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AWARD
WINNING
HOUSE
50

Foreword
Lefevre Beach House
Mirindiba House
Panama House
Pentimento House
Capece Venanzi House
Esker House Rooftop Apartment
Harbour me, Celia!
House in Carabbia
IJburg House
J2 House
Milhundos House
Redondela House
Steigereiland
Villa G
Villa Marstrand Wadt
Villa Petersen
Villa Storingavika
Barrow House
Marcus Beach House
Noosa Hinterland House & Studio
The Bay House
Tugun Residence
Vader House
Helal New Moon Residence
Hover House
Shell House
Symbiosis House in a Forest
Contents
3
5
15
23
31
39
47
55
61
69
77
85
91
101
107
115
121
129
135
143
149
155
161
167
175
183
191
197










J2



G














Zen House
Beuth Residence
Brosmith Residence
Hamptons Beach House
Kelly Residence
Lago Vista Guesthouse
Point Dume Residence
Pool House
Skyline Residence
Suntro House
Surfhouse
The Xeros Residence
Torres House
Villa NM
Zeidler Residence
Biscuit Lofts
Collage Paris
GreenCity Lofts
Silkwood
Strandkanten
"Miravalle Tower
MTN
Museum Residences
Index
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207
213
219
229
235
241
253
259
269
275
281
287
293
301
307
313
319
325
331
337
345
351
357













NM







MTN

3
Foreword
Habitation is one of the fundamental needs for human beings, and it is just from residence that architecture
developed itself. With the unceasing growth of this discipline, designs for public buildings drew more and more
attention, as witnessed by numerous memorial edifces built all over the world. However, architects have never
moved their eyes from residences. In the early 20th century, great designers contributed to this feld with many
gorgeous projects, such as Fallingwater, Villa Savoye, and Schroeder Housein Utrecht. Today when we have
stepped into a new era for design, grandmasters in architecture are paying an unprecedented effort to our living
space with their genius in creativity and innovation.
This book covers ffty outstanding houses built recently, from villas to fats, each shining with its own brilliance.
Thanks to the delicate designs, the clients could live in their dreamed spaces.
Houses are closely related to our life, as some designer once said that the design for a house has nothing to
do with style, creativity, or concept; a good house is only designed with your soul attached. Among all types
of architecture, house design is the most affectionate. The forms of houses may vary greatly, and there are
no fixed rules. Excellent house designs present themselves in various forms. As we could see in this book,
the designers brought out their characterised houses, applying different concepts in different contexts, being
considerate or showing their peculiarities. For sure, you would fnd many surprises here.
The stunning design for the project Harbour me, Celia! would be a good example. It is a renovation project
situated in an old farmhouse, in which the designer tried his best to retain the existing structure. The air of a
farmhouse is further kept with simple decoration. Here simplicity is the expression of beauty. So is Pentimento
House, in which you wouldnt fnd imposing decorations, but subtly and fexibly designed ones which flled the
house with pleasure and surprise. Pool House is another example. It is so small that the house even seems
subordinate to the pool! For this, the designer made a subtle contrast of the scales, and together with careful
details, the house is extremely distinctive.
The fast-paced city life makes us feel more and more alien from nature. As the design that most focuses on
human souls, house design is sure to take nature as a key element. This is well exemplifed by many houses
included here, in which the designers implied various ways to help their clients live closer to nature, in
tranquility and peace.
Symbiosis House in a Forest, for example, is built amongst mountains. The context naturally endowed the
house with a strong sense of nature. The landscape is perfectly kept, without cutting a single tree on the
site. In this way, the forest becomes the garden for the house, with living space fully integrated into nature.
Conversely, IJburg House is a different case. While there is no forest in its surroundings, the designer created
a green context inside the limited space of the house, with as much plant as possible. The small house is quite
impressive for its intimate atmosphere.
Designers are diversifed in their designing methods. In a simple form, an extraordinary spatial sense could be
achieved through designing with fowing streamlines. In Steigereiland House, for instance, in this blue box,

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we would have an unexpected spatial experience, seeing surprising construction techniques. In Surfhouse,
however, apart from the fexible arrangement of the limited interior spaces, the designer livened up the small
house in the form of a square box, by applying a subtraction concept.
Of course, some designers are good at making novel forms in architecture. The grey spaces caused by the
irregular forms become, quite surprisingly, the sparkling points of the houses, through certain magic processing
of the designers. Villa NM stands out just for its graceful confguration, with its streamlines being focal points
for both the outside and the inside. Shell House, similarly, is built with the confguration of a shell, in which the
elegant streamlines could be seen everywhere. Moreover, the designer made use of the shell confguration in
interior design.
In the book, you would fnd careful design schemes as well as excellent design skills, implemented in houses,
villas, fats, etc. in various scales, with a diversity of styles. We believe that certain ones of them would wow you
when catching your eyes!

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NM


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Lefevre Beach House
Location: Punta Misterio, Peru Designer: Longhi Architects Photographer: CHOlon
Photography Completion date: 2008
Conceived as the place where the arid Peruvian desert meets the
Pacifc Ocean, this beach house located at Punta Misterio 117km south
of Lima, is an intervention where the integration of architecture and
landscape was an important concern.
The base of the project is quite special, thus the designers at the
beginning made up their minds to make the house ft the characters
of the environment. Therefore the designers have this tensional rising-
suspending confguration. The monotonous single-linear design is
replaced by corners and obliquely suspending fgures, contributing to
a sparkling point to the design. The faade of the house is built with
local stone material; the white walls are particularly used to achieve a
bright atmosphere corresponding to the beach.
The design made full use of the landform of the site, particularly the
different heights, making the house perfectly suit the landscape. Sand
garden roofs act as the extension of the desert; lap and recreation
pools connect the ocean with the house, while a glass box hangs from
the structure symbolising architecture between sand and water. A
waterscape is also realised through an ingenious use of the landform.
The interior design is simple, linear and layered. The corners and the
different heights are all taken into consideration. In order to offer
the client the most comfortable living space and to enjoy a better
experience of the outside nature, the designers used window boxes to
bring outdoor scenery inside. Stones are used in the interior, matched
with a simple and natural interior design style.

