WASHINGTON, DC

Aspiratations
I haven't received a post card in years. Directly attributable to faster, cheaper ways of going places and staying in touch, I presume. Interestingly, the waning opportunity to send them, hasn't reduced the seemingly unending opportunities to create them. The same ingenuity that makes communications faster and cheaper has provided just about everybody with the ability to capture technically competent digital images. Around Washington, the District of Columbia, the outcome, inevitably, is lots of images that look a lot like the ones the mailman would bring. I am not sure that I would travel to the District to take pictures, but since I have lived here for all of the years that I have pursued photography I have wound up with plenty. Some are good and for sure many are bad, really bad. Both categories contain their share of what only can be called, pejoratively, postcards. This book contains thirty-five or so images picked, because at least aspirationally, the composition, the time of day or the weather conditions makes them seem like something other than postcards.
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Plate 1. Franklin Delano Roosvelt Memorial - Heading the Breadline

THE FDR MEMORIAL
Off the beaten track, seemingly only visited by hordes of high schools kids brought on buses with drivers made knowledgeable by annual repetitions. Hemmed in by ball fields and the wrong side of the tidal basin it ranks at the bottom of the presidential location plie with Grant, Taft and Garfield. ....

THE BREADLINE George Segal As an art student during the late 1940's, Segal was trained by leading abstractionists of the day. He first came to public attention during the late 1960's with his life-sized figures set among ordinary objects. Today, with a renowned and celebrated body of work, he has become better known for his bronzes that are sought for major museums, collections, and public spaces. His work is best known for subject matter that depicts and memorializes the common man and everyday occurrences. His method of sculpting provides him with pliant, hollow forms that serve as the basic structure for his compositions. Mr. Segal's work then seeks to illuminate philosophical and/or psychological truths about these naturalistic figures, their actions, and their times. Through simple, subtle gestures, and specific environments, he is able to communicate multiple levels of meaning. Considered to be among the finest and most innovative of his generation, George Segal's work has received numerous accolades. Mr. Segal has had retrospective exhibitions mounted in major museums throughout the world and is the subject of a PBS documentary and several books. He designed the letters and placement and carved the inscriptions that appear throughout the Memorial in both the outdoor gallery rooms and the passageways linking them. With more than thirty years experience and devotion to the exacting craft of stone carving, John Benson is widely recognized as America's leading designer and carver of monumental lettering in stone. Since 1961, he has worked at the John Stevens Shop in Newport, Rhode Island, and assumed its ownership in 1973. Founded in 1705, the John Stevens Shop is one of the oldest continuously operating business establishments in the United States. For nearly 300 years, it has maintained an unbroken standard of excellence in the carving of stone inscription. Under Mr. Benson, the shop has executed numerous prestigious commissions throughout the country, including the inscriptions on the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the Armand Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. In 1981, Mr. Benson participated in the design of the inscriptions for Maya

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Plate 3. Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial - The Breadline 5

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Plate 4. National Arboretum

COLUMNS
Washington is a city dominated by columns in its public spaces. As the axial load on a perfectly straight slender column with elastic material properties is increased in magnitude, this ideal column passes through three states: stable equilibrium, neutral equilibrium, and instability. The straight column under load is in stable equilibrium if a lateral force, applied between the two ends of the column, produces a small lateral deflection which disappears and the column returns to its straight form when the lateral force is removed. If the column load is gradually increased, a condition is reached in which the straight form of equilibrium becomes so-called neutral equilibrium, and a small lateral force will produce a deflection that does not disappear and the column remains in this slightly bent form when the lateral force is removed. The load at which neutral equilibrium of a column is reached is called the critical or buckling load. The state of instability is reached when a slight increase of the column load causes uncontrollably growing lateral deflections leading to complete collapse.
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Plate 5. United States Supreme Court

