certain times the Service experiences especially high demand and waiting times can increase. To ensure the best possible service is provided and waiting times are managed effectively, a Duty Counsellor is available each day (during opening hours) for those who feel they need to talk to someone before the earliest available appointment date. The Counselling Service is on the fifth floor of Crawford House (building number 31 on the campus map) on the east side of the University Precinct Centre (building number 30 on the campus map), at the junction of Oxford Road and Booth Street East. Enter Crawford House at street level by the central entrance on Booth Street East, or at the end of the walkway on the east side of the Precinct Centre across the road from the shops. Opening times The Counselling Service is open from 9am to 4pm, Monday to Friday, except on public holidays and during the University's Christmas closure period.

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Contact details Email: counsel.service@manchester.ac.uk Tel: 0161 275 2864 (52864 from an internal phone) Fax: 0161 275 2281 University of Manchester Counselling Service 5th Floor, Crawford House Precinct Centre Booth Street East Manchester M13 9QS 26. Accommodation The Accommodation Office provides information and guidance on a range of issues including ways to deal with any problems that students might encounter over accommodation choices, special needs, existing accommodation difficulties, accommodation for students with families and on temporary accommodation, including provision available outside semester time. The Accommodation Office opening hours and contact details are as follows: The Accommodation Office The Student Services Centre Burlington Street Oxford Road University Place University Of Manchester Manchester M13 9PL Tel: +44 161 275 2888 Fax: +44 161 275 3213 email: accommodation@manchester.ac.uk The Accommodation Office Opening Hours are: Mon - Fri: 09.00- 17.00 Tue: 10.00-17.00 For private sector accommodation see the Manchester Student Homes website at www.manchesterstudenthomes.com. Manchester Student Homes (MSH) is owned, managed and funded by the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University and their respective Students' Unions. The Students Union Advice Centre is also an excellent source of help and advice on problems with private accommodation see http://manchesterstudentsunion.com/top-navigation/adviceservice/accommodation-advice. Further information can also be found in https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/home-life/. 27. Students with additional support needs The University of Manchester welcomes students with additional support needs arising from a specific learning difficulty, such as dyslexia, an unseen medical condition, or a disability or impairment. The University has a central Disability Support Office (DSO). In order to access the Crucial Guide Live at

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the full support that the University can offer, you should contact the DSO to discuss your support requirements. They can be contacted by the following means: Email - dso@manchester.ac.uk Telephone - 0161 275 7512 / 0161 275 8518 Text - 07899 663 512 Minicom - 0161 275 2794 Or you can just drop in to the DSO on the second floor of University Place, Block 2, where you can speak in confidence to a Disability Adviser about your needs. The Disability Support Office is open: Monday to Thursday 09.30-16.00 Friday 9.30-12.30 Further information on disability support can be found in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/support/disabled-students/. If you are a student who has, or suspects they have, support needs and have not yet informed the DSO, then please contact them in the first instance. In addition to this, the Faculty of Life Sciences has a Disability Coordinator, Miss Joanne Jolley, who liaises with the DSO to organise your support in the Faculty. She can be contacted by email or telephone: (0161 275 1525/ joanne.r.jolley@manchester.ac.uk). The Stopford Building has wheelchair access and an adapted lift at the car park end of the building. There are also car parking spaces reserved for blue badge holders adjacent to this entrance. 28. Financial help If you are a UK student for fees purposes, you can apply to Student Finance for a Student Loan for Maintenance and a Loan for Fees (see Section 1 What you should do now for further details). Payments for the Maintenance Loan are made directly into your bank account. If you choose to take one, the Loan for Fees is paid directly to the University. Some students may also be eligible for a non-repayable grant and your Student Finance will assess you for this. If you get into difficulties while you are a student, the Student Services Centre on Burlington Street can help with money advice and budgeting. Further information is available in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/financial-life/. In addition, each year the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) allocates the University of Manchester a sum of money to be used for the Access to Learning Fund (ALF). ALF is designed to enable the University to help students who need extra financial support because they have higher than expected costs (such as single parents) or they encounter an unexpected financial emergency (for example a burglary). The Fund can be used for course-related costs such as childcare, exceptionally high books/equipment costs, travel or for general living costs such as rent. For further information refer to https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/financiallife/funding/financial-support-funds/. 29. Discrimination and Harassment Information and University policies on discrimination and harassment can be found in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/personal-life/emotionalproblems/discrimination-and-harassment/. For further information about the Universitys Policy on Harassment, or if you have been a victim of some form of harassment, contact the Equality and Diversity Office on 0161 306 5857 or the Students Union Advice Centre on 0161 275 8066 or 275 8077.

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30. Health The University recognises the importance of the health and wellbeing of all students. Occupational Health Services aim to promote the physical, mental and social well-being of students and to reduce the incidence of ill-health arising from exposure to work place hazards. Students can access advice and guidance by going to see the Service or by visiting their website below (for some issues). Some students will undergo regular health surveillance as required by their School/Faculty/Dept etc, but you can also refer yourself for an appointment. Where necessary the Service work closely with other services at the University e.g. the Disability Support Office (DSO) to support students with health problems or disabilities. The Occupational Health Service does not deal with medical or first aid emergencies and cannot diagnose or provide treatment. If there is a serious medical emergency you should phone (9)999 for an ambulance, remembering to call University Security (69966) immediately afterwards so that they can assist the ambulance in getting to you. See the Occupational Health Services https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/occupational-health/. website for further details

The Occupational Health Services receptions are open for enquiries from Monday to Friday between 09.00-16.00. You will need an appointment to see an Occupational Health Adviser or Physician as the Service does not have the capacity to see you as a 'drop-in'. Their contact details are: Tel: 0161 275 2858 Fax: 0161 275 3137 Email: waterlooocchealth@manchester.ac.uk Campus map location: Building 38 Address: 182/184 Waterloo Place, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9GP Additional information on health issues can be found in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/personal-life/health/. 31. International students The International Society, William Kay House, 327 Oxford Road (opposite the Students Union), offers advice, information and a social base for students. Telephone: 0161 275 4959, email: int.soc@manchester.ac.uk. Further information can be found on the International Society website at www.internationalsociety.org.uk. The International Team forms part of the Student Services Centre. The advisors see students on an individual basis to discuss any problems (e.g. visas, finance) you may have. Telephone: 0161 275 5000 to make an appointment or see www.manchester.ac.uk/international/supportservices/advice. 32. Night-time telephone advice/listening service The Students Union runs Nightline, a telephone advice and listening service operated by students that offers a point of contact throughout the night. You can contact Nightline by telephone on 0161 275 3983 / 3984 from 8.00pm to 8.00am. If you'd feel more comfortable emailing Nightline rather than phoning them, you can send an email to nightmail@nightline.man.ac.uk. Further information is available at www.umsu.manchester.ac.uk/nightline. 32

33. Security on campus The University Security Service should be contacted if you have concerns about personal security or theft (0161 275 2728) or wish to speak to a member of the security staff. You can also contact the Police Liaison Officers on 0161 275 7042 or police@manchester.ac.uk. Information on safety can also be found in the Crucial Guide Live at www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/crucial-guide/personal-life/safety/. 34. Students Union advice centre The Students Union Advice Service (http://manchesterstudentsunion.com/adviceservice) offers free and confidential information and advice to students on personal and academic issues. It is run by professional Advisors who are independent of the University. The Advice Service is based on the ground floor of the Students' Union building on Oxford Road, M13 9PR. The Advice Service is open Monday to Friday, 10.00-16.00 (closed 13.30-14.30) all year round - both in and out of University terms - with the exception of public holidays and occassional training days. During these times you can drop-in, book an appointment, telephone and email. Telephone: 0161 275 8066 or 0161 275 8077 Internal phone: 58066 or 58077 Email:advice.su@manchester.ac.uk 35. The Careers Service The Careers Service is committed to helping students to improve their employability as future graduates of The University of Manchester. We work closely with graduate recruiters across the globe to develop and manage a variety of projects, courses and events, all dedicated to equipping our students with key career management skills and the knowledge vital for future success. We also work in partnership with the Faculty of Life Sciences to organise a range of activities for undergraduate students at key points in their university career. 35.1 Accessing our services The Careers Service is located in The Atrium on the 1st Floor of University Place. We are open all year round, including vacation time. Tel: 0161 275 2829. Our information team can help you research your options and there is information on reference and to take away. You can also book a guidance appointment with a Careers Consultant and get help with applications and interviews. http://www.careers.manchester.ac.uk/students/services/ To access careers information, advice and interactive services visit http://www.manchester.ac.uk/careers/students Use CareersLink to find out about job vacancies and careers events. You can also sign up for email alerts so you dont miss out. We advertise thousands of vacancies each year, for everything from graduate jobs and industrial placements, through to summer vacation work and part-time jobs. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/careerslink

In person:

Websites:

Social Media: Check out our Careers Blog and Twitter feeds for current issues and opportunities. Join the Careers Facebook Group for Life Science students to stay on top of careers and for specific tips and advice for Life Scientists. http://www.careers.manchester.ac.uk/students/services/interactive/ 33

35.2

Careers fairs and events

Many employers target Manchester University students for recruitment. Some host presentations or workshops, others attend one of our large careers fairs. These provide an excellent way for you to explore career opportunities and to meet employers. http://www.careers.manchester.ac.uk/students/events/ 35.3 Just for Life Sciences students

We organise a range of activities including a half day Career Options and Work Experience event for second year students, sessions on looking for work experience and interview training for placement students. We have some new events planned for 2013-14 too. These events are advertised in the school and also highlighted on the Manchester Life Science Careers Facebook Group. If you are looking for work experience, check out the Getting work experience in life science publication. Access a copy online or collect a hard copy from the Careers Service in University Place. http://www.careers.manchester.ac.uk/media/services/careersandemployabilitydivision/careersse rvice/crcpublications/startingpointseriesofhandouts/a5/Getting-Work-Experience-in-LifeScience.pdf 35.4 Making the most of your time at Manchester

Take every opportunity to develop your employability whilst at university as for many competitive career areas, a degree is not enough. Look for opportunities to build your CV, whether work experience, voluntary work, being active in a university society or developing new skills. From the Manchester Gold Mentoring Scheme to the Manchester Leadership Programme, the Careers Service has lots of ways to help you achieve your goals. http://www.careers.manchester.ac.uk/students/employable/ 35.5. Obtaining a reference for employment Most applications require you to cite one or more referees, and you should normally seek permission from your personal advisor to cite him/her as your main/first referee. If you need another referee, this should be a staff member familiar with your relevant work. If this is your research, this should be a supervisor of your practical work, placement, summer or final year research project. Additional referees could include your final year or second year academic advisor, or dissertation supervisor. It is essential to approach the members of staff concerned before citing them, to ensure that they are willing and able to provide a supportive reference.

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D. DEGREE PROGRAMME REQUIREMENTS The programmes are built on a unit (modular) structure. Most students will take: 8 Lecture-based units over the year An Experimental Design Module (EDM, practical unit) in the first semester A Research Skills Module (RSM) in the second semester A dissertation A tutorial unit over the year

You must ensure that the total credits you take over the year is 120 - this is most important and your responsibility. You may choose your lecture-only units from those provided by the Faculty of Life Sciences (coded BIOL and HSTM) and some units from outside the Faculty. No more than 20 credits of your lecture-based units should be taken from units without a BIOL code (this will differ for programmes such as Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology - in all cases please refer to Sections 40 and 46 for specific degree programme guidance). Guidance on your choice of units should be sought from your Personal Advisor or Programme Director. Note that units taken from outside the Faculty may have coursework components that are unlike those offered by units from within the Faculty. For each Degree Programme there are compulsory units that define your chosen programme plus a range of optional units. You should carefully read the section on optional units, taking into account potential timetable clashes between your chosen options (see Section 42). It is recommended that you do no more than 5 lecture-based units in a semester. Any more than this would significantly increase your workload in one semester relative to the other. Most Faculty lecture-only units consist of 22 lectures (or equivalent of other forms of teaching/learning) at the rate of 2 per week. Most lecture-only units from the Faculty include an assessment by written examinations at the end of each semester, i.e. January and May/June. There are a few units offered outside the Faculty that are year-long and are examined in May/June. In the first semester most students will undertake an Experimental Design Module (EDM). This module has been designed to place an emphasis on the design and interpretation of experiments and will allow students to advance from first year practicals by making experimental choices appropriate to the practical. All students taking an EDM unit will complete Phase I, which consists of four 6-hour sessions, carried out on a weekly basis. In Phase II, practical sessions have been divided into four strands (Molecular & Cell Biology, Organismal Biology, Human Sciences, and Physiology & Biomedical Sciences). Your degree programme will dictate which strand of practicals you attend. In the second semester you will do a Research Skills Module (RSM), the nature of which will depend on your degree programme. For most degree programmes there is a specific RSM. If you are a Biology, Biomedical Sciences, Pharmacology/Physiology student you may choose a RSM of one of the specialised degrees according to your interest. Note that some RSMs may have EDM or lecture unit Pre-/co-requisites and may be limited in the number of students that can be accommodated. Entry for RSMs for which numbers are restricted may require submission of an assignment or may be based on marks obtained in earlier units. RSMs will consist of a block of practicals over 4 weeks at the rate of three sessions per week and will usually occur in weeks 1-4 or 5-8. Where appropriate, field courses constitute the RSM and will occur in the Easter or Summer vacation. The University has a system of credit rating of all course units. It is intended to give you an indication of the proportion of your time that all the work of a unit is expected to occupy and is based on a full years work being 120 credits. This figure assumes 30 weeks work at 40 hours per week. Therefore, you can expect to spend ~100 hours on a typical 10-credit unit. This time 35

includes, for example, reading, eLearning materials, writing and revision, as well as direct contact hours. Students doing degrees with a Language - if you entered your degree programme with an A level in your chosen language at grade B or above, you will take 100 credits in life sciences and 20 credits in your chosen language, excluding cultural units (route a); if not, you will take 80 credits in life sciences and 40 credits in your chosen language, including cultural units (route b). This means that for route a, in Life Sciences students will take 6 lecture-based units, the EDM and an RSM unit plus the tutorial and dissertation units. For route b, students will take 4 lecture-based units, the EDM and an RSM unit plus the tutorial and dissertation units. Details of the language units can be found on the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures website www.alc.manchester.ac.uk and you should discuss your choice of units with the relevant Language School. Timetabling may be challenging so you must check carefully that all compulsory units do not clash (tell the staff in the Student Support Office immediately if they do). You may only choose optional units that do not clash with other units. Students doing a joint honours degree with a School outside the Faculty of Life Sciences (e.g. Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology) will take ~50% of their teaching from each of the Faculty and the other School. The requirements for each Degree Programme are laid out in tabular form in Section 46 with additional information for some Programmes on the following pages. They include details of the compulsory units and the recommended optional units. You may be able to take other units but you must talk to your Personal Advisor AND check that there are no timetable clashes before opting to do so. 36. Field Courses If you are a student in the degree programmes of Plant Science or Zoology you are required to take one field course RSM unit in your second year. Students from other degree programmes may be able to take a field course as an optional unit (see Section 46). Field courses are normally 2-3 weeks long and are held in Manchester or abroad. Which course you attend will depend on your choice of second year units, the field course(s) already attended, and your degree programme. Much of the cost is borne by the University, but you will be asked to make some financial contribution. In cases of financial hardship you should contact the Student Support Office before registering for the field course, or as soon as possible thereafter should circumstances change. If you are interested in taking a field course(s) then you should select this unit at September registration. For advice and further information please contact, Dr Clair Baldock (clair.baldock@manchester.ac.uk), on 0161 275 5439, who will be available when you meet with your Programme Director during Welcome Week. In order to complete field course registration you will be required to sign a declaration form: (i) (ii) agreeing to pay an invoice from the University contributing to the cost of your field course, confirming your understanding that the invoice must still be paid should you withdraw, for whatever reason*, from the field course (part or full waiver is not negotiable given that the University often incurs irrecoverable upfront costs in excess of the student contribution), confirming that you will read and comply with any appropriate Risk Assessment, agreeing to contact Student Occupational Health on 0161 275 2858 to arrange an appointment (at a time advised by the Student Support Office). This is to check your 36

(iii) (iv)

medical fitness to travel*, to receive travel advice and to assess whether vaccinations are necessary, (v) confirming that you have read and understood relevant University regulations (e.g. conduct and behaviour).

* In the unlikely event that you are not deemed fit to travel, you will be reimbursed for any costs incurred, providing you give the University as much warning as possible. For overseas field courses you must also provide a photocopy of your passport (even if you did this last year), which must be valid for at least six months after the date of return from the field course - the field course coordinator should be able to confirm the exact requirements for your course. For those travelling in the EU, a photocopy of a valid European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) will also be required. Non-EU students must check visa requirements for overseas courses and, if appropriate, apply immediately to obtain a visa, as they can take considerable time to process. The above documentation must be handed in to the Student Support Office no later than the end of week 2, semester 1. If you fail to submit the relevant documentation you may not be allowed to attend the field course. You will be informed before the end of Week 4 as to whether or not you have been accepted on your first choice course. If unsuccessful, you will have the opportunity to select an alternative field course or may need to choose an alternative second semester unit. For your safety and comfort you must have suitable footwear (strong walking boots and/or Wellington boots) and suitable clothing when you attend field courses. You should regularly check the My Lecture Resources page of the relevant Field Course unit on Blackboard for updates regarding arrangements including travel, forms to be completed by certain deadlines, what you need to take with you etc. Please note: In the event of a field course being oversubscribed you may be asked to select an alternative second semester unit. 37. LEAP - Language Enhancement Access Programme The University offers courses to students who wish to study a language as part of LEAP. Further information is available from: www.langcent.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/leap. If you are considering registering for a language module you must discuss this with your Programme Director at registration during Welcome Week. If your Programme Director authorises your application for a LEAP course, you will need to enrol in person during Welcome Week (16th to 20th September 2013) in room S3.3 in the Samuel Alexander building (number 67 on Campus Map) Monday to Thursday 10:00 to 13:00 and again 14:00 to 16:00. Enrolment will be conducted on a first-come first-served basis and you are therefore strongly advised not to leave it too late. Further information can be found at www.ulc.manchester.ac.uk/languages/information/faqs. 38. Human subjects and animal tissues The life sciences are observational and experimental sciences concerned with living systems. In some courses it is important, therefore, that you gain experience with experimentation and handling of appropriate organisms. Several practical classes require human volunteers and the most logical source is those students registered for the units. In the many years that these practical classes have been held, students have found them both interesting and worthwhile. None of the procedures which volunteers are asked to undergo is inherently dangerous. No volunteer has ever suffered significant ill effects and there is no compulsion of any kind for 37

students to act as subjects. All human volunteer practicals have been approved by the University Committee on the Ethics of Research on Humans. Such practicals have been banded into Band 0, 1 or 2 according to an assessment of Health and Safety risk and ethical considerations. You will be given full information and asked to complete a Consent form for each Band 1 and 2 practical. The practical classes in many second level units (EDMs and RSMs) use invertebrates, and tissues or cell components from vertebrates, including humans. Please check with the relevant unit coordinator if you have any concerns. Your active participation is expected in all practical classes and assessments and examinations will be based on all matters taught in your unit. If you have any reservation about participating, you must discuss it with your Personal Advisor before registration. 39. Choosing second year units We strongly recommend that you complete the 10-step online registration process before you arrive in Manchester by referring to the information in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/registration/. You should already have completed a Course Unit Plan outlining your choice of optional units during the meeting with your Programme Director in May of the last academic year, and you will have been enrolled on these units over the summer. If you did not submit a course unit plan, or would like to make any changes to your choice of optional units, you will need to discuss your choice of units with your Programme Director. At the meeting with your Programme Director in Welcome Week you can obtain further advice on your choice of optional units, and any changes to your final selection will be recorded using a Course Unit Change form, which your Programme Director will be able to provide at the meeting. Please note: it is your responsibility to make any changes to your optional units on the Student System, but this can only be done once you have had a Course Unit Change form authorised by your Programme Director. For guidance on how to amend your course unit enrolments on the Student System please refer to the Guide to Course Unit Selection in the Crucial Guide Live at https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/registration/cus/. PDF versions of the student handbooks, containing course unit descriptions, can be found on the Faculty intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/handbooks/undergraduate.aspx. To assist you in choosing your optional units, you can access the academic advisement/course unit plan for each level of study for your degree programme on the Faculty intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/academicadvisement.aspx. Academic Advisement is the term used in Campus Solutions for the way in which degree programmes are structured, e.g. which course units students take in each academic year, which of those units are mandatory, and which units may be selected as options. If your programme includes units from outside the Faculty you must check for timetable clashes. Contact details for other Faculties can be found either at the back of this handbook or on the University website www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/structure/schools/. The course unit selection procedure should guide you through the process but please keep the following points in mind: i. If you are registered for a non-language degree you need to take a total of 10 units (usually 8 Lecture units, 1 EDM and 1 RSM) (100 credits). These are in addition to the compulsory Tutorial and Dissertation units (10 credits each). NOTE: joint honours students 38

may take a different combination of units - please refer to the table in Section 46 for degree-specific information. ii. If you are registered for a degree with a language: for route a, you need to select 6 units (60 credits), these are in addition to the compulsory Tutorial and Dissertation units and the EDM and RSM units (total 40 credits). In addition you will take language units to the equivalent of 20 credits; for route b, you need to select 4 units (40 credits), these are in addition to the compulsory Tutorial and Dissertation units and the EDM and RSM units (total 40 credits). In addition you will take language units to the equivalent of 40 credits (see page 40 for information routes a and b. iii. Check that you are aware of any recommended or pre-requisite units associated with your choice (see Sections 43). Contact your Programme Director or the Unit Coordinator if you are in any doubt about the suitability or content of any of your choices. iv. Check that the units you have selected do not clash on the Faculty timetable (see Section 42) AND on the timetable for any other Faculty that manages units you intend to take. v. Check that the units you have chosen provide a suitable foundation for the final year units you may wish to take (see Section 44). If you have any difficulties, or you wish to take units that are not included in the list of recommended options, you MUST discuss the matter with your Programme Director. 40. Changing units Changing optional course units. You may change any optional units (except RSMs, including field courses, and language units that run for two semesters), at the beginning of each semester. You MUST get the permission of your Programme Director before you make any changes to the units that you attend. A Course Unit Change Form MUST be completed if you wish to make any changes. Forms can either be collected from the Student Support Office or downloaded from the Faculty intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/studentsupport/supportforms/default.aspx. Your Programme Director must confirm to you by email or signature on the form that he/she approves the change, and you must take the completed form, together with email verification where relevant, to the Student Support Office. Failure to do so may mean you will not be allowed to register for the examinations in the unit to which you have changed. You will not normally be allowed to transfer off or onto a unit after the end of the second week of teaching in each semester. Please note: RSM units (including Field Courses) may NOT be changed, once registered, without the written permission of all RSM Unit Co-ordinators concerned and of the Senior Advisor, who will only sanction this after discussion with the Senior Technician and appropriate members of staff.

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41. Academic calendar First Semester Week No. begins 1 23.09.13 2 30.09.13 3 07.10.13 4 14.10.13 5 21.10.13 6 28.10.13 7 04.11.13 8 11.11.13 9 18.11.13 10 25.11.13 11 02.12.13 12 09.12.13 Christmas Vacation Examination Period 13 13.01.14 14 20.01.14 Revision & Examinations 13 12.05.14 14 19.05.14 15 26.05.14* 16 02.06.14 Second Semester Week No. begins 1 27.01.14 2 03.02.14 3 10.02.14 4 17.02.14 5 24.02.14 6 03.03.14 7 10.03.14 8 17.03.14 9 24.03.14 10 31.03.14 EasterVacation 11 28.04.14 12 05.05.14*

* Bank Holiday Monday (No teaching and/or examinations on the Monday) Reading Week (see Section 41.1) A full academic year calendar with more detailed information is available on the Faculty intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/handbooks/undergraduate.aspx. 41.1 Reading Week

In week 6 of the first semester, Reading Week is where no Life Sciences lectures are scheduled. You should plan to be in the University, as there may be practicals, seminars, meetings and scheduled teaching in other Faculties. There should not be a tutorial (unless your advisor agreed this at the start of the semester) as this week should give you time to read. Some reading matter will be suggested by your lecturers and advisors, the rest should be the material you have accumulated to date, and the reading should prepare you for the midsemester exams that occur in week 7 for all BIOL lecture units (see Section 14.8). A full academic year calendar with more detailed information is available on the intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/handbooks/undergraduate.aspx. The tables below show you the units we expect to clash on the timetable. These lists are provisional and there may be minor changes, however, care has been taken to try to ensure that any student is unlikely to wish to take more than one unit within each block. No compulsory units should clash. If it seems that they do for you (e.g. with compulsory language units), please go to the Student Support Office as soon as possible (and well before the day of the first clash) to resolve this. 41.2 Time Management

Some deadlines may be shortly after the delivery of the material, some quite a way off, and this may well differ for different cohorts of students. This mixture mirrors the graduate world of work, and the requirements of your final year programme, so you are advised to plan 40

ahead! Anticipate a few days of ill-health that might impact on your ability to complete assignments on time, and start work early on items with far-off deadlines. Mastering time management is one of the most essential goals you should set yourself. To help you, every course where there are assessments/assignments/deadlines will have all the deadline dates available to you within the Assessments area of Blackboard in the left hand menu. Please note that it is possible that some dates may be adjusted throughout the semester at the unit coordinators discretion, therefore you should check your deadlines for each course regularly and complete work as early as possible.

E. THE UNITS 42. Second level clash groups Level 2 Clash Groups Life Science units that do not appear in the list below do not clash with any other life science unit and can therefore be taken in conjunction with any unit offered from within the Faculty with the advice of your Programme Director. Semester 1 Clash group 1 BIOL21111 -- Proteins BIOL21281 Animal Physiology Clash group 2 BIOL21221 Animal Diversity BIOL21371 Organismal Genetics Clash group 3 BIOL21101 Genome Maintenance & Regulation BIOL21341 Sensory Systems Clash group 4 BIOL21341 Sensory Systems BIOL21141 Cell Membrane Structure & Function Semester 2 Clash group 1 BIOL21192 Principles of Infectious Disease BIOL21312 Drugs & The Brain Clash group 2 BIOL21232 Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology BIOL21272 Human Physiology Clash group 3 BIOL21172 Principles of Developmental Biology BIOL21302 Clinical Drug Development Clash group 4 BIOL21202 Plants for the Future BIOL21402 Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs 41

43. Second level units with pre-/co-requisite units Listed below are all of the second level units from the Faculty of Life Sciences with pre-/corequisite units. If a unit has pre-/co-requisites, this means that you may need to take the prerequisite unit(s) in order to take this unit. For example, BIOL10221 and BIOL10521 are compulsory prerequisites for BIOL20332, therefore, if you did not take these units in your first year, you will not be able to take BIOL20332 in your second year.
Bold indicates a compulsory prerequisite, italics indicate a recommended prerequisite Unit Code Title Pre-/co-requisite Title Unit Code HSTM10721 Science & the Modern World BIOL21121 BIOL10221 BIOL10521 BIOL21172 BIOL21371 BIOL20342 General & Medical Microbiology RSM BIOL20701 Data Handling Skills 3 BIOL20912 Human Anatomy RSM BIOL10532 BIOL10701 BIOL10722 BIOL10811 BIOL21061 BIOL21291 BIOL20922 Neuroscience RSM BIOL10832 BIOL21332 BIOL21341 BIOL20932 Pharmacology RSM BIOL20942 Physiology RSM BIOL21302 BIOL10832 BIOL21141 BIOL21321 BIOL20972 Developmental Biology RSM BIOL10521 BIOL21172 BIOL21371 BIOL21101 Genome Maintenance & Regulation BIOL21111 Proteins OR OR BIOL21121 The Dynamic Cell BIOL21132 Cell Metabolism & Metabolic Control BIOL21141 Cell Membrane Structure & Function BIOL21152 Omic Technologies & Resources BIOL21172 Principles of Developmental Biology BIOL21192 Principles of Infectious Disease BIOL10221 BIOL10212 BIOL10111 CHEM10021 CHEM10022 BIOL10232 BIOL21111 BIOL10212 BIOL10232 BIOL10221 BIOL21101 BIOL10521 BIOL10532 BIOL21181 BIOL21242 BIOL21202 Plants for the Future BIOL21232 Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology BIOL10511 BIOL10521 The Dynamic Cell Molecular Genetics Genes, Evolution & Development Principles of Developmental Biology Organismal Genetics Microbes, Man & the Environment Data Handling Skills 1 Data Handling Skills 2 Body Systems Human Sciences EDM Human Anatomy & Histology Excitable Cells Motor Systems Sensory Systems Clinical Drug Development Excitable Cells Cell Membrane Structure & Function Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action Genes, Evolution & Development Principles of Developmental Biology Organismal Genetics Molecular Genetics Biochemistry Introductory Chemistry Chemistry for Bioscientists 1 Chemistry for Bioscientists 2 From Molecules to Cells Proteins Biochemistry From Molecules to Cells Molecular Genetics Genome Maintenance & Regulation Genes, Evolution & Development Microbes, Man & the Environment Prokaryotic Microbiology Immunology Biodiversity Genes, Evolution & Development

BIOL20302 Science & Society RSM BIOL20322 Cell Biology RSM BIOL20332 Genetics RSM

42

Unit Code

Title

BIOL21272 Human Physiology

Pre-/co-requisite Title Unit Code BIOL21141 Cell Membrane Structure & Function BIOL21321 Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action Body Systems Drugs: From Molecules to Man Drugs: From Molecules to Man Clinical Drug Development Excitable Cells Excitable Cells Sensory Systems Excitable Cells From Molecules to Cells Drugs: From Molecules to Man Molecular Genetics Genes, Evolution & Development Human Anatomy & Histology Drugs: From Molecules to Man Pharmacology RSM

BIOL21291 Human Anatomy & Histology BIOL21302 Clinical Drug Development BIOL21312 Drugs & the Brain BIOL21321 Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action BIOL21332 Motor Systems BIOL21341 Sensory Systems BIOL21351 Cells & Tissues in Human Disease BIOL21371 Organismal Genetics BIOL21402 Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs BIOL21412 Drugs: Models & Mechanisms

BIOL10811 BIOL10822 BIOL10822 BIOL21302 BIOL10832 BIOL10832 BIOL21341 BIOL10832 BIOL10232 BIOL10822 BIOL10221 BIOL10521 BIOL21291 BIOL10822 BIOL20932

44. Second level units that are pre-/co-requisites for final level units Listed below are all of the final level units in the Faculty of Life Sciences which have level 2 units as pre-/co-requisites. If a unit has pre-/co-requisites, this means that you will need to take the prerequisite unit(s) in order to take this unit. For example, BIOL21111 is a compulsory prerequisite for BIOL31311, therefore, if you did not take BIOL21111 in your second year, you will not be able to take BIOL31311 in your final year.
Bold indicates a compulsory prerequisite, italics indicate a recommended prerequisite Unit Code Title
BIOL31301 BIOL31311 BIOL31321 BIOL31332 BIOL31341 BIOL31352 BIOL31362 BIOL31371 BIOL31381 BIOL31391 BIOL31402 BIOL31411 BIOL31421 BIOL31441

