SRSM Project Briefing Note: Microgeneration, ROCs and Metering

Last Updated: February 2008

Overview
You (the agent for the generator, typically the Supplier in a domestic context) get ROCs and REGOs for the electricity generated not just the electricity that is exported, which means you have to measure at the means of generation regardless of how much is used or exported. As regards ROCs, you have to measure at the means of generation with an Ofgem approved meter, regardless of whether you have one or several different generators attracting different ROCs. As regards selling exported electricity a smart meter could do the job, but as an example the model that is employed by Good Energy is to pay the customer for electricity generated rather than exported. The Appendix describes the relevant sections from the Ofgem guide to small generation on the ROC section of their website. The smart meter could be a conduit to collect information from local devices (e.g. meters at microgeneration units) and pass ROCs information around. The smart meter installed by an energy supplier couldn’t meter microgeneration units independently, as the metering has to be conducted at the unit, and the functionality of the proposed SRSM meter would be overkill for metering generation. We should not need more than one physical register on a smart meter to register exported electricity. The SRSM meter supports one physical import register with a flexible set of tariff/product registers operated and configured using software and export metering could work in exactly the same way. This may warrant some more discussion and investigation, but I think we should be comfortable that the current SRSM metering system and data can cover all existing obligations. There may be further metering system solution options to investigate, but this may just be a matter of further local devices.
Local Device for Smart Meter

Generation Station Readings

Exported Energy

Imported Energy

Imported Energy

Generation Reads To Supplier Exported Energy

Exported Energy

Generation Station Readings
Local Device for Smart Meter

Appendix – Relevant sections of Ofgem ‘Guide to Small Generation’
The Ofgem guide to small generation on the ROC section of their website includes the following detail relating to smart metering; • • If you have a turbine or biomass or solar panel - you are a generating station. 1.10. A generating station can include several sets of equipment for generating or producing electricity (for example boilers, turbines, engines, photovoltaics etc). 1.15. Ofgem will take into account the following factors when determining what sets of equipment for generating electricity taken together constitute a generating station: (there are a few bullet points - these are the key ones): o o whether there is one connection to the transmission or distribution network whether there is the same or linked metering for the sets of equipment for generating electricity (we will require there to be separate metering for separate generating stations, in other words, separate metering is a prerequisite for separate generating stations but it is not sufficient in itself for the sets of equipment for generating electricity to be treated as separate generating stations), and how the metering is registered with ELEXON

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Appendix 3 – Approved meters pursuant to Schedule 7 of the Electricity Act 1989 (Schedule 7 of the Electricity (Northern Ireland) Order 1992) Schedule 7 metering requirements Chapter 2 explains that electricity, for which a ROC is to be issued, must be measured accurately using an approved and certified meter in accordance with paragraph 2 of Schedule 7 to the Act (for ROCs or SROCs) or paragraph 3 of Schedule 7 to Order 1992 (for NIROCs). o Approved pattern or construction and installed in an approved manner o 7.2. 1.2. The Meters (Approval of Pattern or Construction and Manner of Installation) Regulations 1998 set out the requirements for approval by National Weights and Measures on behalf of Ofgem. Meters can also be approved under the Measuring Instruments (Active Electrical Energy Meters) Regulations 2006 or similar legislation in a European member State. Certification o 1.4. A meter must be certified by a meter examiner appointed or authorised by the Authority. The Meters (Certification) Regulations 19986 set out the requirements for certification. Any meter approved by a Notified Body under the Measuring Instruments (Active Electrical Energy Meters) Regulations 2006 will be deemed to be certified. Margins of error o 1.6. The permitted margins of error shall be an error not exceeding tolerances of plus 2.5 per cent or minus 3.5 per cent at any load at which the meter is designed to operate as specified in regulation 7(2) of The Meters (Certification) Regulations 1998. o 1.7. An appropriate class of meter approved under the MID Regulations will meet the tolerances above, but meter installers will need to decide on the correct class to use for a particular situation because of the effect of temperature on tolerance. Input electricity o 1.7. Any electricity that is imported from the transmission or distribution network and used as input electricity will need to be measured using an approved meter, installed by a licensed supplier. We would expect any metering that measures electricity generated by the generating station and used as input electricity to be of an equivalent accuracy. Export metering

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1.8. Meters measuring a generating station’s export should be Balancing and Settlement Code compliant. Non half hourly metering can be used for exports up to 16 amps/phase and Code of Practice 9 will apply.