2008
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Awarded:
2008 Odors 100 Awards
The fgure of the house is simple and elegant, perfectly integrating into
the site. The interior space is layered according to the difference of the
height of the site. The environment is fully considered: the surrounding
stones are integrated with the house and the sea is introduced into the
house; the confguration, the material and the colour palette are all in
good integration with the environment. The outdoor vista is introduced
indoors through the big windows; meanwhile, decorative stones
adopted indoors remind us of the nature outside. The interior design
is simple and delicate, with irregular graphic designs corresponding to
each other. Details are fully considered, contributing to the continuity
of the whole atmosphere, from inside to outside.
:
2008100

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Mirindiba House
Location: So Paulo, Brazil Designer: Marcio Kogan Photographer: Nelson Kon Completion
date: January 2006
Immediately to the right, in the entrance of the house, a large living-
room completely opens, using two window-frame moldings that are
entirely built into the wall, creating cross-ventilation and an area of
continuum space that is totally free. There is no structural interference
in this space. The living room opens to a delicate wooden-foored
garden with a refecting pool and minimum vegetation. The perfection
of the execution, the surprisingly free and continuous space and
the play of volumes invoke a cinematographic atmosphere. The
constructive materiality meets with a said imaginary architecture.
A small atrium articulates the remaining areas: the way to the
dining room and to the kitchen and, vertically, to the other places
programmed into the house. On the frst story are the intimate areas
and, on the second, a more reserved social area. In this room, two
large wooden lath doors open to a deck, on one side, a beautiful view
of the city and, on the other, a view of the garden which, downstairs,
is protracted from the living room. Upstairs, the precision of the
drawing and the execution continues to impress and create the
cinematographic atmosphere of the house.
Awarded:
2008 Short List / D&AD Award
2008 Short List / London International Creative Competition_LICC
2007Short List / International Biennial Barbara Cappochin / Italy
2007 Award Winning / International Design Awards_IDA / USA
The Mirindiba House is an impressive example of construction, good
drawing and good execution on building the architecture. The details,
exhaustively and precisely drawn are fulflled in a perfect execution.
The use of materials, the shape, the intention of the drawing, quietly
materialise, as thoughts on a drawing board. This precise drawing
glimmers in the architectural detail. Each small re-entering angle of
the house was deliberately thought out.

20061

:
2008D&AD
2008
2007
2007

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ground floor
01. main entrance
02. terrace
03. deck - solarium
04. kitchen
05. living room
06. homeoffice
07. dinningroom
08. bedroom
09. closet
10. bathroom
11. sauna
12. hall
13. snackroom
14. hometheater
15. water mirror
16. swimmingpool
17. storage
0 1m 3m 6m 9m
0 10ft 20ft 30ft
01
02
02 05
12
04 13
07
03
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11
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20
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side elevation
front elevation
0 1m 3m 6m 9m
0 10ft 20ft 30ft
SECTION L
scale 1:200
01. main entrance
02. hall
03. library
04. living room
05. deck
06. swimming pool
07. garden
08. dinning room
09. courtyard
10. china closet
11. wine storage
12. lunch room
13. kitchen
14. sentry box
15. service patio
16. dog-house
17. air-conditioner room
18. gallery
19. bathroom
20. pantry
21. bedroom
22. office
23. hometheater
24. dressingroom
25. playroom
26. gym
27. technical area
28. garage
04 05 13
28 21 15
25 26
18 24
Panama House
Location: So Paulo, Brazil Designer: Marcio Kogan Photographer: STUDIO MK27
Completion date: January 2008
The Panama House is located in one of the garden neighborhoods,
just some blocks from Paulista, the fnancial centre of the city of So
Paulo. The client has an important art collection, above all, modern
Brazilian art, and the house was designed to house this collection. The
works of art are scattered throughout all the areas of the residence,
from the bedrooms to the gardens.
The interior house-plant is organised into 3 foors and a sub-solo.
Upon entering the lot, a tree-covered patio leads the guest to the door.
A social hall distributes part of the program of the house: a library,
vertical circulation, the utility rooms and the living room. From within
the library you can see, in front of the exterior stone wall, a Maria
Martins sculpture, reposing over a refecting pool. The living room
has large spans that open, in their entirety, to the garden, building
a spatial continuity between interior and exterior. In the garden, the
pool, installed on the side of the lot, mirrors the stones of the wall.
On the second foor, a large corridor connecting the bedrooms also
works as a gallery exhibiting the paintings and sculptures. Two
windows, at the ends of the corridor, bathe this area with light and, in
front of one of them a sculpture made by Brazilian Amilcar de Castro
constructs the space. An offce annexed to the master suite overlooks
the garden, as do the other bedrooms. The faades of the rooms have
brise-soleils made of sliding vertical wooden lathes. The brise-soleils
are important to guarantee greater comfort, protecting from direct
sunlight and creating a texture with the light. One of the architectural
premises of the house is to organise the space from a wooden box
that is placed inside a C-shaped concrete cask. This concrete cask
is formed by cement slabs and a wall and, in relation to the wooden
box, determines the translucent and transparent areas. On the third
story, a game room and an academy connect to a wooden deck, the
terrace of the house. The utility rooms of the house and the garage are
located on the sub-solo.