Pre-/corequisite Unit Code BIOL21152 Post-Genome Biology BIOL21111 Protein Assembly, Dynamics & Function BIOL21111 Glycobiology: Glycan Function in Health BIOL21162 & Disease BIOL21132 Biochemical Basis of Disease Macromolecular Recognition in Biological BIOL21111 Systems BIOL21181 Current Topics in Microbiology BIOL21192 Bacterial Infections of Man BIOL21242 Advanced Immunology BIOL21252 BIOL21101 Gene Regulation and Disease BIOL21152 Evolution of Genes, Genomes &Systems BIOL21232 BIOL21232 Human Genetics and Evolution BIOL21371 BIOL21141 Protein Sorting BIOL21101 Control of Cell Division BIOL21121 BIOL21101 Cell Signalling BIOL21121 BIOL21141 BIOL21261 BIOL21351

Pre-/co-requisite Unit Title Omic Technologies & Resources Proteins Proteins Chemistry of Biomolecules Cell Metabolism & Metabolic Control Proteins Prokaryotic Microbiology Principles of Infectious Disease Immunology Parasitology Genome Maintenance & Regulation Omic Technologies & Resources Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology Organismal Genetics Cell Membrane Structure & Function Genome Maintenance & Regulation The Dynamic Cell Genome Maintenance & Regulation The Dynamic Cell Cell Membrane Structure & Function Endocrinology Cells & Tissues in Human Disease

43

Unit Code Title


BIOL31451 BIOL31471 BIOL31482 BIOL31501 BIOL31511 BIOL31541 BIOL31551 BIOL31571 BIOL31582

BIOL31591

Pre-/corequisite Unit Code BIOL21172 Comparative Developmental Biology Advances in Animal Behavioural Ecology BIOL21232 BIOL21232 Conservation Biology BIOL21152 Green Biotechnology BIOL21202 BIOL21202 Biotic Interactions BIOL21211 BIOL21211 Living with Climate Change BIOL21211 Human Impacts on the Biosphere BIOL21261 Advanced Endocrinology BIOL21141* Cardiovascular Systems * one of these units must be BIOL21321* taken as a compulsory pre-requisite BIOL21272 BIOL20922* Advanced Ion Transport BIOL20932* * any one of these RSM units is strongly BIOL20942* recommended as a pre-requisite BIOL21321 BIOL21302 BIOL21312 BIOL20922* BIOL20932* BIOL20942* BIOL21172 BIOL20912 BIOL21291 BIOL21402 BIOL21312 BIOL21332 BIOL21341 BIOL21332 BIOL21341 BIOL21261 BIOL21172 BIOL21101 BIOL21121 BIOL21121 BIOL21172 BIOL21351 BIOL21121 BIOL21242 BIOL21252 BIOL21242 BIOL21162

Pre-/co-requisite Unit Title Principles of Developmental Biology Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology Omic Technologies & Resources Plants for the Future Plants for the Future Ecology & Ecosystems Ecology & Ecosystems Ecology & Ecosystems Endocrinology Cell Membrane Structure & Function Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action Human Physiology Neuroscience RSM Pharmacology RSM Physiology RSM Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action Clinical Drug Development Drugs & the Brain Neuroscience RSM Pharmacology RSM Physiology RSM Principles of Developmental Biology Human Anatomy RSM Human Anatomy & Histology Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs Drugs & the Brain Motor Systems Sensory Systems Motor Systems Sensory Systems Endocrinology Principles of Developmental Biology Genome Maintenance & Regulation The Dynamic Cell The Dynamic Cell Principles of Developmental Biology Cells & Tissues in Human Disease The Dynamic Cell Immunology Parasitology Immunology Chemistry of Biomolecules

BIOL31602 Toxins, Toxicants & Toxicity BIOL31612 Neuroinflamation in Health and Disease BIOL31622 Ion Transport in Health and Disease

* one of these RSM units must be taken as a compulsory pre-requisite BIOL31642 Advanced Developmental Biology BIOL31651 Advances in Anatomical Sciences

BIOL31671 Neuropharmacology of Human Health BIOL31681 Clocks, Sleep and Rhythms of Life BIOL31692 Learning, Memory and Cognition BIOL31721 Hormones and Behaviour BIOL31732 Developmental Neurobiology BIOL31742 Molecular Biology of Cancer BIOL31751 Stem Cells

BIOL31771 Cell Adhesion BIOL31791 Advanced Parasitology BIOL31802 Immune Response and Disease BIOL31812 Chemistry of Biological Processes

45. Second level unit descriptions Profiles are provided on the following pages for the majority of the units available to students in the Faculty of Life Sciences. Profiles include Aims, Intended Learning Outcomes, lecture and/or practical content, along with details of the assessments, recommended texts and Pre-/corequisites. The headings give information on the unit code number (which is all that is used by the University to identify a unit, including the information used for entry to examinations), the semester in which it is taught and the unit co-ordinator with his/her email address. The principal 44

lecturers on the unit are also listed at the bottom of the profile. If you have any questions about the content of a unit you should approach the unit co-ordinator. Course unit profiles can also be found on the Faculty Intranet at the following address: https://www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/cm/default.aspx. Students wishing to contact a unit coordinator directly should do so by email. Full descriptions of language units for those students taking the four-year degrees with a language are available on the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures website at http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/ and you should ensure your options are checked by the School. Timetabling may be challenging so you must check carefully that all compulsory units do not clash and may only choose optional units that do not clash with other units. In addition, information on course units run by the University College (available University-wide) can be found at www.college.manchester.ac.uk. Please note: students wishing to enrol on any unit offered by the University College must contact the College directly to request enrolment for a specific unit, the Faculty cannot enrol students on these units. Details of how to contact the College are contained within the individual unit pages on the above website. Please note, although students are allowed to take units outside the Faculty, timetable constraints may not allow some of these units to be taken in conjunction with some compulsory Faculty units. Please discuss this with your Programme Director. 46. Compulsory and optional units The table on the following pages gives brief details of compulsory and optional course units for each degree programme. More detailed information on your degree programme structure for each level of study can be found on the Faculty intranet under the heading academic advisement www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/ugteaching/academicadvisement.aspx. Academic Advisement is the term used in Campus Solutions for the way in which degree programmes are structured, e.g. which course units students take in each academic year, which of those units are mandatory, and which units may be selected as options. By following the above link you will be able to access the academic advisement documents for your degree programme. These sheets are used at registration for your Programme Director to agree your choice of units with you.

45

This chart is intended as a guide only - please refer to the academic advisement for your programme (see sections 40 & 46) for full details
KEY:
C = Compulsory; C* = choose 1 O = Optional (see academic advisement sheets for full details) W = Wildcard - any level 2 unit may be selected as an option = Optional for joint degree with a language (all languages) = Optional for joint degree with an East Asian language only = Not taken by joint degree with a language (all languages) = Not taken by joint degree with an East Asian language only
Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology

DEGREE PROGRAMMES
Biolgoy with Science & Society

Pharmacology & Physiology

Developmental Biology

Medical Biochemistry

Anatomical Sciences

Biomedical Sciences

Molecular Biology

Mneuroscience

Pharmacology

Biotechnology

Neuroscience

Plant Science

Biochemistry

Microbiology

Cell Biology

Physiology

Genetics

COURSE UNITS
BIOL20000 Academic Tutorials Year 2 BIOL20021 Tutorial (Cognitive Neuroscience & Psyc) BIOL20302 Science & Society RSM BIOL20312 Biochemistry RSM BIOL20322 Cell Biology RSM BIOL20332 Genetics RSM BIOL20342 General & Medical Microbiology RSM BIOL20352 Molecular Biology RSM BIOL20552 Field course in Tropical Ecology & Conservation RSM BIOL20682 Field course in Tropical Biology RSM BIOL20701 Data Handling Skills 3 BIOL20872 Urban Biodiversity & Conservation RSM BIOL20902 Clinical Sciences RSM BIOL20912 Human Anatomy RSM BIOL20922 Neuroscience RSM BIOL20932 Pharmacology RSM BIOL20942 Physiology RSM BIOL20972 Developmental Biology RSM BIOL20982 The Biology of Being Human BIOL21041 Molecular and Cellular Biology EDM BIOL21051 Organismal Biology EDM BIOL21061 Human Sciences EDM BIOL21071 Physiology & Biomedical Sciences EDM BIOL21092 Dissertation BIOL21101 Genome Maintenance & Regulation BIOL21111 Proteins BIOL21121 The Dynamic Cell BIOL21132 Cell Metabolism & Metabolic Control BIOL21141 Cell Membrane Structure & Function BIOL21152 Omic Technologies & Resources BIOL21162 Chemistry of Biomolecules

C C

C C

C C

O C O O O O O O O C C C O O C O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O C C C C C* C* C* C* C C C C C C C C C C C C C

C O

C C*

O O O O O O C O C O C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C O C O O O C O O C O O C O C O O O C C C C C O O O O O O O C C C C C C O O O O O O O C O O O O O O O C C C O C C C C C* C* C

O O O C C C

C C C O C

C O O O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O C O O O O C O

O C O O C O O O O O O O

C O C O C O

O O O O O O O O O O O O O

C O O O

C O C

O C C O O O

C O O O

46

Zoology

Biology

DEGREE PROGRAMMES
Biolgoy with Science & Society

Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology

Pharmacology & Physiology

Developmental Biology

Medical Biochemistry

Anatomical Sciences

Biomedical Sciences

Molecular Biology

Mneuroscience

Pharmacology

Biotechnology

Neuroscience

Plant Science

Biochemistry

Microbiology

Cell Biology

Physiology

Genetics

COURSE UNITS
BIOL21172 Principles of Developmental Biology BIOL21181 Prokaryotic Microbiology BIOL21192 Principles of Infectious Disease BIOL21202 Plants for the Future BIOL21211 Ecology & Ecosystems BIOL21221 Animal Diversity BIOL21232 Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology BIOL21242 Immunology BIOL21252 Parasitology BIOL21261 Endocrinology BIOL21272 Human Physiology BIOL21281 Animal Physiology BIOL21291 Human Anatomy & Histology BIOL21302 Clinical Drug Development BIOL21312 Drugs & the Brain BIOL21321 Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action BIOL21332 Motor Systems BIOL21341 Sensory Systems BIOL21351 Cells & Tissues in Human Disease BIOL21361 Haematology BIOL21371 Organismal Genetics BIOL21381 Introduction to Virology BIOL21402 Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs BIOL21412 Drugs: Models & Mechanisms BIOL21422 Field course in Alpine Biodiversity & Forest Ecology RSM BIOL21701 Critical Writing Skills BIOL22011 Level 2 Mini Exams BIOL22020 What is Science For? (Level 2) BMAN Manchester Business School DRAM21111 Science, Theatre & Performance EART20002 Manchester Sustainable City Project HIST20182 The Making of the Modern Mind (20 cr) HSTM20031 From Cholera to Aids HSTM20081 From Cholera to Aids (20 cr) HSTM20092 The Crisis of Nature HSTM20151 An Introduction to Bioethics HSTM20181 Science, Media and the Public HSTM20282 The Information Age HSTM20302 From Frankenstein to the Matrix HSTM20482 History of Mathematics HSTM20592 The Crisis of Nature (20 cr)

C O O O O O O O O O O O O C O C O O O O O

O O O O O O C

O O O

O C O C O O O O O

O O O O

O C O O O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O O C O O O C O O C O O O O O O O O O O O O O C O O C O O O C O C C O O

O O O O O

O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O C O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O C O O O O

O O

C O C C O C

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O O O C C O C C O O

O O O O O O O O C C C

O O O O

O O O O O O O O

O C O O O O O C O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O O O O O C C C C O

O O O O O O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O O O O O C O C

O O O O

C C O

C C O O C C C O

O C O O O O O O O O C

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

C O C O O O O O O O

O O O O O

O O O O O O O

C O O O O C O

C C O O O O O O O O O

C O C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C
W

O C*

O C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C

C C C

O O O O O O C O O O O O O O O O O O

C O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O O O O

47

Zoology

Biology

DEGREE PROGRAMMES
Biolgoy with Science & Society

Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology

Pharmacology & Physiology

Developmental Biology

Medical Biochemistry

Anatomical Sciences

Biomedical Sciences

Molecular Biology

Mneuroscience

Pharmacology

Biotechnology

Neuroscience

Plant Science

Biochemistry

Microbiology

Cell Biology

Physiology

Genetics

COURSE UNITS
HSTM20651 An Introduction to Bioethics (20 cr) HSTM20682 Science, the Media & the Public (20 cr) HSTM20782 The Information Age (20 cr) HSTM20801 From Frankenstein to the Matrix (20 cr) HSTM20982 History of Mathematics (20cr) MCEL Manchester Enterprise Centre units PSYC Psychology units SOCY20022 Sociology of Nature, Environment & Risk UCOL20021 Leadership in Action UCOL20022 Leadership in Action UCOL20031 Leadership in Action (online unit) UCOL20032 Leadership in Action (online unit) UCOL20042 Leadership in Action (online/group work) FURTHER UNIVERSITY COLLEGE UNITS

C C

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

48

Zoology

Biology

Degree Programme in Biology with Science and Society Students take 30 credits compulsory BIOL units (plus Data Handling Skills, Critical Writing Skills and What is Science for?) along with 20 credits of compulsory HSTM units from the Centre for History of Science Technology and Medicine: HSTM20031 From Cholera to AIDS: This History of Infectious Diseases in Europe 1800-2000 HSTM20092 The Crisis of Nature: Issues in Environmental History Optional units must be chosen in addition to make up a total of 120 credits. Degree Programme in Biotechnology Students take 70 credits of compulsory BIOL units (plus Data Handling Skills, Critical Writing Skills and What is Science for?) along with 20 credits of compulsory units from the Manchester Enterprise Centre: MCEL30001 MCEL30012 Tools & Techniques for Enterprise (UG02) Advanced Technology Enterprise (UG03)

Optional untis must be chosen in addition to make up a total of 120 credits. Degree Programme of Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology Students take 50 credits of compulsory BIOL units (plus Tutorial, Data Handling Skills, Critical Writing Skills and What is Science for?) along with 60 credits of compulsory PSYC units from Psychology as follows: PSYC21012 Perception and Action PSYC21021 Topics and Issues in Developmental Psychology PSYC21022 Cognitive Neuroscience PSYC21042 Individual Differences in Mental Health & Wellbeing PSYC21051 Topics and Issues Social Psychology PSYC21061 Statistics and Data Analysis One optional unit must be chosen to make up a total of 120 credits. NB: The British Psychological Society (BPS) sets out accreditation requirements for degree programmes that provide eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Registration of the Society. These may be important if graduates wish to work as a Psychologist or practise Psychology in their future careers. In the case of the Psychology & Neuroscience degree programme, the BPS requirements stipulate completion of a minimum number of course units in Psychology and that the third year project comprises a significant psychology component. Please note that there will be a limited number of such projects available. If students do not have any intention of applying to the BPS for registration, then these constraints do not apply. 47. Withdrawal of units The information provided is correct at the time of publication. The Faculty reserves the right to withdraw or alter units should there be changes in academic staff or insufficient registrations. 48. Transfer between degree programmes Students wishing to change from one programme to another must complete a degree programme change form, which can either be downloaded from the Faculty intranet at www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/studentsupport/supportforms/default.aspx or collected from the Student Support Office (G.483 Stopford). Students must obtain the approval of both the old a nd new Programme Directors. There are, however, some restrictions 49

depending upon which units you have taken (refer to the compulsory units for any programme you may be considering). Please note that there is a deadline of 1st September for completing programme changes for the next academic year. It should be noted that it is not normally possible to transfer into, or out of, the Joint Honours Programme of Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology. Programme changes will be actioned on the student system at the end of the current academic year. 49. External Examiners External Examiners are individuals from another institution or organisation who monitor the assessment processes of the University to ensure fairness and academic standards. They ensure that assessment and examination procedures have been fairly and properly implemented and that decisions have been made after appropriate deliberation. They also ensure that standards of awards and levels of student performance are at least comparable with those in equivalent higher education institutions. External Examiners reports relating to programmes within the Faculty of Life Sciences will be shared with student representatives at the Staff Student Liaison Committee (SSLC), where details of any actions carried out by the Faculty in response to the External Examiners comments will be discussed. Students should contact their student representatives if they require any further information about External Examiners reports or the process for considering them. The External Examiners for each programme are as follows: Programme Anatomical Sciences Biochemistry Biology Biomedical Sciences Biomedical Sciences Biotechnology Cell Biology Cognitive Neuroscience & Psychology Developmental Biology Genetics Medical Biochemistry Microbiology Mneuro Molecular Biology Neuroscience Pharmacology Pharmacology & Physiology Physiology Plant Sciences Zoology External Examiner Prof. Alistair Warren Prof. Tony Wilkinson Dr Martin Speight Dr Richard Tunwell Prof. Craig Roberts Dr Ian Blomfield Prof. Chris Hawes Prof. Frank Sengpiel Prof. Andrew Jarman Prof. Chris Thomas Prof. Tony Wilkinson Dr Ian Blomfield Prof. Frank Sengpiel Prof. Chris Thomas Prof. Frank Sengpiel Prof. Alistair Mathie Prof. Alistair Mathie Prof. Alistair Mathie Prof. Chris Hawes TBC Institution University of Sheffield University of York University of Oxford University College London Strathclyde University University of Kent Oxford Brookes University University of Cardiff University of Edinburgh University of Birmingham University of York University of Kent University of Cardiff University of Birmingham University of Cardiff University of Kent University of Kent University of Kent Oxford Brookes University TBC

Please note that it is inappropriate for students to make direct contact with External Examiners under any circumstances, and in particular with regards to a students individual performance in assessments. Other appropriate mechanisms are available for students, including the Universitys appeals or complaints procedures and the UMSU Advice Centre. In cases where a student does contact an External Examiner directly, External Examiners have been requested not to respond to direct queries. Instead, External Examiners should report the matter to their School contact who will then contact the student to remind them of the other methods available 50

for students. If students have any queries concerning this, they should contact the Student Support Office in the first instance. 50. Course units The following pages provide outlines of the course units on offer in the current academic year. Further information on specific units can be found on the Faculty intranet at https://www.intranet.ls.manchester.ac.uk/education/cm/default.aspx - enter the unit code (e.g. BIOL20000) in the Search Term field and click Find.

51

Highlighted text indicates amendments to the unit specifications since May course unit selection

ACADEMIC TUTORIALS YEAR 2


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Kathryn Hentges (kathryn.hentges@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20000
Semester 1 & 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide all students with the skills associated with their Degree Programme subject and to develop personal transferable skills (such as oral and written communication, personal interaction, team work) which will prove of general use and enhance employability. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will be able to integrate the information obtained in lecture-based units to obtain an overview of their own Degree Programme discipline. Students will become proficient in laboratory report writing, group work and construction and presentation of scientific principles both orally and in writing. Content The unit will normally include at least 15 hours contact with the advisor (for further details see the Second Level Tutorial Handbook). The content will vary between Degree Programmes but may include: abstract writing; essay writing, teamwork; problem solving, group based earning; oral presentations; reading and analysing primary research papers; lab report writing; exam question practice; careers advice Students must complete the Critical Writing Skills (BIOL21701) and Data Handling Skills (BIOL20701) units (see unit profiles for further details). Attendance Attendance is a compulsory element of the Work and Attendance regulations of the Faculty. Students who fail to attend tutorials, have a mean mark for their tutorial assignments of less than 40% and/or fail to exceed 70% in the Critical Writing Skills and Data Handling Skills units, will fail the tutorial unit. Compensation for partial failure of the examinations is available only to students who have passed the Tutorial unit. In addition, students who fail the Tutorial unit are required to complete an assignment during the summer vacation. Assessment Work including essays, problems, learning module exercises and presentation skills will be marked by the academic advisor. Tutorials are also considered to be preparation for the problem & essay papers in the final year. Feedback Students will receive written and verbal feedback from their Academic Advisor for all work submitted for the Tutorial Unit. Students are also encouraged to meet with their Academic Advisor to discuss their written feedback in more detail Employability Skills Oral communication - Students give presentation and regularly have in-class discussions. Written communication - Students prepare multiple essays and other short pieces of written work. Group/Team work - Students complete some assignments as groups and do peer assessments of work. Project management - Students must work on assignments at some sessions without Advisor. Leadership - Students must manage sessions without Advisor to ensure work in completed. Innovation/Creativity - Students explore ethical topics allowing for new ideas. Research - Students must research topic for essays. Analytical skills - Students participate in problem solving exercises. Problem solving - Students participate in problem solving exercises. Pre-/Co-requisites - None. 52

Highlighted text indicates amendments to the unit specifications since May course unit selection

SCIENCE AND SOCIETY RSM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Elizabeth Toon (Elizabeth.toon@manchester.ac.uk)
Aims The programme unit aims to:

BIOL20302
Semester 2 Credits 10

1. Provide the opportunity for students to perform a mini-research project on issues relating to science & society. 2. Introduce students to key sources and methods in HSTM research, including a critical analysis of the limitations of sources and methods. 3. Show students how to write up research results in publication format. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will be able to: Understand the sources and methods used in HSTM research including the use of printed, visual, statistical, material, oral and unpublished sources. Demonstrate familiarity with key methodologies for approaching HSTM source material. Improve academic writing skills including the writing up of research in publication format. Develop interpretative and analytic thinking skills. Practical Content The course will be comprised of two components. First, students will be required to attend weekly lectures/seminars. These sessions will cover the following topics: Reading and note-taking skills Writing strategies in Science & Society Using official and archival sources Using newspapers and magazines Using interviews, oral history and memoirs Using film and fictional media Using images Dealing with controversy

Students will also be required to work on individual projects. This involves individual meetings with a supervisor and intensive supervision on choosing, designing, and writing an HSTM project. Assessment Topic Proposal (10%) Primary Source Bibliography (10 %) Critical analysis of sources - 750 words (30%) Project - 2000 words (50%) Feedback Students receive a face to face meeting with the Unit Coordinator to discuss their work. Employability Skills Oral communication - All sessions are seminar sessions, requiring significant student input. Written communication - Students work on a research project over the whole term, preparing a research proposal, a bibiliography, a primary source critique and an essay. Project management - Students work on a research project over the whole term, preparing a research proposal, a bibiliography, a primary source critique and an essay. 53

Highlighted text indicates amendments to the unit specifications since May course unit selection

Innovation/Creativity - Students work on a research project over the whole term, preparing a research proposal, a bibiliography, a primary source critique and an essay. Research - Students work on a research project over the whole term, preparing a research proposal, a bibiliography, a primary source critique and an essay. Analytical skills - Students work on a research project over the whole term, preparing a research proposal, a bibiliography, a primary source critique and an essay. Problem solving - Students work on a research project over the whole term, preparing a research proposal, a bibiliography, a primary source critique and an essay. Pre-/Co-requisites HSTM10721 Science and the Modern World (Recommended) Teaching Staff Dr Ian Burney, Dr Jeff Hughes, Dr Vladimir Jankovic, Dr David Kirby, Dr Robert Kirk, Dr Neil Pemberton, Dr Julian Simpson, Dr James Sumner, Dr Carsten Timmermann, Dr Elizabeth Toon

54

Highlighted text indicates amendments to the unit specifications since May course unit selection

BIOCHEMISTRY RSM
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Ray O'Keefe (rokeefe@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20312
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To introduce students to biochemical techniques through a defined research project Intended Learning Outcomes The students will have learned to: Examine the structure of an enzyme using molecular graphics Purify an enzyme from cell extracts by different procedures Determine the protein concentration of a solution Determine the specific activity of an enzyme Analyse the purity of a protein preparation by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting Carry out a kinetic analysis on a purified enzyme Use mass spectrometry analysis to identify a purified protein

Practical Content Students will learn the following techniques: Molecular graphics using PC-driven software Use of spectrophotometers Protein concentration assays Affinity chromatography Gel filtration Enzyme assays Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Western blotting Mass spectrometry

Data will be produced during the course of the RSM that will be recorded and analysed. Assessment Assessment will be through a 2 hour written practical test under exam conditions (30%) and a full experimental write-up (70%) composed of an Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussion and References. Feedback Students will receive continuous feedback on their laboratory work during the Unit by the teaching staff. A discussion forum is also available through Blackboard to answer questions and receive feedback from the teaching staff. Detailed feedback on the experimental write-up will be provided via Blackboard. Students are also encouraged to meet with the Coordinator following completion of the Unit to discuss the assessed work. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students asked questions during the practical. Students must also communicate the results of their experiments to the Academic Staff. Written communication - Students are required to keep notes on their experiments. Students must also write up their results in the style of a research paper. Group/Team working - Students work together in groups of 2-3 to carry out their experiments. Project management - Students must decide on particular experiments to try and then organise themselves to carry out the experiments in the alloted time. 55

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Leadership - One group member usually takes the lead in organising the group to carry out experiments. Research - This is a practical course so it is 100% research. Analytical skills - Molecular graphics using PC-driven software. Use of spectrophotometers, Protein concentration assays, Affinity chromatography, Gel filtration, Enzyme assays, Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, Mass spectrometry. Problem solving - If experiments go wrong students must use problem solving to figure out where they went wrong. Prerequisites This Unit is compulsory for all Biochemistry and Medical Biochemistry students and may be selected by other students. Recommended Reading All recommended reading will be made available through Blackboard and a printed manual will be distributed to students on the first day of the Unit which contains background and full description of the practical work. Teaching Staff Dr Josip Lovric, Dr Hui Lu, Dr Ray O'Keefe, Dr Dave Thornton

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CELL BIOLOGY RSM


Unit Coordinator(s): Professor Viki Allan (viki.allan@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20322
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To introduce students to the theory and practice of a selection of commonly-used cell biological research techniques To provide training in experimental design, execution and critical interpretation of data To develop practical skills and team working ability Intended Learning Outcomes Students will develop skills in careful experimental manipulation, design, and organisation. They will gain confidence in recording and interpreting results, and in critical evaluation. Students will work independently and in small groups, aiding development of individual practical skills and teamworking abilities. They will be expected to compare their results with published data and to question conclusions or account for discrepancies. Scope for the design of novel experiments will be provided. Students will be expected to learn detailed concepts related to central aspects of cell biology. Practical Content Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum: In this component, students will undertake a series of experiments designed to examine protein biogenesis at the endoplasmic reticulum and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Yeast will be used as a model system to investigate the how the UPR functions in response to N-glycosylation inhibitors in wild-type and mutant strains. Experimental techniques will include SDS-PAGE, immunodetection, LacZ reporter assays, data analysis and quantification. Protein localisation using green fluorescent protein chimeras: Students will be provided with cDNA constructs encoding a variety of proteins that have been tagged with green fluorescent protein, and will express these by transient transfection of tissue culture cells. The aim will be to determine the localisation of the chimeric molecule with reference to antibodies to a range of subcellular organelles and cytoskeletal structures. Students will design their own experiment to provide further evidence of localisation, by disrupting the structure by drug treatment. Techniques include transient transfection, and the use of antibodies in immunofluorescence microscopy. Tyrosine kinase signalling: Two intracellular tyrosine kinases, Src and FAK, will studied. The aim will be to determine how FAK and Src interact to form a signalling complex. The students will analyse part of this well-characterised signalling pathway using phospho-specific antibodies and expression of mutated forms of each kinase. Both western blotting and immunofluorescence will be used to follow kinase activation. They will also be given key references to help them interpret their data. Assessment 100% coursework - three short written reports plus associated microscope images. Feedback Feedback is provided informally by staff and demonstrators throughout the practical. Feedback where student data will be compared and discussed will be provided in final sessions for each practical. Students will have the opportunity to see their marked and annotated assessed work during a feedback session. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students are encouraged to answer questions during practicals, and to contribute to the final wrap-up sessions where they can describe their experimental results. 57

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Research - Students learn research skills, and apply them to specific problems. They have the opportunity to design and carry out their own experiments. They are expected to read research papers to facilitate their interpretation of data and to plan their own experiments. Analytical skills These are core skills developed throughout the practical. Students will learn to analyse several different types of data, and are encouraged to think critically about their own results. Performing control experiments, and why they are important for data analysis, is a key component of the practical. Problem solving Students will have problems to solve throughout the practical, and will gain hands-on experience when they carry out their own individual experiments . Prerequisites BIOL21121 The Dynamic Cell (Compulsory) This unit is compulsory for all Cell Biology Honours students and may be selected by Biology or Biomedical Sciences students. Recommended Reading Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K & Walter P, Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th edition), 2008, Garland Science Teaching Staff Professor Viki Allan; Dr Andrew Gilmore; Dr Martin Pool; Dr Lisa Swanton

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GENETICS RSM
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Karel Dorey (karel.dorey@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20332
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To introduce students to a selection of modern Genetics research techniques and common model organisms. To provide training in the design of experiments, the analysis and interpretation of data, the presentation of results and the maintenance of a professional lab book. To help students develop relevant practical skills and provide experimental contexts that illustrate some of the theoretical models and concepts that will be taught in BIOL21371 (Organismal Genetics) and BIOL21172 (Principles of Developmental Biology). Intended Learning Outcomes Students will develop skills in experimental design, time management within the laboratory, team working, the analysis and interpretation of data, and the presentation of data. They will also have a working knowledge of several commonly used Genetics techniques. Students will appreciate the need for control experiments and for careful experimental manipulation in order to obtain reliable results. Practical Content Module 1: Using Dictyostelium and E.coli as models to study evolutionary cost and cell competition. Growth and development provide arenas for competition. Cells that grow have a selective advantage with more offspring to pass on that genetic makeup (e.g. antibiotic resistant bacterial strains). Multicellular development can also lead to competition as some cells will die as a result of the differentiation process whilst others survive. Mutations that result in avoiding death will have an evolutionary advantage (cheating). Such developmental advantages will be examined in the social amoeba Dictyostelium and compared to the effects of genetic changes on advantages gained during growth in E. coli. In both cases the evolutionary costs will be measured. Techniques will include the culture of Dictyostelium, -galactosidase staining, microbiological culture and microscopy. Module 2: Genetic linkage and mutation detection in human disease. During this module, students as a team will enter a race to identify a human disease gene, based on linkage analysis of affected families. Upon identification, the gene will then be sequenced to determine the nature of the mutation. Techniques will include: PCR primer design and PCR reactions and analysis by agarose gel electrophoresis; pedigree and genotype analysis; bi-directional fluorescent DNA sequencing and DNA sequence analysis. Module 3: Using Drosophila as a model organism to screen for patterning mutants. This practical will introduce students to genetic screens and demonstrate how they can be used to identify genes which influence development. In addition, the expression of several proteins in developing imaginal discs will be determined by immunohistochemistry. The expression patterns obtained will be compared to the different mutant phenotypes seen in the genetic screen to determine which genes encode the different proteins. Techniques will include dissection of Drosophila larvae, tissue fixation, immunohistochemistry and microscopy. Assessment The unit assessment will vary between modules but will be split (35%; 30%; 35%). In each module assessment will consist of a combination of coursework and individual and group exams taken during class. Current coursework consists of short answer questions and ePBL nodes, assessment of the adequate maintenance of the laboratory notebook, and three formal assessments, including figure presentation and analysis of the results for module 1, a problem set for module 2, and the generation of a composite figure with accompanying legend in publication style for module 3. 59

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Feedback During the practical sessions, there will be many opportunities for you to get feedback from staff or demonstrators on your technical performance. The short answer questions or exercises in the practical manual are there to test your understanding and you should get feedback from staff or demonstrators on your answers. You will get feedback on your overall performance in the form of the final mark for the unit and you will get feedback on the short reports for module 1 and 3. Employability Skills Written communication - You will collate data and describe in powerpoint. You will use statistical analysis to describe data succinctly. Group/Team working - You will work in teams of 2 or 3 to perform experiments. Teamwork will be required to work to a deadline. Project management - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Leadership - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Innovation/Creativity - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Research - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Analytical skills - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Problem solving - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Prerequisites BIOL10221 Molecular Genetics (Compulsory) BIOL10521 Genes, Evolution & Development (Compulsory) BIOL21172 Principles of Developmental Biology (Recommended) BIOL21371 Organismal Genetics (Compulsory) This unit is compulsory for Genetics honours students and may be selected by Biology or Biomedical Science students. Recommended Reading Either Genes VIII (paperback) or Genes IX (hardcover). Griffiths A J F, Miller J H, Suzuki D T, Lewontin R C and Gelbart W M An Introduction to Genetic Analysis (7th edition) 2000 Freeman Fixsen W D Solutions manual for An Introduction to Genetic Analysis (7th edition) 2000 W. H. Freeman Griffiths A J F, Gelbart W M, Miller J H and Lewontin R C Modern Genetic Analysis 1999 W. H. Freeman Ralph Greenspan Fly Pushing : The Theory and Practice of Drosophila Genetics 1997 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Teaching Staff Dr Karel Dorey, Dr Andreas Prokop; Professor Chris Thompson; Dr Kathy Hentges

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GENERAL & MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY RSM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Nicola High (nicky.high@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20342
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To introduce students to laboratory techniques in microbiology for studying bacteria and fungi. To enable students to design experiments and include appropriate controls. To teach students how to analyse, interpret and record data. To teach students to present data in a research paper format. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will have mastered: Aseptic techniques, subculturing and purification of bacterial cultures Examination of stained bacteria in the light microscope How to recognise the colony morphology of bacterial strains Use of spectrophotometers to follow growth of cultures in liquid media Determination of viable counts of bacterial cultures Preparation of solutions and growth media and maintenance of pure cultures Identification of bacterial strains (medical and non-medical) using laboratory tests, commercial biochemical test kits, and 16S rDNA sequencing Design of experiments, including necessary controls. These will include experiments in bacterial genetics that illustrate the principles of antibiotic resistance transfer and experiments on bacterial growth kinetics and physiology. Extraction of total RNA, reverse transcription into cDNA for semi-quantitative analysis of gene expression (semi-quantitative PCR) in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora. Practical Content Week 1 Bacterial genetics: Students will design and carry out an experiment to detect plasmid transfer and plasmid mobilisation in Escherichia coli. Week 2 Bacterial growth & physiology: a) Isolation of halophilic bacteria from various sources e.g. fish skin, salami, soil b) Students will design and carry out an experiment to find the optimum salt concentration for growth of the halophile Vibrio natriegens. Week 3 Bacterial isolation and identification: a) Isolation and enumeration of potential food-poisoning microorganisms in milk. b) Students will compare the heat resistance of the bacterial isolates from milk. Week 4 Fungal growth & physiology: a) Microscopic methods for examining fungi on solid and liquid media. b) Fungi as model organisms: Students will design and conduct experiments that highlight the importance of fungi in elucidating general problems in biology. Assessment 1. Continuous assessment of the four classes by questionnaire (50%) 2. One full practical write-up in the style of a research paper (20%) 3. Practical test (2 hour) under exam conditions after the end of the unit (30%) Feedback All work will be marked, annotated and handed back to students during the exam period.

