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PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY

COLLEGE COUNSELING OFFICE
F R E D E R I C K R . M AY E R C E N T E R - 6 0 3 - 7 7 7 - 3 4 1 5
CCOFFICE@EXETER.EDU

Just as teachers at the Harkness table create a student-centered learning environment, PEA counselors foster active and
open-minded collaboration with students. In this supportive environment, students learn to identify their goals and inter-
ests, to manage a complex and stressful process, and to make healthy and confident decisions about higher education.
Fundamentally, we believe that each student should control the self-evaluation, research, and application writing that is
essential to good college selection.

The staff members are:
Elizabeth M. Dolan
Director
e d o l a n @ e x e t e r. e d u

Pamela R. Appleton
Associate Director
p a p p l e t o n @ e x e t e r. e d u

Gretchen Bergill
Associate Director
g b e r g i l l @ e x e t e r. e d u

A n y a P. B r u n n i c k
Associate Director
a b r u n n i c k @ e x e t e r. e d u

Karen Clagett
Associate Director
k c l a g e t t @ e x e t e r. e d u

R. Cary Einhaus
Associate Director
c e i n h a u s @ e x e t e r. e d u

S . Tr u e D ow
Staff Assistant
s d o w @ e x e t e r. e d u

Sarah A. Herrick
Manager of College Counseling Office Programs
s h e r r i c k @ e x e t e r. e d u

Cori A. Kingsley
Office Assistant
c a k i n g s l e y @ e x e t e r. e d u ,

Lynn M. Seidenberg
Administrative Manager
l s e i d e n b e r g @ e x e t e r. e d u
TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

INTRODUCTION
THE COLLEGE COUNSELOR/STUDENT/PARENT PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT .......2

CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR
WHAT DO YOU WANT: CONSIDERATIONS FOR YOUR COLLEGE SEARCH ............ 5
Type of Institution..............................................................................................................................5
Student Body and Gender ...............................................................................................................6
College Setting....................................................................................................................................6
Enrollment Size...................................................................................................................................7
Geographic Search.............................................................................................................................7
Major Fields of Study ........................................................................................................................9
Campus Life.........................................................................................................................................9
Housing ............................................................................................................................10
Extracurriculars ...............................................................................................................10
Campus Employment......................................................................................................10
Support Services ..............................................................................................................10
Athletics ...............................................................................................................................................11
Advanced Placement .........................................................................................................................12
Financial Aid/Scholarships.................................................................................................................12

STANDARDIZED TESTING .....................................................................................................14
Admissions Selectivity - Category I, II, III, and IV .......................................................................13

Types of Standardized Tests .............................................................................................................14
PSAT/NMSQT - Preliminary SAT/National Merit Qualifying Test..............................14
SAT I - Reasoning Test.....................................................................................................15
SAT II-Subject Tests.........................................................................................................15
ACT - American College Testing Program.....................................................................15
AP - Advanced Placement...............................................................................................16
TOEFL - Test of English as a Foreign Language............................................................16
Test Preparation Resources.............................................................................................................16

COLLEGE COUNSELING WEBSITE ...................................................................................................18
Sending Test Scores............................................................................................................................17

CHAPTER II SUMMER
THE COLLEGE VISIT ....................................................................................................................21
Preparing for Your Trip......................................................................................................................21
Overview of Visit Options ...............................................................................................................21
Tours.................................................................................................................................21
Group Information Sessions...........................................................................................21
Interviews.........................................................................................................................21
Class Visits........................................................................................................................22
Overnights........................................................................................................................22

HOW TO INTERVIEW ....................................................................................................................22
Meetings with Coaches, Music Teachers, Learning Specialists .....................................22

Types of Interviews............................................................................................................................22
Personal Interviews..........................................................................................................22
Alumni/ae Interviews ......................................................................................................22
Interviews at PEA ............................................................................................................22
Tips for Success..................................................................................................................................23

FINANCING YOUR COLLEGE EDUCATION .......................................................................24
Impact on the Decision Making Process ......................................................................................23

C H A P T E R I I I FA L L
OPTIONS FOR ADMISSION ....................................................................................................27
Early Decision and Early Action – Is applying early right for you?.........................................27
Early Evaluation and Early Notification.........................................................................................27

COLLEGE APPLICATIONS ......................................................................................................27
Rolling Admission ...............................................................................................................................27

Types of Applications.........................................................................................................................28
State Applications ............................................................................................................28
British Universities ..........................................................................................................28
The Common Application ..............................................................................................28
Institutional Applications................................................................................................28
A Step-By-Step Guide to Filling Out Applications .....................................................................29
Part I of the Application - Personal Information ..........................................................29
DECISION PLAN....................................................................................................29
NAME .......................................................................................................................29
ADDRESS .................................................................................................................29
PARENT AND SIBLING INFORMATION .............................................................29
PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY INFORMATION..................................................29
FEE/FEE WAIVER ....................................................................................................29
Part II of the Application- Everything Else....................................................................29
LISTING SENIOR COURSES..................................................................................29
INFLUENCES ON YOUR DECISION TO APPLY..................................................29
QUESTIONS ABOUT WHERE ELSE YOU ARE APPLYING ................................29
LANGUAGE, IF OTHER THAN ENGLISH............................................................30
INTENDED MAJOR ................................................................................................30
Reporting Standardized Tests..........................................................................................30
Presenting Your Extracurricular Interests and Activities ..............................................30
COMMITMENT TO ACTIVITIES..........................................................................30
LEADERSHIP ...........................................................................................................30
VOLUNTEER WORK/COMMUNITY SERVICE ...................................................30
HOBBIES/OUTSIDE INTERESTS ..........................................................................30
ACADEMIC HONORS OR AWARDS .....................................................................31
Recommendations ...........................................................................................................31
SECONDARY SCHOOL REPORT (SSR)................................................................31
CLASS RANK ...........................................................................................................31
MIDYEAR SCHOOL REPORT FORMS..................................................................31
ACADEMIC RECOMMENDATIONS FROM TEACHERS....................................31
THE FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 .............31
ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS .................................................................31
Additional Credentials.....................................................................................................32
WRITING YOUR COLLEGE ESSAY ......................................................................................32
Getting Started ...................................................................................................................................32

COLLEGE OFFICE POLICIES .................................................................................................33
Writing the Essay ...............................................................................................................................32

The E Book..........................................................................................................................................33
College Days .......................................................................................................................................33
Disciplinary Issues..............................................................................................................................33
Medical, Personal and Dean’s Leaves .............................................................................................34
Transcripts and Recommendations................................................................................................35
Access to Student Records .............................................................................................................35
Depositing............................................................................................................................................36
Student Rights and Privileges ..........................................................................................................36

CHAPTER IV WINTER
REPORTING WINTER TERM GRADES ....................................................................... 37
FINANCIAL AID FORMS............................................................................................. 37
LOOKING FOR SCHOLARSHIPS ................................................................................ 37
MISSING CREDENTIALS ............................................................................................ 37
SUPPLEMENTAL APPLICATION FORMS .................................................................... 38

CHAPTER V SPRING
DECISIONS, DECISIONS .........................................................................................................39
SENIORITIS ...............................................................................................................................39
WAITLISTS ................................................................................................................................40
UNDERSTANDING YOUR OFFER OF FINANCIAL AID ....................................................42

CHAPTER VI ADMISSIONS DECISIONS
A D M I S S I O N S D E C I S I O N S : H O W T H E Y A R E M A D E ...................................................45
Academic Credentials......................................................................................................................45
Personal Profile...................................................................................................................................45
Other Considerations.......................................................................................................................46

CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS
STUDENT ATHLETES ..............................................................................................................47
Recruitment.........................................................................................................................................47
Your Recruitment Calendar ............................................................................................................48
Spring of Upper Year .......................................................................................................48
Summer Between Upper Year and Senior Year ..............................................................48
Fall of Senior Year............................................................................................................48
Winter of Senior Year ......................................................................................................49
June of Senior Year ..........................................................................................................49
NCAA - Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse ............................................................................49
Eligibility Requirements ..................................................................................................49
Special Considerations for Eligibility .............................................................................50

PERFORMING AND VISUAL ARTS ......................................................................................51
Meeting NCAA Eligibility With A Learning Disability .................................................50

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ..............................................................................................51
Defining “International” ....................................................................................................................51
Permanent Resident ..........................................................................................................................52
Testing ...................................................................................................................................................52
Financial Aid for International Students........................................................................................52

LEARNING DISABILITIES ....................................................................................................52
Declaration of Funds.........................................................................................................................52

Reporting your Disability .................................................................................................................53

SERVICE ACADEMIES ............................................................................................................53
Testing ...................................................................................................................................................53

Application Process...................................................................................................................53
Points to Consider ............................................................................................................53

Academic Programs ..................................................................................................................53
Lifestyle Change ........................................................................................................................53
Postgraduate Obligations .........................................................................................................53

Starting the Application Process.............................................................................................54
The Application Process ....................................................................................................54

Nomination Process...................................................................................................................54
Complete Service Academy Application..............................................................................54
Complete Fitness Exam............................................................................................................54
ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS ............................................................................................................54
THE COLLEGE TRANSFER APPLICANT .............................................................................54

A P P E N D I X G L O S S A RY O F T E R M S
I N T RO D U C T I O N

Welcome to the college process. Since you special considerations and discuss how
have already gone through a selective decisions are made.
admissions process when you applied to
This guidebook is written directly for you The College Counseling
Phillips Exeter, you have a sense of all that
the student, although it is intended to be
is involved. You have taken appropriate Office is open Monday,
shared with your parents and others who
testing, filled out applications, asked teach-
may be interested in its contents. Tuesday, Thursday and
ers to recommend you, and interviewed in
order to gain admission to Exeter. The college process is one of self-discovery, Friday from 8 a.m. until
when students take stock of their ambi-
This time, the task may appear more 5 p.m., Wednesdays from
tions, strengths, and challenges as they
daunting. There are more than 2,500 col-
begin to build a list of college choices. 8 a.m. until 12:30, and
leges and universities in the United States
Students are responsible for contacting col-
not to mention universities in Canada and Saturdays, from 9 a.m. until
leges for interview appointments, signing
overseas from which to develop a list of
up for appropriate tests by the deadlines, 11:30 a.m., when classes
appropriate matches. You have also heard
and putting the necessary energy into all
about today’s competitive admission pic- are held. Please schedule
aspects of the application process. Just as
ture at the most selective colleges and the
you were responsible for attending to your an appointment; parents
increasing tuition costs at these schools.
academic commitments and personal
You are maybe left wondering, “Which are encouraged to do the
needs at the Academy, you must invest fully
schools will admit me, and can I afford to
in researching and applying to colleges. At same. Our office telephone
attend?”
all times, you should be at the center of your
The staff of Exeter’s College Counseling college admissions process, learning to take number is (603)777-3415,
Office stands ready to guide you through charge of it and eventually owning it.
and our email address is
the college admissions maze, ready to talk
In this endeavor, your parents and college
with you about your choices and concerns ccoffice@exeter.edu.
counselor will support and encourage
as we work together in the months ahead.
you. As stewards, the college counselors The office fax number is
In addition, we offer you this guide.
will offer you important guidance along
(603)777-4326.
The College Counseling Guidebook offers the way. Your college counselor is a coun-
vital information all in one convenient selor, not a placement officer, who sup-
place. The information is organized ports you in your choices and offers a real-
chronologically, according to the seasons. istic assessment of your chances of admis-
Winter and spring of your upper year is the sion to colleges. Your parents will offer
time when you and your counselor get to you moral support and encouragement
know each other and begin to form college along the way. The process requires close
lists. In summer and fall of your senior year communication and cooperation among
campus visits, research, and college lists are the important players—student, parents,
finalized. By early winter, the applications and counselor. Success is most often
are completed. Finally, in the winter and achieved when we all approach our vari-
spring, admissions officers make their deci- ous roles with an open mind, humor, and
sions, and you finally make your choice. commitment.
Additional chapters cover candidates with

1
THE COLLEGE COUNSELOR/STUDENT/PARENT PARTNERSHIP
AT PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY

The College Counseling Office believes that to you and the colleges in the
the college admissions process involves a admissions process.
Your “To Do” List partnership between you and your coun-
J Research Category I, II, III and IV
selor. The success of this partnership college choices from your college
................................... depends upon students, parents, and coun- search homework, using the
selors fulfilling their obligations and main- resources available in the College
................................... taining open communication throughout Counseling Office and attending
the admissions process. We have detailed the spring college fair.
...................................
below the expectations and responsibilities
Before the beginning of summer
................................... of each partner.

STUDENT
break:

...................................
Prior to your first individual meeting
J Establish a tentative list of college
choices with the guidance of your
................................... with your college counselor:
college counselor and your parents.

...................................
J Complete the Self-Assessment Form You must include colleges across
found on the College Counseling the spectrum of admissions selec-
................................... Office website. It is imperative that tivity (Category I, II, III and IV
you answer all of the questions on schools), and colleges that will
................................... the Self-Assessment thoughtfully address your financial aid concerns.

...................................
and thoroughly. The information
J Take both the SAT I and the SAT II
from the assessment helps guide Subject Tests once during the spring
................................... counselors in their discussions with term. Students considering an Early
you and aids them in writing the Decision or Early Action applica-
...................................
recommendation they send to your tion should have taken three SAT IIs
list of schools. by the end of spring term.
J Discuss college costs with your
...................................

During the summer:
...................................
J Try to visit colleges from each
family.
At your first one-on-one counseling
of your Category I, II, III and IV
meeting, you and your counselor
categories. Take a formal campus
should:
tour, attend an information ses-
J Talk openly about what you are sion, and schedule an on-campus
looking for in a college. interview, where appropriate.
J Discuss future course work and Schedule visits well in advance.
appropriate AP’s and SAT II subject J Continue to talk with your family
tests. about the admissions process and
J Complete the college search home- begin narrowing your choices
work assignment which will be while maintaining a balanced list.
given to you. This exercise helps you Talk to your family about the pos-
understand what criteria are critical sible need for financial aid.

2
THE COLLEGE COUNSELOR/STUDENT/PARENT PARTNERSHIP
AT PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY

During the fall of your senior year,students sions, by helping them manage important
are expected to do the following: details and deadlines, and by encouraging
J Meet at least twice individually students’ well-being during what for some
Remember,
with your counselor. adolescents can be a very stressful process.

J Finalize and narrow your list of col-
At all times, parents are welcome to con-
colleges,
tact college counselors to talk with them
lege choices.
J Complete your standardized test-
about their child’s process.
not college
ing and have your scores forwarded During uppers’ winter and spring
to all your colleges. terms, parents should: counselors,
J Complete your applications and J Complete the Parent Questionnaire,
supplemental forms. Be sure to mailed to parents in early January, to make the decision
make copies before mailing. help your child’s counselor under-

J Regularly check your Academy
stand him/her better and to aid the to admit
counselor in writing the composite
email, voicemail, and post office
recommendation letter for colleges.
or deny
J Help students to identify and articu-
box for important updates.
COUNSELOR
late their personal criteria for their a student
Your college counselor will support you
college search by listening and by
first as you develop a balanced college list
offering realistic feedback.
to their institutions.
J Discuss college costs with your child
matched to your particular interests and
abilities, and then through the application
and your family’s need for merit- or
process. Important information about
need-based financial aid.
events and college visitors will appear on
Blackboard, through email bulletins, as J If possible, schedule a handful of
well as in periodical mailings, so you must “Goldilocks” colleges visits during
check these regularly. Exeter’s spring break (ask your student
to define a “Goldilocks” college tour).
In addition, the college counselors cultivate
relationships with colleges and universities
and with returning students both to explain During the summer:
the unique features of the Exeter program, J Help students plan to visit colleges
and to understand the ad from each of their Category I, II,
missions procedures at particular institutions. III, and IV categories, by facilitat-
Your counselor will be your resource and your ing travel arrangements during
guide, but remember that you do the work, your family’s summer vacation.
J Continue to listen to your child's
and the college makes the choice.

PARENT evolving college criteria as students
Throughout students' college search, par- begin narrowing down their prelim-
ents can support their children by listening inary college list while maintaining
to students' ideas and concerns, by several colleges that offer a range of
empowering them to make their own deci- selectivity.
3 3
At all times during the college process,
parents should:

Your “To Do” List J Empower your child to make his or
her own decisions; do not send the
................................... message that your child cannot
handle the process.
J Promote integrity and model good
...................................

................................... behavior; children still learn from
their parents’ example.
J Pay attention to verbal and physical
...................................

................................... cues that show your child’s stress,
to encourage their physical and
................................... emotional well-being.

