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Corey Besten Chapter 8 jump start California abandons $2 billion court management system The court management system

was intended to automate California court operations with a common system across the state and replace 70 different legacy systems. Despite paying $500 million on the project already, court officials terminated the project and allocated $8.6 million to determine whether they can salvage anything. The planners expected the cost to be $260 million, but today the cost would be $2 billion if the project were to be completed. Inadequately planned for the statewide case management project and did not analyze whether the project would be a cost-beneficial solution to the superior courts needs. Was unable to provide contemporaneous analysis and documentation supporting key decisions on the projects scope and direction. Did not structure the development vendors contract to adequately control cost and scope, over the course of seven years, the AOC entered into 102 amendments and increased the cost from $33 million to $310 million. Failed to develop accurate cost estimates, in 2004 the cost estimate was $260 million and by 2010 the estimated cost was $1.9 billion. Has not obtained the funding needed for statewide deployment and without full deployment to the 58 superior courts, the value of the project is diminished.

The project was a great idea but failed due to poor planning, management, oversight, governance, and controls. http://www.zdnet.com/blog/projectfailures/california-abandons-2-billion-court-managementsystem/15363 DODs EHR project The Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application was expected to give the militarys healthcare providers real-time access to health information for the 9.6 million active worldwide. Shortcomings in the Department of Defenses failed 13-year, $2 billion transition to electronic medical records. Failures were largely due to poor planning and execution, and a failure to appreciate the complexity of the program. DOD had been forced to scale back other capabilities due to insufficient funds, in addition, users continued to experience significant problems with the performance. DOD had begun to improve the system performance but it has not carried out a planned independent evaluation to ensure it has made these improvements.

Poor planning and research was the key to the failure of DODs EHR. http://www.healthleadersmedia.com/page-1/LED-257477/DODs-EHR-Failure-Due-to-PoorPlanning-Says-GAO##