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Employability Skills Written communication - The students have to write a practical assignment up in the form of a scientific paper Group/Team working - Students carry out the practical in pairs which requires team work Project management - Students have to give some thought to the experiment - devise a protocol and decide what order to do each of the tasks Research - The write up will require reading the literature in order to construct an introduction to the paper and to discuss their results in relation to published findings. Analytical skills - Analysing graphical data produced during the practical Prerequisites This unit is compulsory for Microbiology Honours students. It may be selected by Biology, Biomedical Sciences and Biotechnology students and any one else who has done BIOL10532 and is doing additional microbiology units in the second year. Teaching Staff Dr Christian Heintzen; Dr Nicky High; Dr Dennis Linton

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MOLECULAR BIOLOGY RSM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Sue Crosthwaite (susan.crosthwaite@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20352
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide the opportunity for students to become familiar with specific molecular techniques, to gain confidence planning experiments and working independently in the laboratory. To encourage students to maintain a professional laboratory notebook and to give them experience in writing up their results in publication format. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will develop an understanding of the basis of several commonly used molecular biology techniques and have the confidence to use these in a practical setting to interpret the role of "a gene of interest" in the model eukaryote Neurospora crassa. Students will appreciate the need for good experimental design and laboratory practice. Practical Content The project will characterise a Neurospora gene of unknown function. Week one: Bioinformatic search for protein sequences and functional domains similar to those encoded by the gene of unknown function. Comparison of the overt phenotype of the wild-type and gene deletion strains. Transformation of Neurospora with GFP-tagged gene of interest. Week two: Check identity of strains. Test function of the gene of interest and location of the tagged protein by exposing strains to an appropriate environment (this will depend on the information gathered in week one). Week three: Extract and check the integrity of RNA from control and transformed strains. Week four: RTPCR. Comparison of gene expression in wild-type versus gene deletion strain by

Assessment Students are expected to maintain a lab book that is left in the lab and is available at all times to the demonstrators. The lab book will be marked (50%) and should conform to modern laboratory record keeping standards. In addition a publication-style report of one of the experiments will be marked (50%). Feedback Feedback on the content of lab books will be given at the end of week 2. Generic feedback on the write-up will be posted. Employability Skills Written communication - Students keep a record of their experiments (Lab book) and write up some of their results in the form of an Nucleic Acids Research paper. Group/Team working - Students work at the bench in pairs. Innovation/Creativity - Students are asked to design an experiment based on the knowledge they obtain from bioinformatic analysis of the gene of interest. Research - Students carry out a four week mini project to try to determine the function of a gene. They use several molecular biology techniques and observe good microbiological practice. Analytical skills - Students must describe and analyze: the results of DNA and RNA extraction, a Southern blot, RTPCR products, transformation and protein localization. Problem solving - If students do not get the expected results they must ensure that they understand the procedure well enough to change or discuss possible reasons. 63

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Protocols are intentionally not always comprehensive and some problem solving is required to complete the practical work. Other - Students will gain confidence working in a lab, making solutions, researching protocols, following protocols, setting up experiments, and analyzing the results. Prerequisites This unit is compulsory for Molecular Biology honours students and may be selected by Biology or Biomedical Science students. It is important that these students consult their Programme Director or the Unit Coordinator. Recommended Reading Sambrook J, Fritsch EF & Maniatis T (1989) Molecular cloning: a laboratory manual. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Teaching Staff Dr Sue Crosthwaite, Professor Chris Grant.

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TROPICAL ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION (RSM FIELD COURSE)


Unit Coordinator: Professor Amanda Bamford (Amanda.bamford@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20552
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To study organisms in their natural environment. Experience the experimental, quantitative and analytical approaches used by field-based biologists by conducting a project and compiling a written and verbal report. To apply knowledge gained to assess the conservation issues of natural and semi-natural sites. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will study organisms in their natural tropical environment and gain an understanding of how to plan experiments, collect data and present their work. To understand the basic natural history of key plant and animal taxa in Costa Rica, and be able to identify those importantly associated with tropical ecosystems. Think independently and discuss on environmental and wildlife conservation issues, particularly with regards global sustainability and ethical conservation programmes in tropical environments Field Course Content This 2-week field course takes place in June/July and combines hands-on biological fieldwork with studying conservation-related ecological issues in Costa Rica. The first 7 days are spent experiencing several key places of ecological/conservation interest from the Talamancan Mountain range to the coral reefs off the Caribbean lowlands. Sites chosen highlight climatic and biotic diversity in Costa Rica. Students will be introduced to the practicalities of studying tropical organisms and also witness ecological impact & conservation-related activities firsthand. Study visits include agricultural colleges, wildlife conservation centres, sustainable botanical gardens as well as deforested areas and commercial plantations. Protected areas of national biological importance are also visited, including the Manzanillo Wildlife Refuge, a unique collaboration between local communities and the national park system, where we will visit the extensive coral reef. Fieldwork is an important component of this course, and in the second week, whilst based at La Selva Biological Station students will conduct individual research projects. Importantly, Internet and library facilities are available on site. Students will gain a good understanding of the natural history of local plants and animals in Costa Rica together with the research principles involved in studying tropical organisms in their natural environment. Throughout the course we will consider global conservation concerns and use Costa Rica as a model to evaluate conservation efforts. Assessment Independent project writeup (50%), reflective field notebook (30%), oral report (10%), and students contribution to the field course as a whole (10%). Field Courses require a financial contribution. In cases of financial hardship, you should contact the Senior Advisor as soon as possible. Feedback Oral feedback during course, written feedback on notebook and the final report. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students give a presentation on the final day of the field course. Written communication - Written assessment of project and field note book. 65

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Group/Team working - Students work on projects together. Project management - Students have to complete a project in the last 7 days of fieldcourse. Innovation/Creativity - Creativity in designing the project and also in the field note book, keeping drawings etc. Research - Project is field research. Analytical skills - In writeup students have to show analytical skills. Problem solving - Students design and complete their own project which will require problem solving throughout. Prerequisites None, as background lectures are provided during the course. Teaching Staff Amanda Bamford, Andrew Gray, Dmitri Logunov

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TROPICAL BIOLOGY (RSM FIELD COURSE)


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Richard Preziosi (Richard.Preziosi@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20682
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To study organisms and biodiversity in the natural environment. Presentation of the experimental, quantitative and analytical approaches used in answering biological questions at the organismal and community scale in the field. Intended Learning Outcomes An understanding of: identification of suitable research projects and organisms, design and execution of field based experiments, quantitative data collection, analysis and graphical presentation of data, and the preparation of written and oral reports. Projects usually focus on areas of conservation, biodiversity, community structure and phenotypic adaptation. Field Course Content A three week (approx.) field course in the summer period. The first five days are spent in the cloud forest on the pacific side of the Andes where students conduct small group projects on biodiversity and behaviour. The remainder of the course will take place in an unexploited area of rainforest on the Rio Payamino in Amazonian Ecuador and is hosted by the Payamino Tribe. At Payamino students conduct extended individual field research projects. Several short meetings on logistics, safety and techniques will take place in Manchester before the field course departs. At both locations the following general format is followed. Part 1 - Students explore the area and discuss their research projects. Projects may involve any organism and be in any area of biology as long as an ecological or evolutionary question is being examined. Part 2 - Students design and carry out their research projects. Part 3 - Students screen and analyse their data and prepare their project report. This work is completed using standard computer packages. All students will gain experience in using software for data handling, preparation of figures, statistical analyses and preparation of their report. Part 4 - Students each give a short oral presentation of their project. Recommended texts provided at field centre. Note that this field course takes place at research stations located in remote regions with limited access and communications. Health and safety are a priority and trained first aiders will be present on the course. Field Course RSMs will require a financial contribution to be made early in the first semester of your second year. In cases of financial hardship, you should contact the Senior Advisor as soon as possible. RSM units may NOT be changed, once registered, without the written permission of the RSM Coordinator concerned and the Faculty Senior Advisor. Feedback Oral feedback is provided on an ongoing basis throughout the field course. Written feedback is provided for the final report after the field course. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students give both group and individual presentations of their projects. Written communication - Students prepare a full scientific report of their research project. Group/Team working - Formally, students complete a short group project. Informally, the entire field course relies on the team work of all students. 67

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Project management - Individual research projects are designed and run by the students themselves. This involves formal planning of the experimental design but also requires good time management and attention to logistics. Innovation/Creativity - Students design and run experiments under field conditions that often require innovative approaches to data collection. Research - Students complete 1 short group research project and 1 long individual research project. Analytical skills - Students formally and informally assess both methods and information from their own research and the research of others. Problem solving - Field research rarely goes to plan. Other - Students acquire skills in completing complex tasks under less than ideal environmental and social conditions. Assessment Final written (40%) and oral (20%) individual reports. Cloud forest group projects (20%). A portion of the assessment considers each students contribution to the planning, and the students contribution to the overall success of the field course (10%). A short quiz takes place at the end of the fieldcourse (10%). Assessments are made by staff and, in some cases, by peer and selfassessment. Prerequisites None (enrolment is limited and may depend on prior experience/performance). Teaching Staff Dr Richard Preziosi, Dr Sarah Chan

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DATA HANDLING SKILLS 3


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Martin Steward (martin.steward@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20701
Semester 1 Credits 0

Aims This is the last of three modules that aim to provide experience in scientific calculations, experimental design, data analysis, statistical techniques and the use of scientific software. The module forms an integral part of the tutorial unit for most degree programmes in the Faculty. Intended Learning Outcomes You will be able to use appropriate software: to select and apply appropriate statistical tests; to understand the mathematics of exponential growth and decay; to extract parameter values from experimental data; to modify and make measurements from images; and to search online patent libraries. These skills will help you to prepare your EDM and RSM laboratory reports. Next year they should be useful in your final-year research project or sandwich placement. Lecture Content Parametric statistical tests Dealing with non-parametric data Non-parametric statistical tests Designing experiments and presenting results Growth and decay Transforming data Image analysis using ImageJ Manipulating images in Paint Shop Pro Drawing chemical structures with ISIS/Draw Patents and commercial exploitation Assessment You will undertake weekly exercises within the Blackboard virtual learning environment and enter your answers to both practice and assessed questions on-line. Your cumulative score on the assessed questions must exceed 70% for you to pass the tutorial unit. Feedback You will receive immediate feedback when you submit your answers to the quick quizzes and practice questions, including helpful tips on questions that have been answered incorrectly. You will see your score when you submit your answers to each week's assessment, and also running total and average marks so that you can judge whether you are on target to pass the unit. Weekly clinics provide you with the opportunity to get one-to-one help from a member of staff. Employability Skills Analytical skills - Students have to analyse experimental data. Problem solving - Students have to solve numerical problems relating to the design and execution of experiments and the subsequent analysis and presentation of data. Other - Numeracy, statistical, presentation and software skills. Prerequisites BIOL10701 Data Handling Skills 1 (Compulsory) BIOL10722 Data Handling Skills 2 (Compulsory) Recommended Reading Ennos AR (2012) Statistical and Data Handling Skills in Biology (3rd Edition). Pearson 69

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Phoenix D (1997) Introductory Mathematics for the Life Sciences. CRC Press Aitken MRF, Broadhurst RW & Hladky SB (2010) Mathematics for Biological Scientists. Garland Science

Teaching Staff Dr Martin Steward

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URBAN BIODIVERSITY & CONSERVATION RSM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Giles Johnson (giles.johnson@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20872
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To introduce students to the theory and practice of techniques commonly used by environmental consultants and field-based biologists. To train students in the application of those techniques to assess the conservation value of natural and semi-natural sites. Intended Learning Outcomes At the end of this module students should be able to: assess the nature conservation value of a site, placing this into local, regional & national contexts identify key species of plants and invertebrates found in the local environment and assess the conservation importance of those species to carry out a phase 1 survey of a site and be aware of appropriate techniques for further analysis of urban habitats present conclusions of field surveys in a range of formats, written and oral, suitable for different target audiences Practical Content Biodiversity of polluted and unpolluted aquatic systems (Week 8): Students will carry out assessments of the biodiversity and water quality of aquatic sites in Manchester. Surveys will be carried out in Chorlton Brook, a fast flowing Urban waterway and at Salford Quays, an historically heavily polluted site which has in part been successfully remediated. Detailed field surveys will be undertaken combined with lab based sample analysis to assess the water quality and the ecology of the study sites.. A short report, in the form of a scientific summary, will be required from each student, presenting major findings. Biodiversity in polluted and unpolluted terrestrial sites (Week 9): Students will undertake surveys of two sites in the Greater Manchester region having highly contrasted histories. A Brownfield site (Nob End Local Nature Reserve, Bolton) which has been highly contaminated by previous industrial activities will be surveyed and an assessment made of the plant and invertebrate diversity on the site. This will be contrasted with a relatively uncontaminated site (Mersey Valley Local Nature Reserve, Chorlton). Students will carry out Phase 1 surveys of both sites and make collections of invertebrates and plants from each site for identification in the lab. A phase 1 survey map and max. 1 page summary will be required from each student for each site, summarising the major findings at each site. Project - Habitat survey project (Week 10-11): in the final weeks students will be required to apply the skills gained in the earlier parts of the unit to undertake a survey of a site in the Greater Manchester area. Students will be required to complete a risk assessment for the work to be undertaken, conduct library searches to establish site history, where possible, and then to carry out a detailed survey, assessing the conservation value of different areas of the site, placing this into local, regional and national contexts. Findings will be presented in the form of a short oral presentation in the final session and written report, due to be submitted by the end of Week 12. Assessment 2 page summary of aquatic sites (15%); 2 page summary of terrestrial sites (15%); Group poster presentation on biodiversity of selected site (15%); Group collection of plants and invertebrates (15%); Individual written report of Phase 2 habitat survey of selected site (40%)

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Feedback Reports written during the first 2 weeks will be returned before completion of the final report, with formative feedback being given on these. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students have to present and defend a poster presentation of their work Written communication - 3 written reports written in the style of a professional report Group/Team working - Group based projects Project management - Students identify their own survey site and have to plan their survey Leadership - Individuals within teams have the potential to show leadership Innovation/Creativity - Poster presentations of surveys allow students to demonstrate innovation and creativity. Research - Students perform background research on sites surveyed Analytical skills - Students have to analyse and interpret data collected Problem solving - Students have to work to overcome problems encountered Other - dealing with the public - including communicating with local interest groups and curious passersby Interdisciplinary working - students have to learn aspects of law and social science alongside biology. Prerequisites None Teaching Staff Professor Amanda Bamford, Dr Giles Johnson, Dr Dmitri Logunov, Dr Jennifer Rowntree, Dr Keith White

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CLINICAL SCIENCES RSM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Michelle Keown (michelle.e.keown@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20902
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To introduce students to theory and practice of a selection of commonly used techniques used in both clinical and research laboratories To provide training in experimental design and critical interpretation of data To develop practical skills and team working ability Intended Learning Outcomes Students will: - Develop an understanding of the principles underpinning common clinical diagnostic/research techniques in clinical biochemistry, haematology, pathology and microbiology as well as their respective applications and uses. - Know how to perform various clinical laboratory research techniques in the aforementioned areas and recognise the need for good experimental design and laboratory practice. - Collect, analyse and present data in a format for publication. Practical Content Week 1: Clinical Microbiology Students will be provided with samples of food, implicated in food poisoning outbreaks and a urine sample from a woman suffering from pyelohephritis. Students will be required to identify the bacteria causing these infections using selective media, micrososcopy, biochemical tests and 16srRNA sequencing. A synthetic epidemic will also be modelled and the students will have to use microbiological techniques to identify where the epidemic started. Week 2: Clinical Biochemistry: Students will analyse blood and urine samples from clinical / research scenarios including i) characterisation of human disease (e.g. diabetes and chronic kidney disease), ii) phenotype characterisation of novel transgenic/mutant mice, and iii) clinical drug trial testing. Techniques will include: a) Urinalysis [physical, chemical] - comparison of results with rapid tests such as Clinistix, electrolyte measurements (e.g. phosphate); b) Urinary drug metabolite testing (paracetamol), and c) Blood lipid testing, including serum cholesterol (total, LDL) and triglycerides relative to morphometric measurements (BMI, BP; determination of myocardial infarction risk). Week 3: Clinical Pathology Students will be provided with a number of tumour tissue samples requiring diagnosis. Students will be required to (i) research and design the diagnostic protocol; (ii) conduct the experiments on the sections; and (iii) diagnose the tumours. Techniques include preparation and analysis of H&E sections, histology in the diagnosis of sarcomas, immunohistochemistry, calculation/interpretation of the proliferation index of tumour samples, data interpretation. Week 4: Clinical Haematology Students will investigate the safety and efficacy of new anticoagulant drugs using provided plasma samples. They will generate a test hypothesis and design appropriate experiments including selection of appropriate methodologies, data analysis and interpretation. Standard haematological techniques will include WHO gold standard manual coagulation tests including gross clotting factor levels and specific clotting factor assays. Students will also complete dry lab (group and individual) activities including clinical and research case studies and problem solving. 73

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Assessment 1. Continuous assessment of each week by short answer questions including data analysis and interpretation (50%) 2. Extended write-up in style of a research paper (40%) 3. Laboratory notebook (10%) Feedback During the practical sessions there will be many opportunities for immediate feedback from staff and demonstrators Individual feedback on assessed work Employability Skills Oral communication - Many opportunities to ask and answer questions during all sessions on a one-to-one basis and in small groups. Written communication - Online assessments associated with various practicals/experiments and extended practical write-up (scientific paper style). Group/Team working - Most experiments will involve an element of small group working/team work. Project management - There will be opportunities for project management in various experiments. Leadership - Opportunities for leadership role(s) in various experiments during the 4 weeks. Innovation/Creativity - Many experiments will include an element of innovation where students will be expected to design and plan their actual experiment from start to finish. For e.g. in Pathology and Haematology weeks. Research - All weeks will included a research element beit through wetlab experiments or dry & case study scenarios. Analytical skills - All weeks will involve analysis of data/findings and will include manipulation of data and presentation of this information in many formats. Problem solving - This will be part of all practical experiments in this RSM and also will be incorporated in case studies on some weeks. Prerequisites This unit may be selected by Biomedical Sciences or Biology students. Recommended Reading All recommended reading will be made available through Blackboard and a printed manual will be distributed to students in Week 1 which contains background information and a description of the practical work. Teaching Staff Dr Nicky High, Dr Michelle Keown, Dr Tracey Speake, Dr Donald Ward

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HUMAN ANATOMY RSM


Unit Coordinator: Dr Stefan Gabriel (stefan.gabriel@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20912
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To give students the opportunity to make an 'in depth' investigation in an area of human or comparative anatomy after gaining appropriate skills. To design and devise approaches for the scientific presentation of anatomical findings for research purposes, while working as a member of a team. Intended Learning Outcomes To be able to: Use diverse range of anatomical references and the primary literature Appreciate anatomical variation and know how to evaluate it Conceive and execute a dissection or study a given aspect of human or comparative anatomy Collect, analyse and present data in a format for publication Have an 'in depth' understanding of an aspect of human or comparative anatomy Morphological Research Skills Dissection and observation Working with prosected specimens Living anatomy: surface features; muscle groups; sounds Microscopy and histology Interpreting transverse sections and CT images Evolutionary morphology Geometric morphometrics Anatomical variation and measurement (anthropometry, somatotyping and ergonomics) Mini-project planning Mini-project Students work in groups of 2 to 4 to produce a research study. Most projects will be undertaken in the Dissecting Room in consultation with Anatomy staff but the data for the Morphometric projects may be collected elsewhere. Assessment Morphological research skills practicals (20%) Individual mini-project report (50%) Group PowerPoint presentation (15%) Group show & tell and project performance mark (15%) Feedback For the morphological research skills practicals feedback will be provided during or after the sessions. Group presentation and performance feedback will be given just after the presentation session. Mini-project report feedback will be provided on application after the Easter vacation. Employability Skills Oral communication - Communicating scientific research questions, experimental design and research findings. Written communication - Communicating scientific research, questions, experimental design and research findings.

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Group/Team working - Working in small groups to answer scientific questions through dissection, analysis of CT images, histological slides, collecting and analysing morphometric data, etc. Project management - Establishing research questions and managing time, direction and methodology appropriately to answer them during the mini-projects. Leadership - The mini-projects are intended to be collaborative efforts for groups of two to four students. Nevertheless, some students may embrace a leadership role whilst undertaking them. Innovation/Creativity - Students are given a project outline. After that it is up to them to come up with scientific questions and devise ways to answer them through research. Research - Students carry out mini-projects which allow them to come up with and test scientific questions using methodologies appropriate to anatomical research including dissection, landmark analyses, etc. Analytical skills - Students have to analyse their quantitative data using appropriate statistical tests. They also have to consider which is the best way to present that data verbally, through prose and in graphical form. Problem solving - They have to ask scientific questions and work out how to collect repeatable data to answer them, how to test that data, how best to analyse that data, and then how to interpret their findings. Other - How to carry out blunt and sharp dissection; perform geometric morphometric landmark analyses; interpret CT scans; investigate pathologies using histology; develop an understanding of ergonomics; and answer evolutionary questions using anatomical data. Prerequisites BIOL10811 Body Systems (Compulsory) BIOL21061 Human Sciences EDM (Recommended) BIOL21291 Human Anatomy & Histology (Compulsory) Recommended Reading Gosling, J.A. (2008). Atlas of Human Anatomy (5th edition). Mosby. (Recommended) th Kardong, K.V. (2012). Vertebrates: comparative anatomy, function, evolution (6 edition). McGraw-Hill. (Recommended) Lieberman, D. (2011). The Evolution of the Human Head. Belknap Press. (Further Reading) Moore K.L., Dalley A.F. & Agur A.M.R. (2009). Clinically Oriented Anatomy (6th edition). Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. (Recommended) Pansky B. & Gest T.R. (2011). Lippincott's Concise Illustrated Anatomy: Back, Upper Limb and Lower Limb. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. (Recommended) Snell, R.S. (2011). Clinical Anatomy by regions (9th edition). Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. (Recommended) Teaching Staff Dr Bip Choudhury, Dr Stefan Gabriel, Dr Niggy Gouldsborough, Professor Chris Klingenberg, Dr Fran Shaw, Dr Toki Takahashi

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NEUROSCIENCE RSM
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Fred Cody (fred.cody@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20922
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide practical experience of a range of techniques and data analytical procedures relevant to current neuroscience research. The techniques will mainly be drawn from the disciplines of anatomy, pharmacology and physiology. Students will have the opportunity to work with a variety of biological preparations, from cells to whole humans, and with interactive computer simulations. Intended Learning Outcomes To be proficient in the use of a range of technical skills, including the application of selected electrophysiological, psychophysical, biochemical and histological methods, and to possess the abilities to find and understand information, to analyse complex data sets and to write scientific reports. Practical Content Neurophysiology computer simulations Virtual rat (Sniffy) behaviour Ligand binding to brain receptors Microglial cell activation, IL-1 and cell death Neuroanatomy of sensory pathways Human neuroanatomy Human visual function the Electroretinogram Nitrous oxide and human performance

Feedback Written comments on assessment exercises and lab reports and Feedback session with staff in lecture theatre Employability Skills Oral communication - Students are encouraged to answer questions during experimental classes. Written communication - Students write a detailed report of a laboratory experiment and a series of short note answers to questions on each of 9 practical classes. Group/Team working - Students work in small groups (3-4) when undertaking a range of laboratory experiments and associated data analyses. Project management - Small groups of students collaborate in the design, running and analysis of a series of laboratory experiments, allocating different tasks amongst group members. Leadership - Different members of small groups are encouraged to take the leadership role for coordinating the running of different experiments. Innovation/Creativity - Students are encouraged to design experiments to test specific hypotheses. Research - The unit is based on students performing a series of laboratory research experiments to collect novel data that allow biological hypotheses to be tested. Analytical skills - Students undertake both experimental laboratory and data analyses. Problem solving - Students undertake assessments based on solving both numerical and conceptual problems. Other - Computer and IT skills in running and analysing laboratory experiments.