................................... J Be a refuge by remaining calm and
confident in the face of the process'
................................... ups and downs, to help your child
follow your example.
...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

4
CHAPTER I
WINTER & SPRING
OF UPPER YEAR
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

WHAT DO YOU WANT:
CONSIDERATIONS FOR
• Am I receiving any financial assis-

YOUR COLLEGE SEARCH
tance from Phillips Exeter? How
important is financial aid to my
The age-old adage is true: the process is college studies?
as important as the end result. Nowhere
• Do I have a religious affiliation
is that notion more appropriately applied
which may influence my college
than to the college search process. As you
choice? Is it important for me to
begin your college exploration, approach
attend college with others who
your search with a commitment to work
share my beliefs and values?
hard and be candid about yourself and
your past achievement. Like high schools, institutions of higher
education can be either public or private.
The experience of the College Many of the nationally ranked colleges
Counseling Office has shown that, too in the United States are state-supported
frequently, students and families begin institutions. Often these schools can offer an
the college search focusing on the well- exceptional, top-tier education at a fraction
known handful of highly-selective col- of the price of private schools for in-state
leges that are familiar household names. residents, and even a substantially
We encourage you as you begin your reduced tuition for out-of-state students. Focus on your
search process to forget about college At this early stage of your investigation,
names, and concentrate on establishing we would strongly encourage you to con-
personal criteria
and identifying your own personal, sider both private and public universities. If
unique criteria for selecting a college financial aid has been a consideration in
before carefully researching a wide range – the list of schools
attending Phillips Exeter, and/or could be
of the schools that meet your needs. In for college, we urge you to include in your
your search, focus on your personal crite- will follow.
college list at least one public school in
ria – the list of schools will follow. your home state.
We’ve grouped together general categories While private colleges frequently cost more
below to help frame your thoughts about than public ones, they often possess the
your college search. Each category offers financial means, in the form of endowment
several questions to ask yourself about and alumni giving, to offer generous need-
your interests, goals, needs, and wishes based or scholarship-based financial aid
for your potential colleges. that might make private education as inex-
TYPE OF INSTITUTION pensive as attending your state school. Most
Public, Private, Secular, Non-Denominational, Exonians consider both public and private
Religious Affiliation schools in their college search.
As you consider the type of institutions in A large number of competitive private
which you may be interested, ask yourself universities and colleges have a religious
these “self-evaluation” questions: affiliation. The extent of spiritual influ-
ence varies. But at the beginning of your

5
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

college search we strongly encourage you • What extracurricular activities do I
to consider all private colleges, regardless generally enjoy?
of religious affiliation. • Will my family allow me access to a
STUDENT BODY AND GENDER car in college?
Coed, Single Sex, Historically Black Colleges The location of your academic home for
Ask yourself these “self-evaluation” the next four years will determine your
questions: quality of life and should reflect your per-
sonal values and lifestyle. Colleges and uni-
• Would I consider single-sex
versities can be located right in the hearts
education?
of major cities, in the suburbs, or in more
• How important is it for me to rural settings. Each setting has its own dis-
attend college with others who tinct advantages and disadvantages.
share my ethnic heritage?
Attending college in a major metropolitan
The consideration of single-sex educa-
setting offers extensive opportunities for
tion is predominantly one for women,
cultural events, internships and part-time
although there is a very small handful of
jobs, and research. Most students do not
outstanding all-male colleges (such as
need or use a car and have the opportuni-
There is no Wabash and Morehouse). Similarly, stu-
ty to build an extensive social life outside
dents might consider one of the small
of the campus. Yet college life in a city also
one college number of colleges enrolling predomi-
embodies big city problems. Suburban
nantly African-American students.
areas afford more limited cultural and
that is the National studies have shown that stu-
resume-building opportunities, but also
dents at these institutions are more acad-
possess fewer of the social problems of
“perfect fit” emically involved in classroom participa-
major cities.
tion, have greater academic self-esteem,
and are more likely to pursue advanced More traditional college towns may not
for anyone.
degrees. have all of the amenities of city life but can

COLLEGE SETTING
often have a more relaxed, friendly feeling.
College faculty tend to live in their small col-
Size and Location
lege towns, creating a more residential com-
Think about the kind of place in which
munity feeling on campus. You may need a
you could be comfortable for the next four
car for transportation to the big city a few
years of your academic life.
hours away, but you can also easily drive to
Some questions: nearby outdoor activities. Generally, small
towns have a lower cost of living than bigger
• How have I felt about living in the
cities. Also, colleges in more rural settings
town of Exeter (with approxi-
work hard to bring concerts and speakers to
mately 14,000 residents)?
their campuses to supplement social life.
• What do I like or dislike about the
Academy’s location? Consider what you appreciate or dislike
about the town of Exeter and living and

6
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

learning here. Do you live for “out-of- tion than smaller schools, allowing oppor-
towns” to Boston? Or do you relish the inti- tunities to explore a wider range of poten-
mate feeling of living and learning along- tial majors for students who are undecided
side your teachers? about their field of study. Faculty at larger

ENROLLMENT SIZE
institutions may balance teaching with
research. This research keeps them up-to-
Size of Academic Community
date on current developments in their
Think about the following “self-evalua-
fields and enhances their classroom
tion” questions:
instruction, but it may also decrease their
• How have I felt learning in a com- available time for informal interaction out-
munity the size of Phillips Exeter? side of class. Class size tends to vary great-
• What do I like or dislike about the ly. While courses requiring greater faculty
Academy’s classroom size? interaction (such as foreign language or
English composition) may be smaller,
• How important is faculty accessi-
many introductory courses are taught in a
bility?
large lecture format using graduate teach-
• To what extent do I desire academ- ing assistants. Larger colleges and universi-
ic and social recognition for ties usually have a more diverse student Consider your
achievement? body and a broader selection of extracur-
Colleges can vary dramatically in size: ricular opportunities to explore. Finally,
experience at Exeter.
think carefully about which size is best for many students prefer the greater anonymi-
you both academically and socially. Use ty intrinsic to a larger academic setting.
Do you relish
the following generalizations to reflect on
While we encourage you to gain a better
your experience both in and out of class
feel for the size environment most appro- the intimate,
here at Exeter.
priate for you, we would also encourage
Over 80 percent of American private col- you to investigate colleges of a wide variety
small town feeling?
leges — and almost a quarter of public col- of sizes in your search.

GEOGRAPHIC SEARCH
leges — have enrollments under 2,500.
Or do you live
Smaller colleges generally place a greater
Location in the United States or Overseas
emphasis on teaching as opposed to
When considering the possible locations of for “out-of-towns”
research. Similar to the opportunities avail-
your future colleges, ask yourself these
able through the Academy’s Harkness
“self-evaluation” questions: to Boston?
Table seminar pedagogy, lecture and dis-
cussion classes at smaller colleges can • How do I feel attending Exeter in
afford a high level of interaction with fac- relation to its proximity to my
ulty and opportunities to contribute in home and family?
class. There can be a wonderful comfort in • How important is it to me and my
being a bigger fish in a small pond. family for me to attend college close
Larger colleges and universities can offer a to home?
greater breadth and depth of course selec- • How much do I value attending col-

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CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

lege with students of different geo- affects your quality of life. Perhaps most
graphic backgrounds? importantly, take into account your expe-
• How frequently do I anticipate going rience with your family while attending
home during the academic year? boarding school, how frequently you cur-
rently go home, and the cost of round-trip
• How extensively does the weather
transportation between your home and
affect my studies or quality of life?
potential college. We strongly encourage
A truly national and international com- you to talk with your family about their
munity, Phillips Exeter attracts a broad- possible geographic preferences for you at
ranging geographic diversity. Such the beginning of your college search.
diversity includes day students living
down the road, students only a few Avoid regional parochialism! While the
hours away from home, and others from East Coast offers an extensive number of
across the country or across the world. outstanding colleges and universities, we
Your personal Exeter experience bene- strongly encourage students to include as
fits from this geographic mix of cultures wide a geographic range as possible in
and backgrounds. their initial college search. Don’t over-
look Midwestern or Southern schools –
Avoid regional While you are not planning where you will many of these institutions are hidden gems
vacation for the next four years, weather of truly national reputation. Recognize,
parochialism! and climate can have an influence in the too, that you might have an advantage as
geographical range of potential college an Exeter applicant applying to exceptional
choices for some individuals. colleges outside of New England that
Students who live within a short distance receive fewer applicants from the Academy.
of Exeter enjoy the ease of going home for Depending on your personal search crite-
long weekends. Yet many students are ria, you may also consider investigating
perfectly content to go home only for colleges outside of the United States. These
major vacation periods. While some col- can include Canadian universities and col-
leges include travel expenditures within leges (McGill, Queens, University of
their financial aid packages, transporta- Toronto, etc.), American colleges overseas
tion is often a hidden, but costly, academ- (the American Colleges of Paris, London,
ic expense. or Switzerland, for example), and a select
Reflect on your experience here at the number of European national universities
Academy with regard to Exeter’s location, which have historically welcomed
climate, and proximity to home. Consider American students (such as St. Andrew’s
whether, at college, you would prefer a University in Scotland or the University of
geographically diverse student body such London). While transportation and living
as Exeter’s, or a regional community of costs may affect the total cost of education,
students from more homogeneous back- tuition at these institutions can be signifi-
grounds. Think about climate and how it cantly less expensive than tuition at com-
parable U.S. universities. Some of these col-

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CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

leges, particularly the American colleges often serve as an outstanding springboard
overseas, may offer their own need-based for further graduate-level study, such as
financial assistance; others may allow law, business, or medical school. A handful
select U.S. federal financial assistance, such of exceptionally qualified Exonians who are
as Stafford loans, to be used to meet confident of their intention to pursue med-
tuition expenses. icine may consider joint degree programs
offering early admission to medical school.
Finally, if financial assistance may be a con-
sideration in your college search, the College Remember that many liberal arts colleges
Counseling Office emphatically recom- may not offer either majors or extensive
mends that you include a financial aid “safe- coursework in certain professional fields,
ty” school on your college list. To qualify as such as engineering, business, or physical
a financial aid “safety,” a college must both therapy. If you are certain of a specific field
be affordable and a Category I school – that be sure that the colleges you are considering
is, one where you have the greatest percent- offer that major.

CAMPUS LIFE
age chance of admission. For most Exonians
a state university in the student’s home state
Extracurricular Activities, Housing, Student-
is an appropriate choice.

MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Employment Opportunities, Support Services
Consider the following self-evaluation
As you consider potential college majors, ask questions:
yourself these “self-evaluation” questions:
• How important is it for me to attend
• What are the courses I enjoy most a primarily residential college?
here at the Academy? Enjoy least? • What extracurricular activities am I
• Do I have specific or general career currently pursuing here at Exeter
goals? that will be critical to the quality of
my college life?
Uncertain of your intended major in col-
lege? Don’t panic! While a few students • Do I plan on working part time
begin their college careers with a very spe- while in college?
cific academic major, most students have • Do I require any support services
only a broad idea of potential fields of study. for physical or learning differ-
Liberal arts is the term most generally used ences/disabilities?
to describe the most common form of Much of the success of your college career
undergraduate education in the United comes from liking the experience of living
States. Pre-professional training in such on a college campus. Alumni frequently
fields as business, engineering, and educa- reflect that they learned as much from their
tion prepares students for careers immedi- interaction with their college peers
ately after receiving their undergraduate through study groups, extracurricular
degrees. While offering solid preparation activities, and just hanging out in the
for post-college careers, the liberal arts can dorm as they did through classroom

9
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

instruction. Campus residential and social student’s financial aid package, volunteer
life plays a significant role in effecting stu- or paid internships, or more traditional
dent satisfaction with their alma mater. part-time jobs in service industries. The
college’s location can play a determining
Housing
factor in the availability of off-campus
Living on-campus for the first few years of
employment. Universities in or near
their college experience is a primary consid-
major metropolitan areas offer extensive
eration for most Exonians. Dormitories can
opportunities for part-time jobs, includ-
become a focus of college campus life and
ing positions in a student’s field of inter-
the easiest way to meet new friends. Thus
est; colleges in more rural settings may
finding a college campus that has a primar-
offer fewer options.
ily residential feel, rather than the feeling of
a “commuter” school, can be important. Most colleges and universities provide
Consider the percentage of students who some assistance for finding part-time
live either in campus housing or within a jobs, either through a career center or
close radius of the college campus. If it is an work-study office. In addition, most
important consideration for you, remember institutions of higher learning offer
to ask about availability of on-campus career counseling and placement assis-
housing for all four years. Some colleges tance for graduating seniors who will not
only have enough housing for underclass- be pursuing graduate school immediate-
men, and a few may even require students to ly after their undergraduate degree.
move off-campus for a year to help alleviate
Support Services
their own on-campus housing shortage.
Federal law now requires colleges and
Extracurriculars universities to offer extensive support
College is about working hard and services to students with physical or edu-
studying … but there is plenty of time cational differences. These services can
to have fun, too. Thoughtfully consider include physical accommodations, such
which of your current campus activi- as ramp access to buildings and handi-
ties will be critical to your collegiate capped restrooms. For some Academy
experience. Also consider those activi- students, finding colleges offering exten-
ties you’ve never explored but would sive support services for students with
now like to pursue in college. learning disabilities may be an important
factor in their college search.

ATHLETICS
Campus Employment
As a means of providing personal spend-
ing money, gaining valuable professional As you think about your interest in colle-
experience, or augmenting their need- giate athletics, ask yourself these “self-
based financial assistance, many students evaluation” questions:
will hold a part-time job on or off cam- • What sports am I currently partic-
pus while enrolled full time in college. ipating in at the Academy that I
These jobs can be work-study positions might continue in college?
sponsored by the college as part of the
10
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

• Will my athletic participation be ships. Most larger colleges and universities
at the intercollegiate, club, or field predominantly Division I programs,
intramural level? with some of their underdeveloped pro-
• Will I be a recruited athlete in any grams occasionally competing at a lower
of my Exeter sports? division level. Division I athletic programs
are generally the college sports which
• Have I spoken with any Exeter
receive the most extensive media coverage,
coaches to gain a better sense of my
including such athletic conferences as the
potential for intercollegiate athletics?
Ivy League, the Big Ten, and the Big East. A
Many Exonians who currently engage in handful of truly exceptional Academy
athletics may want to continue such partic- alumni will compete at the Division I level.
ipation in college. College students partici- Almost all Division I programs offer athlet-
pate at three levels: intramural, club, and ic scholarships with the noteworthy excep-
intercollegiate. Intramural play is most tion of the eight members of the Ivy League
common. Intramurals allow students to conference (Brown, Columbia, Cornell,
compete at a variety of different levels of Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, University
competition with a primary emphasis on of Pennsylvania, and Yale).
enjoying the sport for personal fitness,
relaxation, and fun. Club sports are usually The College Counseling Office strongly Take advantage
jointly sponsored by students and the col- believes that student-athletes should dis-
lege, and can compete against other cuss their collegiate potential with their of your coach’s
schools’ club sports as well as varsity inter- Academy coach and other club coaches
collegiate programs. early in the college search process.
wisdom in assessing
Coaches offer a supportive, seasoned per-
Intercollegiate athletics is the university spective that can prove invaluable in stu-
equivalent of varsity-level sports. These your potential
dents’ own self-assessment of their ath-
programs are categorized by the NCAA into letic ability. Take advantage of your
three divisions of varying degrees of com- coach’s wisdom. as a recruited

ADVANCED PLACEMENT
petition: Division I, Division II, and
Division III. There are some very general collegiate athlete.
rules of thumb concerning athletic divi- Consider the following “self-evaluation”
sions. Most small liberal arts colleges and questions:
smaller universities will have a majority of
• Do I plan on taking any AP exami-
Division II or Division III athletic pro-
nations prior to graduating from
grams, with perhaps one or two high-pro-
Exeter?
file sports competing at a higher division
level. Most Exeter alumni participating in • How important is finishing my
intercollegiate athletics will compete at this college study in less than four years?
level. By definition Division III colleges do • Are there any financial benefits to
not offer athletic scholarships, while completing my college degree
Division II programs offer partial scholar- more quickly?

11
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

Many selective colleges and universities Academy, college financial aid may be
can award college credit on the basis of important. We strongly encourage you
AP test scores. Students can fulfill general to begin discussing these issues with
curriculum or graduation requirements your family at the beginning of your
earlier, advancing to higher level courses college search.
even in their freshman year. Advanced
There are many forms of financial
standing can allow students to double
assistance available. The most basic
major or minor more easily, or to take a
financial assistance offered at all col-
reduced load one semester in order to
leges is need-based. Need-based finan-
concentrate on especially challenging
cial assistance is given to families who
coursework or extracurricular activities.
demonstrate financial eligibility using
Because of the financial benefits gained
nationally standardized needs-analysis
by earning AP credit, some students will
forms, such as the Free Application for
accelerate earning their college degree
Federal Student Assistance (FAFSA)
through AP credit, graduating a semester
and the College Scholarship Service
or even a year early.
(CSS) Profile. Demonstration of finan-
While the awarding of advanced academ- cial eligibility is determined through
While cost should not ic standing on the basis of AP credit is detailed review of a family’s net assets,
commonplace, please note that several of salary, investment income, liabilities,
be the principal factor in the most highly selective colleges and uni- home equity, and other factors.
versities may at best use AP examinations
Some colleges also offer merit-based assis-
creating your college list, for placement and do not award any aca-
tance. Such financial assistance comes in
demic credit for even the highest scores.

FINANCIAL AID/SCHOLARSHIPS
the form of scholarships for students who
today’s high price tag have achieved superior levels of academic
Discuss with your family and consider the excellence or offer some special talent in
for college may become following “self-evaluation” questions: the performing arts or athletics. Please
note that while all of the most-highly com-
• How important is financial assist .
a serious factor petitive colleges and universities offer
ance to my education here at
need-based assistance, only a handful offer
Exeter?
in your final decision. any merit-based aid.

ADMISSIONS SELECTIVITY
• Will I require need- or merit-
based assistance to attend college?
Category I, II, III and IV
While we believe that the cost of attend-
As you think about admissions selectiv-
ing a college should not be the principal
ity, ask yourself these “self-evaluation”
factor in creating your college list, the
questions:
high price tag for today’s college educa-
tion has become a serious factor in the • What percentage of applicants is
final decision for many students and offered admission?
families. Even if you are not receiving
any current assistance from the

12
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

• How does my academic achieve- Standardized testing plays a critical role
ment compare with other appli- in admissions. Most colleges and univer-
cants? sities require the SAT I and many require
The most important factor to consider in three sets of SAT II subject examinations.
building your college list and conducting a Other colleges will accept the ACT exam.
college search is finding institutions for When reviewing potential colleges and
which you have a good chance of being universities, keep in mind their ‘middle
offered admission. While the review of 50 percent’ range of testing. While a quar-
your application will take into considera- ter of admitted students have scores
tion numerous subjective factors, such as either above or below this test range, such
your essay, teacher letters of recommenda- a median range will give a general indica-
tion, and perhaps major field of study, you tion of the strength of the applicant pool.
must focus your search on the more con- Including colleges with a broad range of
crete factors involving your academic admissions selectivity is important to a
performance and standardized testing. successful start to your college search. Be
One tool to help narrow down your honest with yourself, making a realistic
prospective colleges is the percentage of assessment of your chances for admission.
students admitted. This ‘admit rate’ The more truthful you are with yourself at
provides a general guidepost for admis- the start of your college search, the better
sions selectivity. Approximately six per- your chances of having a good number of
cent of colleges and universities nation- choices in the spring of your senior year.
wide admit fewer than fifty percent of Your academic performance in a challeng-
applicants to their freshman class. For ing, rigorous program of study is the most
many Exonians, the institutions in this important factor in determining your
category would most likely be classified admissibility to highly selective colleges.
as Category III or IV schools for admis- Admission committees value a consistent
sion selectivity. Colleges admitting more level of achievement over four years, but
than fifty percent are generally Category they also give strong weight to students
I or II schools for many Exeter appli- who demonstrate significant improve-
cants. Note that the admission rate may ment over the course of their academic
not always provide the most accurate career. While your grades are the most
sense of selectivity. For example, many obvious indication of potential future
nationally ranked state universities (such success, colleges also want to see that you
as UC-Berkeley and the University of have challenged yourself in a competi-
Virginia) may have higher than a 50 per- tive, demanding academic program
cent admission rate for in-state stu- throughout your high school career.
dents, yet select a mere handful of out-
In conclusion, as you begin to consider
of-state applicants.
your personal criteria in selecting the
college that is right for you, the College

13
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

Counseling Office strongly encourages TYPES OF STANDARDIZED TESTS
you to think about three critical points. PSAT/NMSQT—Preliminary SAT/National
Merit Qualifying Test
First, take plenty of time to do this step in
The PSAT is administered in October
the process. The more conscientious
to high school 10th and 11th graders
effort you put into thoughtfully reviewing
nationwide. Similar in format to the
the characteristics of the colleges that will
SATs, the PSAT/NMSQT measures the
meet your needs, the more satisfied you
critical reading, math problem-solving,
will be with the choices available to you.
and writing skills that students have
Second, resist the pull of the “names.” developed through the first half of their
From our experience in the College high school career. The PSAT/NMSQT
Counseling Office, too many Exonians will also give students first hand prac-
focus on the names of colleges rather than tice for the SAT I. The PSAT scores are
the characteristics of the schools behind reported as two-digit numbers ranging
those names. A college isn’t “good” only if from 20 to 80, and score reports also
you have heard of its name. Remember show an estimated score range of your
that there are over 4,000 private and pub- projected scores for the SAT I test
lic colleges and universities in the United Critical Reading, Mathematics, and
Remember
States, Canada, and overseas to consider. Writing scores.
Don’t think about names. Focus on char-
that no one college The National Merit Scholarship
acteristics, and the names will follow.
Program uses the PSAT to screen those
Finally, your college criteria will be dis- students of exceptional test-taking abili-
or university is perfect
tinctive from your best friend’s, your ty who may qualify for one of its schol-
roommate’s, and perhaps from every arships. If your score is above a certain
for every single student.
other student in your dormitory. cut-off, which varies each year, you will
Frequently, Exonians forget this simple be notified in September of your senior
Resist the urge year that you are a semi finalist, and will
fact when they begin to compare college
lists. Recognize –and celebrate– the fact receive an application for the final round
to “follow the crowd”. . .