MK27 20081

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Awarded:
2008 Award Winning / International Design Awards_IDA / USA
The stone and the wood, materials that refer to traditional Brazilian
building, are mixed with modern materials, such as reinforced concrete
and plastic and which create an architectural language. Refecting
concern with the precision of the construction, all of the details of the
house were elaborated by the offce, even some of the furniture that
was specifcally designed for the house.
:
2008

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29
30
25
solarium
26 27
01. main entrance
02. hall
03. library
04. living room
05. deck
06. swimming pool
07. garden
08. dinning room
09. courtyard
10. china closet
11. wine storage
12. lunch room
13. kitchen
14. sentry box
15. service patio
16. dog-house
17. air-conditioner room
18. gallery
19. bathroom
20. pantry
21. bedroom
22. office
23. hometheater
24. dressingroom
25. playroom
26. gym
27. technical area
N
PLAN second floor
scale 1:200
0 1m 3m 6m 9m
0 10ft 20ft 30ft
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Pentimento House
Location: Quito, Ecuador Designer: Jose Mara Sez, David Barragn Photographer: Raed
Gindeya, Jose Mara Sez Completion date: 2006
A concrete platform serves as its foundation and adapts to the
topography bypassing the trees or incorporating them. On the platform
rises the prefabricated system. The pieces of steel rods are inserted
into the concrete, anchored by epoxy glue. These rods and elements of
work between pieces generate a tight structure of small columns and
lintels especially well suited to the seism of the area.
The interstices in the prefabricated structure are left open at some
points and closed in others with a transparent or translucent acrylic
and wooden strips, becoming vegetation and light flters. Inside, the
same cracks help to support some wood pieces, including shelves,
seating, tables and steps.
The foundation slab melts with black pigment and hardener to become
the fnal foor. The Flowerpot stays in its precast concrete fnished as
in its interior and exterior. The wood in the interior and vegetation in
the exterior are always an important part of the project. On the top
foor the lookout becomes the main space and robs its attention for
any secondary element, allowing the passage of air and light, aligning
the views of the distant mountains. It concentrates on linking the user
with the surrounding environment.
Economy, simplicity and clarity of the house lead to a simplifed
constructive process and its low budget. The constructing work is done
in a temperate climate and with available materials.
Awarded:
2006 National Architectural Design Award
2006 XV Quito Architecture Biennale
2008 Lisbon Best Work by Young Architect VI BIAU (Architecture and
Urbanism Iberoamerican Biennale)
The appearance of the Pentimento house resembles a fowerpot,
converging with nature as a garden and closely connected with its
surroundings. It is built with a single piece of prefabricated concrete.
Outside is a neutral grid that is camouraged like a fence or hedge.
Inside, each wall is different, ftting its own scale need, function,
position, etc.


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2006
2006
2008

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0 1 2
A B
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Capece Venanzi House
Location: Naples, Italy Designer: Giovanni Vaccarini Architects Photographer: Giovanni
Vaccarini Architects Completion date: 2007
Capece Venanzi House is a suburban house for a young couple. It
s situated in the diffuse sprawl of the Adriatic coast, in one of the
possible areas of this diffuse city in the segment between Ascoli
Piceno and Pescara. The site is tightened between the urban texture of
two levels houses for single families and the hill, completely covered
with spontaneous vegetation.
The system is defned from one development in section on three levels:
Level buried completely dug is in the land; an inner patio is the
element around to which the spaces are organised, constructing a
game of goals between the spaces second plan.
Gruond foor; it is the collective part of the building: large vetrata a
fowing one marks the border between the roof uncovered garden and
the covered area day. The space wheels around to a metallic scale
lamellare that it connects with the frst foor.
The frst level receives the rooms and the private spaces of the
building (bagno/sauna, arena, study)
Awarded:
Winning Academic of National Academy of San Luca, Italy
The idea is to construct a building with one inverse guideline. Instead
of being oriented towards the crowded city, it turns towards the hill,
from wiich the house rises from a "green sea".


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PIANTA PIANO PRIMO +4.50
LEGENDA
1_accesso pedonale
2_accesso carrabile
3_zona giorno
4_zona pranzo
5_servizi
6_zona notte
PIANTA PIANO TERRA +1.50
N
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Esker House Rooftop Apartment
Location: San Candido, Italy Designer: Plasma Studio Photographer: Cristobal Palma
Completion date: November 2006
Esker House (esker means stratifed geological formation) is a self-
contained residential unit placed on top of an existing house from the
1960s.
The project is formed by a series of steel and timber frames that
deform to recreate the smooth hillsides of the surrounding dolomites.
This partly accessible roofscape also determines the spatial character
inside- the spaces are enfolded by an angular and dynamic series
of planes creating new and ever-changing perspectives and spatial
constellations. The unique stratifed morphology and construction
system started off from projecting each step of the external staircase
as a modulor that then was proliferated as frames. These frames
enable the subsequent deformation and softening of the overall
geometry. The split level organisation leads to the lengthening of parts
of the stairs to form a topography for informal occupation. The overall
spatial character is that of an echelon with a diffusion of functions
and conditions where inside and outside, above and below become
gradient zones of varying intensity. These interleave as a loop that
transgresses from the most private zone of bedroom and bathroom via
kitchen, dining and living rooms towards the more public and exposed
territory of the various terraces.
Awarded:
2006 Italy Competition
The architects challenged the standard pitched and overhanging roof
and instead developed a rich texture of different occupiable spaces.
On the outside these are a podium that leads to the top of the roof,
a semi-covered pergola beneath it, a long terrace as extension to the
south of the living room. Given that the existing house has two wings
with different roof levels, the designers started from a simple diagram
of two boxes forming a T, allowing plenty of external space for
terraces to the south. The lower western box became the living zone
with the upper eastern box to contain the master bedroom, bathroom,
second bedroom and kitchen.