Plate 6. Washington National Cathredral

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THE TIDAL BASIN Reflection and Recreation he Tidal Basin is a partially man-made inlet adjacent to the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. It is part of West Potomac Park and is surrounded by the Jefferson Memorial and the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial. The basin covers an area of about 107 acres and is 10 feet deep. The concept of the Tidal Basin originated in the 1880’s to serve both as a visual centerpiece and as a means for flushing the Washington Channel, a harbor separated from the Potomac River by fill lands where East Potomac Park is situated. The basin is designed to release 250 million gallons of water captured at high tide twice a day. The inlet gates, located on the Potomac side of the basin, allow water to enter the basin during high tide. During this time, the outlet gates, on the Washington Channel side, close to store incoming water and block the flow of water and sediment into the channel. As the tide begins to ebb, the general outflow of water from the basin forces the inlet gates to close. This same force is applied to the outlet gates, which open into the channel. Silt build up is swept away by the extra force The Tidal Basin is lined by approximately 3,750 Japanese cherry trees. About 125 of those trees are "originals" from a 1912 gift of 3,000 trees from Tokyo Mayor Yukio Ozaki. The trees blossom in early spring and the event is marked by the National Cherry Blossom Festival. of water running from the Tidal Basin through the channel. The gates are maintained as navigable by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who has recently completed a project to restore the functioning of the gates.

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Plate 7. Jefferson Memorial

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Plate 8. Jefferson Memorial.

Plate 10. Jefferson Memorial

Plate 9. Washington Monument

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THE MALL

Officially established in 1965, National Mall & Memorial Parks contains some of the oldest protected park lands in the National Park Service. The areas within National Mall & Memorial Parks provides visitors with ample opportunities to commemorate presidential legacies; honor the courage and sacrifice of war veterans; celebrate the United States commitment to freedom and equality. Modiam, consecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod dui tatum zzrit praestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer si tisi tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat. praestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet. Quam, sis adigna conse feum nostrud dolor summy nim dolesequatum ea. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat.Modiam, consecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod dui tatum zzrit ecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod dui tatum zzrit praestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud

doloborer si tisi tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat. nit autat. enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer.veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrudtis dionulptis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat. raestrudtis dionulptis dio. praestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer si tisi tat. Tatt. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil ilTie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat. Modiam, consecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod. Modiam, consecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod dui tatumestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer si tisi tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat.Modiam, consecte vel iust.

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Plate 11. Washington Monument

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Plate 12. Washington Monument

Plate 13. Washington Monument

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Plate 14. National Museum of the American Indian

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Memorials on the Potomac
Arlington Memorial Bridge and its related architectural, engineering, sculptural and landscape features are significant as important elements in the neoclassical urban design of the National Capital as it evolved during the first third of the 20th century. Successfully integrated with Washington's grand plan, the bridge composition enhances the monumental city as well as the riverscape. The low, neoclassical bridge is 2,163 feet long ant 90 feet between balustrades, carrying a 60foot-wide roadway and 15-foot sidewalks. Nine broad arches cross the river; roadways pass through additional segmental-arched openings at either end. Except for the central bascule draw span, the bridge is of reinforced concrete construction faced with dressed North Carolina granite ashlar. The draw span is of the double leaf, underneath counterweight type and is faced with pressed ornamental molybdenum steel to blend with the masonry spans. Once one of the longest (216 ft.), heaviest (3000 tons), and fastest (one minute) such draw spans in the world it is now sealed and inoperative.
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Plate 15. Arlington Memorial Bridge

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Plate 16. Lincoln Memorial

Plate 17. U. S. Marine Corps War Memorial

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SNOW IN THE DISTRICT A rare occcurance Washington has a temperate climate typical of the Mid-Atlantic U.S., with four distinct seasons. Summer tends to be very hot and humid Spring and fall are mild. Winter can bring cold temperatures, frozen precipitation and, on occasions, major snowstorms. Modiam, consecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod dui tatum zzrit praestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer si tisi tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat. praestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet. Quam, sis adigna conse feum nostrud dolor summy nim dolesequatum ea. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat.Modiam, consecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod dui tatum zzrit ecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod dui tatum zzrit praestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer si tisi tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu Ernesto Escondido facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat. nit autat. enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer.veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrudtis dionulptis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat. raestrudtis dionulptis dio. praestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer si tisi tat. Tatt. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil ilTie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat. Modiam, consecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod. Modiam, consecte vel iustiss equissed exerostrud mod dui tatumestrud tisis dipismod enis nonsed dunt ullummo loreet nos alissim nostrud doloborer si tisi tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu facillut praestrud tat. Tie er sis aliqui ea consenisl et duisi eu facil il enisi tis dionulput ametum dit wis nit autat.Modiam, consecte vel iust.