STANDARDIZED TESTING
that you are unique. of competition.

Although only the PSAT score from your
Every Academy student will take a series upper year counts in the National Merit
of standardized tests as part of the col- competition, we strongly encourage low-
lege application process. The ers to take the PSAT. Taking the test in
acronyms—including PSAT, SAT-I, SAT- the lower year is good practice for your
II, ACT, AP and TOEFL—can be intimi- “official” PSAT as an upper as well as
dating, and the purposes of the various your SATs. Also, you can look at your
tests can be confusing. Read this section mistakes on the PSAT, practice on those
for help in sorting through the various areas, and potentially raise your scores.
testing options appropriate for you.

14
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

SAT I—Reasoning Test improvements upon taking the SAT I
The SAT I is the most general standardized exams more than twice, but also that
test offered by the College Board, and the long term preparation for the SAT pro-
exam that almost every member of duces better scores than cramming for a
Exeter’s Class of 2010 will take for college few weeks.
admission. With three sections that mea-
Because Harkness pedagogy requires
sure critical reading, mathematical reason-
that all students attend class daily, the
ing, and writing skills, the SAT is a long
Academy builds the school calendar to
test, at three hours and 45 minutes. The
promote a minimum disruption of class
Critical Reading section emphasizes
attendance because of standardized test-
reading skills and tests vocabulary in the
ing; by following the CCO's guidelines,
context of short and long reading passages
students will not miss class and will be
and sentence completion questions. The
able to take standardized testing follow-
Writing section includes both multiple
ing an schedule.
choice questions and a student-written
essay, and tests a student’s skill with Recently the College Board has imple-
grammar, word usage, and word choice. mented a ‘Score Choice’ option, which
The Math section includes topics from will allow students to choose by test date
advanced algebra and precalculus, and which SAT I or SAT II score that they
emphasizes data interpretation and applied want to send to colleges. While this new
math questions. Although it is possible to policy might tempt parents to encourage
complete the Math section without one, their students to take the SATs multiple
students should use a four-function, sci- times, many highly-selective colleges
entific, or graphing calculator for the have already stated that they will require
exam. Student scores will include Critical students to waive the ‘Score Choice’
Reading (CR 200-800), Mathematics (M option and to submit their entire testing
200-800), and Writing (WR 200-800), history.
with two Writing subscores for multiple
Given this trend among the most selec-
choice and the essay. The SAT tests are
tive universities and the importance of
usually offered seven times a year: January,
class attendance, the College Counseling
March or April, May, June, October,
Office believes that Exeter students
November, and December. Most competi-
should be judicious in when they sched-
tive colleges require the SAT I.
ule their SAT I and II exams, and follow
Most Exeter students will take the SAT I our recommended dates guidelines for
once in the second half of their upper testing, which are available at
year, and once or twice in the fall of their “Documents and Forms” under “For
senior year. The Academy believes that Uppers, Lowers, and Preps and Parents”
Exeter students are best prepared for the on the College Counseling section of the
SAT I following this recommended Academy’s main webpage.
schedule, because research by the
College Board has shown not only that
students see very insignificant score

15
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

SAT II—Subject Tests AP—Advanced Placement
Many colleges to which Academy stu- Given once a year in May, the APs are
TEST TAKING TIPS
dents apply require two or three Subject three-hour long examinations based on
• Use the same name on Tests: Math level I or II, and one or two full-year college level courses offered in
all forms. other tests of the student’s choice. high school. APs are scored from 1 to 5,
Carefully check the testing requirements with 5 being the highest score. Many
• Use your Social Security of the schools and particular programs selective colleges require a score of at
number when registering in which you are interested. The Subject least 4 before they will award credit
for tests. Tests are each one-hour long and you and/or course acceleration. Be certain to
may take as many as three different tests check the requirements of colleges you
on any one test date. Like the SAT I, the are interested in to find out their policies
scores range from 200 to 800. regarding placement and/or credit for
these examinations.
In selecting which Subject Tests to take,
focus on your strongest areas of study and While APs were not originally intended
plan to take the corresponding test on the to be used in the evaluation of college
dates you will be best prepared, usually candidates, many admissions officers pay
when you complete a certain course. If attention to the AP scores in a candi-
you have any questions about the appro- date’s folder. If you have taken APs and
priateness of a particular test and the tim- done well, it is in your best interest to
ing of your taking it, please consult your report the scores to the colleges; the task
teacher and your college counselor. of reporting lies with you.

A C T- A m e r i c a n C o l l e g e Te s t i n g P r o g r a m TOEFL—Test of English as a Foreign Language
For some Exonians, the ACT may be a Required by many colleges, the TOEFL is
testing option to consider. The ACT can used to evaluate the English proficiency
be used at many colleges as a substitute for of applicants whose native language is
the SAT I, and sometimes even for certain not English. The test is offered on the
SAT II Subject Tests. You should review Exeter campus in the fall. In addition, the
the testing requirements of the colleges TOEFL is now administered in the United
you are interested in and discuss the ACT States by computer at Sylvan Learning
• Use your home address as option with your college counselor. Please Centers and other sites. Please consult
your permanent address. note that the ACT is not offered at a test- your college counselor about the appro-
• Exeter CEEB code ing site in Exeter, New Hampshire. priateness of the test and the timing and
number is 300185. location of its administration.

TEST PREPARATION RESOURCES
The ACT consists of four 35-50 minute
• Exeter High School’s Test subtests in the areas of English, mathemat-
Center number is 30-145. ics, reading, and science reasoning. You will Although we may decry the role that SATs
receive four separate scores in addition to a have assumed in relation to a student’s aca-
composite score that averages the tests. demic record, standardized tests are more
Scores range from 1(low) to 36 (high). important than ever in selective college
admission. As for any event of such signifi-

16
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

cance, we believe that preparation before- Academy students currently use an outside
hand can not only provide students with tutor or a test-preparation course,
specific, effective test-taking strategies that although such services are generally very
will help their performance on the test, but expensive. If you decide to use an outside
also can build confidence and teach useful tutor or service, you should do so when
skills that extend far beyond the SATs. you have ample time. Many Exeter students
are too busy during the academic year to
Because standardized tests measure abili- take on the additional responsibility of an
ties and skills acquired over many years of outside prep course; summer may be a bet-
education, the best preparation for the ter time for such extended preparation.
SATs is for a student to study hard in a
challenging academic program and to read Members of the class of 2010 will have an
introduction to the SAT during the win-
extensively outside the classroom. Yet
ter term of their upper year. This oppor-
some familiarity with the exam and prepa-
tunity is unique to the Academy in that it
ration before the test can help students
balances Exeter student’s needs for test
improve their scores, on occasion with
preparation with an understanding of the
dramatic results. We strongly believe that
demands already placed on them.
you should first familiarize yourself with TEST TAKING TIPS
Featuring this curricular supplement will
the test by reviewing your PSAT results. • You cannot take both the
teach effective test strategies, fit comfort-
When reviewing their PSAT scores, many SAT I and SAT Subject Tests
ably into students’ busy schedules, and be
students do not look beyond their estimat- on the same date.
accessible to all Exeter uppers.

SENDING TEST SCORES TO COLLEGES
ed SAT I score range; however, reviewing
• Not all SAT subject tests are
the detailed report showing how you per-
It is the student’s responsibility to send offered on every test date.
formed on each question, as well as the
PSAT test booklet, can help identify areas standardized test scores to colleges. The • You are responsible for
to which you need to pay attention. The following offers details on how to send sending your SAT scores
your SAT scores. to colleges.
sample SAT I and II questions in the free
publications “Taking the SAT I” and Sending SAT Scores by Phone:
“Taking the SAT II Subject Tests” (both 1. Before calling the College Board’s
available on the table outside the College Educational Testing Service(ETS),
Counseling Office), and in other test-tak- gather the following information:
ing guides such the College Board’s 10 Real *Score reports for each test
SATs, are also great preparation tools. You *College CEEB codes
may also consider the College Board’s *Credit Card
“Question Answer Service” which, for a 2. Call 1 (866) 756-7346.
nominal fee, provides comprehensive
details about your SAT I test results. 3. ETS will ask for your name, registra-
tion number (on the bottom of the
Some students benefit through more tar- score report) for each test or your
geted preparation. More than half of Social Security number, date of test,

17
CHAPTER I WINTER & SPRING OF UPPER YEAR

name of test and score of test. Guidebook, and much more. It is also a
private “registered” site for you to manage
4. Give ETS the CEEB codes of the col-
most aspects of your college search. With
leges you wish to receive the scores.
your password, you will take advantage of
5. Your SAT I scores will automatically the rich interactivity of your personalized
be sent with your SAT II subject Student Profile Page and the Academy’s
scores. unique College Profile Pages. You will use
these features to create and modify your
Sending SAT Scores electronically
college list, plan your college selection
Follow the directions online at
schedule by saving events and dates from
www.collegeboard.org.
the College Counseling Office calendar,
Sending SAT Scores by Mail:
and bookmarking “hot” links to relevant
Follow the directions in the SAT content from College Counseling Office
Registration Bulletin, or use an publications, college and university web-
Additional Score Report Request Form, sites and external sites.
found online at www.collegeboard.org
You will also complete the important
Sending ACT Test Scores:
Upper Questionnaire on the site, and have
Follow the directions in the ACT
access to it through your personal Profile
Registration Bulletin.
Page. This will enable you to update your
Sending TOEFL Test Scores:
personal and extracurricular information
Follow the directions on their as necessary, thus keeping your counselor
website: www.toefl.org. fully informed and giving yourself a well-
organized database for filling out your col-

COLLEGE COUNSELING
lege applications.

WEBSITE
There are many more helpful aspects of
the college counseling Office website,
USING THE INTERNET IN YOUR
SEARCH
which you will discover as you use it.
The college counselors will give you a
Exeter’s College Counseling website pro- training session on the site at the all-
vides a foundation tool for you as you nav- upper class College Counseling “kickoff”
igate the college selection process. As a meeting in January. The more you use it,
public “browsable” site, it offers lots of however, the more you will take advantage
information about the process, with a cal- of its many features.
endar of events, pages on scholarships and
financial aid, a library of links to our

18
CHAPTER II SUMMER
CHAPTER II SUMMER

Summer may seem to offer a break in your intended visit. By calling ahead you can set
college search process, but in fact the oppo- up a schedule that ideally suits your travel
site is true. The summer between your needs and makes the best use of your lim-
upper and senior years is ideal for commit- ited time. Avoid the drive through and
ting a significant amount of time to drop in approach.

OVERVIEW OF VISIT OPTIONS
researching and visiting the colleges on
your preliminary list, interviewing, and
Tours
writing drafts of essays. Use this summer to
Campus tours generally last about an hour
rest, clear your mind, and think about your
and range in group size from as small as
college criteria without the distractions
your family and a student guide to as large VISITING TIPS
and commitments of the Exeter school
as 50 prospectives and a tour leader. The
year. The steps you take now during the • Call ahead for tour and
campus tour format usually includes a
“downtime” of this summer can benefit group information times.
brief background on the college’s history,
your college search later on.
an overview on the academic and student • Register your visit with

THE COLLEGE VISIT
life programs offered, and a view of the the admissions office to
resources available. If there is a part of the formally demonstrate
For the majority of seniors, the campus campus (the sports center, music facilities, your interest.
visit will be a decisive factor in where you particular dorms) you want to see, be sure • Get directions to the
will apply and enroll. The campus visit is to ask. While it may not be part of the gen- admissions office.
your chance to size up a school and to eral tour, your guide may be able to point it
gauge how it fits with your interests. Do out, and you can always go back on your • Schedule your interview
some research before you go — read the own. Be sure to wear comfortable walking after a tour or information
catalogue and look at the website — so the shoes. session and wear appro-
visit will be more meaningful in the context priate clothing.
Group Information Sessions
of what you have already learned. If you are
This is a popular and efficient forum where
planning an extended trip, consider visiting
a school provides general information and
no more than two schools a day and keep
offers a large gathering of students and
notes of your impressions. Do your cam-
their families the chance to learn more
pus visits during the academic year breaks
about the college or university.
or during the summer after your upper
year. Seniors are allowed two college visit Interviews
days during the academic year. Visit forms A personal interview with an admissions
are available in the College Counseling officer is an evaluative, information-shar-
Office and your college counselor’s signa- ing exchange with a member of the
ture is required. See the E Book for further admissions office. Generally the interview
information on the college visit policy. will last about 30 minutes. When a stu-

PREPARING FOR YOUR TRIP
dent cannot interview on campus, an
interview with an alumnus/a usually can
Always call to find out what type of campus
be arranged in a student’s home area. The
visit arrangements are available well in
interviewer generally writes a summary
advance, at least three weeks, of your

21
CHAPTER II SUMMER

report that is placed in the student’s file. TYPES OF INTERVIEWS
Neat, comfortable attire is appropriate. Personal Interviews
More information is outlined in the These usually take place on the college
“How to Interview” section of this campus and are held with a representative
chapter. of the admission office. The conversation
usually lasts about 30 minutes. Parents are
Class Visits
generally not included in the initial con-
During the academic year, a prospective
versation but will be approached after-
student may attend a class or two of his/her
wards to see if they have any questions.
choice. The student generally stays the
VISITING TIPS entire class period and can approach the Alumni/ae Interviews
To customize your campus instructor afterwards with any questions. When students are not able to travel to
visit arrange an appoint- campus for an interview, the university may
Overnights
ment to: offer students the chance to interview with
Some colleges have designated students
an alumnus/a in the student’s home area.
• Attend a class who serve as overnight hosts or offer com-
The local alumni/ae chapter of the universi-
• Stay overnight mon rooms to visiting students. Generally
ty works with the admission office to
overnights are not offered on weekends
• Meet with a faculty arrange the interviews. Some universities
and might be limited to one night only.
member may ask students to put their request in
Meetings with Coaches, Music Teachers, writing, and other universities will auto-
• Meet with a coach Learning Specialists matically contact you once you have sent in
• Have lunch with an Plan to arrange these meetings on your your application. Be sure to check the appli-
Exeter alumnus/a who is own. While the admission office can give cation materials or call admission offices
a current student you the name and phone number of the directly to see about arranging alumni/ae
person to contact, they will generally ask interviews. Alumni/ae interviews are
you to call directly to arrange a conve- given the same weight as on-campus
nient time.

HOW TO INTERVIEW
interviews in the admission process.

Interviews at PEA

The interview serves two purposes. It rein- Every fall over 120 university representa-
forces your interest in a particular institu- tives visit the Exeter campus either at our
tion and it is an opportunity for the admis- mini college fairs, or at an evening presen-
sion staff to clarify the match between their tation. When the universities’ staffing and
school’s offerings and your interests and schedules permit, representatives will
abilities. Every school treats interviews dif- spend an additional day or evening on
ferently, so it is important to read their lit- campus interviewing interested students.
erature closely and determine where and Interview sign-up sheets are posted in the
when to interview. Your college counselor College Counseling Office and all seniors
will guide you. are notified of upcoming interviewing
opportunities through Blackboard and the
Daily Bulletin. Also, students who have a
specific university on their college list on

22
CHAPTER II SUMMER

their Student Profile Page will receive a Keep the conversation focused on
sign-up notice by email stating when the strengths. While it may be important for an
interviews will take place. Interview slots admission officer to have a sense of family
fill quickly. Seniors are encouraged to check transition or teacher conflicts, the overrid-
Blackboard and the Daily Bulletin and to ing tone of the conversation should be
check their post office boxes and e-mail upbeat, geared toward the last two years in
early each day. school, and show a fit with an institution.

TIPS FOR SUCCESS
Be sure to intersperse the genuine chal-
lenges with the success stories of your life.
Take interviews seriously. It is important to
come across as interested and engaged in During the busiest times of the year, staff
both the learning process and the institu- members may be doing numerous inter-
tion you are visiting. views in one day. Or you may have an
alumnus/a who seems a bit out of touch
Be prepared to talk about yourself. Sounds
with the university. Don’t let the interview-
easy, but you have just 30 minutes to talk
ing style faze you. Politely guide the con-
about all your classes, your activities and
versation when you want to mention
summer plans. Prioritize your thoughts:
something, or at the very end be sure to
what have been your favorite classes, teach-
add that you have one more thing you want
ers, assignments? What extracurriculars are
to emphasize. At the conclusion leave a
most important to you and why? Think
résumé with the person so that he or she
ahead. What do you want to try in college?
has a record of your activities and interests.
Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
The résumé will be a useful reference and
Relate your interests and questions back to may help jog your interviewer’s memory
the college you are visiting. “I am interest- about specific topics you have mentioned.
ed in Russian and I saw you have a study The résumé should not be used as an inter-
abroad program. I’d love to go abroad.” It is viewing prop.

IMPACT ON THE DECISION
imperative that you prepare and are famil-

MAKING PROCESS
iar with the offerings of the school.

Check out your interview style. Do you As most admission officers will tell you, the
appear poised, confident, articulate? Work interview is just one piece in the student’s
at containing any nervous habits and try to application file, and no one credential
keep your thoughts focused on what you alone gets a student admitted or denied.
are saying. If you are shy, reticent, or a non- Rather, all information is examined, and
native speaker, we strongly encourage you typically the interview evaluation rein-
to do some practice interviews before going forces or clarifies other aspects of the file.
to your Category III and IV schools. You
Occasionally, an interview may not be in
will naturally become more comfortable
the student’s best interest, or could adverse-
with the interview format once you have
ly affect the student’s application. Discuss
done a couple and know what to expect.
with your college counselor whether inter-
viewing is appropriate for you.

23
CHAPTER II SUMMER

FINANCING YOUR
COLLEGE EDUCATION
In addition to the “scholarship” file of
printed material located in the College
Counseling Office, we also provide
Beginning the Search for Need
detailed information about scholarships in
and Merit-Based Assistance
the “Financial Aid” and “Library” sections
As increasing college costs put more stress
of the College Counseling webpage.
on family resources, the topic of financial
aid can be a decisive factor in the college Need-based aid is the most common
search for many families. The College form of financial assistance. Since private
Counseling Office strongly encourages you colleges cost more than Exeter, most col-
to honestly and openly discuss with your leges have an even higher percentage of
Filing for
family the role of financial assistance in students on need-based aid; the Academy
your college selection. While we believe provides need-based aid to almost half of
financial aid?
that the total cost of college should not be our students.
the primary factor which shapes your col-
Make sure Need-based aid requires a family to submit
lege search, availability of financial aid fre-
financial documentation which establishes
quently plays a critical role in the final deci-
you have completed their eligibility. All colleges and universities
sion about which college to attend.
require a student to submit the federal gov-
There are two basic types of financial aid: ernment’s Free Application for Federal
the FAFSA
merit-based and need-based. Merit-based Student Assistance (FAFSA). Some col-
aid is offered to a student based on acade- leges and universities will also require their
and CSS Profile.
mic, artistic, athletic, or other criteria; the own institutional form. In addition, over
college or scholarship-sponsoring group 600 private and public colleges also require
makes the determination of the merit the Profile form, which is customized by
award on their own criteria. The most each college to provide the specific addi-
common merit awards are college-spon- tional financial information each college
sored scholarships, corporate or non-prof- needs to assess a student’s eligibility for aid.
it scholarships, government-sponsored Two external parties - the federal govern-
scholarships (such as service academies ment’s Central Processing Agency, which
and state scholarships), athletic scholar- reviews the FAFSA, and the College Board’s
ships for highly-talented Division I and II College Scholarship Service (CSS), which
athletes, and multicultural scholarships. processes the Profile form - serve as impar-
tial agents in assessing eligibility.
The timetable for some merit scholarships
can be as early as the summer between It is vitally important that students and
your upper and senior years. During this families not wait until senior year to find
time, students who are interested in merit- a way to finance their education. To
based aid should begin their research assist families, almost all colleges and
by looking at two websites devoted to universities provide printed and website
scholarships: www.fastweb.com and material which gives guidelines about
www.ed.gov/students/prep/college their individual policies and timetables.