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Assessment Short reports on individual classes (50%) and one full practical write-up (50%) Prerequisites BIOL10832 Excitable Cells (Compulsory) BIOL21332 Motor Systems (Compulsory) BIOL21341 Sensory Systems (Compulsory) Teaching Staff Professor Stuart Allan, Professor Richard Baines, Dr Fred Cody, Professor Rob Lucas, Prof Simon Luckman, Professor Cathy McCrohan, Dr Niall McLoughlin, Dr Emmanuel Pinteaux, Dr Ingo Schiessl

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PHARMACOLOGY RSM
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Richard Prince (richard.prince@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20932
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide practical experience of research methods used in the discovery of drugs, from initial ideas through to full clinical use in man. Intended Learning Outcomes To: Understand methods used in drug discovery and development Improve technical skills Find and understand information Analyse complex data sets Write scientific reports Practical Content Radioligand binding assay: competition and saturation binding assay using [3HQNB. Computer methods for drug discovery: prediction of drug potency using molecular modelling software. Practical data analysis: graphing and analysing experimental data using Graphpad Prism software. Schild analysis: students will study the interaction of methacholine and atropine analogues in guinea pig ileum. Team case study: students will research and present the pharmacological effects, mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of a clinically important drug. Simple kinetics: exploration of basic concepts in pharmacokinetics using a simple hydraulic model. Toxicity testing: students will test drugs for toxicity using a Daphnia model system. Nitrous oxide and human performance: in this practical students will be introduced to the ethical considerations and subject care required in volunteer studies. Drug mechanisms in human skin: students will investigate the effects of local anaesthetics on human skin and drug effects on the Lewis Triple Response. Metabolism of paracetamol in human volunteers. Animal tissue practicals Assessment ePBL mcqs (10%) Short note questions+ lab books (40%) Full practical write-up (40%) Group presentation (10%) Feedback Feedback will be provided via annotated practical write-ups and verbal advice on practical techniques during classes. Employability Skills discipline specific laboratory skills, knowledge of drug discovery strategies Oral communication - Group based oral and written presentations on novel drugs. Written communication - Group based oral and written presentations on novel drugs, practical reports. Group/Team working - All practicals are done in groups 79

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Research - Group based oral and written presentations on novel drugs Analytical skills - Extensive data handling and analysis required to write up practicals Problem solving - Extensive data handling and analysis required to write up practicals Other - Practical lab skills Prerequisites BIOL21302 Clinical Drug Development (Compulsory) Teaching Staff Dr Shazia Chaudhry, Dr Liz Fitzgerald, Dr Gillian Edwards, Dr Michelle Keown, Dr Richard Prince, Dr Tracey Speake, Dr. Niall McLoughlin,

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PHYSIOLOGY RSM
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Tristan Pocock (tristan.pocock@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20942
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide the opportunity for students to perform human volunteer practicals, an exercise project and to study cell physiological methods. To give the students experience in: data presentation, use of some standard statistical analyses and writing up results in publication format. Intended Learning Outcomes To be able to devise, perform, analyse and write up in publication format a mini research project relating to the human response to exercise. To be able to perform a range of experiments using standard physiological techniques, to learn the need for good experimental technique, laboratory practise and for control experiments. To use statistical techniques to analyse data. Practical Content Students will be allocated a mini-research project on an aspect of the human response to exercise. A minimum of 2 experimental days will be spent working on this project. Further days will be devoted to: studying solute transport across the gut epithelium, investigating the effects of changes in motor nerve stimulus parameters on skeletal muscle contraction using the frog sciatic-gastrocnemius preparation; examining physiological CAL simulations of electrophysiological techniques, and determining the control of ventilation by changes in blood gas concentrations. A significant element of the unit is a series of practicals in which ion channels tagged with green fluorescent protein are transiently expressed in mammalian cells in culture. Fluorescence microscopy is then used to determine channel localization in the cells. An RSM manual will be provided and will contain further recommended reading. The miniresearch project will require the students to do a short literature search. Assessment Students will write up their mini-research project in the style of a published paper, which will contribute 40% of the unit mark. The remaining 60% of marks will be derived from completion of worksheets accompanying the other practical classes. Feedback Marks and comments on worksheets, most of which will be returned during the RSM. The miniproject report will be returned with annotations and a completed mark sheet before the end of the semester. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students give small group presentations about their exercise projects to the rest of the group. Written communication - Students are expected to write a report of their exercise project + short answer questions based on the other practical sessions. Group/Team working - Students work in groups of 10-12 to conduct exercise projects and 3-4 for control of breathing practicals. Project management - Students are expected to design their own experiments (with advice from staff) and to manage their own time in the lab. Leadership - A member of the group needs to ensure that experiments are conducted on time and in an appropriate manner. Innovation/Creativity - Students are free to design their own study (within the constraints of the ethical approval). 81

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Research - Students conduct research projects which aim to test a hypothesis they have thought up. Analytical skills - The report is expected to contain data which has been analysed using appropriate statistical tests. There are several parts of the practical work which require data handling. Problem solving - Questions associated with each practical. Other - This unit gives students a good grounding in some basic physiological principles, as well as designing experiments using human volunteers. Prerequisites The unit is aimed at students on the Degree Programmes of Physiology and Pharmacology/Physiology. It may also be of interest to those studying Biomedical Sciences and Biology. BIOL10832 Excitable Cells (Compulsory) BIOL21141 Cell Membrane Structure & Function (Recommended) OR BIOL21321 Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters (Recommended)

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Recommended Reading Staff will recommend reviews about some of the cell physiological methods employed. Students will be expected to perform literature searches as part of the mini-project. Teaching Staff Dr Peter Brown, Dr Jason Bruce, Dr Liz Fitzgerald, Dr Michelle Keown, Dr Peter March, Dr Tristan Pocock, Dr Elizabeth Sheader, Dr Martin Steward

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DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY RSM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Karel Dorey (karel.dorey@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL20972
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To introduce students to a selection of modern Developmental Biology research techniques. To provide training in the design of experiments, the analysis and interpretation of data, and presentation of results. To help students develop relevant practical skills, teamworking skills and provide experimental contexts that illustrate some of the theoretical models and concepts that will be taught in BIOL10521 Genes, Evolution & Development and BIOL21172 (Principles of Developmental Biology). Intended Learning Outcomes Students will develop skills in experimental design, time management within the laboratory, team working, the analysis and interpretation of data, and the presentation of data. They will also have a working knowledge of several commonly used Developmental Biology techniques. Students will appreciate the need for control experiments and for careful experimental manipulation in order to obtain reliable results. Practical Content Pattern formation, cell growth and competition: Growth and development provide arenas for competition. Cells that grow have a selective advantage with more offspring to pass on that genetic makeup (e.g. antibiotic resistant bacterial strains). Multicellular development can also lead to competition as some cells will die as a result of the differentiation process whilst others survive. Mutations that result in avoiding death will have an evolutionary advantage (cheating). Such developmental advantages will be examined in the social amoeba Dictyostelium and compared to the effects of genetic changes on advantages gained during growth in E. coli. In both cases the evolutionary costs will be measured. Techniques will include the culture of Dictyostelium, -galactosidase staining, microbiological culture and microscopy. Role of growth factor signalling in mesoderm induction: In this practical, Xenopus embryos will be used to assess the role of TGF and FGF signalling in mesoderm induction. We will analysed the effect of inhibiting TGF and FGF signalling using small chemical inhibitors in early Xenopus embryos and activating the TGF pathway in nave animal cap cells with the ActivinB ligand. The effects of the different treatments will be analysed at the phenotypical level and by monitoring the expression of genes specific for different tissues type by RT PCR. Techniques will include in vitro fertilisation, raising Xenopus tadpoles, the ex vivo culture of embryonic tissues, RNA extraction and RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining of Drosophila imaginal discs and screening for patterning mutants: This practical will introduce students to genetic screens and demonstrate how they can be used to identify genes which influence development. In addition, the expression of several proteins in developing imaginal discs will be determined by immunohistochemistry. The expression patterns obtained will be compared to the different mutant phenotypes seen in the genetic screen to determine which genes encode the different proteins. Techniques will include dissection of Drosophila larvae, tissue fixation, immunohistochemistry and microscopy. Assessment The unit assessment will vary between modules but will be split (35%; 30%; 35%). In each module assessment will consist of a combination of coursework and individual and group exams taken during class. Current coursework consists of short answer questions and ePBL nodes, assessment of the adequate maintenance of the laboratory notebook, and three formal assessments, including figure presentation and analysis of the results for module 1, presentation of data for module 2, and the generation of a composite figure with accompanying legend in publication style for module 3. 83

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Feedback During the practical sessions, there will be many opportunities for you to get feedback from staff or demonstrators on your technical performance. The short answer questions or exercises in the practical manual are there to test your understanding and you should get feedback from staff or demonstrators on your answers. You will get feedback on your overall performance in the form of the final mark for the unit and should get feedback on the short reports for each module. Employability Skills Written communication - You will collate data and describe in powerpoint. You will use statistical analysis to describe data succinctly. Group/Team working - You will work in teams of 2 or 3 to perform experiments. Teamwork will be required to work to a deadline. Project management - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Leadership - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Innovation/Creativity - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Research - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Analytical skills - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Problem solving - You will develop skills in experimental design to plan experiments and work together to tackle problems. Design will be modified based on the results to try to achieve desired outcomes. Prerequisites BIOL10521 Genes, Evolution & Development (Compulsory) BIOL21172 Principles of Developmental Biology (Compulsory) BIOL21371 Organismal Genetics (Recommended) This is a compulsory unit for Developmental Biology honours students but may also be selected by Biology and Biomedical Sciences honours students. Teaching Staff Professor Enrique Amaya, Dr Karel Dorey, Dr Andreas Prokop, Professor Christopher Thompson

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THE BIOLOGY OF BEING HUMAN


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Caroline Bowsher (caroline.bowsher@manchester.ac.uk)
Aims

BIOL20982
Semester 2 Credits 10

To develop and criticize biological theories of how humans became so different from other animals To explore implications of these theories for human origins, history and social properties

Note: This unit has restricted numbers and a selection process may be necessary following initial registration in September. As such prompt registration for this unit is essential. Any selection process implemented will take place in week1/2 of Semester 3 and this unit will therefore not be available for selection during the Semester 4 course unit change period. Intended Learning Outcomes Understand evolutionary theories of animal social behaviour and the application of these theories to humans Learn how scientific theories are developed and aggressively tested against empirical evidence Lecture Content There are 24 lectures covering: Human uniqueness Behaviour of humans in comparison with other species. Co-operative behaviour, kinselected and kin-independent behaviours; sexual behaviour; childhood Evolution of humans, including the fossil record Development of language Humans as social animals; development of warfare, the state and co-operation

Methods of Delivery This unit is delivered by distance learning from Stony Brook University, Long island, USA. There are videoed lectures, downloadable charts and animations, weekly e-quizzes and a interactive discussion board plus access to past examination papers. Students will be supplied a password and user name to a URL containing the lectures and access the interactive material via Microlab 1 or their own PC. Feedback Though the course is online, interactions with instructors are extensive. Online asynchronous discussions are continuous and instructors participate. Students debate each other on the discussion boards and also receive peer review of their posts. This debate and review includes discussions with students from the United States. Students are also given extensive feedback for correct and incorrect answers on all equizzes and the extensive array of study questions. Live, online videoconference review sessions are held before each examination. Teleconferenced office hours are available on an appointment basis. Employability Skills Oral communication - Live online video conference review sessions are held before each examination. This allows students to discuss learning and understanding with each other and with academics. Written communication - There is an interactive discussion board used throughout the unit. Students debate with each other on discussion boards and also receive peer reviews of their posts. Group/Team working - Students debate with each other on discussion boards and also receive peer reviews of their posts. 85

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Project management - The course is assessed by a combination of exams, e-quizzes and contribution to discussion boards. These all involve deadlines and the students must manage their time effectively to meet these deadlines. Innovation/Creativity - Students debate with each other on discussion boards and also receive peer reviews of their posts. These discussions involve assimilating, reviewing and processing novel information and provides scope for both innovation and creativity. Research - Students debate with each other on discussion boards and also receive peer reviews of their posts. To achieve this it is necessary to independently research and review available literature on the lecture topics. Analytical skills - Throughout the unit students will be presented with information which they will have to analyse. Problem solving - Examinations and e-quizzes based on problem solving. Assessment Three examinations consisting of multiple choice questions spaced out at equal intervals through the unit. The unit mark will be based on the final MCQ examination plus student choice of their 3 highest scores from: exam 1, exam 2, e-quizzes and contribution to discussion board. Pre-/Co-requisites None. Recommended Reading Bingham & Souza, Death from a Distance & the Birth of a Humane Universe (2009) Booksurge Publishing Teaching Staff Professor Paul Bingham, Dr Caroline Bowsher, Dr Joanne Souza

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MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY EDM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Shazia Chaudhry & Dr Mark Ashe (shazia.chaudhry@manchester.ac.uk, mark.ashe@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21041
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims Experimental Design Modules (EDMs) aim to equip students with the skills necessary to become proficient in a number of laboratory techniques that are carried out routinely in modern laboratories. EDMs place an emphasis on the design and interpretation of experiments, building the expertise and knowledge that will be required to undertake the appropriate Research Skills Modules offered in the second semester. Intended Learning Outcomes This unit will allow students to become proficient in making experimental choices enabling them to make amendments to technical protocols, analysing and critiquing research papers appropriate to the practical and using specialised laboratory equipment and procedures required to obtain data. Many practicals will consist of an element of data handling techniques, including statistical analysis and appropriate presentation of results. Practical Content During Phase I sessions, students will undertake a series of practicals that will comprise widely used modern techniques. Phase II practicals aim to train students in the basic techniques and approaches that are relevant to their chosen specialist degree subject, as determined by their programme director. Phase I PCR & Molecular Cloning - D. Boam Clone Analysis - S. Chaudhry Protein Analysis - J. Bella Bioinformatics - D. Robertson Phase II Signalling Pathways/ Sub-Cellular Protein Relocalisation I - M. Ashe Signalling Pathways/ Sub-Cellular Protein Relocalisation II M. Ashe/ P.Woodman Signalling Pathways/ Sub-Cellular Protein Relocalisation III - P. Woodman Assessment Students will be assessed using a combination of online and in-lab assessments for Phase I and II. In addition, students will be required to complete a full experimental report for one practical as determined by their academic advisor. Marks will be distributed between the assessments (80%) and the full write-up (20%). NB Attendance at all practical and lecture sessions is compulsory. Missing a practical without satisfactory explanation will result in a loss of 10% of the total unit score for each missed practical. Missing more than 3 practicals for whatever reason will trigger a meeting with the senior advisor. A mark of at least 40% is required to pass this unit. Failure of this unit will result in a loss of compensation for other failed second year examinations and a resit assessment. Feedback During the practical sessions, there will be many opportunities to get immediate feedback from staff and demonstrators. Phase I and II feedback sessions will be given as separate one hour lectures. Individual feedback on laboratory reports will be provided by your academic advisor. Employability Skills Written communication - Practical write-up of one practical. 87

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Group/Team working - Many experiments require an element of group work. Most practicals involve students working in pairs. Project management - Project management skills are developed throughout this unit. Innovation/Creativity - Designing experimental methodology. Research - Research skills are developed throughout this unit. Analytical skills - Students develop analytical and problem-solving skills in order to fulfil the experimental design aspects of each practical. Problem solving - As above Prerequisites None Teaching Staff Dr Mark Ashe, Dr Jordi Bella, Dr David Boam, Dr Shazia Chaudhry, Professor David Robertson, Professor Philip Woodman

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ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY EDM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Shazia Chaudhry & Professor Amanda Bamford (shazia.chaudhry@manchester.ac.uk, amanda.bamford@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21051
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims Experimental Design Modules (EDMs) aim to equip students with the skills necessary to become proficient in a number of laboratory techniques that are carried out routinely in modern laboratories. EDMs place an emphasis on the design and interpretation of experiments, building the expertise and knowledge that will be required to undertake the appropriate Research Skills Modules offered in the second semester. Intended Learning Outcomes This unit will allow students to become proficient in making experimental choices enabling them to make amendments to technical protocols, analysing and critiquing research papers appropriate to the practical and using specialised laboratory equipment and procedures required to obtain data. Many practicals will consist of an element of data handling techniques, including statistical analysis and appropriate presentation of results. Practical Content During Phase I sessions, students will undertake a series of practicals that will comprise widely used modern techniques. Phase II practicals aim to train students in the basic techniques and approaches that are relevant to their chosen specialist degree subject, as determined by their programme director. Phase I PCR & Molecular Cloning - D. Boam Clone Analysis - S. Chaudhry Protein Analysis - J. Bella Bioinformatics - D. Robertson Phase II The effects of antibiotics on batch culture growth of E. coli N. High Embryonic anatomy and physiology - this practical will require the use of live chick embryos at a very early developmental stage (3 days) K. Brennan Developmental and environmental influences on plant Crassulacean Acid Metabolism A. Bamford Assessment Students will be assessed using a combination of online and in-lab assessments for Phase I and II. In addition, students will be required to complete a full experimental report for one practical as determined by their academic advisor. Marks will be distributed between the assessments (80%) and the full write-up (20%). NB Attendance at all practical and lecture sessions is compulsory. Missing a practical without satisfactory explanation will result in a loss of 10% of the total unit score for each missed practical. Missing more than 3 practicals for whatever reason will trigger a meeting with the senior advisor. A mark of at least 40% is required to pass this unit. Failure of this unit will result in a loss of compensation for other failed second year examinations and a resit assessment. Feedback During the practical sessions, there will be many opportunities to get immediate feedback from staff and demonstrators. Phase I and II feedback sessions will be given as separate one hour lectures. Individual feedback on laboratory reports will be provided by your academic advisor. 89

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Employability Skills Written communication - Short answers online and full write-up of one practical Group/Team working - Work in pairs in the lab Innovation/Creativity - In some labs students have the opportunity to design their own experiment Analytical skills - Lab skills and analysis of outcomes Problem solving - Analysis of data from experiments to answer online questions Other - Lab skills Prerequisites None Teaching Staff Professor Amanda Bamford, Dr Jordi Bella, Dr David Boam, Professor Keith Brennan, Dr Shazia Chaudhry, Dr Nicola High, Professor David Robertson

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HUMAN SCIENCES EDM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Shazia Chaudhry & Dr Donald Ward (shazia.chaudhry@manchester.ac.uk, donald.t.ward@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21061
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims Experimental Design Modules (EDMs) aim to equip students with the skills necessary to become proficient in a number of laboratory techniques that are carried out routinely in modern laboratories. EDMs place an emphasis on the design and interpretation of experiments, building the expertise and knowledge that will be required to undertake the appropriate Research Skills Modules offered in the second semester. Intended Learning Outcomes This unit will allow students to become proficient in making experimental choices enabling them to make amendments to technical protocols, analysing and critiquing research papers appropriate to the practical and using specialised laboratory equipment and procedures required to obtain data. Many practicals will consist of an element of data handling techniques, including statistical analysis and appropriate presentation of results. Practical Content During Phase I sessions, students will undertake a series of practicals that will comprise widely used modern techniques. Phase II practicals aim to train students in the basic techniques and approaches that are relevant to their chosen specialist degree subject, as determined by their programme director. Phase I PCR & Molecular Cloning - D. Boam Clone Analysis - S. Chaudhry Protein Analysis - J. Bella Bioinformatics - D. Robertson Phase II Effects of Ethanol on Performance E. Pinteaux Diabetic Retinopathy S. Gabriel Human Neurophysiology F. Cody Human Neuroanatomy N. Gouldsborough & B. Choudhury Immunoblotting and Immunochemistry D. Ward Biostatistics D. Ward Assessment Students will be assessed using a combination of online and in-lab assessments for Phase I and II. In addition, students will be required to complete a full experimental report for one practical as determined by their academic advisor. Marks will be distributed between the assessments (80%) and the full write-up (20%). NB Attendance at all practical and lecture sessions is compulsory. Missing a practical without satisfactory explanation will result in a loss of 10% of the total unit score for each missed practical. Missing more than 3 practicals for whatever reason will trigger a meeting with the senior advisor. A mark of at least 40% is required to pass this unit. Failure of this unit will result in a loss of compensation for other failed second year examinations and a resit assessment. Feedback During the practical sessions, there will be many opportunities to get immediate feedback from staff and demonstrators. Phase I and II feedback sessions will be given as separate one hour lectures. Individual feedback on laboratory reports will be provided by your academic advisor. 91

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Employability Skills Written communication - Practical write-up of one practical. Group/Team working - Many experiments require an element of group work. Most practicals involve students working in pairs. Project management - Project management skills are developed throughout this unit. Innovation/Creativity - Designing experimental methodology. Research - Research skills are developed throughout this unit. Analytical skills - Students develop analytical and problem-solving skills in order to fulfil the experimental design aspects of each practical. Problem solving - As above Prerequisites None Teaching Staff Dr Jordi Bella, Dr David Boam, Dr Shazia Chaudhry, Dr Bip Choudhury, Dr Fred Cody, Dr Stefan Gabriel, Dr Niggy Gouldsborough, Dr Emmanuel Pinteaux, Professor David Robertson, Dr Donald Ward

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PHYSIOLOGY & BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES EDM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Shazia Chaudhry & Dr Steve Bidey (shazia.chaudhry@manchester.ac.uk, steve.bidey@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21071
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims Experimental Design Modules (EDMs) aim to equip students with the skills necessary to become proficient in a number of laboratory techniques that are carried out routinely in modern laboratories. EDMs place an emphasis on the design and interpretation of experiments, building the expertise and knowledge that will be required to undertake the appropriate Research Skills Modules offered in the second semester. Intended Learning Outcomes This unit will allow students to become proficient in making experimental choices enabling them to make amendments to technical protocols, analysing and critiquing research papers appropriate to the practical and using specialised laboratory equipment and procedures required to obtain data. Many practicals will consist of an element of data handling techniques, including statistical analysis and appropriate presentation of results. Practical Content During Phase I sessions, students will undertake a series of practicals that will comprise widely used modern techniques. Phase II practicals aim to train students in the basic techniques and approaches that are relevant to their chosen specialist degree subject, as determined by their programme director. Phase I PCR & Molecular Cloning - D. Boam Clone Analysis - S. Chaudhry Protein Analysis - J. Bella Bioinformatics - D. Robertson Phase II Effects of Ethanol on Performance E. Pinteaux Oral Glucose Tolerance Test S. Bidey Human Neurophysiology F. Cody Immunoassay of Testosterone S. Bidey Immunoblotting and Immunochemistry D. Ward Biostatistics D. Ward Assessment Students will be assessed using a combination of online and in-lab assessments for Phase I and II. In addition, students will be required to complete a full experimental report for one practical as determined by their academic advisor. Marks will be distributed between the assessments (80%) and the full write-up (20%). NB Attendance at all practical and lecture sessions is compulsory. Missing a practical without satisfactory explanation will result in a loss of 10% of the total unit score for each missed practical. Missing more than 3 practicals for whatever reason will trigger a meeting with the senior advisor. A mark of at least 40% is required to pass this unit. Failure of this unit will result in a loss of compensation for other failed second year examinations and a resit assessment. Feedback During the practical sessions, there will be many opportunities to get immediate feedback from staff and demonstrators. Phase I and II feedback sessions will be given as separate one hour lectures. Individual feedback on laboratory reports will be provided by your academic advisor. 93

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Employability Skills Written communication - Practical write-up of one practical. Group/Team working - Many experiments require an element of group work. Most practicals involve students working in pairs. Project management - Project management skills are developed throughout this unit. Innovation/Creativity - Designing experimental methodology. Research - Research skills are developed throughout this unit. Analytical skills - Students develop analytical and problem-solving skills in order to fulfil the experimental design aspects of each practical. Problem solving - As above Prerequisites None Teaching Staff Dr Jordi Bella, Dr Steve Bidey, Dr David Boam, Dr Shazia Chaudhry, Dr Fred Cody, Dr Emmanuel Pinteaux, Professor David Robertson, Dr Donald Ward

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DISSERTATION
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Bipasha Choudhury (bipasha.choudhury@manchester.ac.uk)
Aims 1. Literature searching to research a specific scientific topic. 2. Interpretation and analysis of scientific literature. 3. Scientific writing to enable production of a comprehensive literature review. 4. Allow students to explore in depth a topic that is of interest to them. Intended Learning Outcomes Students should: be able to understand in depth a scientific area of interest to the student be able to critically appraise research papers develop literature searching skills develop scientific writing skills develop lay writing skills (abstract) develop organisational and time management skills develop oral presentation skills (in tutorials) develop written and oral communication skills

BIOL21092
Semester 2 Credits 10

Lecture / Practical Content The dissertation is a unique opportunity for the student to investigate an area of life sciences that is of interest to them. There will be a list of available topics from which students will make their top 8 preferred choices. Most students will be allocated one of these topics and through discussion with their supervisor be expected to conduct a comprehensive literature review on one aspect of the allocated topic. Assessment Literature review - maximum 9 pages, excluding references (100%) You must obtain a mark of no less than 40% to pass the dissertation. Failure or lack of submission of a dissertation will result in loss of compensation for any other failed units and you will be required to re-submit a dissertation over the summer vacation to obtain the relevant credits. Note: a re-submitted dissertation must achieve a mark of 40% or greater but the mark from the original submission will be used in calculating the marks carried forward to the final year. Feedback Dissertations to be marked using Grademark. Feedback and marks to be returned to students on blackboard. Employability Skills Written communication - Students are expected to produce a comprehensive literature review (9 pages in length) on a topic that interests them. Research - Students are expected to carry out an extensive literature review using scientific databases, read scientific papers and then produce a comprehensive literature review on that topic. Analytical skills - Each paper found during the literature search must be read and critically analysed. Students must think about the reliability of the findings of the paper. Other - Organisational and time management skills. Prerequisites - None Teaching Staff - All FLS Academic staff 95

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GENOME MAINTENANCE & REGULATION


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr David Boam (dave.boam@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21101
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims To provide a general overview of how a genome is maintained and regulated in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This will be achieved using an example and paradigm-orientated approach, emphasising common themes related to mechanism. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will be expected to have basic knowledge and understanding of: The mechanisms by which prokaryotes and eukaryotes detect and repair DNA damage Genome regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational levels Regulation of DNA replication during cell growth and interaction with transcription and DNA repair processes Recombination and mobile gene elements, and their roles in genome function and evolution Genome structure including nuclear and organelle genomes and implications for regulation Lecture Content Gene regulation in prokaryotes o Promoter architecture, regulatory networks, gene regulation and signalling by nutrients and stress in prokaryotes; roles of RNA in prokaryotic gene regulation Gene regulation in eukaryotes o Sequence-specific transcription factors families; mechanisms of transcriptional stimulation coactivators, repressors and chromatin remodelling; signalling to the nucleus; tissue-specific and developmental gene regulation o The co-transcriptional regulation of mRNA processing; generating the transcriptome - alternative splicing, mRNA turnover, RNA interference; RNA nucleocytoplasmic export and the control of mRNA localization o The mechanism and control of eukaryotic protein synthesis DNA replication - basic models of regulation during cell growth in yeast and higher eukaryotes, bacterial and viral DNA replication Mechanisms of DNA repair error-prone, recombination, transcription-coupled excision repair; detection of DNA damage in eukaryotes and prokaryotes Horizontal gene transfer - transduction, transformation, conjugation; DNA segregation. Transposons and retroviruses; their effect on genome evolution, organisation and function Organelle genomes, evolution, composition, regulation and maintenance

eLearning Activity eLearning modules with both formative and summative online assessment; group based ePoster activities Assessment 1hour 45 minute written examination (90%), problem-based eLearning exercises (5%), and a group-based ePoster presentation (5%). 96

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Feedback Online MCQs based on lectures will allow students to practice MCQs and obtain continuous formative feedback on their own progress and understanding. Electronically marked components of the unit assessment allow students to monitor their own progress. An online discussion forum is available for communication between students and staff. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students are encouraged to ask questions during lectures. Written communication - Examination and eposter activity. Group/Team working - Students take part in an online eposter activity in groups of 4. Project management - Students must manage and participate in their groups to submit the poster by a fixed deadline. Leadership - There is the opportunity to develop these skills as part of the eposter exercise. Innovation/Creativity - Opportunity for these skills to be developed through the eposter exercise. Research - Eposter exercise, exam and eLearning assignments. Analytical skills - eLearning assignments and exam include data handling problems. Problem solving - eLearning assignments and exam include data handling problems. Prerequisites BIOL10212 Biochemistry (Recommended); BIOL10221 Molecular Genetics (Compulsory) Recommended Reading Watson et al., Molecular Biology of the Gene (6th edition) 2008. Pearson Lewin B, Genes X (10th edition) 2011. Jones and Bartlett Teaching Staff Dr Mark Ashe, Dr David Boam, Dr Anil Day, Dr Finbarr Hayes, Professor Dean Jackson

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PROTEINS
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Steve Prince (steve.prince@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21111
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims To provide core knowledge of the form, function and role of protein molecules in biological processes and further enable an understanding of biological phenomena at the molecular level. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will be able to Describe the features of proteins which lead to organelle targeting and subsequent posttranslational modification. Describe protein folds in terms of secondary structural elements and the restrictions on peptide structure imposed by the planarity of the peptide bond. Select appropriate experimental techniques for protein purification and characterization (conformation and stability), and describe the relative precision of various approaches and the assumptions implied by each method. Outline methods for 3D structure determination by X-ray crystallography, NMR and electron microscopy. Analyze and manipulate structural data (including the use of the Protein Data Bank in Europe). Analyze data relating to protein function and demonstrate an understanding of associated variables (resolution, Kd, Km & Vmax). Distinguish between various modes of protein-protein interaction and catalysis. Lecture Content Course material can be divided into three broad themes and will comprise lectures on (1) Protein folding and modification, protein isolation, identification and characterization; (2) Methods for protein structure determination and rational modelling (including an interactive computer workshop); (3) Protein interactions and enzyme characterization. eLearning Activity Each of the themes outlined above will be supported by 2 Blackboard eLearning modules each including an online quiz and discussion board. One of the eLearning modules associated with theme (2) will be associated with an interactive computer workshop. Assessment 2 hour written examination consisting of essay and/or data interpretation-based questions (75%). Each of the 6 eLearning modules outlined above will contribute to the remaining portion of the assessment (25%). Feedback Feedback will be provided directly via online discussion boards and through comments in response to practise questions associated with the Blackboard eLearning modules, The mark for assessed Blackboard components is also given as soon as the assignment is completed. Interactive feedback is also provided during the computer workshops at the end of the course. A drop-in session for reviewing marked exam scripts will also be arranged. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students ask questions in lectures; interact with teaching staff in 2 microlab workshops and participate in a wrap up Q&A lecture at the end of the course. Written communication - There are discussion boards on Blackboard on specific themes and students are encouraged to use these in support of their studies. 98

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Group/Team working - Group discussions on the aforementioned boards may be used to suppliment private study in groups. A number of in-class exercises are undertaken and additonal exercises are provided on the Blackboard site these can be attempted as group exercises. Project management - There are regular on line assessments, students must keep pace with the course in order to achieve a good outcome here. Research - There are case study type examples in the course which are directly relevant to research, databases are explored in computer classes which are invaluable in support of research. The emphasis of the course is on practical applications, for example selecting the best technique to address a particular question on protein structure and function. Analytical skills - There is considerable use of graphs and underlying theory in the description of properties of proteins and how these are studied. Problem solving - Problem solving is developed quite extensively, supported by the on-line exercises; problem driven computer workshops and examples. Other - Many of the skills first encountered in the Proteins unit are reinforced in the Biochemistry/Medical Biochemistry semester 4 tutorial program. A large subset of the students therefore extend their skills in smaller teams in tutorials, where they are required to relate and apply the material from Proteins in a problem-solving environment. These thematic tutorials are assessed by the submission of short reports. Prerequisites BIOL10212 Biochemistry (Compulsory) BIOL10111 Introductory Chemistry (Recommended ) OR CHEM10021/2 Chemistry for Bioscientists 1/2 (Recommended ) Recommended Reading Price & Nairn, Exploring Proteins, 2009, Oxford University Press Whitford, Proteins, Structure & Function, 2005, Wiley Teaching Staff Professor Jeremy Derrick, Professor Andrew Doig, Dr Hui Lu, Dr Steve Prince, Dr Jim Warwicker

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THE DYNAMIC CELL


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Tom Millard (tom.millard@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21121
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims To provide an integrated approach to the understanding of the biology of the cell, from understanding the molecular mechanisms that underpin cellular processes through to how such processes allow cells to function in their physiological context (ie. in tissues and during development). To introduce both classical and leading edge experimental approaches to cell biology research. To provide a good grasp of cell biology to those Biological Scientists who will not continue in this area. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will be able to: Understand how cells are able to move Understand how cell motility can be directed and organized to allow single cells, small groups and whole fields of cells to migrate Appreciate how cells interact with other cells and the extracellular matrix allowing formation and maintenance of tissues Understand the spatial organization within the cell and how cellular asymmetry and polarity can be established and maintained and why this can be important for cell function Understand homeostatic mechanisms that allow cells to adapt to changes in development and cellular physiology Lecture Content Cell movement: Mechanisms and regulation of cell migration: the importance of actin polymerisation. Co-ordination of actin and microtubule dynamics, and membrane traffic. Role of the small GTPases Rho, Rac and Cdc42. Importance of assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions. Directing cell motility: Sensing of a chemical gradient by single cells, signalling cascades regulating asymmetric membrane and cytoskeletal organisation. Group migration: effects of scale (distance, cell number & dimension) on cell movement, signal relays & interplay between adhesion & movement. Sheet migration: movement of whole tissues during embryogenesis and wound healing. Cell adhesion: Tight junctions, desmosomes, adherens junctions, gap junctions, hemidesmosomes. Roles and composition. Cell polarity: Establishment and function of apical-basolateral and planar polarity in epithelia, role in formation of neural tube. Spindle positioning in symmetric and asymmetric division. Role of cytoskeletal elements, motors and Par proteins. Tissue homeostasis: Turnover and maintenance of cells within tissues: adhesion, cell polarity stem cells and apoptosis. Cellular asymmetry and homeostasis: Spatial organization and movement within cells: mRNA localisation, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport, GTPases as spatial regulators. Regulation of organelles: unfolded protein response and plasma cell development. eLearning Activity Five scenario-based learning modules introducing students in a guided manner to primary literature associated with the lecture material. Developing skills in interpreting different types of data, importance of controls etc. using examples from classic papers.