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Harbour me, Celia!
Location: Viechtach, Germany Designer: Hai Merlin Studio Photographer: Edward Beierle,
Gero Wortmann Completion date: August 2008
Hai Merlin Studio/Peter Haimerl and Jutta Grlich have decided to
build the new structures in the old farm house in the Bavarian Forest
in foam glass concrete. On the one hand the living spaces should
appear as monolithically as possible and should have very good
thermal properties. On the other hand, the history of the Bavarian
Forest is connected to the production of glass. A very special
landscape characteristic that points out this tradition is the Pfahl
the pile an underground quartz ridge, that comes to the surface near
Viechtach town.
Foam glass concrete is a very light and still very stable material,
whose coeffcient of thermal conductivity is between 0,12 and 0,38
w/(m k) and therefore can also be used as thermal insulation. Another
advantage is that the material has similar characteristics to wood
and therefore connects very well to the old house. In order to achieve
reasonable heights in the kitchen and eating area the foor had to be
sunk 130 centimetres. A downpour of foam glass rubble protects the
living spaces against heat loss.
Awarded:
2008 Best Architect Award 09 in Gold
2008 Architecture Award for Concrete Buildings / Germany
In the latest thirties most of the old farmhouses in Bavarian forest
were destroyed, because of ignorance and the lack of appraisal adverse
to the old stuff, maybe also to erase the contemporary witness of
rather poor time.
Therefore the architectural concept intends to keep the existence as
ruinous at it might be and not to intervent into the structure of the
old farmhouse Celia. The rooms of the old building stay as they are,
barely anything of the existence will be removed, thats imperative to
the windows, the old plaster, the foor tiles and the other old fxtures.
Other removed material will be recycled to produce furniture. Boxes
out of concrete are going to be placed into a few central rooms, for
example the old parlor, where the new life is going to take part. The
new construction frames the old one, carries and protects it, the old
building accomodates the new.


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0.38W/(mk)

130cm
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2008
2008
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House in Carabbia
Location: Carabia, Ticino, Swizerland Designer: Davide Macullo Architetto Photographer:
Pino Musi, Enrico Cano Completion date: 2007
Carabbia is a little village of approximatelly 600 inhabitants. The
house rises on the western side of Mount San Salvatore slope in a
beautiful bowl. Carved in a clear square geometry, the spaces meet
the slope and extend in a spiralfuent movement that constantly
changes the perception of the space and its relation with the exterior,
offering privileged views towards the beautiful landscape of the region.
This small house (13x13m) stands for a sequence of experiences
condensed in a continuous space that gives a sense of protection and,
at the same time, of being projected into the landscape. The sloped
roof that follows the inclination of the land is a reaction of building on
the hill side proposing an organic language instead of an urban one!
The plot is characterised by a slope of about 30 facing west. The way
the new volume adheres to the sloped land optimises the excavation
works. No earth has been displaced from the construction site.
The three main storeys of the house are set on the plot at shifted
levels to match the correspondent level of the site. This offers a direct
relation to the outside from all parts of the house at all levels. While
entering the house the eyes embrace the whole interior space and
the related outdoor space, till the most far diagonals. This enlarged
the potential of the perception of bigness of a house that is actually
a very small volume: around 1000 cubic metre for a usable area of
150 square metres; while the perception is closer to a house of at
least 300 square metres. The dilatation of the perception between
the spaces and between outside and inside works in the same way
throughout the entire building.
From all part of the building the feeling is approximately to live in an
open space surrounded by a prosperous natural landscape and the
space you are enjoying is related to the others through transparent or
translucent flters/layers. The perception transits always from inside
to outside to inside again, making the outdoor space part of the
indoor one. In this way the living space has been stretched and its size
appears bigger.
This research on dilatation of the perception of the spaces enhances
the idea that a space can be only completely understood by spending
time in it and that besides the walls/slabs (material), shape, design,
type, typology, etc. a space must be conceived using time as
instrument for the planning/creative phase.


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13x13

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Awarded:
2007 101 of the Most Exciting Young Architects of the World, by
Wallpaper UK
25 Shortlist, House of the Year 2007, by WANWorld Architecture News
This house is characterised by the creation of clearly identifable
geometric structures that delimit an organised development of the
spaces. The underlying theme is the establishment of a spatial
relation between interior-interior and interior-exterior that aims at the
dilatation of the living dimension. The interesting lesson comes from
the succession of Japanese gardens which show a different awareness
of the space through a sequence of sceneries and space dilatation. It
is as if it were possible to experience a domestic atmosphere and, at
the same time, to project ones own perception on a geographic scale.
This building responds to the owners wish to live in an intimate space,
as if it were a shell.
:
2007101
2007WAN25