24
In addition, we suggest using some of • Our experience has shown that
the most helpful and commonly Exeter often awards much more
used financial aid website resources: generous financial aid than colleges.
www.fafsa.ed.gov, www.finaid.org, • Although many colleges are “need-
and /or www.collegeboard.com. blind,” some schools may consider a
Every family contemplating applying for student’s financial eligibility as they
need-based aid should try at the beginning make admissions decisions. Because
of the college search process to determine of this, students should apply to sev-
what their approximate eligibility will be. eral colleges where their credentials
By completing the College Board’s ‘Finding will place them among the strongest
Scholarships and Financial Aid’ calculator candidates in the applicant pool.
or the ‘Need Analysis Financial Aid • It is possible for colleges to admit
Estimation Form’ on the finaid.org website, you but deny financial aid, or to pro-
families can be provided with an approxi- vide you with an aid package that
mate Expected Family Contribution (EFC). does not meet your calculated need.
In addition, some colleges will have their This is known as “gapping.”
own worksheet which can calculate the EFC • On your summer college visits, ask
as determined by their own unique policies. questions about each school’s finan-
It is important to remember that this EFC cial aid policies: Is the college need-
figure is only an estimate; some colleges and blind/need-aware? Any merit-based
universities will expect a family to pay more scholarships?
or less than the EFC, depending on the col-
• If receiving financial assistance is
lege’s admission and financial aid policies
critical to your ability to attend col-
and the availability of institutional funding.
lege, you must include a financial
However, by knowing your estimated EFC,
aid “safety” school on your college
you can begin to look more knowledgably
list. This financial “safety” school
at grant and loan options for paying for col-
must both be affordable and fall in
lege costs.
the Category I group for admis-
In addition, keep in mind these points sions. Often a state university in the
about financial aid: student’s home state is an appropri-
• Aid is offered in packages consist- ate choice.
ing of grants, work-study, and a siz- • Deadlines are important, and
able amount of loans. Carefully many come early; a handful of
consider whether you are willing to scholarship applications are due as
assume a heavy loan burden. early as the summer prior to the
• Most highly-selective institutions senior year. Although the federal
offer few, if any, merit-based schol- government’s FAFSA form cannot
arships. be filed until January of the senior
year, we recommend that the

25
College Board College Scholarship The College Counseling Office encour-
Service (CSS) Profile registration ages parents and guardians to discuss
form (Part 1) should be submitted financing higher education with their
shortly after a student’s return to children in order to assure that college
campus in September. planning will reflect family circum-
• Students can register on-line with stances and will promote the search for
Profile by checking the website any and all means of supporting our stu-
http://profileonline.collegeboard.co dents’ aspirations. Please feel free to
m. If you are applying under an speak with your college counselor if you
Early Decision or Early Action plan, have any questions regarding financing
you should register with the Profile your college education.
as early as possible. Worksheets to
help families complete on-line the
Free Application for Federal
Student Assistance (FAFSA), the aid
form required by all colleges, are
available at the ‘Library’ section of
the CCO website.

26
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

OPTIONS FOR ADMISSION the official decision being mailed in early
EARLY DECISION AND EARLY ACTION April. On occasion, these plans may
Is applying early right for you? advantage a student in the review
Most colleges and universities offer an process. Students should discuss this
early application plan that allows a senior option with their college counselor.

ROLLING ADMISSION
to apply by November 1 or 15 and receive
a decision by approximately December 15. Many state universities render decisions
Some schools offer Early Decision, a bind- as applications become complete.
ing plan that states that a student agrees to Therefore, we encourage students to
matriculate if offered admission. Students apply to state universities with rolling The College
can only apply Early Decision to one admission plans (for example, University
school. Some schools offer an Early of Michigan or University of Wisconsin) Counseling Office
Decision II plan which is still binding but by late September of the fall term.

COLLEGE APPLICATIONS
has an application deadline later than
assumes that a student
November 1. Typically Early Decision
candidates, if accepted, are required to
The time has come. You have made your accepted under
make a deposit at the university to secure
college list, checked it twice, and are ready
their place in the class.
to put pen to paper and start filling out your an early admission plan,
Early Action, also an early admission plan, college applications. Before you begin the
is not binding. Students, if accepted, do process, keep a few things in mind.
either Early Decision or
not have to deposit until May 1. Some
First, college admission officers expect hon-
schools offering Early Action plans
est and complete answers to the questions Early Action,
include: Boston College, Georgetown and
asked. Take time to read each part of the
MIT. However, the College Counseling
application fully and, when possible, use the has completed
Office assumes that a student accepted
space that has been provided. Whenever
under an early admission plan, either Early
possible, type your application. the application process
Decision or Early Action, has been admit-
ted to their first choice school and therefore Second, many application booklets provide
has completed the application process and a checklist for keeping track of required cre- and will file no further
will file no further applications. This phi- dentials and important dates. Keep a copy
losophy parallels the spirit of the of this along with a copy of your completed applications.
Academy’s motto of “Non sibi,” and allows application for each school.
the greatest number of Exonians to be
Last, work on your college applications a lit-
favorably considered at the most selective
tle bit at a time. Read through the applica-
colleges.

EARLY EVALUATION AND EARLY
tion once fully, and then spend some time

NOTIFICATION
thinking about how you want to organize
your academic and extracurricular record.
With Early Evaluation and Early Jot down some essay ideas. Revisit the whole
Notification plans, universities send a process again and again. By working at it a
preliminary letter indicating the likeli- little bit at a time, you will have more time to
hood of acceptance in late February with prepare a full and attractive application.
27
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

TYPES OF APPLICATIONS October 1 postmark deadline; the online
State Applications UCAS application deadline for both universi-
State university applications require tran- ties is also earlier. Students may not apply to
script and testing information but may not Cambridge and Oxford in the same year, and
ask for teacher recommendations or an most successful candidates will have several
essay. Some university systems, such as the Advanced Placement test scores of ‘5’s prior to
University of California, require the com- their senior year. Additional information
pletion of a standardized self-reporting about applying to British universities and the
form. Generally, students submit one application timetable are available from the
application to the university system and College Counseling Office.
indicate which campuses they prefer.
The Common Application
Because many state universities admit on a
Over 350 private colleges and universities com-
rolling basis, the College Counseling Office
prise the Common Application member insti-
strongly encourages all seniors to submit
tutions which agree to give equal treatment to
state applications by late September.
the information provided in the Common
Students applying to the University of
Application form. In fact, many more
California system need to complete the
schools have begun to accept the Common
application by November 30.
Application as the standard. The advantage
British Universities of the Common Application is that stu-
The British university system, including dents can complete, thoughtfully and care-
Cambridge and Oxford, uses a standardized fully, one version of the application and
application form. Applications to British uni- send photocopies to participating institu-
versities are processed through the Universities tions. The disadvantage is that students are
and Colleges Admissions Services (UCAS), often required to complete a supplemen-
and are submitted online at www.ucas.co.uk. tary application once the university has
Most British universities require an applica- received their Common Application.
tion to be submitted prior to January 15. Both Sometimes, students hastily complete or
Cambridge and Oxford have significantly ear- don’t return this additional information
lier deadlines, however, and students interest- and thus jeopardize their applications.
ed in either school must submit both the
If you use the Common Application you
UCAS application and an Oxford or
must follow through fully on these subse-
Cambridge application by mid-September, in
quent forms. Each school has particular
order to be eligible for overseas interviews in
application fees and deadlines, and you may
the United States. Students should ask an
need to submit a letter stating the decision
Academy teacher to be their referee before
plan or particular college within the uni-
mid-August, so that the referee’s recommen-
versity for which you wish to be considered
dation can be submitted to UCAS prior to
if it is not clearly stated in the application.
early September. The Oxford and Cambridge
Common Applications are available in the
applications must be mailed to the U.K. by the
College Counseling Office or can be found
second week of September, so that the docu-
online at www.commonapp.org.
ments can arrive in the U.K. prior to the
28
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

Institutional Applications Parent and Sibling Information: Check
Most schools still offer some version of an and verify college attendance and gradua-
admission application. While similar in tion dates. If your parents did not attend
appearance to the Common Application, college, it is important for your colleges to
institutional applications may include know that. You may be identified as a first
questions about legacy, visit information, generation college student.
and different essay questions.

A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO FILLING
Phillips Exeter Academy Information:

OUT APPLICATIONS
Our CEEB number is 300185. The College
Counseling Office address is Phillips Exeter
Read the directions thoroughly and follow Academy, 20 Main Street, Exeter, NH Students are
the instructions. 03833. The phone number is (603)777-
If you are uncertain where to start, make a 3415. The fax number is (603)777-4326. responsible for
copy of the application and write out a Fee/Fee Waiver: Personal checks, money
draft to see how the information appears. orders, or credit cards are acceptable. If you contacting the Educational
Remember that writing assignments often receive substantial financial support from
take longer than you think they will. A the Academy, application fee waivers are Testing Service directly
short-answer essay question may take you a available through the College Counseling
long time since you are trying to find just Office Be sure to speak with your counselor and requesting
the right four lines. early in the fall. An application may be
processed and read without a fee or fee that their SAT scores
Also, technology can be both a blessing waiver but the university might withhold
and a curse. Be sure to allow time to work notification of the final decision.
out the unforeseen kinks. be sent to their schools.
Part II of the Application
Part I of the Application Everything Else
Personal Information Part II of an application takes a little more
The receipt of your Part I will often convert time and thought to complete and must be
you in the university’s system from a submitted by the application deadline. Part
prospective student to an official applicant. II questions include:
Some of the typical questions asked in Part
I of the application are: Listing Senior Courses: Admission officers
want to see your full senior schedule. If the
Decision Plan: Standard options include Early space provided is divided into semesters,
Decision, Early Action, or Regular Decision. draw a line down through the second
Name: Be consistent. Use the same name semester and separate out winter and
that is on your Exeter transcript and SAT spring term. Be sure to denote intensive-
tests. level or college-level courses.

Address: The permanent address is where Influences On Your Decision To Apply:
your family resides and the mailing address is This question is less about the admission
where all correspondence, including the process and more about which of their mar-
decision, will be mailed. keting efforts are effective in getting stu-

29
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

dents to apply. A sampling of choices is scores and have attended a previous high
usually provided and you should just school should check about the reporting of
answer honestly. testing on their previous transcript. While
the College Counseling Office submits all
Questions About Where Else You Are
transcripts to admission offices, we cannot
Applying: Some universities might pose
be held responsible for the testing informa-
this question to see where their applicant
tion provided by other schools.
pool overlaps with the competitors. You
can either leave it blank or offer a partial Presenting Your Extracurricular
list (say three other similar schools). It is Interests and Activities

Using a not advisable to offer a full list of schools Just as college admission officers try to
under consideration. assess your academic record by looking at
your course of study and grades, they will
Common Application? Language, If Other Than English: If a stu-
also try to gauge your level of achievement
dent has a low SAT Reading or Writing
outside of the classroom by looking at how
Remember to submit score, an admission officer will look here
you spend your time. While there may be
to see whether another language is spoken
significant personal merit and enjoyment
any required supplements. at home.
by being involved in a variety of activities,
Intended Major: Most colleges and uni- admission officers tend to look for students
versities recognize that students will with commitment.
change their minds several times before
Commitment To Activities: Most colleges
officially declaring a major at the end of
will ask students to amplify their commit-
their sophomore year, so the emphasis here
ment to an activity by defining hours per
is on “intended.” Be aware some universi-
week, positions held, and whether or not a
ties suffer from over-represented majors
student plans to continue with the activity
(for example, science majors interested in
in college.
pre-med). Discuss with your college coun-
selor the possible impact your intended Leadership: As you consider your senior
major may have on the admission process. activities, think about ways that you can
take on a leading role, perhaps in your
Reporting Standardized Tests
dorm, in clubs/organizations, or on athlet-
Standardized testing information is not
ic teams. If an organization does not exist
reported on the Phillips Exeter Academy
at PEA, think about starting one. Many
transcript. Students are responsible for
established groups started this way.
contacting the Educational Testing
Service directly and requesting that scores Volunteer Work/Community Service:
be sent to their university choices. At cer- Admissions officers are interested in how
tain times in the admission process, univer- you help others, whether during the acade-
sities may contact Phillips Exeter and mic year or on breaks from school.
request scores. Only with your prior written Through the Exeter Social Service
approval will the College Counseling Office Organization (ESSO), potential contribu-
release the scores to admission offices. tions are limitless. Rather than being active
Students who want to report only ACT in five or so different social service groups,
30
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

try identifying which issues are of most Exeter sends final winter term grades,
concern to you and play an active role in which are usually available mid-March, to
making a difference. all schools on a student’s list, even if a stu-
dent was accepted under an Early
Hobbies/Outside Interests: Admission
Decision plan. Exeter does not release
officers are interested to see how you spend
midterm grades to colleges since they are
your free time.
an internal assessment tool. A final tran-
Academic Honors or Awards: Be sure to list script is sent to the school where a stu-
all the academic achievements that you dent matriculates.
have earned since ninth grade.
Academic Recommendations from Be sure to ask
Recommendations Teachers: Generally, two teacher rec-
Secondary School Report (SSR): Most ommendations are requested by col- your teachers for
colleges and universities require the leges, and you should ask teachers from
College Counseling Office to submit infor- the upper or senior year. Some schools
recommendations early
mation about you—your academic perfor- will require an English teacher and one
mance, your personal qualities and your other instructor, but be sure to read each
—a month or two
extracurricular accomplishments—as part application closely. Be sure to ask your
of your application. We provide this infor- teachers early—a month or two in
mation with a form, called the Secondary advance is not too soon. Fill out the top in advance
School Report, to which we attach your portion of the form with your name,
high school transcript(s), documentation address, and Social Security number and is not too soon.
of medical leaves or probations, and a provide your teachers with pre-
detailed recommendation written by your addressed, pre-stamped envelopes. Share
counselor. In the applications that you your interests with your teachers, either
receive from most colleges, you will find a through conversations or by providing
Secondary School Report form. You can an outline. Academy faculty graciously
ignore this form, because at PEA we have extend themselves by writing for seniors,
our own Secondary School Report form so please be considerate and give them
that all colleges and universities accept. as much notice and information as pos-
sible. And remember to thank them!
Class Rank: Many schools request infor-
mation on class rank and ask the coun- One year seniors and postgraduates are
selor to compare students within certain encouraged to talk with their college
categories. Phillips Exeter does not rank counselors about asking teachers from
its students, but we do provide a range of both Exeter and from their previous high
cumulative grade point averages attained school.
by seniors who entered the Academy in a
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy
particular year.
Act of 1974: The act entitles a student to
Midyear School Report Forms: Students review his/her permanent record once
do not need to submit the midyear report she/he has matriculated at a college. Most
forms found in most college applications. students opt to waive the right to see the rec-

31
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

ommendation because it implies that the Every essay should reflect both of these
recommendation was written candidly. attributes. This is your chance to distinguish
yourself to the college admissions officers.
Additional Recommendations: If you
GETTING STARTED
have one or two additional people who
would like to write on your behalf, it may The end of the upper year is not too early
be worth considering. However, too to begin. Make a list of traits and experi-
many additional reference letters can be ences that set you apart from others. Make
distracting to the admission reader. a chronological list of important things
Again, talk with your college counselor you have done in and out of school.
about the value of your additional letters. Finally, boil it down to a few that have
Before you mail your
application: Additional Credentials meant the most to you, or carry index
The deadline for alumni/ae interviews is cards with you and every time you think of
Check to see that you signed
usually well in advance of the application something write it on one of the cards.
the application forms.
deadline. If needed, check the application When your applications arrive in the fall
Make sure someone proofreads booklet for details about how to arrange list all the questions. Make sure you answer
your entire application. an interview. the question or questions that the college
asks. Choose a topic that is close to your
Make sure you mail the appli- Students with talents in the performing
heart. Let your personality shine through.
cation to the correct school (it arts should discuss with their college
Tell them what you want them to know,
is very easy with the Common counselor the process for sending art,
not what you think they want to hear.
Application for materials to music, theater or dance material. See the
Never underestimate the power of your
get mixed up). chapter “Special Applicants” for more
own written words. Make one experience

WRITING YOUR COLLEGE
Always keep photocopies of information.
come alive. Reinforce something positive

ESSAY
your completed applications. in your application.