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Assessment 1.5 hour written examination composed of short answers and 1 essay question (95%); eLearning activity (5%). Feedback Mid- and end-of semester formative mini-exams, online discussion forum, post-exam clinic. Employability Skills Analytical skills - eLearning exercises develop analytical skills involved in experimental design and data interpretation. Problem solving - eLearning exercises also develop problem-solving skills. Prerequisites BIOL10232 From Molecules to Cells (Compulsory) Recommended Reading Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K & Walter P, Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th edition), 2008, Garland Science Lodish H, Berk A, Kaiser C, Krieger M, Scott M, Bretscher A, Ploegh H & Matsudaira P, Molecular Cell Biology (6th edition), 2008, W. H. Freeman Teaching Staff Professor Viki Allan, Professor Keith Brennan, Dr Tom Millard, Dr Martin Pool, Professor Chris Thompson.

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CELL METABOLISM & METABOLIC CONTROL


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Lisa Swanton (lisa.swanton@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21132
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide knowledge of the essential features of cellular metabolism, and an understanding of the mechanisms through which metabolism is controlled. This will be achieved using specific examples and model situations to illustrate principal control mechanisms. Diseases caused by defects in metabolism will be studied to emphasise the importance of metabolic control. The course will focus on mammalian systems, with some reference to plants and microbes. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will: Have knowledge of cellular metabolism, including central catabolic and anabolic pathways. Understand the principals and importance of metabolic control. Be able to describe the main mechanisms through which metabolic processes are controlled, and appreciate that control occurs at multiple levels. Understand how different control mechanisms may be integrated to coordinate cell metabolism and function. Understand how metabolism is coordinated in mammals, and have knowledge of how disturbances in metabolism contribute to disease. Lecture Content 1. Principles of metabolic control and control mechanisms: Overview of metabolism - functions and end-products, anabolism and catabolism, energy metabolism; concepts of metabolic control Control mechanisms levels of control, isoenzymes, branched and linear pathways, allostery, control by covalent modification, control of enzyme level. 2. Regulation of core metabolism: Carbohydrate metabolism - long-term regulation of glucose utilisation, enzyme-level control of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, links to fatty acid metabolism, glycogen turnover, sugar interconversions and the citric acid cycle. Lipid metabolism regulation of fat mobilisation, lipoprotein metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, lipid synthesis, links to glucose metabolism, ketones. Amino acid metabolism control of protein turnover, nitrogen handling, links to nucleic acid metabolism, amino acid oxidation, integration with citric acid cycle. Metabolism in plants - starch/sugar metabolism and fermentation for biofuels, storage lipid biosynthesis: regulation and applications. 3. Integration and adaptation of metabolism: Metabolic states and signals, tissue cooperation, adaptation of metabolism to physiological/pathological situations (feeding-starvation, diabetes, obesity). eLearning Activity Online quiz (exam-style short answer questions). eLearning modules (contributing 5% of the final mark). Scenario-based problems will be used to develop skills in applying knowledge gained from lectures to unfamiliar situations. Discussion forums will be open for each topic. to encourage dialogue between students and teaching staff. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination, composed of short-answer questions and one essay (95%); eLearning module (5%). 102

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Feedback Online quiz will provide formative feedback (model answers provided upon completion). eLearning modules will provide feedback for incorrect answers. Students will be encouraged to ask questions and will receive direct feedback from staff, both in lectures and via Blackboard discussion forums. Employability Skills Written communication - Short note and essay questions in exams Analytical skills - ePBL involves analysis of experimental data. Lecture material incoroporates students to primary sources and data. Problem solving - ePBL as above. Prerequisites BIOL21111 Proteins (Recommended) Recommended Reading Nelson & Cox, Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry 5th edition, 2008, W. H. Freeman or other good biochemistry reference book Frayn, K.F., Metabolic Regulation: A Human Perspective 3rd edition, 2010, Portland Press Review articles and commentaries as recommended by the lecturers. Teaching Staff Professor Alan Dickson, Professor Chris Grant, Dr Jon Pittman, Dr Lisa Swanton

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CELL MEMBRANE STRUCTURE & FUNCTION


Unit Coordinator(s): Professor Martin Lowe (martin.lowe@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21141
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims To provide an understanding of the structure, organisation and function of cellular membranes. Particular emphasis will be placed on membrane composition and organisation, and involvement of membranes and membrane proteins in ion and solute transport, signal transduction and vesicular transport. Diseases that arise from defects in these processes will be used to exemplify the importance of this topic to life science. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will have an understanding of: How the biochemical and biophysical properties of membranes constituents contribute to the structure and organisation of membranes Cell compartmentalisation and how proteins are transported between organelles. The principles and organisation of signal transduction pathways How ions and solutes are transported across membranes Lecture Content Membrane Structure and Function These lectures will describe the composition of biological membranes, and how the constituent lipids and proteins determine membrane identity and physical properties. How membrane domains are formed and the dynamic properties of membranes will also be covered. Membrane Trafficking There will be an overview of the endomembrane system and membrane trafficking pathways. The lectures will describe the molecular machinery that is required for formation of membrane carriers, their movement within the cell, and how they fuse with target compartments to deliver their contents. Emphasis will be given to the mechanisms underlying these processes. The secretory and endocytic pathways and their role in health and disease will be covered. Signalling From Membranes The general principles of signalling will be introduced. The lectures will describe enzyme-linked receptors and G-protein-coupled receptors, and how membrane lipids act as signalling mediators. The mechanisms by which signalling is terminated and how membranes participate in organisation of signalling pathways will also be covered. Membrane Transporters and Ion Channels Membrane transport and transport proteins will be introduced. Active and passive transport, facilitated transport, and secondary active transport will be described. Appropriate examples will be used to illustrate the key points. Ion channel gating and channel permeability and selectivity will be covered, with examples of how defects in these processes leads to disease. eLearning Activity Discussion forum Mid-semester mini-exam with answers provided Problem questions with worked answers Assessment 1.5 hour written examination with both short answer and essay questions (95%) On-line coursework comprising problem-based questions (5%) Feedback Mid-semester mini-exam with answers provided; post-exam clinic; feedback on problem-based questions built into assessment 104

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Employability Skills Written communication - Written problem questions that form part of coursework. Written examinations in January comprised of short answer and essay questions. Analytical skills - EPBL assignments where critical assessment of scientific data is required. Problem solving - On-line short answer and problem-based questions that form part of coursework. Prerequisites BIOL10212 Biochemistry (Recommended) BIOL10232 From Molecules to Cells (Recommended) Recommended Reading Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K & Walter P Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th edition) 2008 Garland Science Teaching Staff Professor Mark Dunne, Dr Katherine Hinchliffe, Professor Martin Lowe, Dr Craig P Smith, Professor Philip Woodman

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'OMIC TECHNOLOGIES & RESOURCES


Unit Coordinator: Professor Richard Reece (richard.reece@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21152
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims This unit will introduce a range of molecular biology, genetic engineering and bioinformatic techniques and illustrate how these can be, and have been, applied and adapted to answer major questions in the biological sciences and medical genetics. Using a topical example-driven approach including human, animal, plant and micro-organismal students will be exposed to a number of the important techniques that underpin many of the recent advances in understanding biological systems at the molecular level. They will be exposed to the step change that occurs between the analysis of single genes, proteins etc. and the analysis of most, or all, of the genes and proteins within an organism. In addition, they will gain an understanding of the cross-talk and interactions that occur between different genes and gene products. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this unit, students will gain an understanding of: Gene cloning, engineering alterations in a gene, screening for genes, genome mapping and sequencing projects How proteins can be made and manipulated Using single-celled organisms, plants and animals as tractable experimental models Dealing with large-scale datasets generated from 'omic scale experiments. Lecture Content Analysis of individual genes Analysis of genomes (transcriptomics) Understanding gene function (proteomics) Analysis of small molecules (metabolomics) eLearning Activity A Blackboard module in which students will be able to explore many of the topics that are discussed in a hands-on setting. Assessment 1.5 hour examination (90%) consisting of two parts (A and B). Part A will consist of 8 shortanswer questions, all of which should be attempted. In part B, students will be required to answer 1 essay question from a choice of 3. Continual assessment - ePBL (10%). Feedback Students will receive feedback via the Blackboard module for this unit, which forms part of the continuous assessment of the unit. Students will also be afforded the opportunity to receive written feedback on an examination-style essay and a series of examination-style short-answer questions. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students encouraged to answer questions during lectures. Written communication - Students participate in a practice examination-style essay which is marked by staff and detailed comments are returned. Innovation/Creativity - Students complete a series of online exercises that augment the lecture material and require significant creative input to address fully. Research - Online exercises require background reading and the understanding of some primary literature. 106

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Analytical skills - eLearning modules require students to analyse data and experimental results. Problem solving - eLearning modules require students to analyse data and experimental results. Prerequisites BIOL10221 Molecular Genetics (Compulsory) BIOL21101 Genome Maintenance & Regulation (Recommended) Recommended Reading Reece, RJ, Analysis of Genes and Genomes, 2003, John Wiley and Sons Ltd Brown, TA, Genomes. 3rd Edition, 2006, Garland Science Teaching Staff Dr Sam Griffiths-Jones, Professor Graham Pavitt, Professor Richard Reece, Dr. Joy Wang

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CHEMISTRY OF BIOMOLECULES
Unit Coordinator(s): Professor David Leys (david.leys@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21162
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide information about biochemically important aspects of the chemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids, using appropriate examples. This includes organic, inorganic and physical chemistry aspects of biomolecules. Key emphasis is placed on understanding the structural principles that govern reactivity/physical properties of molecules as opposed to learning structural detail. The emphasis is on knowledge at the atomic level. Intended Learning Outcomes Students should: Have knowledge of the structure/conformational freedom of biomolecules, e.g. proteins, DNA/RNA, carbohydrates and key metabolites/co-factors, e.g., be able to draw and recognize key structures such as the 20 amino acids, 5 nucleotides and major metabolites Understand and demonstrate how the structure of biomolecules determines their chemical properties and reactivity Draw molecules and reaction mechanisms, understand and propose site-directed mutagenesis experiments aimed at elucidating mechanism Understand biochemistry at the atomic level. Lecture Content: 3 lectures + 1 workshop on basic chemistry, required to appreciate and understand biochemistry, focussed entirely on biologically relevant atom species (C, N, H, O, S, P, various metals) and their properties. Bonding, reaction mechanism and structure/function relationships are discussed. 8 lectures + 1 workshop on organic chemistry of biomolecules: ranging from amino acids, lipids, enzyme cofactors, oligonucleotides to oligosaccharides. Each are introduced in detail from a structure/function perspective with appropriate examples presented to illustrate their role in biochemistry 6 lectures on inorganic chemistry: i.e. metals in biology, focussing on both redox and not-redox roles of metals in biochemistry, as well as on metal specific experimental techniques relevant to biochemistry 1 overview lecture, studying a key chemical process relevant to life: photosynthesis. This lecture will aim to bring together material seen in previous lectures and explore the chemical basis underpinning this process. It will also provide a preview on how material will be presented in the 3 year chemistry course (BIOL31812) An exam workshop will be organised at the end of the lectures series. eLearning Activity A marked assessment (15%) will be conducted on material presented in the first 3 lectures. This will be held early on in the lecture series, to allow revision of the basic chemical knowledge, allowing students to follow the more advanced concepts introduced in the remaining lectures. Assessment 2 hour written examination (85%) and one online module (15%). Feedback Students will be invited to test their knowledge via blackboard multiple choice tests. These will span the various main topics: basic chemistry; organic chemistry; metals in biology; physical chemistry; overview lectures. In each case, the test assessment will be available immediately after the last lecture of that topic. Immediate feedback is given when answers are incorrect. 108

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Assessments remain open during the lecture course and students can retake them as many times as they want. Employability Skills Research - The course introduces people to chemical reasoning and thinking, encouraging application of chemical rules and logic to problems. Analytical skills - The course introduces people to chemical reasoning and thinking, encouraging application of chemical rules and logic to problems. Problem solving - The course introduces people to chemical reasoning and thinking, encouraging application of chemical rules and logic to problems. Pre-/Co-requisites Any level 1 chemistry course, such as those listed, is strongly recommended. BIOL10111 Introductory Chemistry (Strongly recommended) CHEM10021 Chemistry for Bioscientists 1 (Strongly recommended) CHEM10022 Chemistry for Bioscientists 2 (Strongly recommended)

Recommended Reading The listed text is recommended or earlier editions. Voet & Voet, Biochemistry, 4th edition, 2011, Wiley

Teaching Staff Professor David Leys, Professor Andrew Munro

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PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY


Unit Coordinator(s): Professor Keith Brennan (keith.brennan@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21172
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide a general introduction to the mechanisms used in both plants and animals to produce and position, during embryonic development, the many different cell types required to create a functional adult organism. Intended Learning Outcomes To understand the basic mechanisms used to produce different cell types and to arrange cells in three dimensions during development. To understand how these basic mechanisms are linked to establish the axes and segments of the embryo. To appreciate that very similar mechanisms are used in very diverse organisms. To understand the role developmental biology plays in medicine. Lecture Content A conceptual tool kit for development. These lectures will introduce the basic concepts and terms of developmental biology. In addition the general mechanisms by which cells adopt different fates will be described. Maternal control of development and establishment of the major embryonic axes. In most organisms maternal information is deposited in the egg which is essential for the establishment of anterior-posterior (head-tail), dorsal-ventral (front-back) and left-right axes of the embryo during the very earliest stages of development. These lectures will cover the different strategies used in plants and animals during this process. Segmentation, pattern formation and tissue identity. These lectures will cover the mechanisms by which different regions of the organism become specified. Examples include how segmentation occurs along the anterior-posterior axis in flies and vertebrates, and how organ identity is controlled in plants. Conservation of developmental mechanisms. Rather surprisingly, the development of many organs is highly conserved between very diverse species. For example, specification of the eye is very similar in flies and humans. These lectures will provide specific examples of these conserved mechanisms. Application of developmental biology to modern medicine. Finally the importance of developmental biology in novel therapies in medicine will be discussed, covering stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. eLearning Activity The unit will have a series of five scenario-based PBL exercises that simulate developmental biology experiments and cover important concepts from the course. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination containing both short-answer and essay questions (85%), completion of eLearning modules (5%) and online examination (10%). Feedback Feedback is given throughout the semester by the completion of 5 ePBL exercises that simulate developmental biology experiments, and a discussion board. Within the ePBL exercises, there are quiz questions with feedback for incorrect answers. Also there are two formative quizzes and a set of practice essays. Answers to one of these essays will be marked for formative feedback, but the mark will not contribute to the unit mark.

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Employability Skills Written communication - Written exam contains both short and long answer questions. Project management - There are a succession of deadlines for completing the ePBL modules. Research - Reading lists of primary literature are given. Analytical skills - ePBL modules are data handling problems. Problem solving - ePBL modules are data handling problems. Prerequisites BIOL10521 Genes, Evolution & Development (Compulsory) Recommended Reading Gilbert, SF (2010) Developmental Biology (9th edition). Sinauer Wolpert, L & Tickle, C (2011) Principles of Developmental Biology (4th edition). Oxford University Press Teaching Staff Professor Keith Brennan, Dr Kathy Hentges, Dr Adam Hurlstone, Dr Minsung Kim, Dr Matthew Ronshaugen

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PROKARYOTIC MICROBIOLOGY
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Dennis Linton (james.d.linton@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21181
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims This unit will provide students with a comprehensive overview of bacterial cell structure/function, metabolism and regulatory mechanisms. It will also outline the evolutionary history of prokaryotes and the rich diversity of bacterial species. Finally, students will be introduced to the key emerging technological developments that are shaping the future of bacteriology. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will appreciate and be able to describe: The detailed molecular structure and functioning of the key components of the bacterial cell The principal sensing and regulatory mechanisms employed by bacteria Bacterial metabolism and metabolic diversity Prokaryotic phylogeny, including the Bacterial and Archaeal Domains and their major subdivisions The diverse habitats that bacteria occupy and their adaptations to these environments Recent technological developments, including the rise of bacterial genomics and metagenomics. Lecture Content Cell envelopes: Cell envelope structure of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, peptidoglycan, LPS, S-layers, Cell division & cell shape: processes involved in cell division & variety of cell shapes Microbial growth: fundamentals of bacterial growth including exponential nature, batch and continuous cultures, biofilms Motility: Structure and function of flagella, interaction with chemotaxis systems. Bacterial signalling and sensing: Sporulation in Gram positive bacteria, quorum sensing and two component regulatory systems Structures associated with bacterial outer membrane: OMPs and porins, pili/fimbriae Protein secretion systems: diversity of pathways for protein secretion in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria Bacterial metabolic processes: energy sources and storage in bacterial cells, variety of bacterial metabolic pathways. Bacterial phylogeny: sequence based phylogenies, fundamental division of prokaryotes into Bacteria and Archaea, principal subdivisions of Bacterial and Archaeal domains Bacterial genomics and metagenomics: genome sequencing, methodologies and resultant insights into bacterial evolution, transcriptomics, RNAseq technologies, metagenomics, bacterial communities, human microbiome eLearning Activity An eLearning based coursework exercise to write a short scientific news and views style article based upon a topical subject related to course content. This will be set following lecture 10 and completed during reading week and the following week, when there will be no lectures for this course. It will be set and marked via Blackboard and will contribute 15% to the overall unit assessment. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination comprising two essay questions (85%). An eLearning based coursework exercise to write a short scientific news and views style article based on topical subject related to course content (15%). 112

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Feedback Feedback will be given on completion of the eLearning module, by a mid semester mini-exam and by end of semester exam marks. This will include: (i) detailed written formative individual feedback to all students regarding the eLearning activity (within 15 days of submission), and (ii) feedback on individual exam performance will be made available through a drop-in session run by the unit coordinator. Informal feedback throughout the course will also be provided during lectures and via discussions on Blackboard. Employability Skills Written communication - Students will be required to write a short news and views style article based on a topic relating to the course content. The examination will be comprised of two essay questions. Innovation/Creativity - Opportunity to be creative in terms of how students address the coursework article. Research - Students are encouraged to read around the lecture material and up to date review articles are recommended in lectures. Prerequisites BIOL10532 Microbes, Man & the Environment (Recommended) Recommended Reading Madigan, Martinko, Dunlap & Clare, Biology of Microorganisms (12th Edition), 2008, Pearson (Strongly Recommended) Up-to-date review articles recommended in lectures. Teaching Staff Dr Dennis Linton, Professor Jeremy Derrick, Professor Ian Roberts

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PRINCIPLES OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Jen Cavet (jennifer.s.cavet@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21192
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To explore the fundamentals of how microorganisms cause disease and the interactions that occur between a pathogen and host during infection. To study the mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity, starting with pathogen transmission and entry into the host, progressing through adhesion, invasion and pathogen survival strategies within a host, to cell and tissue damage and host responses to infection. Intended Learning Outcomes To provide students with a broad understanding of the biology of microbial infections, with an emphasis on bacterial infections of man. Students will gain knowledge of: The role of host defences in preventing infection The various strategies used by microorganisms to penetrate host defences and colonise and/or invade the host to cause disease The role of microbial products in the pathology of infectious disease (such as endotoxins, exotoxins, peptidoglycan, lipoarabinommannan, pili, polysaccharide capsules, urease, invasins and secreted effector proteins) The physiological adaptations that allow microorganisms to survive in a host Examples of selected human infectious diseases in detail, as paradigms of pathogenhost interactions. Lecture Content Basic concepts of microbial pathogenicity and virulence Colonisation and invasion of the host: Routes of entry and exit. Host surface defences. Microbial mechanisms of colonisation and invasion. The normal microbiota & opportunist infections Encounter with innate immunity: Phagocytic effector cells and complement, mechanisms of microbial killing. Microbial survival strategies Encounter with adaptive immunity: Pathogen adaptation to growth in the host Mechanisms of cell and tissue damage Introduction to toxin types and septic shock Toxins in specific diseases (eg diphtheria, botulism, tetanus, cholera & whooping cough) Selected human infectious diseases in detail Survival in macrophages: Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the disease TB Gastro-intestinal diseases: Examples to include diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, and Salmonella sp. Colonisation of the stomach mucosa by Helicobacter pylori Intracellular survival and spread: The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and the disease listeriosis Emerging diseases Examples to include Legionella pneumophila and Legionnaires disease. Clostridium difficile and pseudomembranous colitis. The spirochetal diseases, Lyme disease and Syphilis. Fungal infections of the immuno-compromised. eLearning Activity An eLearning (ePBL) based coursework module will be set using Blackboard and will be based upon a published research article on a topical subject related to course content. This will be undertaken during the week involving lecture slots 11 and 12 when there will be no lectures for this course. This eLearning exercise will form part (10%) of the overall assessment of the unit. 114

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In addition, lecture slides and materials that support the lecture material will also be will be posted on Blackboard. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination comprising short answer questions and 1 essay question (90%), plus one eLearning module to complete (10%). Feedback Feedback will be given on completion of the eLearning module and by end of semester exam marks. This will include: (i) formative individual feedback to all students regarding performance in the eLearning activity, and (ii) general feedback on exam performance by releasing a document addressing general strengths and weaknesses of answers and how questions were answered. Additional individual guidance (written or verbal) on exam and eLearning performance will also be provided upon request. Informal feedback throughout the course will also be provided by verbal comments during lecture sessions and by online-discussion forums. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students encouraged to answer questions during lectures Written communication - Short note and essay questions in examination Research - eLearning exercise focused on primary research paper. Students encouraged to read research papers and review articles. Analytical skills - eLearning exercise requires students to analyse experimental data and interpret results. Problem solving - eLearning questions based on problem solving Prerequisites BIOL10532 Microbes, Man & the Environment (Compulsory) BIOL21181 Prokaryotic Microbiology (Recommended) BIOL21242 Immunology (Recommended) Recommended Reading Wilson, B.A., Salyers, A.A., Whitt, D.D. & Winkler, M.E., Bacterial Pathogenesis : A Molecular approach (3rd Edition), 2010, ASM Press Details of up-to-date relevant reviews will be provided during the course Teaching Staff Dr Jen Cavet, Dr Dennis Linton, Dr Lubomira Stateva

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PLANTS FOR THE FUTURE


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Patrick Gallois (patrick.gallois@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21202
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To provide a knowledge and understanding of: The key concepts in plant physiological response to the environment. How this knowledge is utilised to address the future issues of food security The contribution of plant sciences to solving major societal and environmental challenges. The knowledge base for the third year Green Biotechnology unit. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this unit, students will have knowledge and understanding of: The contribution of plant sciences to solving major societal and environmental challenges: examples of links between basic plant sciences, sustaining our food supply and improving the environment. A selection of key concepts in plant physiology The physiology behind the predicted impact of climate change on crop production An understanding of how plants continuously monitor and respond to environmental stimuli such as light, temperature and the availability of nutrients. Lecture Content Lectures address various aspects of plant biology and how these are related to future challenges faced by humanity. The course will give an overview of the regulation of plant growth by hormones, the biology of root, leaf and seeds and plant nutrition. Lectures will illustrate how understanding these principles will allow to meet some of the challenges caused by climate change and increased population. These challenges include flood tolerance in rice; better climate change models; optimizing crop flowering time by temperature and seasons; tailoring plant architecture to increased yield; enhancing wood formation in trees, improving drought, cold and salt tolerance of crops; allowing bioremediation of contaminated soils using plants. eLearning Activity eLearning knowledge assessment on lectures 1-8 to ensure that students understand the lecturers expectations in knowing and using the appropriate level of details in exam conditions. Assessment Two hour written examination: two short essays out of four questions (80%), one assessed abstract on a selected aspect of the course (15%), eLearning assessment (5%) Feedback Performance in eLearning knowledge assessment, written feedback on one abstract (online), feedback on one exam practice to be submitted on a voluntary basis. Employability Skills Written communication - Abstract writing. Essay writing. Project management - Management to meet the deadline of continuous assessment. Prerequisites BIOL10511 Biodiversity (Recommended)

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Recommended Reading Taiz, L. & Zeiger E., Plant Physiology (5th edition), 2010, Sinauer Associates,Inc ) with companion website: http://5e.plantphys.net/ Alison Smith et al., Plant Biology, 2009, Garland science. Slater, A, Scott, N, Fowler, M Plant Biotechnology: The Genetic manipulation of plants (2nd Ed.), 2008, Oxford University Press Teaching Staff Dr Patrick Gallois, Dr.Thomas Nuhse, Dr.Jon Pittman, Professor Simon Turner, Professor Terry Brown

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ECOLOGY & ECOSYSTEMS


Unit Coordinator: Dr Keith White (keith.white@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21211
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims To provide a knowledge and understanding of: (i) the interactions that determine the distribution and abundance of organisms in the natural environment through the study of key ecosystems and biomes; (ii) methods and approaches used in the assessment and prediction of population and community interactions and ecosystem change. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will gain an understanding of: The interactions at the population and community level that determine distribution and abundance of organisms through the study of key ecosystems and biomes; Methods and approaches used in the assessment and prediction (modelling) of population and community interactions and ecosystem change. And will be able to: Appreciate the importance of descriptive, functional and evolutionary approaches in understanding how organisms interact with the biotic and abiotic environment; Appreciate the importance of field and laboratory studies in testing ecological ideas; Lecture Content Introduction to ecology. Definition; importance to biology and humans; levels of organization and hierarchy; energy and nutrient cycling; ecosystem modelling. The freshwater ecosystem (theme: ecosystem structure and nutrient cycling) The hydrosphere; freshwaters as continua; producers, consumers and decomposers; the abiotic world; diversity; human impacts and water security. The soil ecosystem (theme: evolutionary ecology) Community structure and soil ecosystems; foodwebs; competition; definitions of niche; competitive exclusion; mutualism: microbe/plant interactions in the rhizosphere; parasitism and virulence. Temperate forests (theme: community ecology and ecosystem development) The deciduous forest biome; factors determining distribution; ecosystem dynamics; ecophysiology of forests; forest management; climate change. Tropical grasslands and savannas (theme: population ecology) Grasses and the C4 pathway; maximising fitness; life history strategies; advantages and disadvantages of group living; modelling - foraging, predator-prey and individuals. eLearning Activity 1. Introduction complemented by self directed eLearning module to ensure all students have a basic knowledge and understanding of key concepts. 2. Self directed eLearning modules will accompany each component of the unit. Assessment Two hour written examination (75%), assessed fact-sheet (20%), eLearning assessment (5%). Feedback Performance in eLearning revision assessment; written comments on poster; overview of student posters; question/answer session in final session. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students asked questions during lectures Written communication - Individual eposter and revision multiple choice answers plus essay/short note questions during examination 118

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Project management - Organise and produce eposter to specified deadline Innovation/Creativity - eLearning poster designed to be appealing to a general audience. Research - Required for e-poster Analytical skills - e-poster requires analysis of primary and secondary (reviews) sources and critically evaluate experimental and field data Problem solving - eLearning questions include those that require problem solving Prerequisites None Recommended Reading Odum, E, Brewer, R & Barrett, G. Fundamentals of Ecology (5th edition), 2005. Thompson Brooks/Cole, London. Begon M, Townsend, C & Harper, J. Ecology: from Individuals to Ecosystems (5th edition), 2005, Wiley-Blackwell, San Francisco. Krebs, C. Ecology - The Experimental Analysis of Distribution and Abundance: International Edition (6th Edition), 2008, Persons. Teaching Staff Dr Giles Johnson, Dr Jennifer Rowntree, Dr Bill Sellers, Dr Keith White

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ANIMAL DIVERSITY
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Robert Nudds (robert.nudds@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21221
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims To provide students with an overview of some of the major animal groups. A brief introduction will be given to evolution before the major groups will be described in terms of their structure, phylogeny, adaptations and characteristics. This unit is ideal for Biology, Zoology, & Genetics students as well as those taking more organismal focused degrees and options. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will be able to: Appreciate how evolutionary forces act to create complex biological systems Gain knowledge of the similarities and differences between vertebrate & some key invertebrate groups: anatomy, functional morphology, behaviour & diversity Apply evolutionary concepts to understand the evolution of major animal groups. Lecture Content 1 Course Introduction 2 The First Animals 3 Why Sponges are Animals 4 The Cambrian Explosion 5 Bilateria 6 Arthropods I - worms and tardigrades 7 Arthropods 2 - chelicerates 8 Arthropods 3 - crustaceans 9 Arthropods 4 - insects 1 10 Arthropods 5 - insects 2 11 Skeletons Muscles & Scaling 12 Chordates 13 Seas III - fishes 14 Water to Land III - tetrapods & amphibians 15 Amniotes 16 Reptiles 17 Mammals I - mammal origins 18 Mammals II - primates & human evolution 19 Systems Evolution I - respiratory 20 Systems Evolution II - locomotor I (water to land) 21 Systems Evolution III - locomotor II (land to air) 22 Systems Evolution IV - cardiovascular Assessment 1.5hr examination (80%), e-exam (10%) museum coursework (10%) Feedback Feedback will be given throughout the course. Students can use the e-exams to gain feedback on their understanding of the course content. Group feedback will be given during lectures following the museum session. Written or oral one-one feedback is available by emailing the course coordinator. Employability Skills Oral communication - There is a museum assignment session, where staff interact verbally with students. Students are also encouraged to ask questions during lectures. 120