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Plate 18. Constitution Gardens

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Plate 19. Peace Memorial

Plate 20. U.S.D.A. Forest Service Museum

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MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE
Embassy Row is the informal name for a street or area of a city where embassies or other diplomatic installations are concentrated. Perhaps the best-known of these is in Washington, D.C., capital of the United States. Washington's Embassy Row lies along Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., and its cross streets between Thomas Circle and Ward Circle, although the vast majority of embassies are found between Scott Circle and Wisconsin Avenue. Considered Washington's premier residential address in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Massachusetts Avenue became known for its numerous mansions housing the city's social and political elites. The segment between Scott Circle and Sheridan Circle gained the nickname "Millionaires' Row." The first embassy on Millionaires' Row, and still one of the most prominent, was the British Embassy, directly adjacent to the United States Naval Observatory. It was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens to combine the offices and the residence of the ambassador, resembling an English country house in the Queen Anne style of architecture.
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Plate 21. Embassy of South Africa

Plate 22. Embassy and Chancery of Norway

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Plate 23. Embassy of Finland

Embassy of Finland Nanny Still Exhibition More than a diplomatic outpost, the Finnish embassy is a cultural symbol of a people and their lifestyle. It leverages the power of architecture to convey a message in a way that spoke and written words can't. But more important than what it's done for Finland is what it's done for the diplomatic world. At first, the construction of the embassy was seen as an extravagance to people with a lack of vision. Why bother building such a showcase for a government office? The answer comes in something that large corporations have known for years – prestige and notoriety. How much free advertising has the Chrysler corporation gotten over the years from a building it no longer inhabits? What about the Bank of China? Or Lloyds of London? The fact is that great architecture expands an organization's clout, creates to-of-mind awareness, and enhances credibility without resorting to brash advertisements. This is exactly what happened with the Finns. Ernesto Escondido Nanny Still (1926-), also known by her married name, StillMcKinney, is one of the important modern Finnish designers of glass and ceramics. The body of work she created, mainly during the 1950s and 1960s, serves as a reflection of the period's style as well as being a harbinger of the coming innovations in structure, color and functionality. She worked with lighting--designing for Raak-- porcelain, flatware and jewelry, but is best known for her glassware and for her woodcarving. The trademarks of her work in both decorative and functional glass, were her experiments with extremes of color and her practice of revisiting traditional processes to create enduring, elegant pieces.

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NON-OFFICIAL WASHINGTON
Suburbs are inhabited districts located either inside a town or city's outer rim or just outside its official limits (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. The presence of certain elements (whose definition varies amongst urbanists, but usually refers to some basic services and to the territorial contiguity) identifies a suburb as a peripheral populated area with a certain autonomy, where the density of habitation is usually lower than in an inner city area, though state or municipal house building will often cause departures from that organic gradation. Suburbs have typically grown in areas with an abundance of flat land near a large urban zone, usually with minimal traditions of citizens clustering together for defence behind fortified city walls, and with transport systems that allow commuting into more densely populated areas with higher levels of commerce.S doloborer si tisi tat. Tat veliquatie eu feu faci.

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Plate 24. Union Station

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Plate 25. Saint Albans Church

Plate 26. Grace Episcopal Church, Georgetown

Plate 27.

Plate 28. North Capitol Street

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Gardens of Washington
Dumbarton Oaks - There are about ten acres (four hectares) of gardens on the grounds of Dumbarton Oaks, designed from 1922-1947 by the noted landscape architect Beatrix Farrand in collaboration with Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss. The gardens comprise a series of terraces built on a hill behind the house, with the remaining areas laid out informally. They include the Star Garden, Green Garden, Beech Terrace, Urn Terrace, formal Rose Garden, Arbor Terrace, Fountain Terrace, Lover's Lane Pool, and Pebble Terrace, as well as a Camellia Circle, Prunus Walk, Cherry Hill, Crabapple Hill, Forsythia Hill, and Fairview Hill.

Glover-Archbold Public Garden - Another place neighbors mingle is the community garden site in Glover Archbold Park, at 42nd Street and Tunlaw Road. Run by the National Park Service, the plots are one of the few "victory garden" sites in continuous use since World War II.

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Plate 30. Glover-Archbold Public Gardens

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Plate 31. Dumbarton Oaks

Plate 32. Dumbarton Oaks

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Plate 33. Gardens at the Colonade

Plate 34. Glover-Archbold Public Gardens

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