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technical drawings
2.1 Fragment of the facade
2.2 detail of the conrner
2.3 0oorp|on ground0oor 2.4 0oorp|on 0rst 0oor
2.5 elevation north 2.6 elevation west
2.7 section 1 2.8 section 2
1.1 concept
diagrams
1.1 concept
1.1 concept
1.2 roof garden
1.3 energy su|0c|ency
1.3 energy :uffciency
1.4 p|cnI: cvergrcwing fccce
1.5 thickness of the wall
1.5 Ihickne:: cf Ihe wc||
2.2 ceIci| cf Ihe ccrner
2.1 frcgmenI cf Ihe fccce 2.7 :ecIicn 1
2.5 e|evcIicn ncrIh
2.3 fccrp|cn grcuncfccr
2.8 :ecIicn 2
2. e|evcIicn we:I
2.4 fccrp|cn fr:I fccr
MARC KOEHLER ARCHITECTS
| HOUSE IJBURG
diagrams
drawings
IJburg House
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands Designer: Marc Koehler Architects Photographer:
Marcel van der Burg Completion date: 2007
The 140-square-meter house is located on a small plot in IJburg; a
recently developed suburb of the city of Amsterdam. The house is
designed as a vertical garden giving space to fora and fauna to grow
in a densely urbanised area. Closed private spaces contrast with open
collective spaces that seem to have been carved out from the solid
volume as a continuous transparent void. In this way the interior space
is visually and physically connected to the street, the garden and roof
terraces. Outdoor and indoor spaces become one and natural daylight
fows into the interior.
Three bedrooms, a small bathroom, WC and a multipurpose hall are
situated on the ground foor whereas the frst foor remains completely
open for living, cooking and eating, fooded with daylight. The
multipurpose hall on the ground foor is much more than an entrance
zone. It also functions as an artist studio, work-desk, laundrette and
playground. Storage and service spaces are invisibly integrated in
thick walls keeping the living spaces as open, transparent and fexible
as possible.
The faade contains specifc brick detailing inspired by techniques
from the famous Amsterdam school style from the 1920s, which had
become redundant in the second half of the 20
th
century. By intensive
cooperation with brick and mortar suppliers, masonry consultants
and brick layers, the architect managed to introduce these traditional
texture effects in contemporary building methods. Because brickwork
lasts long, is free of maintenance and can be recycled it is an
interesting sustainable building material.
The ornamental masonry is not only a decorative enhancement
of the sculptural character of the design, but also functions as an
underlayment for different sorts of climbing plants to grow up the
facade, giving birth to the idea of a vertical garden, which was
enhanced by integrating fower pot on several levels in the facade.
Hedra, Kiwis, grapes, apples and roses will over time overgrow the
house and create a natural curtain around the living spaces and
terraces, providing natural shading and privacy. Although the living
area is situated on the frst foor, the inhabitants will experience their
garden as an integral part of their living space, uniting nature and
culture in a unique way.


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technical drawings
2.1 Fragment of the facade
2.2 detail of the conrner
2.3 0oorp|on ground0oor 2.4 0oorp|on 0rst 0oor
2.5 elevation north 2.6 elevation west
2.7 section 1 2.8 section 2
1.1 concept
diagrams
1.1 concept
1.1 concept
1.2 roof garden
1.3 energy su|0c|ency
1.3 energy :uffciency
1.4 p|cnI: cvergrcwing fccce
1.5 thickness of the wall
1.5 Ihickne:: cf Ihe wc||
2.2 ceIci| cf Ihe ccrner
2.1 frcgmenI cf Ihe fccce 2.7 :ecIicn 1
2.5 e|evcIicn ncrIh
2.3 fccrp|cn grcuncfccr
2.8 :ecIicn 2
2. e|evcIicn we:I
2.4 fccrp|cn fr:I fccr
MARC KOEHLER ARCHITECTS
| HOUSE IJBURG
diagrams
drawings
Awarded:
2008 World Architecture Festival, Barcelona, Spain
The green faade of the house is a living faade, changing the image
of the building time and giving space to birds and insects, creating
a new urban ecosystem. The house uses large windows to capture
sunlight to heat up the collective spaces in winter, and uses the natural
curtain to create shading in summer. Moreover, the house features
a heating earth-pump, solar panels on the top roof and a balanced
mechanical system using a heat recovery unit combined with natural
ventilation in each space. This house shows that comfort, beauty and
sustainability can strengthen each other, promoting eco-effectivity
more than eco-effciency. Because of this, the house also received a
special subsidy given to sustainable buildings in The Netherlands and
was nominated for the Dutch Faade Design Award 2008.
:
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technical drawings
2.1 Fragment of the facade
2.2 detail of the conrner
2.3 0oorp|on ground0oor 2.4 0oorp|on 0rst 0oor
2.5 elevation north 2.6 elevation west
2.7 section 1 2.8 section 2
1.1 concept
diagrams
1.1 concept
1.1 concept
1.2 roof garden
1.3 energy su|0c|ency
1.3 energy :uffciency
1.4 p|cnI: cvergrcwing fccce
1.5 thickness of the wall
1.5 Ihickne:: cf Ihe wc||
2.2 ceIci| cf Ihe ccrner
2.1 frcgmenI cf Ihe fccce 2.7 :ecIicn 1
2.5 e|evcIicn ncrIh
2.3 fccrp|cn grcuncfccr
2.8 :ecIicn 2
2. e|evcIicn we:I
2.4 fccrp|cn fr:I fccr
MARC KOEHLER ARCHITECTS
| HOUSE IJBURG
diagrams
drawings
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5 2 1 m 10 appendix:
Elevation north-east
project:
House J2
J2 House
Location: Zagrb, Croatia Designer: 3LHD Photographer: Damir Fabijanic Completion date: 2007 The type of the project J2 House was commission, the site area is
687 square metres, the gross foor area is 396 square metres, its
footprint is 159 square metres, and also, the entrance level is 201.5m.
On both sides the site is bordered by a street and a high building.
These contextual facts determined the concept and the shape of the
new project. The L layout with closed fronts protect the house from
the street and the neighboring building. At the same time the garden
has been redesigned with all the main rooms in the house oriented
towards it. The living room, dining room and kitchen form a unique
space and together with a swimming pool are built into the ground. In
this way, being at the same level and separated from each other by a
glass wall they bring the garden into the house. The house entrance
is above, at street level, together with garage, storages, closet-space
and studio. The family area is above the entrance space along with the
living and dining rooms.
The materials used for the faades correspond to the spatial
organisation of facilities. The living and dining spaces are separated
by glass walls which completely open the living space to the outside;
on the other hand, the bedroom walls are alternatively panelled by
wooden boards.
Awarded:
2008 Annual Award for Best Realisation
On the 15th of April 2008 at 6 p.m., at the Plaster Casts Museum
venue in Zagreb, the Yearly Exhibition of Realisations organised by
the Croatian Architects Association for 24 continuous years, since
the Zagreb Architects Society has for the frst time presented the
achievements of Croatian architects in 1984.
The family house for a couple with children is located in the green
residential part of the city of Zagreb. The family house did fully use
all the advantages of the site and did it meet the requirements of
contemporary living standards. What is more, the beautiful view to the
city and large garden was valued appropriately.
J2
3LHD 2007
687396159
201.5
L