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Written communication - Museum assignment project and short answer, and essay questions in examination. Project management - Students must complete a museum assignment over a period of 9 weeks. Innovation/Creativity - The museum assignment allows students to choose an animal and an adaptation to discuss. Research - Students must compare and contrast animal specimens housed in the museum and design an experiment to test their findings as part of their museum assignment. Analytical skills - eLearning exam contains numeric questions. Problem solving - The museum assignment requires the students to formulate an hypothesis and then design an experiment to test it. Prerequisites None. Recommended Reading Holland - The Animal Kingdom: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press Hickman, Roberts, Keen, Larson & Eisenhour - Animal Diversity, McGraw-Hill. Kardong - Vertebrates: comparative anatomy, function, evolution, McGraw-Hill Barnes, Calow, Olive, Golding & Spicer - The Invertebrates: a synthesis, Blackwell Publishing Additional References to journal articles will be given in lectures. Teaching Staff Robert Nudds, Jonathan Codd, Matthew Cobb, Bill Sellers, Holly Shiels

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FUNDAMENTALS OF EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Casey Bergman (casey.bergman@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21232
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims This unit aims to provide a deep understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the evolution of biological systems. By blending classical theory with cutting-edge examples, this unit will demonstrate how microevolutionary processes lead to the macroevolutionary patterns of life on earth. Fundamental evolutionary concepts and techniques will be used to explain some of the greatest mysteries of life on earth, such as the evolution of sexual reproduction and the origin of modern humans. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the unit, students will be able to: Understand the theoretical basis behind how the forces governing evolution (e.g. mutation, natural selection) work to cause heritable change in natural populations Understand the principles and techniques needed to infer phylogenetic relationships among populations and species Understand how the processes of speciation and extinction work to create patterns of biodiversity over space and time Appreciate how evolutionary forces act to create complex biological systems Apply evolutionary concepts to understand the evolution of modern humans Lecture Content Evolutionary Forces (mutation, natural selection, genetic drift, migration and non-random mating) Phylogenetics and Phlyogeography (concepts and methods to build phylogenetic trees, using phylogenies to study relationships among taxa, geographic patterns of biodiversity) Speciation and Macroevolution (mechanisms of speciation, rates of speciation and extinction over time, adaptive radiations) Co-evolution and the Evolution of Sex (host-parasite evolution, evolution of virulence, the cost of sexual reproduction, hypotheses for the advantages of sex, why is there a 1:1 sex ratio?) Human Evolution (origin of modern humans, relationships with Neanderthals, global migration patterns) eLearning Activity Exercises on population genetics and phylogenetics in week 6. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination (95%), assessed exercises (5%). Feedback Provided via (i) assessed mid-unit online assessed exercises, (ii) an online discussion forum for students and lecturers, and (iii) an end-of-unit review session with students and lecturers. Employability Skills Research - Ability to perform research in ecology and evolutionary biology Analytical skills - Quantitative reasoning Problem solving - Ability to perform basic population and phylogenetic genetic analysis Prerequisites BIOL10521 Genes, Evolution & Development (Compulsory) 122

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Recommended Reading Futuyma, D. (2009) Evolution. 2nd ed. Sinauer Press. (Recommended) Barton, N.H., Briggs, D.E.G., Eisen, J.A., Goldstein, D.B., Patel, N.H. (2007) Evolution. Cold Spring Harbor Press. (Recommended) Teaching Staff Dr Casey Bergman, Professor Terry Brown, Dr Daniela Delneri, Professor David Robertson, Dr Cathy Walton

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IMMUNOLOGY
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Sheena Cruickshank (sheena.cruickshank@manchester.ac.uk)
Aims To understand the components and functioning of the immune system

BIOL21242
Semester 2 Credits 10

Intended Learning Outcomes Students should understand: The role of the immune system, innate immunity and the specific immune system, recognition of microbes by the specific immune system and how the immune system protects against different pathogens. They should also have an appreciation of some aspects of immunopathology: allergy, autoimmunity, transplantation and AIDS. The concepts that enable the immune system to function properly and the consequences of it going wrong. Lecture Content Lectures will cover the main role of the immune system in providing defence against infection caused by bacteria, viruses, yeasts and parasites. They will describe the two main arms of the immune system, the innate immune system and the specific immune system. The different anatomical, cellular and molecular components of the two systems will be covered and how these systems detect the presence of infectious pathogens will be an important part of the unit. How the immune system actually deals with infectious organisms will also be described as well as some of the challenges to the immune system such as in HIV/AIDS. Finally the unit will cover some of the problems that arise when the immune system gets it wrong; this will include allergy and autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. eLearning Activity Mini-exam (Contributing 10% of the final mark) Assessment 1.5 hour examination (90%) consisting of short note answers including drawing diagrams. Feedback Feedback on mini-exam Employability Skills Innovation/Creativity - Scope for students to read outside the core lectures and develop their knowledge. Research - Additional text is provided so that students can research the topics in more detail. Prerequisites None Recommended Reading Wood, P, Understanding Immunology (3rd Ed.), 2010 Pearson Press Teaching Staff Dr Sheena Cruickshank, Dr Kathleen Nolan, Dr Mark Travis

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PARASITOLOGY
Unit Coordinator(s): Professor Richard Grencis (richard.grencis@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21252
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims The aim of the unit is to provide an understanding of the molecular and cellular interactions underpinning the functional interactions between animal parasites (protozoa and helminths) and their hosts, and to provide an appreciation of the scope and relevance of parasitism in terms of parasite biology and human and animal disease. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this unit, students should: Gain an appreciation the diversity of parasitic infection and the importance of parasitism as a life strategy Know the major groups of parasites and their influence upon animal and human biology and health Have an understanding of the different mechanisms used by different parasites to gain entry to their hosts and survive within them, at the genetic, molecular, cellular, whole organism and population levels Identify key features of the major human parasites, the diseases they cause and understand their life cycles Be able to integrate knowledge about different parasitic organisms and infections; cross reference information from gene to population level, compare and contrast different strategies used within and across different parasitic groups To begin to understand how a parasite interacts with its host at the level of the immune system. Lecture Content Lectures will cover the major groups of parasites and each lecture will illustrate a particular feature such as host invasion or the strategies used by parasites to avoid being destroyed by the host immune system. The lectures will also describe how this information can be utilised alongside that emerging from parasite genomes studies to develop new methods of control including vaccines. eLearning Activity This will comprise an online spotter test plus interactive websites specifically related to the course. One compulsory eLearning component will be for students to watch a short video entitled Survival: Intestinal dwelling nematodes III Immunoregulation. The good the bad and the wormy - the science between lectures 15 & 16. This component will be facilitated by key questions for students to answer and concepts will be extended in Lecture 16. Assessment 1.5 hour examination (90%) and spotter test (10%). The spotter test will be taken in one of the multi-user labs within FLS. Feedback Feedback on progress in the course will be given via two How well am I doing? sessions spaced towards the middle and end of the course. These will be given in lecture theatres in the form of spotter tests (similar to the end of course test). After each question the students will be given instant feedback on whether they have given the correct answer; the correct answer will be given and the students will also be able to see the class score for the individual answers as well as the overall class score for the test. There is also an additional online practice spotter test associated with the course that students can work through in their own time. 125

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Prerequisites None Recommended Reading There is no set course text book. Students will be directed to relevant reading during the lectures. For those students who are not taking the Immunology (BIOL21242) unit in the second year, the listed recommended text may be helpful: Wood, P Understanding Immunology (3rd edition) Pearson Press, 2010

Teaching Staff Professor Kathryn Else, Professor Richard Grencis

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ENDOCRINOLOGY
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Steve Bidey (steve.bidey@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21261
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims To explore the biochemistry, physiology, and pharmacology of endocrine control systems, and to describe their individual and interactive roles in humans and other mammalian species. Intended Learning Outcomes To have gained an understanding of (i) the structure and function of mammalian endocrine tissues, and (ii) the manner in which the regulatory control and actions of individual endocrine tissues are integrated to maintain appropriate physiological and metabolic responses to changes in the internal and external environment. Lecture Content As a highly-specialised tissue-to-tissue signalling network, the endocrine system plays a fundamental role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis within the human body. Initial lectures will consider how endocrine control mechanisms are fundamentally dependent on interaction between a structurally-diverse family of chemical signalling molecules (hormones) and specific receptors for such molecules on or within target cells. The clear mechanistic links between endocrine and neurological signalling mechanisms will then be examined, and the manner in which they serve to enable the endocrine system to respond to environmental changes will be discussed. Key illustrative examples will include the endocrine responses to day length, temperature, water and food availability, as well as to internal events such as physical and emotional stress. Fundamental to our understanding of endocrine physiology has been the development of diagnostic procedures to detect and quantify vanishingly small levels of individual hormones within biological fluids. The theory and application of such techniques will be considered, and their key roles in elucidating the mechanistic links between the hypothalamo-pituitary axis and distal endocrine tissues will be discussed. As a key interface between the neural and endocrine systems, the hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates and responds to the diverse activities of other endocrine tissues, e.g. the thyroid, adrenal, ovaries and testes, each of which will be the topic of individual lectures. Further endocrine mechanisms that function independently of the hypothalamo-pituitary axis, as exemplified by the endocrine pancreas and parathyroid glands, will also be considered. As an interactive network of chemical signalling mechanisms, capable of integrating the responses to both internal and external stimuli, the endocrine system plays a vital role in such diverse events as appetite regulation, water conservation, temperature regulation, puberty, and pregnancy. The endocrine involvement in each of these will be described, before considering the more common abnormalities in such processes that can be attributed to defects in the underlying endocrine control mechanisms. eLearning Activity Directed reading assignments with self-assessment provided on Blackboard. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination comprising 15 short answer questions & 1 essay out of a choice of 3 (90%) and electronically marked Blackboard exercises (10%). Feedback 1. By having the opportunityto work through a model examination essay question on Blackboard, with individual feedback provided by the unit co-ordinator. 2. By publication of a general feedback document addressing general strengths and weaknesses of students examination essays, and giving an indication of how questions were answered. 127

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3. By attending a post-examination drop-in clinic session, where students are able to see examiners comments on their answers. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students encouraged to ask and answer questions during lectures. Written communication - Short notes in examination; students also encouraged to attempt an exam-style essay question in weeks 8-10. Prerequisites None Recommended Reading Porterfield S & White B Endocrine Physiology (3rd edition), 2007, Elsevier London: Mosby Physiology Monograph series. Recommended Hadley M Endocrinology (5th edition), 2000, Prentice Hall. Optional Teaching Staff Dr Steve Bidey, Professor Mark Dunne, Dr Donald Ward, Dr Melissa Westwood

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HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Peter Brown (peter.d.brown@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21272
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To study the principal functions of the mammalian (human) gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and the renal system To learn how these systems are affected by diseases and about the available treatments. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will gain an understanding of: The mechanism and regulation of nutrient absorption by the GI tract The importance of the kidneys in maintaining body electrolyte and water balance How molecular genetics has enhanced our understanding of transport processes in the intestines and kidneys Examples of diseases of the GI tract and kidney, which are targets for important therapeutic drugs Lecture Content Part 1: Introduction: Principals of epithelial transport & chemistry of dietary components. The physiology of the G.I. tract: Digestion and absorption; Control of G.I function; The mechanism and regulation of salivary, gastric and pancreatic secretion; G.I. motility. Management of peptic ulcers and diarrhoea. Renal physiology: Glomerular filtration; Reabsorption of nutrients and ions; Production of a concentrated urine; Control of extracellular fluid volume & electrolyte balance; Acidbase balance. Mechanisms of action of diuretic drugs. Renal failure. Part 2: The molecular physiology of iron transport proteins: Ferric reductase, DMT-1, ferroportin, transferrin, the transferrin receptor and hepcidin. Cystic Fibrosis: The molecular genetics of C.F.; CFTR an anion channel and channel regulator. Diuretic action and Bartters Syndrome: Diuretic selectivity is dependent on drug + secretion. Na absorption in the kidney tubule (TAL) is imapaired in Bartters by mutations to five different proteins. GI tract infections: Causes of and treatments for diarrhoea and peptic ulcers. eLearning Activities CAL on: 1) The pharmacokinetics of diuretic drugs; 2) The molecular physiology of Bartters Syndrome; 3) Novel treatments for cystic fibrosis. Assessment 1.5 hour summative examination (90%) comprising one essay question plus short-note and multiple-choice questions. eLearning modules (10%) Feedback Feedback will be provided as part of two online multiple-choice assessments on lecture content and of the two assessments associated with the eLearning activities A Question and Answer session will be held to discuss any student-raised concerns and/or past examination questions A formal feedback session will be held in the subsequent semester in which students will have access to their marked examination scripts and to generic comments from the essay markers. 129

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Employability Skills Oral communication - Questions are encouraged during the lectures. Drs Smith and Sheader also actively question the students. Research - Directed reading of annotated scientific papers which are source material for the second phase of the unit. Analytical skills - Analysis and interpretation of data in scientific papers which are source material for the second phase of the unit. Prerequisites BIOL21141 Cell Membrane Structure & Function (Recommended) OR BIOL21321 Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters (Recommended)

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Recommended Reading For Part 1 of the unit, useful background information will be found in the texts below. For Part 2 of the unit, essential information will be found in lecture specific references, which will be listed in the unit handbook. Boron W & Boulpaep EL Medical Physiology (2nd updated edition) 2012 Saunders Koeppen BM & Stanton BA Berne & Levy Physiology (6th edition) 2009 Mosby Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM & Flower R Rang & Dales Pharmacology (6th edition) 2007 Churchill Livingstone

Teaching Staff Dr Peter Brown, Dr Liz Sheader, Dr Craig Smith

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ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Martin Steward (martin.steward@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21281
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims To study phenotypic plasticity across levels of biological organisation and to understand how this allows animals to adapt to their environment. To study mechanisms of physiological adaption in response to environmental challenges including: thermoregulation, osmoregulation and gas convection in vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Intended Learning Outcomes An understanding of invertebrate and vertebrate animal physiology, emphasising control mechanisms and response strategies used to cope with different external environments. Students will appreciate how physiological plasticity is key to maintaining and adjusting physiological processes in terrestrial and aquatic animals. Lecture Content The nature and fundamental mechanisms of environmental adaptation will be discussed under the broad lecture themes of: Water and ion balance Respiratory and cardiovascular systems Muscle systems Thermoregulation eLearning activity All lecture slides will be posted on Blackboard. Journal articles that support the lecture material and interactive learning tools specifically created to enhance learning (e.g. osmoregulation) will be available online. Self-assessment exercises will be provided throughout and four online summative assessments will contribute to your overall unit mark. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination (90%), eLearning assessments (10%) Feedback Students will receive feedback from eLearning exercises and assessments during the course. Drop-in clinics after the exam will allow feedback on exam performance. Employability Skills Written communication - Examinations are essay based. Research - Students have to extract additional information from the published literature through additional reading. Problem solving - Online coursework in the form of multiple answer questions requires a small degree of problem solving. Prerequisites None Recommended Reading Hill, Wyse & Anderson Animal Physiology (3rd edition) (2012) Sinauer Associates. Willmer, Stone & Johnston Environmental Physiology of Animals (2nd edition) (2004) Blackwell Science Schmidt-Nielsen Animal Physiology: Adaptation and Environment (5th edition) (1997) Cambridge University Press. Teaching Staff Dr Jonathan Codd, Professor Andrew Loudon, Dr Martin Steward, Dr Holly Shiels 131

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HUMAN ANATOMY & HISTOLOGY


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Bip Choudhury (bipasha.choudhury@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21291
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims This unit focuses on the human alimentary, urinary and reproductive systems and aims to integrate anatomy, histology and embryology with clinical and pathological topics. In addition to lectures, students will gain practical experience of the overall structure of these organ systems and of their components by working with prosections, models and histological specimens in the dissecting room. The dissecting room sessions are designed to complement the lecture course. Intended Learning Outcomes Understand the anatomy of the alimentary, urinary and reproductive systems Understand the structural arrangement of the abdomen and its contents Understand the structural arrangement of the pelvis and its contents Understand the histological arrangement of all of the above structures Relate the structural anatomy to pathological processes that may occur Understand the normal embryological development of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and how variations in these can result in pathologies Lecture Content Anatomy and histology of the gastrointestinal tract will be covered in detail. The musculature of the anterior and posterior abdominal walls, as well as composition of the pelvis are covered. Anatomy and histology of the genitourinary tracts are also covered in detail. The pathology lectures link together important anatomical concepts and describe basic pathological problems. Basic embryology of both gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts are covered. eLearning Activity Task 1: critically analysing a paper from a well-known anatomical journal. Students are put into groups of 5-6 from differing degree programmes. They utilise group-specific discussion boards and chat rooms to complete the task. Peer assessment makes up 40% of the total mark available for this eLearning node. Task 2: solve a clinical case using their anatomical knowledge. Students are put into groups of 5-6 from differing degree programmes. They utilise group-specific discussion boards and chat rooms to solve the case. Peer assessment makes up 40% of the total mark available for this eLearning node. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination (92%) comprising of a choice of 5 essay questions from which students have to answer two. Two eLearning modules to complete (8%). Feedback Feedback given via blackboard on completion of the 2 eLearning nodes. Question bank available on blackboard for students to check their learning (not assessed). Informal verbal feedback as required. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students encouraged to ask and answer questions during lectures. Written communication - Groups assessed on 1 piece of writing (as a group). They have to communicate with each other using group specific discussion boards and chat rooms. Group/Team working - Two eLearning tasks where students have to work in their groups to produce the final assessed piece of work. 132

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Project management - All members of the group must keep an eye on the progress of the group and the task. Leadership - Each group elects a group leader whose task it is to steer the group in the right direction and submit the final assessed piece of work. Research - Students have to link the anatomical sections they see to physiology and pathology. They have to read a research article and provide a written critique of it. Analytical skills - As above. Problem solving - The 2nd eLearning task leads the students through a series of questions/clues to enable them to work out the diagnosis of the patient they are presented with. Other - Develops organisational skills Prerequisites BIOL10811 Body Systems (Recommended) Recommended Reading Snell RS Clinical Anatomy by Regions (9th edition) 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Moore & Dalley Clinically Orientated Anatomy (5th edition) 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Cui D Atlas of Histology with functional and clinical correlations (1st edition) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Ross MH, Pawlina W Histology a text and atlas (6th edition) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Gosling J A Human Anatomy (4th Edition) 2002 Mosby Schoenwolf, Bleyl, Brauer & Frances-West Larsen's Human Embryology (4th edition) 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Sadler Langman's Medical Embryology (12th edition) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Teaching Staff Dr Bip Choudhury, Professor Anthony Freemont, Dr Stefan Gabriel, Dr Niggy Gouldsborough, Dr Tokiharu Takahashi

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CLINICAL DRUG DEVELOPMENT


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Tracey Speake (tracey.speake@manchester.ac.uk) & Professor Alison Gurney (Alison.gurney@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21302
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To explain the appliance of science whereby new drugs are discovered and developed from initial ideas through to full clinical use in man To explain how consideration of how an individuals handling of drugs, i.e. pharmacokinetics, is important in the development of new drugs Illustrate the interplay between business aspects and the biosciences Intended Learning Outcomes Students will gain an understanding of: The major approaches to drug discovery Application of molecular biology techniques to identifying lead compounds Methods for determining the pharmacological and toxicological properties of compounds The role of pharmacokinetic principles in the drug discovery process Regulatory requirements for drugs Clinical evaluation of drugs Lecture Content Overview: Medicines: the discovery processes. The pharmaceutical industry. Initial stages: Target discovery. Applications of molecular biology. Lead discovery. Lead optimisation. In silico methods. Measurement of drug properties: Assay techniques. Agonists (full, partial and inverse). Competitive antagonists. In vivo models. Pharmacokinetic profiles of compounds. Pharmacogenetics. Formulations. Pre-clinical safety assessment. Later stages: Pharmaceutical development. Clinical evaluation: Phase I and II. Concepts in clinical trial design. eLearning Activity Discussion board will be open to encourage dialogue between students. Additional resources to support the lecture content will be provided. eLearning self-assessment modules: four question sets based on the course content and additional reading will be presented for summative assessment. Assessment Coursework components include a drug discovery game (15%) and eLearning modules (5%). Summative 1.5 hour examination (80%) comprising MCQs (40% of exam) and short-note questions (60% of exam). Feedback Students will be encouraged to ask questions during lectures and receive immediate feedback from staff and also via the Blackboard Discussion Board, which will be the main vehicle for providing feedback. Staff will also give individual feedback to questions raised by email. Students will receive feedback throughout the drug discovery game. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students encouraged to answer questions during lectures. Following production of a poster, those 5 teams with the best poster mark will be invited to present their poster to the entire unit cohort (up to 150 students). This presentation is 5 minutes. 134

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Written communication - Collaborative PowerPoint poster looking at the drug discovery process. Students work in teams of 5 or 6. Short note questions in examination. Group/Team working - Collaborative PowerPoint poster. Students work in teams of 5 or 6. Students are randomly allocated to teams and therefore may have to work with students they do not know. Project management - Collaborative PowerPoint poster undertaken by teams of 5 or 6 students. The students spend approximately 9 weeks on this project. Information is drip fed to them throughout the project. Leadership - Collaborative PowerPoint poster undertaken by teams of 5 or 6 students. Each team may identify a team leader. Innovation/Creativity - Collaborative PowerPoint poster undertaken by teams of 5 or 6 students. Opportunity to generate an eye catching poster which also includes the appropriate level of scientific detail. Research - Collaborative PowerPoint poster undertaken by teams of 5 or 6 students. See below with regards to problem-solving skills. Students will need to determine appropriate experimental techniques to generate data. Additional reading material provided to students with each lecture. Analytical skills - Collaborative PowerPoint poster undertaken by teams of 5 or 6 students. Data is drip-fed to each team on a regular basis. Students are required to analyse this data and determine the next step to be taken in the drug discovery process. Some eLearning modules will require students to analyse data and experimental results. Problem solving - Collaborative PowerPoint poster undertaken by teams of 5 or 6 students. Data is drip-fed to each team on a regular basis. Students are required to analyse this data and determine the next step to be taken in the drug discovery process. This will require analysis of primary sources. Some eLearning modules are based on problem solving. Other - Business awareness. Underpinning this unit is the need to understand the relationship between business aspects and the biosciences. To this end, we have three guest lecturers (AstraZeneca, Gentronix and ICON) who deliver a total of 4 lectures on this unit. Prerequisites BIOL10822 Drugs: From Molecules to Man (Compulsory) Recommended Reading Griffin JP & O'Grady J, The Textbook of Pharmaceutical Medicine (5th edition), 2005, London BMJ Rang HP, Drug Discovery and Development: Technology in Transition, 2005, Churchill Livingstone Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower, R & Henderson G. Rang & Dale's Pharmacology (7th edition), 2012, Churchill Livingstone (ebook) Teaching Staff Dr Cyril Clarke (ICON), Dr Susan Cochran, Dr Natalie Gardiner, Professor Alison Gurney, Dr Chris Pollard (Astrazeneca), Dr Richard Prince, Dr Tracey Speake, Dr Lubomira Stateva, Professor Richard Walmsley

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DRUGS & THE BRAIN


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Ken Grieve (ken.grieve@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21312
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims To describe the range of mechanisms by which drugs can interfere with neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS) how neurotransmitter activities can be modified by drugs leading to the rational treatment of CNS disorders how an understanding of neurotransmitters and mechanisms of drug action can lead to more selective treatment of CNS disorders. Intended Learning Outcomes To: detail important classes of drugs used in medicine and/or biological research to influence central neuronal activity, particularly in humans describe the mechanisms of action of these drugs in terms of their effects on major neurotransmitters describe mechanism-related drug side-effects Lecture Content Introduction to neuropharmacology The central synapse: neurotransmitter systems as targets for drug therapy Accessing the central synapse: the blood-brain barrier to drugs Pharmacology of movement disorders such as Parkinsons disease Pharmacology of general anaesthetics Pharmacology of antipyretic-analgesic drugs Pharmacology of opioid analgesic drugs Pharmacology of antiepileptic drugs Pharmacology of anxiolytic drugs Pharmacology of CNS stimulants and psychotomimetics Pharmacology of antipsychotic drugs Pharmacology of antidepressant drugs eLearning Activity All lecture slides available for eLearning including self-completion exercises. Online assessment for formative feedback. Assessment Online: 2 MCQ exams, (2.5% each). 1.5 hour written examination comprising 10 compulsory short answer questions (95%). Feedback Mid-sessional formative assessment / feedback. Post-exam guidance. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students may ask questions during/after the lecture. Written communication - Through the use of Blackboard discussion board (see below) Group/Team working - The material in the Blackboard discussion group has been healthy and interactive, with lots of student participation (ie not just asking questions, but helping one another). 136

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Prerequisites BIOL10822 Drugs: From Molecules to Man (Compulsory) BIOL21302 Clinical Drug Development (Recommended) Recommended Reading Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM & Flower, R Rang & Dale's Pharmacology (7th Edition) 2011 Churchill Livingstone (Compulsory) Teaching Staff Professor Richard Baines, Dr Ken Grieve, Dr Richard Prince

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MEMBRANE EXCITABILITY: ION CHANNELS & TRANSPORTERS IN ACTION


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Jon Turner (j.turner-2@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21321
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims The aim of this module is to give students the strongest grounding in our current understanding of excitable cell pharmacology and physiology through study of the key elements of membrane excitability. It will also provide a solid theoretical framework in membrane excitability irrespective of which degree programme the students are pursuing. It will treat each area in a logical, fresh and exciting manner highlighting relevance to function and disease. In addition, students will be encouraged to think critically and to appreciate the special challenges intrinsic to studying excitable membrane function. Intended Learning Outcomes In relation to membrane excitability, students should be able to describe in detail: (i) the key governing principles, (ii) the role of ion channels and ion transporter proteins, (iii) the relationship between cellular structure and the function of excitable cells, (iv) the features of the synapse that underpin fast chemical neurotransmission and its modification, and (v) the methods used to analyse or predict cell excitability. Lecture Content Membrane structural organization and types of integral membrane proteins Regulation of cell volume and contents including pHi and [Ca2+]i Ion channels, selective ion permeability and membrane potential generation The ionic basis of the action potential and diversity in excitable tissues Functional diversity of voltage-gated ion channels and their pharmacology Cell polarization in epithelia and neurones, and the role of compartmentalization Cytoskeleton and the differential trafficking of membrane-targeted proteins Electrical and chemical neurotransmission and transmitter-gated ion channels Transmitter synthesis, vesicle exocytosis and recycling Synaptic integration and plasticity eLearning Activities Blackboard discussion board topics (as suggested by contributors). Mid-semester mini-exam to assess progress. Simulation of excitable membrane behaviour to expand understanding of the Nernst equation and the ionic basis for excitability (eLearning modules). Exam format questions with model answers (revision aides for January exam). Assessment 1.5 hour examination (90%): 12-15 short questions; eLearning modules (10%) Feedback Mid-semester exam seminar to provide answers and Q & A session on material presented so far. Exam clinic to follow in Semester 4 as a forum to discuss marks and see model answers. Employability Skills Analytical skills - Students encouraged to think critically about the topics covered. Problem solving - Short answer questions in the exam and eLearning modules may require a degree of problem solving. Prerequisites BIOL10832 Excitable Cells (Compulsory) 138

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Recommended Reading Boron, WF & Boulpaep, EL Medical Physiology, 2008, Saunders Elsevier Teaching Staff Dr Peter Brown, Dr Liz Fitzgerald, Dr Richard Prince, Dr Jon Turner

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MOTOR SYSTEMS
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Niall McLoughlin (niall.p.mcloughlin@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21332
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims This course aims to explain our current understanding of how the mammalian nervous system plans and executes movements, with particular reference to the human case. Topics will include the anatomy and physiology of the motor systems, spanning from muscles contraction to spinal reflexes, cortical and sub-cortical control of movement and how certain neurological diseases affect movement. In this way, the students will be exposed to the many levels of motor control, and will acquire a critical knowledge of what we know (or dont yet know) about the structure and function of human motor control systems. Intended Learning Outcomes By the end of this course students should be able to critically assess the current knowledge of motor control and to communicate these topics in a concise manner that recognises the limitations of current hypotheses. Students should also have acquired the following skills: an understanding of the motor systems at a variety of levels (from cellular to systems neuroscience). an accurate understanding of the different strategies used by the nervous system to control movement. an understanding of the different roles played by muscles, the spinal cord, midbrain, cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia in the organisation of movement. A critical knowledge of the different experimental methods used to investigate motor control.