Use appropriate postage WRITING THE ESSAY
The most difficult and time-consuming
for the weight of your Once you have decided on your topic find
portion of the application is the essay —
application envelope. a quiet place, sit down and write from the
or essays, since many colleges ask you for
heart. Put down whatever comes into your
more than one. This is your opportunity
mind and edit it later. Find your own
to speak for yourself and your candidacy
voice; don’t twist yourself into someone
in an honest and straightforward manner.
else. The college admissions committee
Consider it an invitation to talk face to face
expects you to write the way a 17-year-old
with an admission committee. It is an
writes, not the way a parent writes. Use
interview on paper. Colleges ask these
Hemingway’s sentiment, “Show, don’t
essay questions for two reasons:
tell!” How long should your essay be? “As
• To learn more about you. Who is short as you have time to make it,” writes
the real person behind these one admissions officer.
credentials?
Lead into the essay clearly and quickly.
• To discover if you are a skilled and Avoid slang, long words and humor
articulate writer. (unless you are truly funny and have a
32 truly funny story to tell).
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

Use transition sentences between para- Only one college day can be taken in any
graphs to retain continuity. The first draft one term; students who wish to take both
will be very rough. Leave it for a few days, their college days in one term must petition
then read it again with fresh objective eyes. the Dean’s Office. We advise students to
Rewrite. Ask a literate friend to read it and reserve at least one college day for a visit
make suggestions. Ask him/her if your per- after the receipt of college admission letters
sonality shows through in the essay. Take to help inform their final choice. All college
criticism gracefully. Re-read your essay, days must be taken before May 1.
being aware of grammar, spelling, and
Students who are admitted through an
correct organization around the theme.
Early Decision or Early Action program will POINTS TO REMEMBER:
Remember to be concise; the reader allows
not be allowed to miss a class for a college • Follow the directions in
approximately 2-3 minutes per essay.
visit subsequent to their acceptance unless regard to length, format and
Finally, college admission officers are savvy they receive an invitation to an orientation whether it should be typed
to essays that have been over-edited by par- or open house program for admitted stu- or in your own handwriting.
ents or purchased on the Internet. Please dents. In such a situation, you must submit
• Read the question carefully
do not download any part of your essay a copy of your invitation or a description of
and answer the question

COLLEGE OFFICE POLICIES
from cyberspace. the program to the College Counseling
accordingly.
Office and the Dean’s Office in order to
obtain the necessary permission. • Start in plenty of time to do
The E Book contains relevant information all that needs to be done.
about the College Counseling Office and its Extensions of the college day for travel are not
• More is not better. Keep it
policies and procedures; please refer to The E permitted, so you should plan these days
short and simple without
Book for more detailed information than carefully. To facilitate travel, consider taking a
big words.
that which is listed here. college day on a day adjacent to a no-class day
or long weekend. The college day is defined as • Use your own voice.
College Days
any 24-hour period. Before travel plans are • Make sure your grammar and
In general, Exonians are encouraged to visit
made, students should obtain approval from spelling are correct. A mis-
colleges during vacation times. However, by
the Dean’s office for a college day. take is evidence that you are
faculty decision, seniors are allowed to miss
not truly interested in that
classes on two days for the purpose of visiting Disciplinary Issues
college.
colleges. You must obtain a permission form Increasingly, colleges are asking students
from the College Counseling Office for a col- and college counselors about disciplinary • Make it neat and well-
lege day, complete the form, and return it to infractions of the applicant. In those cases organized.
your college counselor. Then submit the where the question is asked directly of the • EDIT! (More than once)
completed form to the Dean of Students student and/or the college counselor on the • Write about something you
Office and fill out an out-of-town form. If application forms the question needs to be care about.
you are staying overnight on a college cam- answered truthfully. A student who is placed
• Finally, make it your best
pus, a written invitation from the host at the on disciplinary probation during his/her
effort.
college and written parental permission is tenure at the Academy, but before filing of
required by the Dean’s Office before an out- applications, should address the situation
of-town will be approved. within the body of the application. A brief
and honest explanation of your past trespass-
es and a longer description of what you have
33
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

learned from your experience are both In situations where a student is required to
required. If you have questions about report- withdraw from the Academy, the College
ing such matters to colleges with your initial Counseling Office will notify in writing all
application, you should seek clarification and the colleges to which the student has
guidance from your college counselor. applied describing the charge and the
change in status within 10 calendar days of
If you are placed on probation during or
the decision. Students are encouraged to
shortly after the filing of your application, and
contact the colleges involved immediately
the colleges to which you have applied ask a
and discuss the specifics of their situation.
direct question about probation, you should
If such disciplinary action is taken after the
submit a supplemental letter explaining the
student has been admitted to college, the
incident in question to the particular colleges,
College Counseling Office is still obligated
despite the fact that the actual application may
to notify the colleges to which the student
have already been submitted. Colleges have
has applied of the change in status, through
numerous ways of uncovering such informa-
a written statement describing the charge
tion, and a straightforward, honest approach
and the change in status, within 10 calen-
concerning the disciplinary process at the
dar days of the decision.
Academy has proven to be the most effective
method of dealing with such issues and the Medical, Personal and Dean’s Leaves
college application process. Once again, you By Academy policy, when a student takes a
should always check with your counselor if medical or personal leave from Exeter, the stu-
there are lingering concerns or questions dent’s transcript reflects the change in status.
regarding such a specific situation. In most cases, college admission officers will
ask questions about such leaves of absence. It
In those cases where the question is asked
is the practice of the College Counseling
directly of the student and/or the college
Office to indicate that the medical or personal
counselor on the application forms, the
leave has occurred, and to encourage the stu-
College Counseling Office will forward to
dent to discuss the leave and the reasons
the college a brief statement describing the
behind it with each college directly.
Academy’s philosophy about discipline, a
brief description of the disciplinary In cases where the student has taken a med-
process, and a simple statement of the ical leave of absence and has returned to
charge brought against the student. If you school prior to the filing of his/her applica-
are on probation after filing an application, tion, the fact that the student has successful-
you will be instructed by the College ly continued his/her academic career after
Counseling Office (in writing or through a the medical leave often reassures college
personal meeting with your college coun- admission offices of the student’s readiness
selor) to notify the college in writing about to handle the rigors of college life. In cases
the disciplinary action. After 10 calendar where the leave is prolonged or occurs close
days, to allow the student to inform the col- to or after the filing of the college applica-
lege, the College Counseling Office will tions, colleges will be more concerned about
send a statement concerning the probation the leave and its ramifications.
directly to the college.
34
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

The College Counseling Office encourages ed by the College Counseling Office, in
students to be direct and honest with writing or through a personal meeting
admission officers in these situations so the with his/her counselor, to notify colleges in
college representative can make an writing about the Deans' Leave. After 10
informed assessment of the effect of the calendar days, to allow the student to
medical condition on the student’s ability inform the colleges to which s/he has
to perform academically. Medical leaves applied, the College Counseling Office will
occurring prior to senior year will be noted send a statement concerning the Dean's
on the student’s transcript and should be Leave directly to each college.
addressed by the student within the body of
Leaving Exeter Early
the application. Check with your counselor
On rare occasions, a student who has gen-
for advice on the most effective means to
erally exhausted the Academy's curricu-
convey this information to colleges.
lum, has demonstrated a significant level of
If medical or personal leave is taken dur- academic achievement, and has a high
ing the senior year, the College degree of emotional maturity may consider
Counseling Office is required by the col- applying to college in the eleventh grade
leges to notify them immediately of the year. Such a process is unusual and should
absence, regardless if the leave is granted be approached cautiously, after consulting
from the Academy or from an off-campus with the student's adviser, college coun-
program. Students should contact the col- selor, subject teachers, and academic deans.
lege admissions office immediately and Students must declare their intention for an
discuss the specifics of the particular situ- early admissions application to the College
ation. After giving the student 10 calendar Counseling Office by November 1st of the
days to contact the colleges directly about eleventh grade year. The College
the reasons for the leave, the College Counseling Office will assume that a stu-
Counseling Office will submit to each col- dent who has applied and has been admit-
lege in question a written statement indi- ted to college in the eleventh grade year
cating the change in status for that stu- (prior to receiving an Exeter diploma) will
dent. If a student has already been admit- not return to the Academy, nor continue in
ted to a college, the College Counseling the college admissions process.
Office is still required by the colleges to
Transcripts and Recommendations
inform them of a change in status, and a
The College Counseling Office will process
written statement will be submitted to
transcripts and counselor letters of recom-
those schools in question.
mendation. The Exeter transcript only
Reporting of Personal and Dean’s Leaves to Colleges reports end-of-term grades. It is the policy
In situations where a student is required to of the College Counseling Office NOT to
take a Dean's Leave from the Academy, the include unofficial midterm grades. The
College Counseling Office will forward to College Counseling Office sends out tran-
all the colleges to which the student has scripts on all applicants (including those
applied a brief statement describing the admitted under an Early plan) to all
Dean's Leave. The student will be instruct- schools at the end of each term.
35
C H A P T E R I I I FA L L

We do not act as a clearinghouse for Depositing
teacher recommendations or your part of A student must accept only one offer of
the application. Except in the case of some admission. In most circumstances, the
large state universities which require that acceptance of such an offer is indicated by
all application materials be enclosed in the submission of an enrollment deposit
the same mailing, it will be the student’s and occurs on or before May 1 of the
responsibility to make sure that he/she senior year. Submitting two or more
has sent all applications to the colleges deposits, or double-depositing, is against
before the applicable deadline. the National Association for College
Admission Counseling (NACAC) guide-
A student may accept Access to Student Records
lines and will not be condoned by the
A student wishing to review his or her Academy
College Counseling Office. Students who
only one offer records must submit a written request to either
double-deposit may jeopardize their place
the Dean of Students or Director of College
in the freshman class at both institutions.
of admission Counseling. Parents of students under the age
of 18 must sign a request. The Academy will Student Rights and Privileges
respond within a reasonable amount of time. The College Counseling Office recognizes
– double-depositing
and abides by all counseling principles set
Copies of transcripts will be provided to stu-
forth by NACAC. We expect students and
is not allowed. dents and families upon request. These tran-
parents to abide by these principles, as
scripts will clearly indicate either unofficial
described through the counseling process,
or official status, depending on the nature of
as well. If you have questions about your
the request and the specific situation at
rights and obligations in the application
hand. All other records contained in a stu-
process, you should immediately seek
dent’s permanent file may be reviewed at the
clarification or explanation from a college
Academy in the presence of the Director of
counselor.
College Counseling. The composite report
written in the College Counseling Office Students admitted to a college under a
does not become a part of a student’s per- binding Early Decision program will be
manent file until the completion of the col- strongly encouraged to abide by their agree-
lege admission process, after graduation. ment that they, their parents, and their col-
Parents wishing to review the composite lege counselor sign as part of the process.
report may follow the above procedures after While financial issues sometimes compli-
graduation. Once again, the Academy will cate such agreements, students and their
respond within a reasonable amount of families must recognize that Early Decision
time. Alumni and alumnae may also request commitments entail a financial, as well as
to review their records; requests for a copy of an admission commitment that may affect
a transcript must be made in writing to the their decision to apply under an Early
College Counseling Office. The process for Decision plan.
alumni/ae review of other records is identi-
cal to the one outlined above.

36
CHAPTER IV WINTER
CHAPTER IV WINTER

By now you have mailed your applications, as soon as they know the admission status
have requested that test scores be sent to of your application. If you are having trou-
colleges, and are finishing up supplemen- ble getting your financial aid forms pre-
tal application materials that arrived after pared, speak with your college counselor.

LOOKING FOR SCHOLARSHIPS
mailing the initial application. Now,
though it may seem like a relatively quiet
With most of the application work already
time in the college process, the college
done, winter term can be an appropriate
counselors, through telephone calls and
time to continue to look for scholarships.
campus visits, are making themselves
Continue your search by visiting two web-
available to admission officers. For this
sites devoted to scholarships: fastweb.com
reason, we encourage you to remain in
and studentaid.ed.gov. Also, the College
close contact with your college counselor
Counseling Office posts information
so that the counselor is aware of course
about scholarships on Blackboard and the
grades and winter term activities.

REPORTING WINTER TERM GRADES
College Counseling Office website and you
will receive notification in your mail if you
The College Counseling Office sends win- qualify as a National Merit Semifinalist or a
ter term grades to all colleges to which a Congressional Presidential Scholar.

MISSING CREDENTIALS
senior has applied. Early Decision and
Early Action candidates should note that
By the beginning of winter term, all tran-
the College Counseling Office sends win-
scripts and counselor letters of recom-
ter term grades to the school where they
mendation have been mailed to your list of
have been accepted. While many colleges
colleges. Occasionally, students will receive
request midyear grades by February 15,
notification that their application is
the winter term at Exeter does not end
incomplete because of missing documents
until mid-March. As soon as the term
or test scores. Don’t panic. Admissions
ends, the grades are sent to the schools to
officers are processing tens of thousands of
which a senior has applied. Though stu-
pieces of mail with varying degrees of effi-
dents receive midterm grades, they are
ciency. Often the “missing credential” let-
unofficial and are not released to admis-
ter and the Exeter materials have crossed
sion officers.

FINANCIAL AID FORMS
in the mail or the materials are in the
admissions office but have not been
Most colleges request that institutional processed. If you receive such a notice,
financial aid forms, supporting documen- bring it to the College Counseling Office
tation, and the Profile form be submitted and we will promptly follow up with the
by February 1. While it can be challenging college to confirm that the information
to gather tax information and complete has been received. If, for any reason, the
the necessary paperwork by the deadline, missing document cannot be found, we
it is important that financial aid officers will fax and/or express mail the missing
are able to process your financial aid award forms.

37
CHAPTER IV WINTER

SUPPLEMENTAL APPLICATION FORMS legacy status and visit information. Be
After you have submitted your applica- sure to answer the questions fully. More
tions, some colleges may send you a sup- and more schools are keenly interested in
plemental application form that you need gauging a student’s interest in their col-
to complete and promptly return. Be sure lege, so the answers you provide will help
to take as much care with the supplemen- them to determine the level of your
tal form as you did with the original interest in their school.
application. The information requested
is very often institution-specific, such as

Your “To Do” List

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

...................................

38
CHAPTER V SPRING
CHAPTER V SPRING

DECISIONS, DECISIONS When you make your final decision,
remember that students must accept one
It’s here — that long-anticipated “senior
offer of admission by the official candi-
spring.” The many hours you have spent
date reply date, May 1. Take this deadline
thoughtfully researching your college
very seriously. Colleges have been known
choices, filling out forms, writing essays,
in the recent past to return deposits post-
and visiting college campuses have paid off
marked after the stated deadline. Do not
with offers of admission and financial aid
put yourself in this difficult position. Be
packages from several of your colleges. For
sure to graciously decline the admission
many of you, the decision will be an easy
offers made by other colleges. Remember
one, as you have been offered admission to
that accepting two colleges’ offers of
your first-choice college. Other seniors
admission to secure a spot in the freshman Senioritis (sen’yer-ey-tiz), n.:
may still be undecided, and may choose to
class at two different schools — an uneth- infectious, yet curable, ill-
revisit college campuses to narrow their
ical practice known as “double-deposit- ness common among high
choices, attend open houses or receptions
ing” — is prohibited by the National school 12th-graders in late
for admitted students, or speak with
Association for College Admission spring prior to graduation;
Exeter alumni/ae who are currently
Counseling (NACAC), of which Exeter is a often minor infection which,
attending colleges under consideration.

SENIORITIS
charter member. when left untreated, can
Use your college counselor as a resource to
cause extensive damage to
help you sort through your options, con-
future college goals, often
firm your financial aid award, and make You’ve made it! The 1st of May has come
irreparably. Also known as
your final decision. and gone, you have deposited with your
senior slide or senior slump.
first-choice school and are already begin-
As the College Counseling Office celebrates
ning to anticipate the start of college. You
your admission offers with you, we recog-
are now ready to relax, knowing that the
nize that many of you will also have received
pressure of performing academically in
some disappointing news from colleges. A
order to get into college is off. It is time to
denial letter is never pleasant,
take it easy because, after all, grades don’t
even if you were anticipating it. Being
count anymore.
denied admission does not mean that you
were unqualified or did something “wrong.” This is false. The college process isn’t over
With many more highly qualified students until that Sunday in June when the final
applying by record numbers at institutions senior’s name is announced at gradua-
nationwide, a denial letter simply means tion. Until that moment, and even
that there were other candidates who better beyond, colleges retain the right to
met the college’s unique needs and criteria. rescind offers of admission for students
Your college counselors firmly believe that who have failed to maintain consistent
the college didn’t turn you down — they academic performance. Reread your offer
turned down your résumé. Use the support of admission. Colleges require students to
resources of your family and friends as you agree to maintain their academic status
sort through your decisions.

39
CHAPTER V SPRING

quo and complete their Exeter career at Sometimes a college’s projections for its
the same general standard which they had target may be dead-on … other times, sig-
achieved before. Your failure to do so is a nificantly over or under its goal. At any
breach of your end of the bargain, thus per- point just before or after May 1, once the
mitting colleges to reconsider their part of college has recognized that they have not
the contract — your offer of admission. met their target enrollment, admissions
offices review their waitlist to select a num-
Some clever students may attempt to gauge
ber of students to round out their class.
the threshold at which they can lessen their
When waitlist letters are mailed, it is
effort without causing their grades to raise
impossible to know which colleges will be
You should only remain any “red flags.” Yet only the college knows
able to admit students from their waiting
its own threshold. Continue to work hard
lists or how many students they will admit.
active on a waiting list to maintain your present standard of per-
The status of the waiting list will become
formance.
much clearer after May 1 when admissions
if you are sincerely Colleges have been known to rescind offers offices will have a final tally of matriculat-
of admission. While colleges are not eager ing students.
interested in attending to take such a dramatic step, they are will-
No two colleges look at waitlists in the
ing and able to rescind offers of admission.
same way. Some schools use it as an effec-
that college. Remember that you are not a freshman at
tive enrollment tool, others hope never to
that college until the first day of class. Any
go to their waitlist. Others inappropriately
action you take — not only academic
use the list as a supposedly gentler way of
inconsistency, but also disciplinary matters
saying “no,” without any intention of ever
both on- and off-campus — can impact
admitting a student. The number of stu-
your offer of admission. Don’t be foolish.
dents taken from a waitlist can be a mere
Do not do anything that can jeopardize all
handful or in the hundreds. Sometimes

WAITLISTS
of your hard work.
colleges have “special interest” waitlists for
athletes or legacy cases; others group every-
Many students incorrectly judge a college’s one together. Some institutions rank wait-
decision on the size or weight of the enve- lists, others do not. Recognize that there are
lope: a big, fat packet means an offer of numerous variables to how a college uses a
admission; a thin envelope signifies the dis- waitlist. Waitlist opportunities can fluctu-
appointment of being denied admission. ate from year to year — no two years are
Yet colleges mail out more than two types exactly alike at a given institution. Carefully
of decision letters. Often, that thin enve- review the waitlist letter for clues about
lope can convey a different type of deci- past waitlist activity. A telephone call to
sion: a waitlist letter. admission offices can also provide valuable
information.
Most selective colleges and universities use
waitlists as an “insurance policy” for meet- Being placed on a waitlist can be both a
ing their target for their freshman class. blessing and a curse. The good news is
College admissions is art, not science. that you might have received a simple let-

40
CHAPTER V SPRING

ter of denial. Yet there are downsides. cation of whether the college
Accepting a place on a waitlist prolongs encourages additional supporting
your admissions process at a time when evidence or recommendations.
most of your peers may be wrapping up Some schools welcome such “lobby-
their own. There is also absolutely no ing” from candidates, while others
guarantee of any positive outcome to may discourage it.
remaining on a waitlist. Despite a college’s • Decline offers of admission at col-
statement that only a handful of waitlist leges you do not plan to attend
students may be admitted, many students before May 1. In the spirit of “Non
cling to a false sense of hope, only to be sibi,” such action could benefit one Your “To Do” List
disappointed. Whatever happens, a waitlist of your peers in getting off that
can be an emotional roller coaster ride. school’s waitlist and being offered ...................................