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2008
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Milhundos House
Location: Penafel, Portugal Designer: Francisco Portugal e Gomes Arquitecto Photographer:
Fernando Gabriel Completion date: 2007
The plot is located in the outskirts of Penafel, in the valley of the
Cavalum River and is inserted in an allotment near the Farm of the
Flagstones Park.
The proposal modifes the implementation anticipated in the original
allotment, and resumes the duplication rule, not observed in the
buildings of the adjacent lots, seeking a more articulated solution with
the nearest volumes and simultaneously taking the vast ambiguities
and disarrangements between the allotment and the lot drawings into
account.
The slate/dark stone covered volume contains the living and dining/
kitchen areas and the white plastered volume, is for the nights
repose areas. Each one of these volumes has different relations to the
exterior space: the white seeks the most distant landscape; the dark
has a more direct contact with the surrounding garden.
The applied materials condense a domestic duality, which is projected
in the public space, in between the intimate and the public, the day
and the night, the light and the darkness, that here fnds an inverted
expression: To the night nucleus it corresponds to a white plaster and
to the day nucleus consists a facing, clad with a dark stone.
Awarded:
2008 World Architecture Community, UIA, WA Awards, 1st Cycle Winner
The initial scanty budget creates not only an economic, but above
all a conceptual challenge. All the process was thought and felt in
a permanent dialectics between the maximum of systematisation
and restraint, and the uttermost expressive outcomes. A project is
not a good project when it is solely used to satisfy a functional and
economical program, it has to satisfy another type of questions, such
as substance and nature. And nevertheless, a good project does not
necessarily lead to a good work. The author must look for the works
own character in a process permanently alive and pledged.


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2008UIA

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Redondela House
Location: Pontevedra, Spain Designer: Jesus Castro Irisarri, Guadeloupe Piera Manso
Photographer: Manuel G. Vincent, Jesus Irisarri Completion date: 2006
A sheet of concrete is replicated as a shell since its start as a
containment wall, forming a volume that is emptied offers from remote
and hidden from the eyes, which makes intermediate sequences
penetrate the wilderness, until a fnal shooting outwards, with the
dominant eye on the distant landscape, returning to the owners
that look on the river, which made them choose this place to live.
The shape of the shell as well as hosting the program resolves the
structure, the leading water and the various scales that make up the
diversity within the space.
A program that receives in turn linked to the land, the vast storage
needs of products that provides a continuous foor space in the yard
and cutting section formed in the volume, which will place direct links
to the nature of the place and that as a lookout and rises from the
ground to provide an autonomous and site staff.
A parcel deep, narrow and steep that hangs over the river and the
distant horizon of the sea, with the city of Vigo to feet and a special
client, (all are), which are intensely ancestral rural Galicia and the time
of globalisation.
Awarded:
2008 FAD and ENOR Awards
This is a building that qualifes in each space, the look and feel of the
surroundings and the distant landscape. In contrast to other cases
where we have overlapping architectures that emerge through the
actions of the users, preparing stage with a large processing capacity,
here is an architecture and is the scene that opens the lives of its
residents to the world.


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Steigereiland
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherland Designer: Kerkhofs montagebouw Photographer:
Jeroen Musch Completion date: February 2007
On the Steigereiland, near Amsterdam, Pieter Weijnen built his own
experimental wooden home. The house is painted a vibrant blue,
referring to the traditional dike houses of nearby Durgerdam. The
ground foor consists of a roomy live-in kitchen. Entering the home,
the frst thing you notice is the lounge hanging from the ceiling like
a foating island. The bottom of this contraption is shaped like the
belly of a whale and clad in copper. The shape has been interpreted
as a boat or a basket, giving the space below a homely atmosphere.
Together with the foating lounge, the 7-metre-high space creates a
vertical loft. To make the most use of the space, Weijnen wanted to
avoid load bearing walls as much as possible. To ensure stability, he
used old docking poles as diagonal braces behind the front wall. All
the walls and foors are made of massive, laminated Lenotec spruce
wood.
Sustainable use of energy is a leading principle for the house on
steigereiland. The glass faade facing South, lets in plenty of daylight
and sun heat. The air-conditioning is based on an ancient Arabian
system: the air from the dwelling is pumped through underground
tubes. After the air has cooled down, it is led back into the building. A
tank under the roof terrace collects rainwater, which is used for the
washing machine and the toilets. Plenty of recycled materials were
used building this wooden home. The large beams in the front are old
docking poles from the IJ, and the furniture in the childrens room is
made of used cheese shelves. The copper cladding on the foating
lounge, used to be on top of the roof of a church.