Lecture Content Muscles and motoneurons - These lectures will describe how muscles contract, how motoneurons determine muscle contraction and how the spinal reflexes are orchestrated by spinal circuits comprising interneurons and motoneurons. The generation of locomotor activity by spinal neuronal networks called central pattern generators will also be covered. Motor cortex and descending systems - This part will deal with the anatomy and function of motor and premotor areas of the cerebral cortex. Experiments illustrating the activity of motor cortical neurons during different behavioural tasks will be described. The concept of population coding will be introduced. The medial and descending system originating in the cortex and in the brainstem will be described. Oculomotor control - These lecture will describe the neural control of the extraocular muscles that control eye movement, with particular emphasis on the generation of saccadic movements by brainstem pontine centers and how they are controlled by the cerebral cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia - This part will focus on these neuronal systems that are essential for motor control. Their complex architecture and their connectivity with the cerebral cortex and the descending brainstem systems will be covered. The neurological problems arising from damage to each of this system will also be described in detail. eLearning Activity Moderated discussion board on Blackboard. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination (100%) composed of compulsory short answer questions. 140

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Feedback Questions on several topics of the unit will be posted (after the relevant lectures have been delivered) on dedicated sections of the Discussion Board. The students will have the opportunity to post answers as well as to comment on their peers answers. This will be followed by posting of model answers by the lecturers, who will also comment on the students efforts. Another section of the Discussion Board will be dedicated to students questions or requests for clarification. Again, peers comments will be followed by lecturers posts in an open-ended interactive format. Employability Skills Written communication - Short answer questions in the exam. Students encouraged to answer questions posted on the Blackboard discussion boards and to comment on answers. This is followed by posting of model answers online. Analytical skills - By the end of this unit students should be able to critically assess the current knowledge of motor control and the experimental methods used to investigate motor control. Prerequisites BIOL10832 Excitable Cells (Recommended) BIOL21341 Sensory Systems(Recommended) Recommended Reading Kandel ER, Schwartz JH & Jessel TM Principles of Neural Science (4th ed.) 2000 McGraw-Hill Teaching Staff Dr Fred Cody, Professor Cathy McCrohan, Dr Niall McLoughlin

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SENSORY SYSTEMS
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Ken Grieve (ken.grieve@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21341
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims This course aims to explain: how external stimuli impact upon central neural pathways to give rise to perception the nature and extent of sensory systems from periphery to CNS, with emphasis on the higher mammalian systems, but including appropriate comparative comparisons. basic elements of the cognitive processes involved in sensory interpretation and reaction. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to: comprehend the ability of nervous systems to access, integrate and interpret sensory information understand the common plan of sensory systems across species, as models for neuroscience research look beyond 'sense' to cognition. Lecture Content 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Introduction to comparative sensory physiology - What is a sense? How do we, and other creatures, interact with a physical reality? The Eye - window on the soul? - Capturing light - in mammals and others. Retina - "First Contact" with the central nervous system - how to convert light to brain messages. Comparative Colour Vision - "The peacock's tail and other colourful facts" The vision we don't "see" - Projection of information through secondary visual pathways; circadian rhythms Thalamus - gateway to cortex? - Passive gateway or active amplifier? To sleep, perchance... to "attend". The Primary Visual Cortex - The "beginning" of cortical processing - the human "condition". "To V2 and Beyond!" - how does cortex communicate information - hierarchy or "cloud"? Higher Visual Cortices - ....when things go wrong - amblyopia, blindsight, neglect and other short stories... Chemo-reception - A "taste" of science. Chemo-reception - Olfaction, the "world" of scent Feed-back Session! The chance to work through exam question/answers From ear to hear - What is sound? Sound in the air; "sound" for other animals Cochlea - transduction, amplification and more - Hair cells, fluid mechanics and the "I-pod" generation! From hearing to speaking - Central "interpretation" of sounds - and language, from bats to whales, and us. Mechanoreceptors - The basic unit of the somatic sense Mechanoreceptors - Understanding mechanotransduction - "feeling" your way.... Somatosensory Pathways and the Somatosensory Cortex - From skin to the spinal cord and higher - through thalamus to cortex. Whiskers and Barrels - Specialisation in somatosensation - the rodent whisker system Pain - The "sense" of nociception and "feeling of pain".... sense to perception. Somatosensation: Cognition and decision - Plasticity, Phantom Limbs and other "higher" aspects of somatosenation Cognition & Sense(s) - Integration of cortical senses. 142

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eLearning Activity All lecture material will be offered in advance on Blackboard. An appropriate mini-exam will be provided for ~week 7 and a forum for discussion. "Interesting examples" of non-lecture materials, designed to highlight aspects of the lecture-based material, will be provided. Assessment 2 on-line MCQ tests (5% each), in weeks ~7 and 11, and a 1.5 hour written examination (90%) in MCQ + short answer format, covering all aspects of the course, lecture-based or Blackboard. It will include 30 MCQ's and 3 sections of short answer questions with a choice of 2/3 questions in each section ie 6 questions in total. (It is therefore suggested that students spend 30 minutes on MCQ's and 60 minutes on short answers.) Feedback All students are given the Unit Coordinators email address for questions or comment, as well as being encouraged to contact lecturing staff immediately following the lecture, or later by email or in the Blackboard discussion forum. Mid-sessional formative assessment / feedback. Post-exam guidance. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students are reminded (repeatedly) to ask questions during or after lectures, and one session is devoted to discussion of examination questions and how best to answer them. Written communication - Strongly encourage the use of Blackboards discussion group. Group/Team working - Encourage the use of Blackboards discussion group for student-tostudent communication. There is also a student led discussion group. Research - Looking at research, as presented in the lecture course; with insight into research methods etc. Prerequisites BIOL10832 Excitable Cells (Compulsory) Recommended Reading Kandel E.R., Schwartz J.H. & Jessel T.M. Principles of Neural Science (5th edition) 2012, McGraw-Hill Medical Bear, M.F., Connors B.W. & Paradiso M.A. Neuroscience: exploring the brain (3rd edition) 2006, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins Teaching Staff Dr Ken Grieve, Professor Rob Lucas, Dr Rasmus Petersen

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CELLS & TISSUES IN HUMAN DISEASE


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Adam Hurlstone (adam.hurlstone@manchester.ac.uk)
Aims To introduce cellular and molecular mechanisms of human disease.

BIOL21351
Semester 1 Credits 10

Intended Learning Outcomes Students will acquire knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying a range of human diseases. They will understand how drugs act on cellular and tissue dysfunctions to ameliorate these diseases. Lecture Content The course examines the cellular and molecular causes of a wide variety of human diseases such as diabetes and cancer. It aims to show how understanding a disease at the molecular level explains its pathology and allows the design of therapeutic strategies. Specific topics will include: Cell death mechanisms and disease Cell adhesion and its pathological defects of connective tissues Type 1 and 2 diabetes Biochemical complications of diabetes and therapies Inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs Molecular pathology of cancer Cancer chemotherapy

eLearning Activity Each set of lectures will be followed by an online quiz to provide formative feedback on your understanding of the material A graphical exercise on diabetes will be provided on Blackboard. This includes example essay and short answer questions on the subject of diabetes and its pharmacology. Assessment 2 hour written Exam worth 90% of the final unit mark, comprising short answer questions (40% of exam) and 1 essay (60% of exam). eLearning activities worth 10% of the final unit mark. Feedback The eLearning activities will provide on line feedback. Advice on the example exam questions on the eLearning resource will be provided if requested. Feedback will be given on the MCQ assessment before the end of the course. Post-exam guidance will be provided. A formative mid-semester miniexam A formative mock exam Employability Skills Research - Students have to carry out additional reading for each lecture. Other - Meeting multiple deadlines. Students have a number of on line activities to completes, with fixed deadlines. Students have to manage these deadlines. Prerequisites BIOL10232 From Molecules to Cells (Recommended) BIOL10822 Drugs: From Molecules to Man (Recommended) 144

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Recommended Reading General texts that will provide useful background include: Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM & Flower, R Rang & Dale's Pharmacology (7th Edition) 2007 Elsevier. Cassimeris, Lingappa, Plopper. Lewins Cells (second edition). Jones and Bartlett. Alberts et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th edition). Garland Science.

However, no one textbook will cover all the material presented in the lectures, due to the diverse nature of the course. Each lecturer will therefore provide specific reference articles for their lecture material. Teaching Staff Dr Christoph Ballestrem, Dr Adam Hurlstone, Dr Tracey Speake, Professor Mark Dunne.

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HAEMATOLOGY
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Michelle Keown (michelle.e.keown@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21361
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims This unit is aimed at providing an extensive knowledge of the main areas of haematology including understanding, diagnosis and treatment of haematological disorders and to introduce the main areas of interest in blood transfusion. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the underlying processes in blood cell formation describe, discuss & diagnose diseases of blood including anaemia, leukaemia and disorders of haemostasis & thrombosis describe the role of haematology in the investigation of disease in general bring together, evaluate and apply knowledge from biochemistry and cell biology in interpretation of the functions of blood & related diseases interpret biochemical & morphological data in the diagnosis of certain blood disorders/diseases reflect critically & analytically on their study learning styles so as to be able to identify and review additional literature to enhance learning Lecture Content 1 Introduction to module 2 Blood cell formation: haemopoiesis 3-6 Red blood cell and haemoglobin, red blood cell membrane and enzyme disorders Iron metabolism, Vitamin B12 and Folate, Anaemias 7-8 Haemoglobinopathies-thalassaemia and sickle cells 9-12 Haemostasis-platelets and coagulation cascade, Coagulation cascade: lab tests/anticoagulant therapy; Disorders of haemostasis 13 White blood cells (WBC): structure, function and differentiation 14 WBC:reactive proliferation, benign and infection 15-20 Basis and classification of haematological malignancies; Neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorders; Neoplastic myeloproliferative disorders 21 Blood transfusion:introduction 22 Exam practice Assessment 1.5 hour examination (90%) - short answer questions and 1 essay question from a choice of 3. Five online enquiry based learning (EBL) activities (2 group and 3 individual) each worth 2% (Total: 10%). Feedback Immediate feedback on individual EBL assessments on Blackboard. Generic feedback on Blackboard for group EBLs within 2 weeks (10 working days) of submission deadline. Individual feedback on request or if appropriate. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students are encouraged to ask and answer questions during lectures Written communication - 5 online assessments, 2 group and 3 individual, exam consists of 1 essay and 10 SAQs Group/Team working - Two of the five online assessment are group/collaborative assessments

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Project management - Although not a formal requirement there is potential for project management in the two group online assessments which each span a two week period in the semester. Leadership - No formal requirement for leadership however there is potential for a leader in each of the group assessments. Innovation/Creativity - Interpretation (lateral thinking) of case study findings in the two group online assessments. Research - Online group assessments require interpretation of laboratory findings and tests in case studies. Some information is given in lectures but also requires other reading/resources such as primary souces, internet etc. Analytical skills - All online assessments require analysis of information e.g. interpretation and analysis of lab test results in a case study (as in group assessments) or in the understanding/analysis of primary literature (individual assessments). Problem solving - All online assessment have an element of problem solving Prerequisites BIOL10212 Biochemistry (Optional) BIOL10401 Introduction to Laboratory Science (Optional) BIOL10811 Body Systems (Optional) Recommended Reading Hoffbrand AV and Moss PAH Essential Haematology (6th edition) 2011 Blackwell Publishing - Recommended Hughes-Jones NC, Wickramasinghe SN & Hatton CSR Lecture notes on Haematology (8th edition) 2009 Wiley-Blackwell Optional Moore G, Knight G, Blann A. Fundamentals of Biomedical Science: Haematology (1st Edition) 2010. Oxford University Press - Optional Teaching Staff Dr Shazia Chaudhry, Dr Michelle Keown

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ORGANISMAL GENETICS
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Kathy Hentges (kathryn.hentges@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21371
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims The aim of this unit is to provide students with a deeper understanding of fundamental genetic concepts. Specifically, emphasis will be placed on understanding the analysis of mutant phenotypes generated through various genetic manipulations in a wide range of organisms to determine gene function, providing a foundation for further study in any discipline. Intended Learning Outcomes After completion of this unit, students will be able to describe model systems used in the study of genetics, understand different types of mutant alleles, be able to link genotype and phenotype variations and understand how genetic manipulations aid in dissecting gene function. They will also gain an understanding of approaches used to investigate human genetic disease. Furthermore, they will understand how genetic approaches are integrated with other biochemical, physiological and developmental analyses to facilitate the uncovering of biological mechanism and its relevance to the whole organism. Lecture Content Genomic Alterations: Introduction to large-scale chromosomal rearrangements, the concepts of ploidy, dosage balance, duplication events and hybrid organisms. These lectures will feature examples from species such as yeast, plants, and worms to compare methodologies for dissecting gene function and genome conservation. Genetic Analysis: These lectures will examine the ways in which gene function can be determined through genetic experimentation. Both loss of function and gain of function approaches will be explored. Examples from a variety of organisms will be covered. Complex Traits: Examples of non-Mendelian phenotypes and effects of multiple genes on phenotypes will be presented, with an example of mouse models of human diseases. Alleles and Genetic Interactions: These lectures will examine how varied mutations affect gene function and discuss specific genetic reagents for the study of allele series and somatic mutations. Specific examples of using genetic approaches to identify signalling pathways and understand brain function will be discussed. Fitness, Epistasis, and Plasticity: The concepts of genetic interactions, copy number variations, and genotype-environment interactions will be presented. Human Genetics: Specific genetic approaches used in the study of human disease and human genetic variation will be discussed. Future challenges to identify genetic contributions to human disease will be explored. eLearning Activity There are 5 ePBL scenarios in which the student assumes the role of a genetics researcher to perform virtual genetics experiments and interpret data. Each scenario has quiz questions with feedback provided for incorrect answers. Completion of each scenario within the specified time period achieves 1% of unit marks. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination (85%), in-class poster session (10%) and completion of online ePBL exercises (5%). Feedback Feedback will be provided to students on their group work by written comments on marking sheets and direct dialogue with instructors at the in-class poster session. Group feedback will also be given by peer assessment of posters at the in-class poster session. Individual feedback is provided by completion of the ePBL scenarios, which have quiz questions embedded within 148

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the ePBL with feedback for incorrect answers. Students can also obtain individual feedback on their work by completing the unit mini-exam. Individual feedback is also offered from selfmarking of the in-class mock exam according to the marking criteria provided. Employability Skills Oral communication - Students present a poster at an in-class poster session. Written communication - Students answer exam questions in short-answer and essay format. Group/Team working - Students work in groups to produce poster for presentation. Project management - Students work in groups to produce poster for presentation. Leadership - Poster group work allows students to take ownership of their project. Innovation/Creativity - Poster group work relies on students choosing topic and presenting in visually appealing manner. Analytical skills - Students work through virtual experimental scenarios to solve problems. Problem solving - Students work through virtual experimental scenarios to solve problems. Prerequisites BIOL10221 Molecular Genetics (Strongly Recommended) BIOL10521 Genes, Evolution & Development (Strongly Recommended) Recommended Reading Griffiths AJF, Wessler, Carroll, Doebley, Introduction to Genetic Analysis (10th ed.), 2011, WH Freeman, Recommended Meneely P, Advanced Genetic Analysis: Genes, Genomes & Networks in Eukaryotes, 2009, Oxford University Press, Recommended Teaching Staff Dr Martin Baron, Dr Maggy Fostier, Dr Daniela Delneri, Dr Kathy Hentges

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INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Nicky High (nicky.high@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21381
Semester 1 Credits 10

Aims The aim of this unit is to provide an understanding of viruses and viral disease. It will provide an introduction to viral structure and function and explain how viruses subvert host cell function to generate viral factories. Details of the pathogenic mechanisms used by viruses to cause disease will be explained using examples such as the influenza virus and HIV. The design of viral vaccines will also be covered and their use in eradicating viral infections such as polio discussed. Intended Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will have an appreciation of: viral structure the interaction of virus and host the mechanisms of viral replication in host cells viral pathogenesis immune response to viral infections acute, chronic and latent viral infections viral vaccines and anti-viral drugs viral epidemiology Lecture Content What is a virus? Viral structure Viral genomes and replication Viral interactions with the host Acute viral infections Latent and persistent viral infections Viruses and immunodeficiency Viruses and Cancer Viral vaccines Anti-viral therapy Viral evolution Emerging viral infections Zoonotic viral diseases eLearning Activity HIV doesnt cause AIDS The Duesberg phenomenon. Students will be asked to address the nine points made by Duesberg and produce a rebuttal of his contention, made in his original Science article, that HIV is not the cause of AIDS because it fails to meet the postulates of Koch and Henle, as well as six cardinal rules of virology. Assessment 1.5 hour written examination at the end of the unit (75%); eLearning project (20%); MCQs (5%). Feedback Feedback will be provided on the eLearning projects. Knowledge will also be assessed by an optionAL MCQ exams set towards the end of the course.

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Employability Skills Written communication - 1000 word assignment in which the students have to respond to the nine assertions by Duesberg in which he claims that HIV does not cause HIV. Research - The student has to use text books and journals to respond to the points raised in the assignment. Analytical skills - The students have to think about Duesbergs comments and analyse what they mean to select the correct facts from the literature to demonstrate that Duesbergs comments about HIV are wrong. Prerequisites None Recommended Reading Dimmock NJ, Easton AJ & Leppard KN, Introduction to Modern Virology (6th ed.), 2007, Blackwell Publishing. Cann AJ, Principles of Molecular Virology (4th ed.), 2005, Academic Press Flint SJ, Enquist LW, Racaniello VR & Skalka AM Principles of Virology (3rd ed.), 2009, ASM Press. Teaching Staff Dr. Nicky High, Professor David Robertson

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ANATOMY OF THE SPECIAL SENSE ORGANS


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Tokiharu Takahashi (tokiharu.takahashi@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21402
Semester 2 Credits 10

NOTE: This unit is for Anatomical Sciences students only. As the spotter exams cannot be rescheduled, you should avoid arranging any appointments or extracurricular activities in the lecture course (usually Friday 14:00-16:00) after week 5. Aims This unit focuses on the anatomy of the head and neck with a particular focus on the special sense organs. The aim is to provide students with a good foundation in these topic areas through hands-on experience of the overall craniofacial structure. Intended Learning Outcomes The students will be able to: Describe the anatomy and histology of the skull/CNS and the special sense organs Explain the topological disposition and functional organisation of craniofacial organs Explain the nerve and blood supply of craniofacial organs Discuss the development of these structures Identify all the above structures on prosections and models Lecture Content The emphasis is hands-on practical anatomy rather than teaching through lectures. There will be 24 seminars/spotters using prosections and models on the following topics: Anatomy of skull (bones, foramina) Overview of brain and cranial nerves Anatomy of vision (layers of eyeball, extraocular muscles, retina, visual pathway) Development of the eye Anatomy of hearing and balance (external, middle, internal ear) Development of the ear Anatomy of taste (oral cavity) Anatomy of smell (nose) and paranasal sinuses

eLearning Content Four eLearning modules will be constructed which will reinforce anatomy learnt in the seminars in preparation for spotter exams and build upon the skills learnt in BIOL21291. These are on: brain/CN/skull, eyes, nose/tongue andears . Assessment Short-medium answer questions (answer 4 out of 8) 3 spotter exams (eyes, nose/tongue, ears) 4 eLearning modules

1.5 hours 50% 10 minutes/spotter 45% 1 hour/module 5%

Feedback Feedback will be given after completion of each of the eLearning modules and the spotter exams. Oral feedback will be given during each seminar while students handle specimens and try to find structures. Employability Skills Oral communication - This unit is specifically designed for Anatomy students only. The class is small and teaching is based on an interactive style between staff, students and specimen. Written communication - eLearning and short essay questions in examination. 152

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Group/Team working - Examinations of models/specimen with colleagues in a small group. Research - The anatomical skills are assessed by spotter exams in every section. Extensive research skill will be developed through the preparation. Analytical skills - Analytical skills of anatomical/histological structure will be obtained through interactive teaching. Problem solving - The anatomical knowledge/skills are assessed by spotter exams in every section. Other - The understanding of the relationship between shapes and functions will be important not only for biology. The students will obtain this intellectual skill through the interaction and handling with human anatomical specimen. This unit will also provide an anatomical foundation for future career such as opticians, speech therapists or medical professions. Prerequisites BIOL21291 Human Anatomy & Histology (Compulsory) Recommended Reading Snell RS Clinical Anatomy by Regions (8th edition) 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Moore & Dalley Clinically Orientated Anatomy (5th edition) 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Gosling JA Human Anatomy (4th Edition) 2002 Mosby Stevens A & Lowe JS Human Histology (3rd Edition) 2005 Elsevier Cui D Atlas of Histology with Functional and Clinical Correlations 2011 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins Ross M and Pawlina D Histology: A Text and Atlas (6th edition) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Schoenwolf GC Larsen's Human Embryology (4th edition) 2008 Churchill Livingstone Sadler TW Langman's Medical Embryology (11th edition) 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Teaching Staff Dr Bip Choudhury, Dr Stefan Gabriel, Dr Niggy Gouldsborough, Dr Tokiharu Takahashi

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ALPINE BIODIVERSITY & FOREST ECOLOGY (RSM FIELD COURSE)


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Daniela Delneri (d.delneri@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21422
Semester 2 Credits 10

Aims The unit aims to provide training in research techniques for studying biodiversity and investigating ecological problems in a mosaic of mountain habitats such as meadows, high pastures and forests. The unit focuses on observational methods, experimental design, quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques, statistical analysis and interpretation of the results and delivery of the findings. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will be able: to use a wide range of sampling methods to quantify habitat characteristics to identify organisms to assess biodiversity to assess community structure to gain knowledge of the species and ecology of European mountain forest habitat to introduce student to land and forest management and conservation to identify fundamental biological questions to recognize accurate research approaches and to use correct analytical techniques to use problem solving, innovation and creativity to monitor and self-correct progress throughout the development of the project to give ethical consideration of field base investigation including animal handling and welfare to appraise critically their findings to use experimental and quantitative approaches to the investigation of natural environments. to use sampling techniques to use identification keys to record professionally data in lab book to communicate scientific findings (both written and oral) to manage experimental plan to develop leadership to analyse and critical evaluate literature to develop team working and group skills to understand ethical values concerning wildlife Field Course Content This is a 14 day course (July 2014) held in the Field Station Baita Torino located on the Pura Mountain pass in the Italian Carnic Alps. The two-week residential format provides a unique opportunity for students to immerse themselves in research. Besides providing a basic knowledge on how to identify organisms and quantify habitat variables, this course offers a challenging framework to explore the biological dynamics within different ecosystems. Students are also encouraged to formulate working hypotheses based on ecological observation, beginning the transition from being relatively passive consumers of scientific information to become active and competent investigators of new facts. By the end of the course, students will have acquired a degree of self-sufficiency and independence in their understanding of how to plan and carry out a scientific investigation.

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Part 1: Biodiversity survey of different ecosystem. The first few days of the course, students will use a variety of sampling methods to measure habitat variables, and to study and identify organisms found in the different forest and mountain areas (i.e. plants, animal, fungi, lichens etc.). The students will be taught how to quantify ecological characteristics and how to use taxonomic keys for identification, and particular focus will be given on comparing and contrasting the different habitats studied. Students will be tested on their acquired knowledge of the local biodiversity and different alpine ecosystems through a test. These few days will also help the student to gather ideas for their individual research project. Part 2: In small tutorial groups, together with demonstrators, each student designs and plans their individual project focusing on testing a hypothesis they have identified. This part includes training in experimental design, choice of statistical methods, and the use of lab books for recording data. Each student will produce a detailed experimental plan including the rationale and significance of the study, hypothesis/expectations based on pilot preliminary data, methodology to be used and the schedule for data collections including a contingency plan. Part 3: Data collection takes place over several days. Data are explored, analysed and interpreted. Initial data analyses and conclusions are presented and discussed in small tutorial groups. Follow up hypothesis are identified and if time allows a further round of data collection is carried out. Data are then written up in a concise scientific report, to develop the students ability to summaries effectively their finding. Part 4: The project is presented to the rest of the students in a final one day workshop. Students will be trained to convey efficiently their hypothesis and the key findings to their peers, within the given time frame (12 min). Students chair the sessions and participate in the marking of the oral presentations. Field Course RSMs will require a financial contribution to be made early in the first semester of your second year. In cases of financial hardship, you should contact the Senior Advisor as soon as possible. RSM units may NOT be changed, once registered, without the written permission of the RSM Coordinator concerned and the Faculty Senior Advisor. Assessment Biodiversity test 10%; Experimental plan report (3-4 pages) 25%; Lab book 5%; Oral presentation (12 mins) 20%; Concise final report (4-5 pages) 30%; Students contribution to the field course 10%. Feedback Feedback provided on daily basis through tutorials and one-to-one discussions. Employability Skills Oral communication - The students have to present their project, data, results and conclusions in a 12 minute talk. The oral contribution is marked and counts 20% towards the final mark of the unit. Written communication - The students have to write an Experimental Plan Report (25% of the overall mark) and a Concise Final Project Report where they summarise their findings and conclusions (30% of the total mark of the unit). Group/Team working - The students are split into tutorial groups (4-5 students per group) and they are encouraged to report their findings and discuss each others projects daily. Project management - The students will conceive and manage their own experimental project. Leadership - The course is design to give opportunity to the keen students to take leadership in organising evening activity and the final leaving party. Usually two students each week volunteers to take charge of this duty. Moreover the students have the opportunity to volunteer to chair one of the oral sessions, since there are usually six sessions and therefore six students can take this opportunity. 155

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Innovation/Creativity - Innovation and creativity is very much supported. The students are encouraged to find the biological questions that they are interested in and to conceive the experimental project. A mark is awarded for the Experimental Plan Report reflective of the student ability to formulate new research ideas and planning and organising in a sound manner the experiments (counting 25% of the total mark of the unit). Most of the project requires building up and assembly of appropriate material for the research project, fuelling the creativity of the students (i.e. chamber&#39;s of choice for insects; cardboard flowers; fish&#39;s trap etc.). Research - The whole course is about research. The students learn how to formulate a scientific question, and how to tackle it experimentally. Results and data are collected, analysed and conclusions are drawn. Pro, Cons and drawbacks of the project are discussed in tutorial groups. Analytical skills - The course requires students to analyse statistically the ecological/behavioural data which were collected. Problem solving - During the project the students have to overcome and solve several technical and scientific challenges. Other - The students live and study together for two weeks as a community, developing group skills, and learning how to adapt to different needs. Pre-/Co-requisites None Recommended Reading Background material is provided during the course. Ennos, AR Statistical and Data Handling Skills (2nd edition), Prentice Hall, 2007

Teaching Staff Daniela Delneri, Henry McGhie, Tucker Gilman

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CRITICAL WRITING SKILLS


Unit Coordinator(s): Professor Liz Sheffield Liz.Sheffield@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL21701
Semester 1 Credits 0

Aims To assess and enhance current language skill utilisation competences To enhance understanding of what constitutes academic malpractice, including plagiarism, and how to avoid it To support self-learning through use of computer based training To develop critical reading and writing skills, and good practice in time management and organisational skills as part of continued learning To provide training in the use of referencing software (Endnote) Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this unit students should understand what constitutes academic malpractice including plagiarism, be aware of how we as a University detect plagiarism and the consequences, and be aware of how to avoid committing it. Students should have enhanced critical reading and academic writing skills and be able to store, retrieve and use references within Endnote. Content This eLearning course and the assessments are delivered entirely on-line, via Blackboard on a weekly basis. The course begins with a module which provides an assessment of language competencies, and leads on to a self-contained module on academic malpractice including plagiarism, with a final assessment timed for completion prior to submission of assessed written work. Neither of these modules contribute to the final mark, but must be completed before the rest of the eLearning materials can be accessed. The remainder of the course is designed to help improve your critical reading and writing skills. The aim is to help turn the average writer into one who can read and write in an academic style, and to help the accomplished writer refine and improve further. Over the remaining weekly modules the user receives information on the basics of writing all the way up to the finer points of professional academic style. The last modules introduce Endnote and provides training on the use of this time-saving and helpful referencing software that should prove invaluable for dissertation, report and other scientific writing. Assessment Each assessment is in the standard format of two attempts per assessment, and a mean mark of 70% is required to pass the unit, which is a required component of the tutorial unit (failure will lead to loss of compensation for poor examination performance and a requirement for satisfactory completion of the material in the unit during the summer vacation). Feedback Each assessment contains feedback on responses. Employability Skills Written communication - Requires students to write 3 summaries of scientific articles Other - Peer review of summaries Prerequisites None Recommended Reading - all online within the unit. 157

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WHAT IS SCIENCE FOR?


Unit Coordinator(s):; Dr Sarah Chan (sarah.chan@manchester.ac.uk)

BIOL22020
Semester 1&2 Credits 0

Aims To equip students with an understanding of the broader context of science To introduce students to key concepts and issues in science ethics To encourage students to reflect on the role of science in society and their own part in this as students of science and as scientists-in-training Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this unit students should have developed an understanding of The broader context of science The key concepts and issues in science ethics The role of science in society Content What is Science for? (Science, Ethics and Society) is a learning strand that runs through the tutorial component in each year of the degree programme, covering a range of topics relevant to the ethics of science and innovation and exploring the social and ethical implications of science. Through the activities of the course, students will be encouraged to consider and reflect on questions such as: What is the purpose of science? What role does science have in society? Is there such a thing as good science and bad science? What sort of research should we be doing, and who decides? Is there some research which is prima facie unethical and should not be pursued? To what extent are scientists responsible for the consequences of their research and/or the uses to which their research is put? What motivations are there for pursuing science? How do we evaluate the various reasons for pursuing scientific research from an ethical standpoint? How should scientific research be regulated? What justifies public funding of science? Are there reasons to be concerned about the commercial funding of science? Are there reasons to be concerned about the commercialisation of the fruits of scientific research?

In Year 2, the activities for this course unit comprise a case study discussion / debate in tutorials; preparation of a 3-page essay, which will be peer-assessed; and a 5-minute class presentation. Additional resources are available in the form of eLearning materials divided into four modules, each consisting of a e-lecture (both in podcast format and as a set of slides with written notes, for students to review in their own time) and associated reading materials, which may assist in the preparation of the essay. Assessment The assessed components are: Preparation of a 3-page essay on a choice of set topics Participation in peer-marking process and discussion 5-minute presentation in Tutorial Feedback Feedback on essays and presentations during tutorial 158

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Employability Skills Oral communication Students are required to prepare and deliver an oral presentation in their tutorial groups and to take part in class discussion. Written communication Students are required to prepare a 3 page essay that should clearly communicate their ideas and analysis in response to one of a number of set topics. Group/Team working 1) group discussion and participation in debate should improve students abilities to work together and communicate with others; 2) the peer-marking process relies on participation from the whole group, emphasising the imporatnace of teamwork to achieve a successful result. Project management Students will need to plan the preparation of their essays to meet set deadlines, requiring time management and organisational skills. Innovation/creativity Students are encouraged to express their own ideas and opinions in response to the material presented. Research Preparation of the essay will require students to conduct some degree of research, both guided and independent. Analytical skills The class discussion and essay both require students to analyse relevant arguments and issues in order to formulate their conclusions. Other Ethics and social responsibility are increasingly perceived as important across all areas. An improved awareness of the social and ethical context of their activities should enhance students value to potential employers. Pre-/Co-requisites None Recommended Reading All online within the unit.