There are concrete things you can do if admission to their first-choice
...................................
you have been placed on a waitlist: school. If you and your friends
respond quickly, colleges may turn to
• If you plan to remain on a college’s ...................................
their waitlists earlier than mid-May.
waitlist you should immediately
While the decision to take a student from ...................................
contact your college counselor and
the waitlist ultimately rests with the college
work out a plan. Students who plan ...................................
admissions office, there are some effective
to drop their waitlist candidacy
actions you can take if you choose to ...................................
should notify both the college and
remain on a waitlist:
their counselor promptly. Consider
...................................
your options carefully, and talk with • Tell your counselor of your plans.
your college counselor and your • Accept one college’s offer of admis- ...................................
family about your plans. sion and make a deposit there
• You should only remain active on a BEFORE May 1 so that your place ...................................

waitlist if you are sincerely interested in their freshman class is guaran-
...................................
in attending that college. If you have teed. Your deposit will be forfeited
other college choices about which ...................................
if you are accepted off the waitlist at
you are excited, then it is not advis- your other choice, but you cannot
...................................
able to remain on a list. It may not be postpone depositing because you
wise to remain on a waitlist if your will lose your place at the college ...................................
recent grades or other parts of your which offered you admission. It is
college candidacy have not shown an accepted practice to commit to ...................................
improvement. one college while remaining on the
• Many colleges provide information waitlist at another. Remember that
on how often and to what extent the there is no guarantee that any col-
waitlist has been used by their lege will offer admission to any stu-
admissions office in the waitlist let- dents placed on its waitlist, so it is
ter. The letter may also give an indi- IMPERATIVE that you accept an

41
CHAPTER V SPRING

offer of admission that has been The College Counseling Office will stay in
made to you before May 1. contact with the colleges during this time
• Keep up your performance in the to support your efforts. Remain patient,
classroom and remain active keep this process in perspective, and con-
in extracurricular activities. tinue communicating openly with your
family and your college counselor. Use the
• Discuss with your counselor the effi-
support network you have to assist you
cacy of writing a direct, succinct let-

UNDERSTANDING YOUR
through this challenging time.
ter to the appropriate admissions

OFFER OF FINANCIAL
AID
officer at your waitlist school. (The
Accept one college’s College Counseling Office has
his/her name.) Restate your reasons
offer of admission for wanting to attend the college, For students who have applied for need-
mention any recent accomplish- based financial aid, most colleges will noti-
ments or pertinent new information fy students of their aid package shortly
and make a deposit there
about which the college may not be after their offer of admission. If a student
aware and emphasize that you will has submitted required documents, such as
BEFORE May 1
attend if offered admission from the the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal
waitlist. Show this letter to your col- Student Aid) and the Profile forms, on
so that your place time, college financial aid offices are usual-
lege counselor before mailing it.
ly able to notify students of their aid award
in their freshman class • Resist the urge to telephone admis-
prior to the May 1 deadline for accepting
sions offices to lobby on your own
an admission offer.
behalf.
is guaranteed.
Upon receipt of their financial aid package,
• Discuss frankly with the college,
students and families should thoroughly
your college counselor, and your
read all of the information that has been
family the opportunities available
included in their aid award. Families who
for need-based financial aid for
have questions about award packages
waitlisted students. Many colleges
should contact the college’s financial aid
completely deplete their institution-
office as soon as possible. Aid officers are
al resources for grant money on or
available to help families make sense of
before May 1. Some schools do not
their packages and financing options.
have the resources to offer any aid to
When contacting aid offices, be patient –
waitlist students.
many other families are also seeking to
Above all else, try to maintain perspective
clarify their packages in the next three
and a sense of humor. Remember that you
weeks, before the May 1 deadline.
probably have wonderful college choices
available to you. By concentrating your Remember that need-based financial aid
focus and energy on those and making a packages consist of two types of assistance:
deposit before May 1 to one of them, you grant and ‘self-help’ money. Grants may
can assure yourself of a good college come from the college or from federal/state
option. governments, and do not require repay-

42
ment. The most common forms of grants Foundation - to meet the ‘gap.’ Please rec-
Exonians receive in their financial aid ognize that some of these loans have origi-
award include SEOG, Pell Grants, and col- nation fees, in addition to interest payments
lege-sponsored scholarships or grants. and requirements that students begin to
Colleges expect students and families to repay during their undergraduate years.
help finance their education through such
If you have any questions about under-
‘self-help’ means as college work-study or
standing your financial aid award, or need
student loans. Students are required to pay
help in determining how to proceed with
back ‘self-help’ money. Exonians may see
questions and negotiations with college
in their award packages such ‘self-help’
financial aid officers, please feel free to con-
funding as Perkins Loans, college work-
tact your college counselor.
study, Stafford Loans, and privately-spon-
sored loans, such as PLUS loans. If you have not heard about your financial
aid package by the first week in April, we
When reviewing the aid package, students
strongly recommend that you contact the
may also consider college-sponsored
college financial aid office immediately, to
options, such as payment plans and
confirm that your aid application is com-
deferred payment programs, that can help
plete. Frequently, the following missing
spread out a family’s contribution. Some
information can hold up a student’s aid
colleges and universities may include their
package:
own college-sponsored loans, which are
often offered with attractive payment plans • Did you complete your FAFSA/Profile
and competitively low interest rates. Check on time? Delays in submitting these
with the college aid office to see how to forms create delays in receiving finan-
apply for these programs. cial aid.

On occasion, some colleges’ financial aid • Have you returned your Student Aid
awards do not fully meet a family’s demon- Report (SAR)? Four to six weeks after
strated financial need, as calculated by the submitting the FAFSA, students will
Expected Family Contribution (EFC) from receive their SAR, the official record
the FAFSA and Profile forms, with suffi- that the federal processing agency
cient grant dollars, leaving a significant dif- received your FAFSA. Upon receiving
ference between the cost of attendance and their SAR, students should carefully
the total aid award. This administrative review all the information to make
policy is known as ‘gapping.’ If you have sure it is correct. Students must
received a ‘gapped’ aid package, we suggest return their SAR to the federal pro-
you speak directly with the respective cessing agency. Failure to promptly
financial aid office. Some students may return the SAR to the agency can hold
choose to borrow funds from an outside up your aid package.
source - Tree Loans, CitiAssit loans, or other
loans recommended by the New
Hampshire Higher Educational Assistance

43
• Has your SAR been selected for verifi- • Does your family own a business or
cation? On the form, look for the let- are they self-employed? Usually, col-
ters EFC followed by a series of num- lege financial aid offices require addi-
bers. If there is an asterisk (*) after tional documentation (such as specif-
your EFC, your FAFSA has been ic tax return schedules) for small-
selected for verification. About 30 per- businessmen.
cent of FAFSAs are selected for verifi-
• Do you have any siblings or parents
cation. If selected, you will be asked by
who are enrolled as undergraduate
college financial aid officers to pro-
college students? Financial aid offices
vide more information.
may require verification of full-time
• Have you submitted copies of tax enrollment.
returns and W-2 forms to financial aid
Because every family’s financial cir-
offices?
cumstances are unique, each financial
• If your parents are divorced or sepa- aid case will be different. Do not hes-
rated, have you submitted documen- itate to speak directly with a college’s
tation verifying their marital status? financial aid office, should any of
Financial aid offices may seek addi- these specific areas of concern pertain
tional information about a student’s directly to you.
non-custodial parent.

44
CHAPTER VI ADMISSIONS
DECISIONS
CHAPTER VI ADMISSIONS DECISIONS

ADMISSIONS DECISIONS:
HOW THEY ARE MADE
• School profile: context of learning
environment, number of 400+/AP-
There are many factors that influence an level courses offered, faculty/student
An admissions officer
admissions decision. The type of institution ratio, percent of graduates attending
(public vs. private), the size (large, medium four-year colleges, unusual pro-
reviews two main
or small), the level of selectivity, the philoso- grams, history of school with col-
phy of the institution and the “context of the lege/university, grade distribution.
applicant pool” in any given year will influ- ingredients
• Grade distribution vs. class rank vs.
ence how an admissions officer will read and grade-point average.
rate an application, present an application to of a student’s
• Standardized Test Scores (SAT I,
a committee, and make a final decision on an
SAT II, ACT, TOEFL).
application. application—
• Teacher and counselor recommen-
Most often at public institutions, objective
dations. Both should provide specif- the student’s
data (rank, GPA, SAT I, SAT II Subject tests,
ic information about strengths,
ACT) will direct a decision. However, this is
accomplishments, areas of improve-
not true for every public institution — you academic
ment and aberrant performance.
must ask each institution how it evaluates
• Achievements/Awards/Scholarships. and personal
in-state and out-of-state applicants. At the
most selective private institutions, a stu- • Academic programs beyond the tra-
dent’s academic and personal profile as well ditional, including study abroad profiles.
as the secondary school context (the num- programs and summer study.
ber of applicants from Exeter in any given • Academic interest (major).
PERSONAL PROFILE
year, the strength of their as well as our
applicant pool, the history of admissions
• Extracurricular activities including
decisions, matriculation rates and present
time commitment and roles within
performance of Exeter students) are taken
activities, both in and outside of
into consideration. If you have attended
school. (Colleges are not necessarily
more than one secondary school, each edu-
looking for the “well-rounded stu-
cational experience will be evaluated.
dent,” they are looking for a well-
An admissions officer reviews two main rounded freshman class.)
ingredients of a student’s application — • Character traits (leadership, fellow-
the student’s academic and personal pro- ship, inspiration, discipline, determi-
files. The outline below will offer some nation.) What traits do you possess?
insight into the many facets of each profile.

ACADEMIC CREDENTIALS INCLUDE
• Interviews can give life to your appli-

A REVIEW OF:
cation, or clarify a special talent or
lapse in your record.
• The transcript. Balance and rigor
• Recommendations (counselor,
of courses (Intensive/Honors/
teacher, employer, volunteer
400+/AP-level), as well as grades.
supervisor, etc.).

45
CHAPTER VI ADMISSIONS DECISIONS

• Summer experiences. How have they • Language ability.
influenced your life/perspective? • Area of interest.
• Cultural experiences (travel, living • Legacy status, or whether a child of
abroad, etc.).
OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
a faculty or staff member.
• Other supplementary material (e.g.
The list below may be factored into the term paper, portfolio, etc. Ask the
admission equation. institution if they will review it.).
• Gender. • Philanthropic interest.
• Family background, race or • Financial need.
ethnicity. • Unusual circumstances.
• Permanent residence (geographical • Disciplinary issues such as
diversity). probation.
• Recommendations (peer, political • Separation from school, such as
figures, etc.). medical leaves.
• Special talents (art, music, writing,
athletics, etc.).

46
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC
APPLICANTS
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

STUDENT ATHLETES RECRUITMENT
If you presently compete in varsity athlet- According to the NCAA (National College
ics, and/or with a competitive club, AAU Athletic Association), you become a
If you are a recruited
team, Junior National and/or Junior “prospective student-athlete” when you
Olympic team, you may want to consider start ninth-grade classes. You become a student-athlete, no
the possibility of playing at the college or “recruited prospective student-athlete” at a
matter what the
university level. Athletics can enrich your particular college if any coach or represen-
undergraduate experience and may assist tative of the college’s athletics interests division level, read the
you in the college admissions process. (booster or representative) approaches
“NCAA Guide for the
you (or any member of your family) about
Before you contact college coaches, take
enrolling and participating in athletics at College-Bound Student
time to discuss your interests and abilities
that college. Letters from coaches, faculty
with your present coach. Ask your coach for
members and students are not permitted
Athlete” to be clear on
a candid evaluation of your ability (i.e. can
until September 1 of your upper year. In recruiting rules and
you play at the Division I, II, or III level, or
all sports other than football, telephone
are you a recreational student-athlete?). If violations.
calls from faculty members and coaches
your present coach is unable to assess what
are not permitted until after July 1, after
division you can compete at on the college
completion of your upper year.
level, you may want to attend a summer
camp in order to access the expertise of col- Most of the Academy’s “recruited prospec-
lege coaches, most of whom can evaluate tive student-athletes” are contacted in the
your skill level. Once your skill level is deter- summer prior to their senior year or dur-
mined, discuss with your coach and college ing the fall of their senior year. Many stu-
counselor those colleges that meet both dents will visit college campuses during
your academic and athletic needs. this time. For both Division I and Division
II, you can have one expense-paid official
As in the overall college admissions
visit to a particular campus. An official visit
process, it is important to create criteria
may not exceed 48 hours and has a limit on
for selecting athletic programs. What are
dollars spent on the recruited student-ath-
you looking for in your college athletic
lete as well as dollars spent by the host.
team? Do you want to be part of an already
Division III student-athletes can have one
winning program or do you want to be a
expense-paid (official) visit to a particular
star in a building program? Is your talent
campus; however, there is no limit on the
or position needed in the college’s upcom-
number of campuses that you may visit if
ing class or in two years? How many
you initially enroll in a Division III college.
seniors graduate from the team? As you
match your talent with the “right” pro-
gram, your coach and college counselor
can give you additional questions to ask to
be an informed consumer.

47
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

YOUR RECRUITMENT CALENDAR and/or e-mail contact. Continue to
Spring of Upper Year express interest in their program by
Speak to your respective Academy/club/ inquiring about specific aspects of their
Most of the Academy’s
AAU coaches for their assessment of your program:
level of skill and potential as a recruited
“recruited prospective • What is their record over the last
student-athlete. Ask them for their recom-
two years?
mendations of potential college programs
student-athletes” that would best match your athletic talent. • How many athletes will graduate
Share this information with your college in the coming year - what posi-
are contacted counselor. Ask your coaches if s/he will be tions? what events?
willing to complete college sport question- Keep track of each college coach contact
in the summer naires on your behalf and/or write letter of (i.e. name of coach, Head vs. Assistant, etc.,
recommendations with follow-up phone date and substance of contact). Consider
prior to their senior year calls to the college coaches. keeping a journal noting the frequency of
contacts and distinguishing between hand-
Summer Between Upper Year and Senior Year
or during the fall written and computer-generated, generic
Write a letter to every coach of the respec-
form letters. Remember Division I and II
tive college programs to which you are
of their senior year. coaches are only permitted by NCAA regu-
interested in applying. Include in your let-
lations to make one weekly phone call to
ter the following information:
you. You may call them as often as you like.
• Your interest in the college and Division III coaches do not have NCAA
athletic program. phone call restrictions.
• A profile of both your athletic and Complete an NCAA eligibility form
academic performance(s) over the (review the following section on NCAA for
past three years. more details).
• Summer camps and competitions
Be aware that some coaches may encourage
outside of your Exeter experience,
you to apply Early Decision/Action as a
names of coaches, and any statistics
tool in their recruitment process. Talk to
clarifying your talent.
your college counselor about the ramifica-
Fall of Senior Year tions of such a decision.
By September you have contacted your
A Division I student-athlete may be asked
coaches for an assessment of skill.
to sign a National Letter of Intent. There
Remain in contact with them regarding
are restrictions on signing a National Letter
the completion of college sport question-
of Intent that may affect your eligibility.
naires and telephone contact with college
Read it carefully (and show the letter to
coaches.
your parents, coach and college counselor).
Having contacted all of your prospective Remember, DO NOT sign any institution-
college coaches in writing, it is time to al or conference letter of intent before the
begin the follow-up telephone calls National Letter of Intent signing date.

48
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

Signing dates are listed in the NCAA Guide. Athletic recruits who plan to participate in
an “Official Paid Recruiting Visit” at a
A college coach’s recruitment “list” can shift
Division I or Division II school should reg-
through the fall and winter, because of Register with the National
ister for the NCAA Eligibility Center as
changes in a coach’s needs, the result of a
soon as possible. In addition to complet- College Athletic Association
preliminary review of your academic cre-
ing the NCAA Eligibility Center form, you
dentials, or a change in your level of interest Clearinghouse before you
must contact College Board to send offi-
in the program.
cial SAT I scores to the NCAA Eligibility graduate from the Academy
Remain realistic – if coaches are not calling Center. Please note the NCAA CEEB code
if you plan to participate in
or returning your calls, you may not be cur- is: 9999.
rently considered a recruit by the coach. Use Division I or Division II ath-
Eligibility Requirements
your contact journal and talk with your
In order to compete in Division I or letic programs.
Academy coach and college counselor to get
Division II athletics as a freshman, you
a “reality check” of your prospects.
must meet the NCAA’s eligibility require-
Winter of Senior Year ments for members of the Class of 2010.
Continue your contact with coaches They are:
through the beginning of March.
1. Graduate from high school.
June of Senior Year
2. Have a core-course grade-point
After graduation, students will have to average (based on maximum of
receive a final certification from the NCAA 4.000) and combined score on the
Eligibility Center before they will be SAT Verbal and Math sections or a
allowed to compete for their college or uni- sum score on the ACT based on the
versity. Division III athletes do not have to qualifier index scale in the NCAA
register with the NCAA Eligibility Center. Guide.
NCAA ELIGIBILITY 3. Successfully complete a core cur-
The NCAA continues to set standards for riculum of at least 16 academic
the recruitment and eligibility of Division I requirements. These requirements
or Division II student-athletes. You must include:
register with the NCAA Eligibility Center by
ENGLISH:
the time you graduate from the Academy if
4 full years for Division I; 3 years
you plan to participate in Division I or II
for Division II
athletic programs. You can obtain an NCAA
MATHEMATICS:
Eligibility Center form on the Internet at
3 years for Division I;
http://web1.ncaa.org/eligibilitycenter, or
2 years for Division II
write to:
(Division I — one year of algebra
NCAA Eligibility Center
plus one year of geometry or a year
P.O. Box 7136
of higher-level math for which
Indianapolis, IN 46207
geometry is prerequisite.)
(877) 262-1492

49
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

SCIENCE: • Field Courses do NOT fulfill
2 years for Division I or II NCAA requirements.
(1 year of lab science for both) • Potential Division I or II student-
Your “To Do” List
ADDITIONAL MATH, SCIENCE, athletes who participate in fall
................................... or ENGLISH: term abroad (Stratford, Grenoble,
1 year for Division I; Russia, Beijing) or winter term
...................................
2 years for Division II abroad (Cuernavaca, Germany)
SOCIAL SCIENCE: MUST enroll in two English elec-
...................................
2 years for Division I or II tives during senior spring.
................................... • The Washington Intern Program
(history, economics, geography,
psychology, sociology, government, does NOT necessarily provide an
...................................
political science, anthropology) NCAA recognized English credit.
................................... Students who participate in the
ADDITIONAL WORK:
Washington Intern Program may
4 years for Division I; 3 years for
................................... find that they will be ineligible to
Division II (English, math, science,
compete in Division I or II athletics.
................................... foreign language, computer science,
philosophy, “non-doctrinal” reli- • After graduation, students will have
................................... gion— see your college counselor to receive a final certification from
for the list of non-core courses that the NCAA Eligibility Center before
................................... they will be allowed to compete for
do not meet eligibility according to
................................... the NCAA). their college or university. Division
III athletes do not have to register
Special Considerations for Eligibility
................................... with the NCAA Eligibility Center.
• Repeated courses are ONLY
................................... counted ONCE. This includes • Division III schools are NOT
classes taken at different high affected by any of this!
................................... schools that have similar titles. Meeting NCAA Eligibility With A Learning

• Changing schools can sometimes Disability

make the certification process If you have a documented learning dis-
more confusing. ability, discuss with your college coun-
• Post-Graduates (PG’s) should selor how to meet NCAA eligibility.
have received certification before There is a four-step process that includes:
coming to Phillips Exeter. 1. Documenting your disability.
• For Canadian citizens who have 2. Registering with the NCAA
graduated from a Canadian high Eligibility Center as a student with
school prior to attending Exeter, a disability with the intention to
the certification process is different potentially request a waiver of cer-
than domestic students; speak with tain requirement standards.
your counselor and the NCAA
directly.

50
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

3. Register and complete non-stan- your application will be evaluated. Ask
dardized SAT I testing. each college:
4. Meet the acceptable NCAA core • How much is your talent used in the If you are a
courses for students with disabili- decision-making process?
ties, obtained from your college student with talent in the
• How do they evaluate your talent
counselor. Also, review the section
(portfolio, audition, and tape)?
on “Learning Disabilities” in this
arts you may want to

PERFORMING AND
guidebook. • Does each institution look for spe-

VISUAL ARTS
cific ingredients in talent? What does
each college want to see in your include a sample of your
portfolio or audition?
If you are a student with talent in the visu-
• For this year’s applicant pool, is the
ability to the
al arts, music, dance or theater, you may
want to include a sample of your ability to college looking for one type of
instrument more than another (e.g. colleges
the various colleges to which you are apply-
ing. Consider the following in determining harp players over violinists, or oil
what you send: painters over graphic designers)? to which you are applying.
• How do you make an audition
• Does your Academy or private
appointment? Who does the actual
instructor believe your talent will
evaluation? Are there regional
win a favorable review from a par-
auditions available? Can you send
ticular college? Which pieces should
a tape?
be used to demonstrate your talent?
After learning more about the evaluation
• Do you have the time and
process at each college, have a conversation
resources to present your talent in a
with your college counselor, adviser, and
format that is acceptable to the col-
Exeter teacher to determine which schools
lege (e.g. art in the form of slides

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
are a better match for you.
not original canvas)?