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Awarded:
2008 International Architecture Award
The house has won the International Architecture award 2008, issued
by The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design and
Metropolitan Arts Press Ltd. and co-presented by The European Centre
for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies. This is an international
award, open to designers worldwide.
Spaciousness is the keyword in this design. The lounge hanging from
the ceiling like a foating island made the house particularly eye-
catching. Besides, sustainable use of energy is the leading principle
for this house on Steigereiland.
:
2008
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Villa G
Location: Bergen, Norway Designer: Saunders ArchitectureTodd Saunders Photographer:
Bent Completion date: 2009
Villa G lies like a white landmark in the soft landscape at Hjellestad,
near Bergen. The wooden cladding on the house consists of 3 different
size mounted in a random pattern. The house has an over-built
outside space and the second foor covers the entrance below helping
the house work together with the rough climate on the west coast of
Norway.
The stair is one solid piece of 1cm thick steel, galvanised with white
sand corn making it slip resistant. The stair is produced locally, weighs
almost a tonne, and had to be lifted into place by a crane through
the window in the roof. The architect and client have an enthusiastic
description of the design and building process. Saunders say, "the
client is very intelligent and has an acute interest in architecture. He
challenged us the whole time, but never can get in the way of out
design process. The family has documented their wants and needs.
These clear and concise wishes help us come of with simple design
principles for the project."
When commenting his own experience of the how the design of the
house evolved, the owner said: "yes, we had an exact number of
how many meters of closets we needed and so on. We have built a
few houses before this and have learned from our experiences and
mistakes. We knew that we wanted a house with clean lines without
any visual noise and clutter." This is one of the reasons that most of
the closets and storage spaces are integrated into the so-called thick
wall walls that are at least 60-70cm deep. The kitchen bench is 8
meters long and has plenty of drawers for kitchen equipment and even
other things that need to be stored away. None of the electrical outlets
are visible and all technology controlled by a main control panel in the
kitchen. The client admits that he is a 'gadget freak' and the house
refects this part of his personality."
G
2008
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Awarded:
2008 Nominated for Wallpaper Best Housing Project
The house is large yet not dominating, modern but not pretentious.
The house has a futuristic form but is built with traditional Nordic
materials and architectural elements with a good basis in Norwegian
building methods.
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Villa Marstrand Wadt
Location: Jyllinge, Denmark Designer: CORNELIUS + VGE Dan Cornelius, Nanna Vge
Photographer: Adam Mrk Completion date: 2007
The project is a rebuilding of an existing house from the sixties. It
enjoys a beautiful view of the protected natural settings of Roskilde
Fjord. The site has a unique contrast with the light from the Fjord and
the setting sun in the background.
The house is L-shaped. It has a very large living room, kitchen, dining
and master bedroom facing the view to the west and with access to
3 terraces that all enjoy the view. Each of the terraces has its own
quality; either as a panorama terrace, an evening terrace or a wind-
protected morning terrace, and all of them enjoy different settings of
the sunlight during the day. The bathroom and another bedroom are
placed in the back of the house opening towards the morning terrace
to the east.
The house is kept in modernistic white, but a local red colour of
traditional wooden fshermen houses is used on the wall and door in
the entrance area. The underground garage is a dark colour in order to
underline the horizontal line. Eventually some black-painted wooden
slats will allow climbing green plants to grow on the dark sidewalls.
Visitors to the house take the outside steps to the main entrance
on the south side of the house. Big slabs of reused granite are used
as steps. Black slate is used in the entrance and at various points
throughout for fooring and terraces.
Awarded:
2006 3-year Architectural Grant from The Danish Arts Foundation
The architectural approach is to create a precise connection with
the house and the surrounding landscape. The horizontal line of
the landscape and the view is integrated into the residence. A west-
facing cantilevering roof rises up to gather in the sunlight to the west
in a very dramatic fashion. The horizon is almost penetrating into the
interior of the house as light pours in during the day.
The structure is clean. The lines of the house control the view from
the interior to the landscape. Everything is framed with new openings
and lines that radiates out from the interior. Different views and new
experiences inside the and outside make the building a more lasting
piece of architecture in its new incarnation.

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Villa Petersen
Location: Jyllinge, Denmark Designer: CORNELIUS + VGE Dan Cornelius, Nanna Vge
Photographer: Adam Mrk Completion date: 2007
Situated with a beautiful view over Roskilde Fjord and the sunset, Villa
Petersen lies on a sloping site exposed to the sun and wind from the
west. The building is based on a squarely plan with rooms organised
in a U-shape around a protected raised terrace in the middle of the
house. A big roof is following the square form of the plan with sun
and weather-protective areas around the entrance and in the front of
the house. From almost all interior spaces the beautiful view can be
enjoyed as delicate transformations from the outside to the inside.
The house is following the sloping landscape allowing different levels
to be integrated into the architecture. From all spaces the view to
the Fjord can be enjoyed in different ways together with natural light
falling into the spaces from all sides and skylights.
From an inviting entrance of long sliding stairs, visitors are led to the
entrance of the house. Entering with a direct access across the house
on the highest level where the kitchen and dining area are located
with close contact to a wind protected terrace to the east. From the
kitchen it is possible to overlook the living space on a lower level and
to walk directly out into the raised terrace in the middle of the house.
A master bedroom with integrated bathing area and closets are
situated on the other side of the raised terrace. Different levels lead to
the bedroom with a full view of the landscape and from the combined
shower and bathtub there is contact to the view and raised terrace as
well.
The building is a wooden construction with vertical oil-treated Larch-
wood in the covered and more protected areas on the outside. On the
more exposed surfaces of the exterior horizontal black-painted wood
are being used.
The interior is kept in white surfaces allowing the natural sunlight to
penetrate through the building from different angles and opening. In
this way the interior spaces are always enjoying the changing light
during the day and during the different seasons. The foors are made
of black slate and white-oiled ash. The freplace works both as outdoor
and indoor freplace and is made of a local brick stone.