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FROM CHOLERA TO AIDS: THE HISTORY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN EUROPE (1800-2000)


Unit Coordinator(s): Professor Michael Worboys (Michael.worboys@manchester.ac.uk)

HSTM20031/HSTM20081
Semester 1 Credits 10/20

Aims This course develops understanding of the historical links between epidemic diseases, cultures of health and healing, and the emergence of modern medicine and science. Students will examine case studies of important disease outbreaks in history, using a range of primary sources as well as secondary literature from history as well as other social scientific disciplines. By locating epidemic outbreaks within their wider historical contexts, the course integrates histories of medicine, biology, disease ecology and society. Intended Learning Outcomes Understand the complex historical relations between epidemic disease outbreaks and the particular cultural, social and political context Apply a disease-led approach to the history of medicine and microbiology Analyse the history of health and disease using quantitative and qualitative material Lecture Content Lectures form a connected series of explorations across the history of epidemics and follow the case study principle. Cholera I: Pandemics in Europe (1800-1900) Cholera II: Miasmas, germs and public health Tuberculosis I: Campaigns, treatments and experiences (1875-1939) Tuberculosis II: Antibiotics, clinical trials and global dimensions (1945-2000) Immunization I: Smallpox to diphtheria (1750-1950) Immunization II: Polio, MMR, HPV (1945-2010) Nosocomial Infections I: Hospitals, communities and cleanliness (1800-1950) Nosocomial Infections II: MRSA and infection control (1948-2000) HIV/AIDS I: Western case studies (1980-2000) HIV/AIDS II: Global health crisis Seminar Content Seminars consolidate lecture material through a set of weekly readings. Assessment 10 credit unit (HSTM20031) - 1500 word essay (50%); 2 hour examination (50%) 20 credit unit (HSTM20081) - 1500 word essay (25%); 2 hour examination (25%); 3000 word project report (50%) Feedback Students may ask questions at any time during lectures and seminars. Teaching staff will answer specific queries by email and during office hours, and will provide contact details in the course handbook or at lectures. All submitted coursework will be returned with annotations and an assessment sheet explaining the mark awarded. Employability Skills General Statement - Verbal communication skills are developed in seminars and writing skills in assignments; preparing for seminars and essays uses qualitative research skills and answering questions; initiative is developed through the learning demands of the course; the course requires organisation skills to meet deadlines and to coordinate the different learning resources used; seminars require working as part of group, adapting to different demands and negotiating with other students. 160

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Oral communication - Students encouraged to take part in discussion of the lecture material during seminar sessions Written communication - Feedback provided for a 1500 work coursework essay Innovation/Creativity - Students have the opportunity to be innovative in terms of how they address their essay topic Research - Research required for essay Analytical skills - Students critically examine case studies using primary and secondary literature and analyse the topics covered using both quantitative and qualitative materials Prerequisites None. Recommended Reading Hamlin, Christopher, Cholera: The Biography, Oxford 2009 (compulsory) Farmer, Paul, Infections and Inequalities. The Modern Plagues, London 1999 (background) Berridge, Virginia (ed.), Aids and Contemporary History, Cambridge 1993. (portions compulsory) Teaching Staff Professor Michael Worboys

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THE CRISIS OF NATURE: ISSUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Vladimir Jankovic (vladimir.jankovic@manchester.ac.uk)

HSTM20092/HSTM20592
Semester 2 Credits 10/20

Aims Pandemics, plastics, global warming, mass extinctions, disappearing forests both the popular media and scientists today increasingly speak in terms of environmental crisis. The aim of this course is to explore the following questions: How new are these concerns? What are the origins of environmental thinking? Indeed, what is meant by nature? What is thought to be the ideal relationship of the human species to the rest of the world? And do we have anything to learn from other cultures or from our own past? Intended Learning Outcomes By the end of this unit, a student taking this unit will be able: to analyse environmental movements and environmental legislation in the light of key scientific and ethical issues to see the global connections that link environmental changes and pay particular attention to how modern technology has changed our relationship with nature on a worldwide scale to analyse the many cultural and historical constructions of nature and to explore ideas about relations between nature and culture to be familiar with a wide range of perspectives on the environment social, cultural, scientific and political In addition, students taking the 20 credit version will be able: to find and research a topic of their own choosing; to find and assess critically primary and secondary sources; to write, with full scholarly apparatus, a report on their individual research project. Lecture Content Origins and meaning of nature Invention of the environment Risk Society Environmental health Climate Crisis Overfishing Catastrophes Food chains and GMOs Plastics Crises in the Media One lecture and one seminar per week Assessment 10 credit unit (HSTM20092) - 1000 word essay (50%); exam (50%) 20 credit unit (HSTM20592) - 1000 word essay (25%); exam (25%), project (50%) Employability Skills General: Critical analysis and independent evaluation of arguments in relevant literature. Communication skills developed during seminars. Effective writing skills (abstract summaries) and extended composition for Essays. Independent research, time management and

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organization of data for Projects. Team work in preparation for in seminars. Effective learning and revision techniques. Oral communication - Seminars discussions, debates Written communication - Essay and exam; short summaries when required Group/Team working - Each class divided in 4 groups with changing roles for each seminar. Working in groups to present, challenge, adjudicate and objectively pass verdict - a form of oral self-assessment Leadership - During seminars, group leaders are in charge of leading the group in the debate Innovation/Creativity - Students develop different interpretations to problem questions - on occasion work on highly localized problems even on campus (light saving proposals on basis of observations). In sessions, developing argument for maximum impact on jury. Jury creatively interprets defense and prosecution groups. Research - Primary and Secondary Analytical skills - Critical reading, essays - all based on analytical readings of sources Problem solving - Essays may require finding a solution to a problem: e.g. what is the key environmental issue on the campus of University of Manchester? Prerequisites None. Recommended Reading Cronon W Uncommon Ground 1996 W.W.Norton Soule M & Lease G Reinventing Nature: Responses to Postmodern Deconstruction 1995 Island Press Douglas M Purity and Danger 1984 London : Ark Vladimir Jankovic, Confronting the Climate (New York 2010). Teaching Staff Dr Vladimir Jankovic

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AN INTRODUCTION TO BIOETHICS: THEN AND NOW


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Sarah Chan; Dr Duncan Wilson (sarah.chan@manchester.ac.uk); (duncan.wilson@manchester.ac.uk)

HSTM20151/HSTM20651
Semester 1 Credits 10/20

Aims To understand why bioethics emerged during the late twentieth century, to critically assess its methods, and chart its impact on science and society To learn how bioethical controversies reflect historical, political and social factors To compare current and historical debates over specific issues To lead informed discussions about these issues. Intended Learning Outcomes By the end of this course, students will: have gained insights into major issues in bioethics: e.g., abortion, embryo research, human experiments, euthanasia and the scientific use of animals. understand the history of these issues, and how this informs current debates . be able to write and take part in informed discussions about these issues. know where to find material for further research. Lecture Content The lecture content comprises an introductory lecture followed by 10 lectures organised into two-week blocks, covering the historical background and ethical approaches to each of five topics. Week 1 Weeks 2 & 3 Weeks 4 & 5 Weeks 6 & 7 Weeks 8 & 9 Weeks 10 & 11 Introduction to bioethics: Its history, influences and methods. Abortion and Reproductive Rights. Embryo Research and Stem Cells. Human Experimentation. Issues at the End of Life: Euthanasia and Organ Donation. Animal Rights and Post-human ethics

Assessment 10 credit unit (HSTM20151) 1500 word essay (30%); examination (70%) 20 credit unit (HSTM20651) 1500 word essay (15%); examination (35%); 3000 word essay (50%) Feedback Teaching staff can usually answer specific queries by email or during office hours, and will provide contact details in the course handbook or at lectures. All submitted coursework will be returned with annotations and an assessment sheet explaining the mark awarded. In addition, students on the 20-credit unit will receive feedback on the development of their projects through individual supervision meetings. These will allow students to discuss students ideas about project coverage and structure with the course co-ordinator, who will also offer written comments on one full draft of the project (provided the student presents it according to an agreed timetable). Employability Skills Oral communication - Students are encouraged to take part in weekly seminar sessions, which encourage participation in group discussion and develop oral communication skills. 164

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Written communication - Assessment for this module involves essay writing. Students will develop their writing skills by discussing essay projects with supervisors and in groups. Group/Team working - Some seminar sessions involve group-based discussions of particular ethical issues. This will encourage students to work together, to summarize the often different views of their peers and to communicate these to the class. Project management - Students are expected to manage the materials for the essay writing assignments, collecting and summarizing research materials and incorporating these into a written piece of work. This will develop time management and project skills. Innovation/Creativity - Students will develop their creativity skills as part of the written assignments, where they write as a doctor or ethicist from a particular period, on a particular subject: ie., on abortion in the 1960s. Research - The essay projects involve independent research, which will enhance students research and project management skills. Analytical skills - Students will develop their analytical skills by reading and summarizing scientific and ethical literature, both for the discussion sessions and the written assignments. Prerequisites None. Recommended Reading Renee Fox and Judith Swazey, Observing Bioethics 2008 Oxford University Press Harris, J. (ed) Bioethics 2001 Oxford University Press Jonson, A.R. The Birth of Bioethics 1998 Oxford University Press Teaching Staff Dr Sarah Chan, Dr Duncan Wilson, Dr Robert Kirk

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SCIENCE, THE MEDIA & THE PUBLIC


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Jeff Hughes (jeff.hughes@manchester.ac.uk)

HSTM20181/HSTM20681
Semester 1 Credits 10/20

Aims This course explores the structure, meanings, and implications of science communication through media by reading scholarly research and critically analysing media texts. We will look at the contexts for science in the media including the role that science serves in these texts, how they contribute to the entertainment value of media, and how they feed back to science itself. We will explore the themes of science and media across different media formats, historical periods, and cultural contexts. The course will focus on the differences between science communicated through the written word, visually, and aurally. We will also evaluate the differences between science communicated through news media and entertainment media. Intended Learning Outcomes Students will understand the communication of science, technology and medicine through media including the differences between various media formats, appreciate medias impact on the cultural meanings of science, and comprehend the increasing blurring between fictional and non-fictional media with regards to science. They will also increase their media literacy and develop interpretative and analytical thinking. In addition, the 20 credit version of the unit will extend and develop students research and writing skills through an individual research project. Lecture Content Lectures form a connected series of case studies of various aspects of science in society and culture and will include guest lecturers from a range of science communication and media outlets. Lectures will cover the following indicative themes: Introduction Science and its Publics News Content and News Production Media Frames and Media Effects Public Understanding of Science and Policy Making Popular Science Books and Magazines Science in Museums and Science Centres Science Documentaries Wildlife and Natural History Films Literature, Films, Television and Science

Seminar Content Seminars consolidate lecture material through group discussion of a set of weekly readings & media texts, group activities in class etc. Assessment 10 credit unit (HSTM20181) - group project (50%); coursework (50%) 20 credit unit (HSTM20681) - group project (25%); coursework (25%); 3000 word research project based on individual research (50%) Feedback Students may ask questions at any time during lectures and seminars. Teaching staff can usually answer specific queries by email or during office hours, and will provide contact details in the course handbook or at lectures. All submitted coursework will be returned with annotations and an assessment sheet explaining the mark awarded.

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Employability Skills Oral communication - students will participate in group discussions and small group-work, allowing them to develop oral communication skills in an informal setting. Written communication - students will produce short and longer pieces of written work as part of the assessment for this unit, and receive written feedback. Group/team working - students will participate in group discussions and small group-work in class, and a significant part of the assessment for the unit is through a group project. Project management - student groups are required to self-manage their group projects using social media or other techniques. Past students have found this an excellent way to use and develop their skills in these areas. Leadership - students are sometimes required to act as leaders or spokespersons for their group. These skills can be developed in a friendly and informal setting. Innovation/creativity - writing assessments and the group project encourage students to think creatively and analytically and to innovate within the general framework of the unit topic. Research - the assessments for this unit require some independent research, generally on topics chosen by the student. A major part of the assessment for the 20-credit version of the unit is an individual research project. Analytical skills - lectures and seminars encourage students to think critically and analytically about the relationships between science and the media, and about their place in contemporary society. Prerequisites None Recommended Reading Bucchi, M. Science and the Media 1998, Routledge Russell, N. Communicating Science. Professional, Popular, Literary. 2010, CUP. Teaching Staff Dr. Jeff Hughes.

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THE INFORMATION AGE


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr James Sumner (james.sumner@manchester.ac.uk)

HSTM20282/HSTM20782
Semester 2 Credits 10/20

Aims How did information-processing equipment come to dominate, by the beginning of the twentyfirst century, so many areas of human life? Who are the winners and losers in a computerised, automated, data-driven world? Is information technology applied computer science, or applied bureaucracy? This course tries to answer this question by tracing the histories of a range of technological developments, from the mechanical calculating machines of the nineteenth century to the global networked systems of today. The course is equally suitable for computer science students and those who have never studied the field, but are interested in learning more about the background of one of the dominant technologies of our time. Intended Learning Outcomes By the end of this unit, it is expected that a student taking the 10 credit version will have a good working knowledge of major developments in the history of information technology, particularly from the Second World War onwards have developed skills in critical reasoning and analysis, understanding the different motivations of historical characters in the history of information technology, and the differences in the ways they interpret and describe events be able to appreciate, and display the ability to analyse and discuss, the different factors - social, technical, sometimes accidental - which shape the history of computing, and the definition of the computer and its users In addition, a student taking the 20 credit version will have defined (in consultation with the lecturer) a research project in the history of computing be able to find, and assess critically, relevant primary and secondary sources have produced, with full scholarly apparatus, a report (or alternative piece of work, subject to the lecturers approval) based on this research. Lecture Content Lectures and seminars are likely to cover the following themes: Charles Babbage and mechanical calculation Managing information before the digital computer Early digital computers and the power of legends Robots in reality and fiction Alan Turing and thinking machines Software The 1980s: computers in the home Women, men and computers Information-age fears Boffins, wizards, hackers and nerds: images of computer people Mass internet access and online identity

Assessment 10 credit unit (HSTM20282) - 1500 word essay (50%); 2 hour exam (50%) 20 credit unit (HSTM20782) - 1500 word essay (25%); 2 hour exam (25%); extended project of around 3000 words (50%) 168

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Prerequisites None. Feedback Students may ask questions at any time during lectures and seminars. Teaching staff will answer specific queries by email and during office hours, and will provide contact details in the course handbook or at lectures. All submitted coursework will be returned with annotations and an assessment sheet explaining the mark awarded. In addition, students on the 20-credit version (HSTM20782) will receive comments on the progress of their projects through individual supervision meetings. Employability Skills Oral communication - Half the classroom time each week is devoted to seminar discussion based on a reading or research task. All students will be involved in oral discussion. Written communication - All students write a 1500-word essay in standard humanities form, and receive individual written feedback. Innovation/Creativity - Throughout the course, students are expected to give their own interpretations of the ideas and narratives presented, through in-class discussion and in their written work. Research - All assessed work is based on independent source research. Analytical skills - All work on this course involves the critical examination of source materials (who wrote this, when and why? What was the intended audience? Did it have the intended effect?...) Problem solving - All essay-writing is a form of problem-solving! Other - This course has a particularly broad intake from across the University, and provides opportunities to interact with students trained in a wide range of disciplines. Recommended Reading Martin Campbell-Kelly and William Aspray, Computer: a history of the information machine, 2nd ed. Boulder: Westview 2004 (required) Eric Swedin and David Ferro, Computers: the life story of a technology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press 2005 (Recommended) Paul Ceruzzi, A History of Modern Computing, 2nd ed. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press 2003 (Recommended) Steven Levy, Hackers: heroes of the computer revolution, updated edition. London: Penguin 2001 (Recommended) Sherry Turkle, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. New York: Basic 2011 (Recommended) Teaching staff Dr James Sumner

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FROM FRANKENSTEIN TO THE MATRIX: HSTM20302/HSTM20802 SCIENCE FICTION AND FILM


Unit Coordinator(s): Dr Jane Gregory jane.gregory@manchester.ac.uk Semester 2 Credits 10/20

Aims To explore through literature and film the ways that ordinary people have reacted to developments in science and technology, and their fears as well as hopes for the future. This course takes a selection of classic texts and films from the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries to see what continuities and differences there have been in the public imagination of science and technology over this period. Intended Learning Outcomes to develop the ability to take historical approaches to science, technology & medicine in literature & film to understand Science Fiction as a genre to demonstrate knowledge of the chronology of changes in popular responses to science, technology and medicine over the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries to enhance critical thinking skills through an exploration of debates about the relationship between literature & science to take part in informed discussions of these topics and issues to comprehend Science Fictions impact on the cultural meanings of science, technology and medicine to improve their science literacy through an understanding of the ways scientific images are constructed, interpreted, and transformed for Science Fiction. 20 credit unit only: to find and research a topic of their own choosing; to find and assess critically primary and secondary sources; to write, with full scholarly apparatus, a report on their individual research project Lecture Content Lectures form a connected series of explorations across the history of SF and will include several guest lectures from British SF authors. Lectures will cover the following SF texts: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein H.G. Wells, The Time Machine Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward and William Cameron Menzies, Things to Come Aldous Huxley, Brave New World Walter Miller, A Canticle for Leibowitz Tony Ballyntyne, Twisted Metal Geoff Ryman, Air Andrew Niccol, GATTACA Andy and Larry Wachowski, The Matrix and Ridley Scott, Blade Runner James Cameron, Avatar and Neill Blomkamp, District 9 Seminar Content Seminars consolidate lecture material through a set of weekly SF readings and media texts. Assessment 10 credit unit (HSTM20302) - 1500 word essay (50%); Seminar Responses (50%) 20 credit unit (HSTM20802) - 1500 word essay (25%); Seminar Responses (25%); 3000 word research project based on a case study (50%)

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Feedback Students may ask questions at any time during lectures and seminars. Teaching staff can usually answer specific queries by email or during office hours, and will provide contact details in the course handbook or at lectures. All submitted coursework will be returned with annotations and an assessment sheet explaining the mark awarded. Employability Skills Written communication - All assignments involve written communication. Students have one long essay and three short written pieces. Group/Team working - Students do group work extensively in seminars. Innovation/Creativity - Students develop creative skills through some of the assignments where they apply their knowledge of science fiction history to develop a new science fiction story based on an existing movie. Research - Students undertake research into science fiction topics for their essays. Analytical skills - The whole point of the course is to develop students analytical and critical thinking skills. They have to critically read science fiction literature and academic texts. Other - Students develop skills in media literacy. Prerequisites None Recommended Reading Primary reading is indicated by the 'lecture content'. Critical literature to discuss themes (eg utopias, science and the future, human/machine) is introduced, such as: Haynes R From Faust to Strangelove: Representations of the Scientist in Western Literature 1994 Johns Hopkins University Press Roberts A Science Fiction: The New Critical Idiom 2000 London: Routledge Aldiss B The Billion Year Spree 1973 London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson

Teaching Staff Dr Jane Gregory

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HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS
Unit Coordinator(s): Dr John Kennedy (jay.kennedy@manchester.ac.uk)

HSTM20482/HSTM20982
Semester 2 Credits 10/20

Aims The aims of the course are to examine the development of mathematics as part of wider culture, from Ancient Greece (and even earlier) to the twentieth century. The objectives of the course are that students should achieve a thorough understanding of how mathematics has always formed part of a wider culture, and a historical grasp of how the mathematics and culture have interacted. Intended Learning Outcomes By the end of this Unit, students will be able: to show an appreciation of various approaches and methods in the history of mathematics; to demonstrate a knowledge of the main developments in the history of mathematics; to have a critical appreciation of the place of mathematics in wider culture; to take part in informed discussions on these topics and issues; to reflect critically on the possibilities and limits mathematical thinking In addition, students taking the 20 credit version will be able: to find and research a topic of their own choosing; to find and assess critically secondary sources, and some primary sources; to write, with full scholarly apparatus, a report on their individual research project. Lecture Content Ancient Babylonian and Egyptian Mathematics China/India Islam Renaissance Perspective, algebrae and methods 17th Century: Geometry, instruments, Galileo, Dee, calculus Analysis and Algebra in the 18th and 19th centuries Probability and statistics Non-Euclidian Geometry Crisis in Foundations Mathematical Physics Hardy v Hogben Ethnomathematics Assessment - 10 credit unit (HSTM20482) - essay (50%); exam (50%) - 20 credit unit (HSTM20982) - essay (25%), exam (25%), project (50%) Feedback Students may ask questions at any time during lectures and seminars. Teaching staff can usually answer specific queries by email or during office hours, and will provide contact details in the course handbook or at lectures. All submitted coursework will be returned with annotations and an assessment sheet explaining the mark awarded. Employability Skills Written communication - We ask for an ambitious essay in this class (two in the 20 cr version). Students negotiate a topic related to their career interests, digest recent research, and write a critical paper which advances an original thesis (or at least one they have not encountered in the literature). 172

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Project management - The essay requires quite a lot of initiative and organization: choosing topics, assembling reading lists, outline a problem and proposed solution. Individual meetings with students to help them along. Innovation/Creativity - The essay is fun and creative. Research - Interviews with each student including recommendations to get them started, but students do quite a lot of self-started research. Analytical skills - This course is designed to teach mathematics and science students to do the kind of critical thinking that is at the core of the Humanities. They must frame a topic, assess previous work, and propose a new idea. We emphasize critical thinking: analysis of evidence, advancing arguments, etc. Prerequisites A Level Mathematics is required Recommended Reading There is no single textbook for the course, but the following provide a useful introduction to some of the themes of the course: Fauvel J & Gray J (1987) The History of Mathematics: a Reader. London: Macmillan Grattan-Guinness I (1997) The Fontana History of the Mathematical Sciences. London: Fontana Katz, V (1998) A History of Mathematics: an Introduction. New York: Addison Wesley Teaching Staff Dr John Kennedy

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LANGUAGE UNITS
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures

LANGUAGES
Semester 1 & 2

Students registered on a with language degree programme only. For further information please contact: School of Arts, Languages and Cultures Faculty of Humanities Room S3.5 Samuel Alexander Building www.alc.manchester.ac.uk School Receptionist Tel: 0161 275 8311
Programme Chinese Studies Programme Director James St. Andr james.st-andre@manchester.ac.uk Barbara Lebrun Barbara.lebrun@manchester.ac.uk Margaret Littler margaret.littler@manchester.ac.uk Stephen Milner stephen.j.milner@manchester.ac.uk Jonathan Bunt jonathan.bunt@manchester.ac.uk Lcia S lucia.sa@manchester.ac.uk Caterina Sinibaldi caterina.sinibaldi@manchester.ac.uk Programme Administrator Jonathan Powell jonathan.powell@manchester.ac.uk Gill Worrall gill.worrall@manchester.ac.uk Wendy Howat wendy.howat@manchester.ac.uk Rachel Corrigan rachel.corrigan@manchester.ac.uk Jonathan Powell jonathan.powell@manchester.ac.uk Nicholas Prideaux nicholas.prideaux@manchester.ac.uk Rachel Corrigan rachel.corrigan@manchester.ac.uk

French Studies

German Studies

Italian Studies

Japanese

Spanish & Portuguese Studies European Studies

You should be aware that timetabling constraints may limit your choice of units and you should consult with your Programme Director when you meet at registration.

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MCEL UNITS
Manchester Science Enterprise Centre

MCEL
Semester 1 & 2

For further information please contact: Ruth Froes D42.5 Sackville Street Building Sackville Street. Tel: 0161 306 8480 Email: ruth.froes@mbs.ac.uk

https://mec.portals.mbs.ac.uk/StudyEnterpriseWithUs/Undergraduateunits.aspx

You should be aware that timetabling constraints may limit your choice of units and you should consult with your Programme Director when you meet at registration.

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PSYC UNITS
School of Psychological Sciences

PSYC
Semester 1 & 2

PLEASE NOTE:

PSYC units are only taken by students enrolled CognitiveNeuroscience & Psychology programme.

on

the

For information on PSYC units please contact ug.psychology@manchester.ac.uk or telephone 0161 275 2559. School of Psychological Sciences Coupland 1 Building Coupland Street www.psych-sci.manchester.ac.uk

You should be aware that timetabling constraints may limit your choice of units and you should consult with your Programme Director when you meet at registration.

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UCOL, ULBS & ULFR UNITS


The University College

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
Semester 1 & 2

Please note: units offered under the University College are not necessarily available to students on all programmes. The University College for Interdisciplinary Learning presents an opportunity for students to broaden their educational horizons. It offers courses that showcase the research and knowledge found at the University and encourages student to go beyond the boundaries of their degree programme. See the University College website for further information on available course units http://www.college.manchester.ac.uk/courses/. Students wishing to enrol on any of the above units must register their interest via the link on the individual unit description page on the University College website. See also the following section on Leadership in Action course units.

You should be aware that timetabling constraints may limit your choice of units and you should consult with your Programme Director when you meet at registration.

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LEADERSHIP IN ACTION
The Manchester Leadership Programme Semester 1 & 2

UCOL20021 UCOL20022 UCOL20020 UCOL20031 UCOL20032

Leadership in Action (sem 1) Leadership in Action (sem 2) Leadership in Action (sem 1&2) Leadership in Action (sem 1) - online unit Leadership in Action (sem 2) - online unit

See the Manchester Leadership Programme website for further details of the course units on offer http://www.mlp.manchester.ac.uk/academicunits/. The Manchester Leadership Programme offers a unique combination of academic units and volunteering. MLP students:

Learn the importance of leadership that promotes social, economic and environmental sustainability Gain an insight into some of the key issues facing 21st-century societies. Develop practical skills such as team working, project management and presentation skills.

Students wishing to enrol for a Leadership in Action unit should check the MLP website for application details http://www.mlp.manchester.ac.uk/apply/ or contact the MLP Team at leadership@manchester.ac.uk. You should be aware that timetabling constraints may limit your choice of units and you should consult with your Programme Director when you meet at registration.

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GLOSSARY
Campus Solutions
Campus Solutions Glossary of Terms Introduction This Glossary describes terms used in the Campus Solutions Student System and describes general usage including University of Manchester terminology.
Campus Solutions Term Academic Career Academic Group Academic Plan Academic Programme Class University Of Manchester Usage/Definition Study path e.g. Undergraduate, Postgraduate Taught Alternative Terminology Career/Study Level

Any body that can offer a course be it Faculty, School, School/Faculty Division, Subject Area A plan of the programme especially where there are Programme specialisations A course of Study made up of one or more course units Programme which leads to an award

A scheduled instance of a course unit Session Choice and enrolment of both mandatory and optional Class Enrolment Course Unit Selection course units Course An individual study unit of the programme Course Unit or Module Degree Emplid/ID Facility Matriculate Session Term Term Activate Units The award normally achieved at the end of the programme Award The number generated by Campus Solutions unique to the Person ID/Registration individual, whatever the role. For students it will also be Number their registration number. Class or meeting venue Building The process by which applicants are converted to students. Roll Forward A session can be either one of the two semesters or the full Semester term Academic year running from September to June Academic Year The process by which the system is informed that admitted and matriculated students are eligible to enrol on classes in Expected to register a particular term An award is achieved by attaining a mandatory amount of Credits units (units are earned by completion of a course)

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LEVEL 2 UNITS - BY UNIT NUMBER Code BIOL20000 BIOL20302 BIOL20312 BIOL20322 BIOL20332 BIOL20342 BIOL20352 BIOL20552 BIOL20682 BIOL20701 BIOL20872 BIOL20902 BIOL20912 BIOL20922 BIOL20932 BIOL20942 BIOL20972 BIOL20982 BIOL21041 BIOL21051 BIOL21061 BIOL21071 BIOL21092 BIOL21101 BIOL21111 BIOL21121 BIOL21132 BIOL21141 BIOL21152 BIOL21162 BIOL21172 BIOL21181 BIOL21192 BIOL21202 BIOL21211 BIOL21221 BIOL21232 Title Academic Tutorials Year 2 Science & Society RSM Biochemistry RSM Cell Biology RSM Genetics RSM General & Medical Microbiology RSM Molecular Biology RSM Tropical Ecology & Conservation (RSM Field Course) Tropical Biology (RSM Field Course) Data Handling Skills 3 Urban Biodiversity & Conservation RSM Clinical Sciences RSM Human Anatomy RSM Neuroscience RSM Pharmacology RSM Physiology RSM Developmental Biology RSM The Biology of Being Human Molecular and Cellular Biology EDM Organismal Biology EDM Human Sciences EDM Physiology & Biomedical Sciences EDM Dissertation Genome Maintenance & Regulation Proteins The Dynamic Cell Cell Metabolism & Metabolic Control Cell Membrane Structure & Function Omic Technologies & Resources Chemistry of Biomolecules Principles of Developmental Biology Prokaryotic Microbiology Principles of Infectious Disease Plants for the Future Ecology & Ecosystems Animal Diversity Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology 180

Code BIOL21242 BIOL21252 BIOL21261 BIOL21272 BIOL21281 BIOL21291 BIOL21302 BIOL21312 BIOL21321 BIOL21332 BIOL21341 BIOL21351 BIOL21361 BIOL21371 BIOL21381 BIOL21402 BIOL21422 BIOL21701 BIOL22020

Title Immunology Parasitology Endocrinology Human Physiology Animal Physiology Human Anatomy & Histology Clinical Drug Development Drugs & the Brain Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action Motor Systems Sensory Systems Cells & Tissues in Human Disease Haematology Organismal Genetics Introduction to Virology Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs Alpine Biodiversity & Forest Ecology (RSM Field Course) Critical Writing Skills online unit What is Science for? (Level 2)

HSTM20031 From Cholera to Aids: The History of Infectious Diseases in Europe 1800-2000 HSTM20092 The Crisis of Nature: Issues in Environmental History HSTM20151 An Introduction to Bioethics: Then and Now HSTM20181 Science, Media & the Public HSTM20282 The Information Age HSTM20302 From Frankenstein to the Matrix: Science Fiction and Film HSTM20482 History of Mathematics

LEVEL 2 UNITS - BY UNIT NAME Code BIOL21152 BIOL20000 BIOL21422 BIOL21402 BIOL21221 BIOL21281 BIOL20312 Title Omic Technologies & Resources Academic Tutorials Year 2 Alpine Biodiversity & Forest Ecology (RSM Field Course) Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs Animal Diversity Animal Physiology Biochemistry RSM 181

HSTM20151 An Introduction to Bioethics: Then and Now

Code BIOL20322 BIOL21141 BIOL21132 BIOL21351 BIOL21162 BIOL21302 BIOL20902 BIOL21701 BIOL20701 BIOL20972 BIOL21092 BIOL21312 BIOL21211 BIOL21261

Title Cell Biology RSM Cell Membrane Structure & Function Cell Metabolism & Metabolic Control Cells & Tissues in Human Disease Chemistry of Biomolecules Clinical Drug Development Clinical Sciences RSM Critical Writing Skills online unit Data Handling Skills 3 Developmental Biology RSM Dissertation Drugs & the Brain Ecology & Ecosystems Endocrinology

HSTM20031 From Cholera to Aids: The History of Infectious Diseases in Europe 1800-2000 HSTM20302 From Frankenstein to the Matrix: Science Fiction and Film BIOL21232 BIOL20342 BIOL20332 BIOL21101 BIOL21361 BIOL21291 BIOL20912 BIOL21272 BIOL21061 BIOL21242 BIOL21381 BIOL21321 BIOL21041 BIOL20352 BIOL21332 BIOL20922 BIOL21051 BIOL21371 BIOL21252 BIOL20932 BIOL21071 Fundamentals of Evolutionary Biology General & Medical Microbiology RSM Genetics RSM Genome Maintenance & Regulation Haematology Human Anatomy & Histology Human Anatomy RSM Human Physiology Human Sciences EDM Immunology Introduction to Virology Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action Molecular and Cellular Biology EDM Molecular Biology RSM Motor Systems Neuroscience RSM Organismal Biology EDM Organismal Genetics Parasitology Pharmacology RSM Physiology & Biomedical Sciences EDM 182

HSTM20482 History of Mathematics

Code BIOL20942 BIOL21202 BIOL21172 BIOL21192 BIOL21181 BIOL21111 BIOL20302 BIOL21341 BIOL20982 BIOL21121 BIOL20682 BIOL20552 BIOL20872 BIOL22020

Title Physiology RSM Plants for the Future Principles of Developmental Biology Principles of Infectious Disease Prokaryotic Microbiology Proteins Science & Society RSM Sensory Systems The Biology of Being Human The Dynamic Cell Tropical Biology (RSM Field Course) Tropical Ecology & Conservation (RSM Field Course) Urban Biodiversity & Conservation RSM What is Science for? (Level 2)

HSTM20181 Science, Media & the Public

HSTM20092 The Crisis of Nature: Issues in Environmental History HSTM20282 The Information Age

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