DEFINING “INTERNATIONAL”
• Contact each of your respective col-
leges to learn what supplemental
materials they will accept and where It is important to determine how each of
to send them (i.e. the admissions your respective colleges defines an “interna-
office or the music department tional student.” Some students are defined
and/or both). by citizenship, while others are defined by
foreign educational experience, sometimes
If you are planning to apply to a conserva-
both. Check with each school on how they
tory, art institute, or school devoted to the
define your particular status and whether
arts (e.g. Julliard or Museum of Fine Arts)
you must submit a different international
or a school for the arts within a larger uni-
application, supplemental form, or decla-
versity (e.g. The Tisch School at NYU or
ration of financial status form.
Cornell’s College of Architecture, Art and
Planning), you should understand how

51
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

PERMANENT RESIDENT many colleges and universities offer some
If you are an illegal alien in the United States, financial assistance for international
you will be considered an international stu- undergraduate students. The International
dent by most colleges. If you are in the midst Student Handbook of U.S. Colleges, pub-
of becoming a legal resident, please do your lished by the College Board, provides a list
best to expedite the process before your of average aid awards given to internation-
senior year so that you may be considered al students at a wide range of colleges and
for federal dollars and financial aid. universities. Ask your college counselor for

TESTING
a copy of this list.

Most colleges ask international students DECLARATION OF FUNDS
who are not native English speakers to take Most colleges and universities will ask
the Test of English as a Foreign Language international students for a declaration of
(TOEFL) exam or the English Language funds. This is a statement from your par-
Proficiency Test (ELPT) exam. The ELPT ents’ bank indicating in American dollars
test is used to test language proficiency of that your family can afford at least one year
non-native speakers of English who have and as much as four years of college. Some
been enrolled in ESL programs in American colleges ask to see a balance that will cover
high schools. The TOEFL exam is used for more than one year. Ask each institution
international students whose native lan- exactly what they are looking for in their
guage is not English and who are applying declaration of funds. Many colleges and
for admission to colleges and graduate universities will not notify a student of
schools in the United States. Therefore, the their admissions decision until supporting
College Counseling Office recommends financial documentation has been submit-

LEARNING DISABILITIES
students take the TOEFL exam in the ted for review.
summer between their upper and senior
year and/or in the fall of their senior year.
If you are a student with a documented
Exeter offers an “institutional” version of
learning disability (i.e. a professional has
the TOEFL exam; however, some colleges
evaluated your learning style with diag-
will only accept the “computer-based”
nostic tools and has written a report indi-
exam offered at regional sites throughout
cating a learning style difference), you
the United States and world. The comput-
have the right by law not to share this
er-based exam is expensive and has limit-
information with colleges. However, most
ed admittance, so plan ahead.

FINANCIAL AID FOR
Academy students with learning disabili-

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
ties have developed various strategies to
help them with their academics and share
U.S. citizens, dual citizens with the United with colleges their learning difference and
States, and permanent residents are all eli- coping strategies.
gible for federal financial aid dollars
should they qualify. This is not true for Colleges must accommodate students
most international students. However, with learning or physical disabilities by

52
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

law. However, it is helpful to inquire what sive steps necessary to complete the appli-
the individual college offers in terms of cation include nomination by a senator or
support for students with learning disabili- congressperson, as well as evaluation of
ties. Do they presently have the services your academic credentials, personal
you need? integrity, and physical fitness.

REPORTING YOUR DISABILITY POINTS TO CONSIDER
If you choose to disclose your learning dis- Application Process
ability, enclose a copy of the diagnostic As mentioned above, you must receive a
evaluation with your application. If your nomination from your senator or con-
evaluation was done as a young child, it is gressperson. Also, an evaluation of acade-
helpful for the college to know how you mic credentials, personal character and
manage your learning difference (i.e. do physical examination are considered in the
you need extra time on papers and tests, or application review.
do your present strategies allow you to
Academic Programs
handle your workload without any inter-
Math, engineering, and the physical sci-
vention?).

TESTING
ences continue to be strong at the service
academies. Are you interested in one of
As a student with a learning disability, you these academic areas?
may want to take untimed SAT I or SAT II
Lifestyle Change
Subject testing. Discuss with your college
The service academy requires a change in
counselor whether extended timed testing
lifestyle. It is very different from the
is appropriate for you and what the proce-
traditional undergraduate experience.
dures are for such testing. Students who
Investigate and comprehend the magni-
require extended time must register with
tude of the change and whether you are
the College Board in their upper year.
ready to fully embrace it on a daily basis.

SERVICE ACADEMIES
Postgraduate Obligations
As a service academy graduate, you are
obligated to give at least six years of mili-
If you are considering one of the service
tary service in return for your free educa-
academies among your college choices,
tion. Determine whether this obligation is
the College Counseling Office recom-
reasonable to you.
mends you think carefully about the
education and experience found at a ser- THE APPLICATION PROCESS
vice academy. First and foremost, you Starting the Application Process
must know yourself well enough to Request and submit a pre-candidate ques-
understand whether this is an appropri- tionnaire at the end of your upper or
ate match for you personally, academical- beginning of senior year. You may obtain a
ly, physically, and vocationally. The exten- questionnaire from one of the service acad-

53
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

emies or a senator or congressperson. New London, CT 06320
Listed below are the addresses for the (800) 883-8724
Service Academies: www.uscga.edu
Use the following website for
Candidate Guidance Office Complete Service Academy Application
more information:
United States Naval Academy Write to the individual service academy
www.militarycareers.com. 117 Decatur Road for an application.
Annapolis, MD 21402-5018
Complete Fitness Exam
(410) 293-4361
www.usna.edu You will be sent information about how to
complete your physical examination upon
Your “To Do” List U.S. Military Academy
initial inquiry.
Director of Admissions

ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS
................................... West Point, NY 10996
(845) 938-4041
................................... www.usma.edu If you are interested in a ROTC schol-
arship, contact the Navy ROTC, Army
U.S. Air Force Academy
................................... ROTC, and/or Air Force ROTC at the
Director of Admissions
USAFA/RRS following telephone numbers for more
...................................
USAF Academy, CO 80840 information:
................................... (800) 443-9266 Navy – ROTC
www.usafa.edu (800) USA-NAVY
...................................
Nomination Process Army ROTC
...................................
You must be nominated in order to apply (800) USA-ROTC
to a service academy. Write to each of your
Air Force ROTC
................................... senators and your congressperson to ask if (866) 423-7682
they would consider you as one of their
................................... Marine ROTC
nominees. The letter must include the fol-
(800) MARINES
lowing information: your name, address,
...................................
phone number, date of birth, Social ROTC will provide a booklet that indicates
................................... Security number, secondary school, year of what majors at particular colleges/universi-
graduation, name of your parents, and ties they will sponsor. Upon graduation from
................................... your first, second, third and fourth choices college with a ROTC scholarship, you will be
for academies. In turn, the senator or con- responsible to serve in the military for eight

THE COLLEGE
................................... years (active duty and/or Reserves).
gressperson will contact you by letter with

The U.S. Coast Guard does not TRANSFER APPLICANT
instructions on what to do next.

require a nomination by a senator or The College Counseling Office recommends
congressperson, although the evaluation each student carefully consider the resources
process does use the same selection criteria at their present college before pursuing a
as the other military academies. transfer admissions process. Often, your pre-
sent institution will allow you to achieve your
U.S. Coast Guard Academy academic goals through independent study
Director of Admissions or access to graduate courses in order to
54 15 Mohegan Avenue accommodate your needs. However, if you
CHAPTER VII SPECIFIC APPLICANTS

are truly unhappy, here are some guidelines to fer applicants to have completed by
consider when transferring. the close of their first year? Usually,
colleges will evaluate transfers more
If you are a senior dissatisfied with your college The same process
favorably if they have taken some of
choices in spring of your senior year, the
the basic requirement courses towards
College Counseling Office suggests preparing for first-year students
their major. This may not hold true
now to enhance your transfer candidacy later.
for students attending a focused pro-
The same process for first-year students applies applies to transferring,
gram (e.g. conservatory); they may be
to transferring, with some slight modifications.
evaluated differently due to the cours-
Begin the transfer process by thinking about a with slight modifications.
es and opportunities available.
range of schools (i.e. Category I, II, III, and IV).
Review your original criteria for colleges and • Does financial aid play a role in the
call each of the colleges that you believe meet transfer admissions decision?
your criteria. Ask if you can speak to someone • What was the percentage of aid given to
who evaluates transfer applications. Write accepted transfer students last year?
down this person’s name as your contact What was the average grant for transfer
source and call him/her for all future inquiries. students?
It is important to ask the following questions • Does the college have a separate finan-
and review the answers to determine how to cial aid budget for transfer students?
proceed in your college course work in order to Does this budget fluctuate each year?
enhance your transfer application. How much?
• What is the percentage of transfer stu- Transcripts Requests
dents accepted as sophomores for the
If you are a current Exeter upper or senior
last two years? Percentage projection
or an Academy alumna/us requesting a
for the year you plan to apply?
transcript, all requests must include:
• What is the percentage of transfer
• your full name and any former names;
students accepted as juniors? Percentage
projection for the year you plan to apply? • your graduation year;
• What was the average college GPA • name and address to where tran-
and SAT I score accepted in the last script(s) are to be mailed; and
two years? • your daytime phone number.
• How much weight is given to the high Seniors can stop by the College Counseling
school record in the evaluation? It is Office and complete a ‘pink sheet’ request
usually less if you are applying for form. Requests from alumni/ae can be
junior status. made by completing the online transcript
• How much weight is given to SAT request form on the College Counceling
scores in the evaluation process? section of the Academy’s webpage at
(Again, it is usually less if you are apply- www.exeter.edu/about_us/7456.aspx.
ing for junior status.) Please note that the College Counseling
Office will only mail ‘official’ transcripts
• What are the required courses the
from our office directly to a third party (such
admissions office is looking for trans-
55
as a college admission office, employers, deferred admission at a university, the
scholarship organizations, etc.). Since there College Counseling Office requires a copy
may be as much as a 10-day processing peri- of the deferral letter, before we can release
od, particularly during busy periods when transcripts to additional colleges. If you
the office is helping current seniors or pro- are transferring, it is very helpful to our
cessing their applications, we encourage you counseling of other students to know why
to plan accordingly. alumni/ae are considering transferring
from their current college. To that end, we
Standardized test scores, such as the SAT,
would appreciate your response to our
ACT, AP, and TOEFL, do not appear on
year-end “Transfer and Gap Year
Exeter transcripts. If you need your previous
Application Results” questionnaire
standardized test scores, you are responsible
when it is emailed to you in June. Your
to contact the College Board and/or the ACT
feedback is extraordinarily helpful and
for all testing reports.

ASSISTING FORMER STUDENTS
greatly appreciated.

The Academy follows the Principles of Good
While Exeter’s College Counseling Office
Practice set by the National Association for
will provide occasional support to gap year
College Admission Counseling (NACAC).
and transfer applicants, it is our expectation
The College Counseling Office expects that
that you have acquired the skills necessary to
alumni/ae will self-report their records hon-
complete the college admission process.
estly and fully. Alumni/ae should also know
Our primary responsibility is to the current
that some colleges and universities ask the
student body; we know Exonians are
Academy about discipline issues as part of
characterized by their ability to think
the application. Phillips Exeter’s policy is to
independently, to evaluate information
report on discipline whenever a college asks
critically, and to utilize appropriate research
the question on any application. This policy
tools—all of which are necessary to ensure
continues after initial applications are filed
a successful college match.
and after graduation if an alumna/us
If you are a recent Exeter alumna/us who is initiates a transfer or gap year application.
planning on filing a new college application,
Former Exonians who did not receive
either as a transfer applicant or as a first-year
a diploma from the Academy for any
student after having completed a gap year,
reason, including a Requirement to
please follow the instructions above to
Withdraw, do not request transcripts
request a transcript. Remember that the
from the College Counseling Office.
College Counseling Office requires 10
Instead, former students should contact
working days to complete your request.
the Dean of Students Office for official
If you are pursuing a gap year, please let Academy transcripts.
your former college counselor know how
you have spent your interim year and if
you are currently deferred from any other
university. If a gap year student has

56
APPENDIX
G L O S S A RY O F T E R M S
APPENDIX G L O S S A RY O F T E R M S

Academic Discipline: A college depart- Asset Protection Allowance: The por- Budget: The estimated cost of atten-
mental or subject area, such as English tion of parents’ assets that is not includ- dance for a student at an institution
literature, history, or business. ed in the calculation of the Expected which typically includes tuition, fees,
Family Contribution (EFC) (q.v.), as cal- books, supplies, room, board, personal
Academic Year: The period in which
culated by Federal Methodology (q.v.). expenses, and transportation.
school is in session - typically September
through May. Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.): Traditional Category I: Selective colleges and uni-
degree awarded by a liberal arts college or versities on an Exonian’s college list, to
Accelerated Programs: Exceptionally-
university following successful completion which s/he has the greatest chance of
selective admission programs which
of a course of study.These degrees may be gaining admission; generally colleges with
offer graduate school admission, gener-
granted in any number of fields in the a higher percentage of applicants offered
ally for medical school, to freshman
humanities, social sciences, natural sci- admission.
applicants. Program length can vary
ences, or fine/performing arts. Some col-
from seven to eight years, often includ- Category II: Selective colleges and uni-
leges award an A.B., which is simply the
ing summer coursework. versities on an Exonian’s college list, to
Latin abbreviation (Arts Baccalarius) for a
which s/he has roughly 50/50 odds of
Accrual Date: The date on which inter- Bachelor of Arts degree.
gaining admission; frequently subjective
est charges on an educational loan begin
Bachelor of Business Administration factors, such as the college’s own institu-
to accrue.
(B.B.A.): Degree offered by undergradu- tional needs and a student’s demonstra-
Adjusted Available Income: The remain- ate business and management programs, tion of interest, can play a large role in
ing income after taxes and a basic living which are accredited by such national the application review for Category II
allowance have been subtracted in agencies as the American Assembly of schools.
Federal Methodology. (q.v.). Collegiate Schools of Business, by meet-
Category III: Highly-selective colleges
ing a required set of certification and
Advanced Placement (AP) Exams: Tests and universities on an Exonian’s college
course requirements. Accredited busi-
sponsored by the College Board for stu- list, to which s/he has a moderate chance
ness programs can differ significantly
dents who have taken advanced, college- of gaining admission.
from B.A. (q.v.) liberal arts degrees.
level courses here at the Academy. Some
Category IV: The most-selective col-
colleges may allow students to receive col- Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.): Degree
leges and universities on an Exonian’s
lege credit for high scores on these exams; offered by fine arts, design, theater, dance,
college list, to which s/he has the small-
still others will place students out of intro- and other visual and performing arts pro-
est chance of gaining admission; general-
ductory-level courses into higher levels. grams. Admission to B.F.A. programs can
ly colleges with the lowest percentage of
be based to a large extent upon artistic
American College Test (ACT): College applicants offered admission.
talent, determined through an audition
admissions examination administered by or portfolio review, and to a lesser Collateral: Property used to secure a
the American College Testing Program, extent upon standardized testing and loan which can be seized if the borrower
measuring through multiple-choice academic performance in traditional cur- defaults on the loan.
questions four areas of academic knowl- riculums.
edge: English, mathematics, reading, and College Board: For-profit organization
science reasoning. While widely accept- Bachelor of Science (B.S.): Degree usual- which sponsors such educational testing
ed throughout the United States, this ly awarded for successful completion of as the SAT I, SAT II, AP, and CLEP exams
exam is used more commonly by requirements in the natural and physical and such financial aid forms as the Profile
Midwestern and Western colleges and sciences, or for more professionally-ori- form. The informal name of the College
universities for admission testing. ented programs, such as education, engi- Entrance Examination Board [CEEB]
neering, or business. Note that many col- (q.v.).
Assets: Cash in checking and savings leges award B.A.s (q.v.) for similar
accounts, trusts, stocks, bonds, other degrees. Some universities may offer College Days: Academy policy currently
securities, real estate, income-producing both degrees in a particular academic allows for a student to use two days dur-
property and business equipment and discipline; generally the B.S. degree may ing the senior year to visit colleges, known
inventory which is all considered in require additional work in the major for as college days. In addition to the standard
determining the Expected Family graduation. out-of-town procedure, students must
Contribution (EFC) (q.v.). procure from their college counselor a
permission slip to request a college day
A P P E N D I X G L O S S A RY O F T E R M S

from the Dean of Student’s office. Visits ences, natural and physical sciences, quan- Dependency: A student’s dependency
must take place prior to May 1. titative fields, and requiring English and status determines the degree to which
foreign language proficiency. Core curricu- the student has access to parental financial
College Entrance Examination Board
lums can range from a handful of courses resources.
(CEEB): Another name for the College
to well over half the required courses
Board (q.v.). In filling out applications and Differential Packaging: Administrative
necessary for graduation.
other college forms, students are fre- policy where colleges use enhanced finan-
quently asked for their high school’s Cosigner: Individual who assumes cial aid offers to entice academically-
CEEB number; the Academy’s CEEB responsibility for a loan if the borrower stronger or under-represented students
number is 300185. fails to repay. to matriculate (q.v.). While meeting
demonstrated financial need (q.v.), differ-
College Level Examination Program Credit Hour: Measure of degree of diffi-
ential packages may consist of a larger
(CLEP): Exam offered by the College culty of courses, frequently proportionate
percentage of grant money vs. student
Board testing knowledge in a subject to the number of hours of weekly class-
loans than what most students would
area without regard to how a student room instruction. For example, a four-
receive.
gained that knowledge. Unlike AP exams, credit hour course will generally require
these tests do not require that a student more work and be more demanding than Disbursement: The process by which
complete high school coursework to a three-hour course. Most colleges financial aid funds are made directly to
take the exam. Some colleges award col- require students to meet a certain thresh- students for use in meeting educational
lege credit for high CLEP results; others old of credit hours in order to graduate. expenses.
will waive certain general curriculum
Custodial Parent: In cases where a stu- Discipline: See “Academic Discipline.”
requirements.
dent’s parents are divorced or separated,
Division: Academic unit of a college or
College Scholarship Service (CSS): the custodial parent is the parent with
university; can also be a school (“School of
Branch of College Board (q.v.) which whom the student lived the most during
Business”) or college (“College of Arts &
administers the Profile (q.v.) form and the past 12 months.
Sciences”) within a university.
other financial aid services.
Default: Failure to repay or otherwise
Double Deposit: Accepting two colleges’
College Work-Study Program (CWSP): meet the terms and conditions of a loan.
offers of admission by submitting a binding
A federally-sponsored program which Penalties include a damaged credit rating,
deposit to secure a spot in the freshman
allows students to pay for part of their withholding of tax refunds, and loss of
class at both. This practice is prohibited by
educational expenses through part- future aid eligibility.
the regulations of the National Association
time work on campus. A portion of the
Demonstrated Financial Need: Amount, for College Admissions Counseling
work-study salary comes from the col-
as determined through Federal, private (NACAC), and is vehemently discouraged
lege employer; most is through federal
and/or institutional financial aid forms, by the College Counseling Office.
subsidies. Only students with demon-
which is the difference between the total
strated financial need are eligible for Early Action: The non-binding admission
cost of attendance and the estimated fam-
work-study jobs. process used by a handful of colleges
ily contribution (q.v.).
whereby a student applies to his first
Cooperative Education (Co-op): College-
Demonstration of Interest: An internal choice college in late fall and is notified of
sponsored programs designed to help
measure by selective colleges and univer- his admission decision in mid-December,
undergraduates meet college expenses
sities that may be sensitive to their fresh- yet does not need to respond to the
and gain work experience, alternating
man yield (q.v.) of an applicant’s level of institution until the May 1 common noti-
periods of study with periods of work in
interest in their institution. Such factors fication deadline (q.v.). While Early Action
a field related to a student’s academic or
considered can include on-campus visits, colleges do not require a student to with-
professional interests.Traditionally, but not
interviews with an alumnus/a or admis- draw other applications, the College
exclusively, used by students in such pre-
sions officer, meetings with an admissions Counseling Office takes the approach
professional programs as engineering,
officer off-campus, or the level to which a that, since a student has been offered
computer science, and business.
student engages with the college’s applica- admission to her/his first choice school,
Core Curriculum: Required college tion and essay. s/he will withdraw all other college appli-
courses necessary for graduation, consist- cations.
ing of a comprehensive selection from
such fields as the humanities, social sci-
A P P E N D I X G L O S S A RY O F T E R M S

Early Admission: An admission process Expected Family Contribution (EFC): Grants: Financial aid money from the
whereby a student who has completed The amount of money determined Federal/ state government or matriculat-
11th grade applies for college admission, through needs analysis, (q.v.) from ing college, which does not require
thus skipping their 12th grade year. Federal and institutional financial aid repayment, like a loan.
Occasionally, though infrequently, used forms, that a family can afford to spend
Honors Programs: Special college cours-
synonymously for Early Action (q.v.). for college.
es within an informal or structured pro-
Early Decision: The binding admission Extracurriculars: Activities in which gram offering greater intellectual chal-
process whereby a student applies to his students participate outside of the class- lenge for highly-qualified, motivated stu-
first choice school in late fall, and is noti- room, such as athletics, student organi- dents. Some programs are open by invita-
fied of their decision in mid-December. If zations and clubs, volunteer work and tion only; others require a supplemental
offered admission under Early Decision, community service, music lessons or application, different from the application
the student must withdraw any other groups, or part-time jobs. for admission. Many honors programs
applications from other colleges. offer scholarships or special prerogatives,
Feder al Methodolog y (FM): The
such as preferential registration.
Early Evaluation: A non-binding admis- method created by the U.S. Government
sion process where a student is tenta- and calculated from the information sup- Hook: A subjective factor in the admis-
tively notified of their admission decision plied by the FAFSA (q.v.) used to deter- sions decision-making process which can
in January or February, receives their mine a student’s expected family contri- influence, to varying degrees, a student’s
official offer in late March, yet does not bution (q.v.). final decision, such as legacy (q.v.) status,
need to respond to the college until May athletic recruitment, exceptional artistic
Federal Processor: The organization that
1. While the Early Evaluation college talent, or membership in an underrepre-
processes the information submitted on
does not need to be a student’s first- sented multicultural population.
the FAFSA (q.v.) and uses it to compute
choice school, most applicants use the
eligibility for federal student aid. Humanities: Fields of study including
program for their first or near first
English, literature, languages, philosophy,
choice college. 4-1-4 Plan: An academic calendar usually
classics, history, music, fine arts, theater,
including a fall term with four courses, a
Educational Testing Service (ETS): and religion.
shortened winter term with one course,
Branch of the College Board (q.v.) which
and a spring term with four courses. Institutional Methodology (IM): The
administers the SAT I and SAT II (q.q.v.)
method used by individual colleges from
examinations, and processes requests Free Application for Federal Student Aid
the information supplied by the Profile
for scores to be reported to colleges. (FAFSA): The Federally-sponsored finan-
form (q.v.) to determine a student’s EFC
cial aid form required by all U.S. colleges
Eligibility Center: Division of the (q.v.).Where Federal Methodology is uni-
and universities to apply for Federal
National Collegiate Athletic Association versally standard, the individual compo-
loans and grants, used to determine a
[NCAA] (q.v.) which certifies that all nents of Institutional Methodology can
student’s financial need based upon
Division I and Division II athletes have vary from school to school.
Federal Methodology (q.v.).
taken 16 “core” high school courses,
Interest: See “Demonstration of Interest.”
meeting a minimum level of achievement Gapping: Administrative policy where
in academic and testing performance. the college’s financial aid award does Internship: A part-time paid, volunteer,
Prospective athletes must register and be not fully meet a family’s demonstrated and/or for-college-credit position offer-
cleared by the NCAA Eligibility Center financial need (q.v.). Such a “gap” can ing hands-on experience in a student’s
prior to their participation in college range from a few hundred to several academic or professional field of inter-
sports. Most Academy students initiate thousand dollars. est. Internships are undertaken either
the NCAA Eligibility Center process while enrolled during the academic year
during the fall of their senior year. Grade-Point Average (GPA): Numerical
or in the summer.
conversion of letter grades into a cumu-
Enrollment Status: For financial aid pur- lative average, by term, year, or academic Ivy League: While its eight members
poses, the amount of time a student is career. Generally GPAs are computed (Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth,
enrolled in courses per semester – “full- using a 4.0 scale (4.0 = A, 3.0 = B, etc.); Harvard, Penn, Princeton, and Yale) are
time” for a full course load generally the Academy utilizes an 11.0 scale (11.0 = highly selective colleges for admission, the
consisting of four or more classes and A, 10.0 = A-, 9.0 = B+, etc.). designation “Ivy League” only refers to
“part-time” for less than that amount. their membership in a common athletic
conference.
A P P E N D I X G L O S S A RY O F T E R M S

Joint Degree: Also may be known as a National Association for College Need Aware, Need Conscious or Need
“dual degree” program. Academic pro- Admission Counseling (NACAC): Sensitive: A college financial aid policy
gram of study which allows a student to Professional association of college admis- where a family’s ability to pay may influ-
either major in two separate undergradu- sions and high school guidance/college ence the college’s admission decision.
ate fields in completely distinct disciplines counseling personnel. As a member of Students with a higher demonstrated
(such as engineering and business, or busi- NACAC, Exeter and its students agree to financial need who may not be near the
ness and foreign language), or to pursue a abide by the “Principles of Good academic top of a college’s applicant
joint undergraduate-graduate degree pro- Practice,” which outlines the appropriate pool are most vulnerable in the admis-
gram (such as joint B.A./M.B.A., B.A./J.D., ethical standards for such issues as Early sions process at need aware colleges.
or B.A./M.D. programs). Decision, application deadlines, and dou-
Need Blind: A college financial aid policy
ble depositing.
Legacy: Having an immediate family where a family’s ability to pay does not
member, generally a parent and occa- NCAA Clearinghouse: influence the college’s admission decision.
sionally a grandparent or a sibling, as an See “Clearinghouse.”
Needs Analysis: The standard, uniform
alumna/a of a college to which the stu-
National Collegiate Athletic Association process by which a college financial aid
dent is making application.
(NCAA): National organization which office determines how much a family can
Liberal Arts: A broad-based introduc- supervises and regulates most intercol- afford to pay, using two systems: federal
tion to a wide variety of subjects, includ- legiate athletic programs. Based upon methodology and institutional method-
ing the social sciences, humanities, and size of institution and level of competi- ology (q.v.v.).
natural sciences (q.v.v.). Generally does tion, these programs are divided into
Package: A student’s financial aid award,
not include professional programs, such three divisions: Division I, II, and III. The
“packaged” together with such compo-
as business, engineering, or nursing, first two Divisions generally award ath-
nents as loans, grants, work-study, and
although these programs may contain letic scholarships; Division III athletic
scholarships.
some coursework in the liberal arts. programs do not.
Parent Contribution (PC): Another
Loans: Financial assistance which must National Merit Commended Student: A
name for the EFC (q.v.), usually not
be repaid over an extended period of designation given to students by the
including any of the student’s summer-
time, generally after a student completes National Merit Corporation for stu-
employment savings.
an undergraduate degree, but occasion- dents who score high on the
ally beginning during undergraduate PSAT/NMSQT (q.v.) examination, but do Payment Plans: College-sponsored pro-
enrollment. not pass the state-specific threshold grams which allow families to spread the
score to become a Semifinalist (q.v.). yearly cost of attendance out over
Major: Concentrated field of collegiate
monthly installments.
study in one academic discipline (q.v.), National Merit Finalist: A National
requiring a set number of required Merit Semifinalist (q.v.) who becomes eli- Pell Grant: Named in honor of Sen.
courses for completion beyond any gible for merit-based academic scholar- Claibourne Pell (RI), Federally-funded
required core curriculum (q.v.) require- ship, based upon the student’s strong grants (q.v.) designed to help students
ments. Students concentrate in two aca- PSAT/NMSQT (q.v.) scores, high school with the lowest EFC (q.v.). Eligibility is
demic fields by “double-majoring.” record, and counselor recommendation. determined through the information
provided through the FAFSA (q.v.). The
Matriculate: Academic term meaning National Merit Scholar: A National
yearly maximum amount of a Pell Grant
to “enroll” at or “attend” a college or Merit Finalist (q.v.) who receives a merit-
is about $3,000.
university. based academic scholarship, sponsored
by a member organization or college, or Perkins Loans: Federally-funded college
Merit-based Aid: Financial aid based on
the National Merit Corporation. loan with traditionally lowest interest
academic, artistic, athletic, or other non-
rate of educational loans, with repay-
need based criteria. National Merit Semifinalist: The initial
ment deferred until nine months after a
designation by the National Merit
Minor: A secondary field of concentrat- student leaves school. Students may bor-
Corporation for students who pass a
ed study during the final two years of row up to a total of $15,000 for an
state-specific threshold score on the
college, similar to a major (q.v.) yet with undergraduate degree (approximately
PSAT/NMSQT (q.v.) examination.
fewer requirements. $3,000 annually), and eligibility is deter-
mined through the information provid-
ed through the FAFSA (q.v.).
A P P E N D I X G L O S S A RY O F T E R M S

PLUS Loans: Federally-sponsored col- fields of study. Law and medical schools promise, regardless of whether a student
lege loans administered through individ- generally offer basic guidelines on under- qualifies for assistance on the basis of
ual banks and loan lenders available to graduate courses for students interested demonstrated financial need (q.v.).
parents who are U.S. citizens of an in gaining admission to these graduate
Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT):
undergraduate student enrolled at least programs. However, students can gener-
Standardized tests administered by the
part-time. Parents must pass a credit ally integrate these basic requirements
College Board (q.v.) which provide col-
check to qualify for PLUS loans and are into many divergent majors, including
lege admission offices with a common
legally responsible for repayment. business, engineering, and other non-tra-
national standard for evaluating student
Available without regard to financial ditional pre-professional majors.
records from different high schools.
need, PLUS loans may cover the full cost
Profile: Financial aid form sponsored by Along with a student’s academic perfor-
of education minus other forms of aid.
CSS (q.v.) and utilized by approximately mance in high school and other more
Prepaid Tuition Plan: A college savings 320 participating colleges, which is simi- subjective factors such as recommenda-
plan guaranteed to rise in value at the lar to the FAFSA (q.v.), but is cus- tions, extracurriculars (q.v.), and essays,
same rate as college tuition. Several tomized by colleges to supply additional the SAT is used with variable success to
states and private institutions offer such information as required by the colleges attempt to predict a student’s academic
programs. to which the student is applying for aid. performance in college.
Principal: The amount borrowed or Quarters: Academic calendar consisting SAT I: The most general standardized
owed on a loan. of four terms, approximately 10 weeks test offered by the College Board – a
in length; some quarter-system schools three-hour, primarily multiple-choice
Professional Judgment: For need-based
have courses in the summer. test which measures Verbal and
federal aid programs, financial aid admin-
Mathematical reasoning abilities. The
istrators can adjust the Expected Family Rate of Attrition: Percentage of stu-
SAT is required by almost all U.S. col-
Contribution (EFC) (q.v.) or the cost of dents who do not return, due to acade-
leges and universities for freshman
attendance, or change the dependency mic, financial, or personal reasons, usu-
admission.
status (q.v.) with documentation when ally given at the end of the freshman
extenuating circumstances exist, such as year. SAT II: One hour-long, primarily multi-
when a parent becomes unemployed. ple-choice tests measuring knowledge
Reser ve Officer Tr aining Cor ps
of particular specific subject areas and a
Promissory Note: A legally binding con- (ROTC): U.S. military program offering
student’s ability to apply that knowl-
tract which a student signs before receiv- one-, two-, and four-year scholarships at
edge. SAT II Subject Tests fall into six
ing the disbursement (q.v.) of their finan- select colleges and universities, covering
general areas: English, history and social
cial aid package that details the terms of tuition, books, and fees in addition to a
sciences, mathematics, sciences, and for-
the loan contract and obligating the bor- living stipend, in exchange for a set num-
eign languages. Many highly selective col-
rower to repay the loan. ber of years in a branch of the service.
leges and universities will require SAT II
PSAT/NMSQT (Preliminary Scholastic Rolling Admission: Admission process exams for admission.
Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship whereby students are offered or denied
Secondary School Report (SSR):
Qualifying Test): Administered by ETS admission throughout the calendar year.
College-generated form requesting a
(q.v.), a standardized exam generally admin-
Satisfactory Academic Progress: A col- copy of the applicant’s high school
istered during the 10th and/or 11th grade
lege or university’s policy stipulating record and, frequently, a college coun-
enabling students to practice for the SAT I
that a student maintain a certain mini- selor letter of recommendation. Exeter
and SAT II: Writing tests. The PSAT test
mum number of courses that must be creates its own SSR forms and does not
offered in October of the 11th grade year
completed each semester, the maximum use any of the colleges’ own copies.
is the qualifying exam for the scholarship
time permitted, and the minimum
competitions administered by the National Selective Service: U.S. Department of
grade-point average (q.v.) required to
Merit Scholarship Corporation. Defense bureau which requires registra-
continue to receive financial aid.
tion by all 18-year-old U.S. citizens.
Pre-Law/Pre-Med: Not a major (q.v.) or
Scholarships: Merit-based financial assis- Confirmation of registration with the
academic discipline (q.v.), but an intended
tance offered in recognition of a student’s Selective Service is required for eligibility
direction for graduate school allowing a
academic, personal, extracurricular for federally-funded financial aid money.
student to concentrate in many different
and/or athletic achievements and
A P P E N D I X G L O S S A RY O F T E R M S

Self-Help: The amount of money, in Student Contribution: An estimate of Pell Grants, PLUS Loans, Perkins Loans,
addition to receiving non-repayable the student’s ability to contribute to and Stafford Loans (q.q.v.).
grants, which colleges ask students to his/her college education, typically up to
Title IX: Federal government law
help finance their education through col- 35 percent of savings and up to half of
requiring that any college or university
lege work-study or loans (q.q.v.). student summer earnings above $1,750.
that receives money from the U.S. gov-
Semester: The most common academic Student-Faculty Ratio: The ratio deter- ernment must have roughly the same
calendar, dividing the year into two equal mined by dividing the number of stu- proportion of female athlete opportu-
terms. dents by the number of professors. The nities as female undergraduates.
student-faculty ratio is often of ques- Schools must also demonstrate a con-
Servicer: An organization that is paid by
tionable value; “average class size” fre- tinuing history of expanding athletic
a loan lender to administer student
quently provides more useful informa- opportunities for women.
loans.
tion about faculty-student interaction.
Transcript: Official school record of
Simplified Needs Test: An alternative
Subsidized Loan: Student loans on grades and courses.
method of calculating the expected fam-
which borrowers do not have to pay
ily contribution (q.v.) for families with Trimester: Academic calendar divided
interest until after their grace period
adjusted gross incomes over $50,000, into three roughly-equal terms (i.e., the
expires, usually within six months of
who have filed or are eligible to file an Exeter academic calendar).
completion of a terminal degree.
IRS Form 1040A or 1040EZ, or who are
Tuition: The portion of college expens-
not required to file an income tax Supplemental Educational Opportunity
es which covers the cost of a student’s
return. Grant (SEOG): Federally-funded grants,
academic program and enrollment. For
with priority funding going to students
Social Sciences: Academic fields of study full-time students, tuition is calculated at
receiving Pell Grants (q.v.).The maximum
which focus on human behavior and a set figure; part-time students pay a
annual SEOG is $4,000.
societal interactions, such as psychology, pro-rated amount calculated per class or
sociology, political science, anthropology, 1040/1040A/1040EZ Form: Federal credit hour (q.v.).
and economics. income tax form frequently required by
Unmet Need: Difference between cost
colleges to verify accuracy of financial
Stafford Loan: Formerly known as of attendance and the student’s available
information submitted on FAFSA and
“Guaranteed Student Loans” and resources, including his/her financial aid
Profile (q.q.v.) forms.
renamed in honor of former Sen. Robert package.
Stafford (VT), low-interest loans spon- Test of English as a Foreign Language
Verification: Review process in which
sored by the Federal government for stu- (TOEFL): Examination providing a more
the financial aid officer requests all doc-
dents enrolled at least half-time. Loans accurate assessment of non-native ver-
umentation from a federal aid applicant
can be both subsidized (for students with bal ability that the SAT I (q.v.) Critical
to verify accuracy of information.
demonstrated financial need) and unsub- Reading and Writing Sections.
sidized (for students who do not qualify Waitlist: Limited number of freshman
Three-Two (3-2) Program: Degree
for need-based financial aid). While the applicants who are neither admitted nor
program where a student begins their
U.S. government will pay the interest on denied admission, but are told they will
studies at one institution, generally a
subsidized Stafford Loans until six be notified after May 1 of their final deci-
smaller liberal arts college, and after
months following a student’s final full- sion as spaces within the freshman class
three years, transfers to another larger
time semester enrolled, students pay the become available during the summer.
institution to complete his or her stud-
interest (no principle) on unsubsidized Waitlists are utilized by most selective
ies. Most of these programs are in busi-
Stafford loans. institutions to ensure that they will meet
ness, engineering, computer science, or
their target enrollment numbers.
Student Aid Report (SAR): The form a related field. Three-two programs can
returned to a student following the be either single or dual undergraduate Yield: The percentage of students offered
completion of the evaluating processing degree programs; others are under- admission to a college or university who
of the FAFSA (q.v.) by the U.S. govern- graduate and graduate B.A./M.S. or matriculate as depositing students.
ment’s Central Processing Agency. M.B.A. combinations.
Copies of this form are frequently
Title IV Programs: Federal student aid
required by colleges, and are necessary
programs authorized under Title IV of
for sending additional copies of the
the Higher Education Act of 1965, such as
FAFSA information to colleges.