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Awarded:
2006 3-year Architectural Grant from The Danish Arts Foundation
The role of the Foundation is to promote Danish creative arts. The
Foundation's area of activity includes visual arts, literature, music,
crafts and design, architecture, cinema, and theatre, as well as other
comparable forms of creative art that do not have other avenues
for state support. Out of 2000 applications CORNELIUS + VGE was
chosen as one of 3 architectural offces that received the grant in
2006. The grant is considered to be the largest and most prestigious
architectural grant in Denmark.
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EAST ELEVATION 1:100
V7 V8 V7
NORTH ELEVATION 1:100
EAST ELEVATION 1:100
V7 V8 V7
NORTH ELEVATION 1:100
Villa Storingavika
Location: Bergen, Norway Designer: Saunders ArchitectureTodd Saunders Photographer:
Jan Lilleb, Michael Perlmutter Completion date: 2007
Overlooking breathtaking fjords and a stretch of Norways west coast
archipelago, Villa Storingavika is a robust yet refned vessel from which
to appreciate the delicate coastline and sometimes rugged climate.
It is a pale timber volume enrobed in a crisp, pleated dark timber
exterior.
The house is oriented along the contours of the site and concrete
stairs link an upper outdoor terrace with a lower lawn, utilising all of
the natural terrain. This also minimises the impact of the house on the
topography. Built-in concrete furniture is also integrated into the site,
increasing the use of the lower terrace as an extension of the interior
space.
Unlike some of Saunders other houses whose plinths lightly hover
above the ground, this house is well-grounded in the terrain. On both
storeys, the utility and service rooms are located along the northern
side of the house, while the living areas open out to the south and the
view to the sea. As a consequence, there are very few punctures on
the northern side, and large foor-to-ceiling windows face the south.
The height of the outdoor room, the tallest section of the house,
signifes its importance in the scheme. Notably, the exterior ceiling
timber continues into the house in the lounge room where the ceiling
is as high as the balcony. The balcony is pierced by three circular steel
columns that are 'threaded' from the ground to the roof.
As a work of architecture, Villa Storingavika is a textbook example of a
regional modernism, combining the modern gesture of wide spanning
platforms of space with the traditional forms and materials of Bergen
s light-framed timber houses. The buildings proportions are also akin
to Bergens maritime architecture and its long history of two-storey
timber buildings. Translating this established building approach to a
restrained, contemporary volume links the house to its context, and
ties it indelibly to the site.


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Awarded:
2007 Architectural Review Award Honorable Mention
With honesty in its treatment of materials and integrity of construction,
Todd Saunders design for the villa at Storingavika succeeds beautifully
in blending house and landscape. Though conceived within the
framework of an uncompromising contemporary architecture, this
house demonstrates that a strict design approach can meld seamlessly
with the making of a comfortable and dignifed home.
The house departs from pure tradition though, and is both experimental
and inventive. Interaction with the view and a poetic transition from
inside to outside lends richness to the stark interior. The rough-sawn
weatherboards catch jagged shadows with their tapered profle. Its
an interlocking of volumes in a simple but exciting spatial experience.
Stark yet harmonious contrasts in texture and tone of materials give
clarity to the architectural ideas.
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ground floor plan
n
a. living
b. dining
c. kitchen
d. laundry/pantry
e. landing/hallway
f. ensuite/bathroom
g. bedroom
h. deck
i. terrace
j. pool
k. studio
l. garage
j b a
f c d
l
k
Barrow House
Location: Mel bourne, Vi ctori a, Austral i a Designer: Andrew Maynard Archi tects
Photographer: Peter Bennetts Completion date: November 2008
The Barrow extension appears as an arrangement of timber boxes,
each independently rotated and subjected to varying amounts of
extruding and manipulating forces. These separate actions result in a
variety of shapes, which united, create an interior of differing volumes
and organisations, providing an interesting double storey addition to
this weatherboard house.
The extension challenges the traditional nature of timber construction.
Normally lightweight and fragile, added wall thickness to different
areas results in a structure with a fuctuating sense of mass. The
dynamic and varying nature of these environments is further enhanced
by differing window arrangements and framing techniques. Frequently
the windows are setback within the frame of the wall, sometimes fush
and occasionally extruding beyond the timber frame.
This unconventional approach to massing and window design subverts
the conservative planar nature of a box. The movement of the
shadows created by these extruding or intruding elements are tracked
on the external faade and internal environment, creating varying
patterns and giving the extension an undefned geometry.
The external timber cladding wraps itself inside and fuses the
extension into the original house, where the old living space now is
occupied as a bathroom. Here, there is no evidence of conventional
bathroom materiality, the room still maintaining its appearance as a
living/dining space. The only defning feature is a free standing cast
iron bath (re-used from the original demolished bathroom) at the
centre of the room, demonstrating the capability of a single element to
alter the programme of a space.
The strategic placement of a separate living space at the western end
of the site, refects the focus of the site internally, frames the large
open area and increases privacy levels.
Both this new addition and the extension to the old part of the
house, at the western end of the site, openly embrace this central
garden space. Defnition between indoor and outdoor is blurred by
the transparent divisions of bifold doors and large windows; visual
interaction is constant. This central outdoor space becomes part of
the living circulation space as the diurnal patterns of the occupants
see them traverse the yard to the rear living quarters.
The brighter, larger extension nurtures the dynamic, more numerous,
day time activities, whilst the low key, more relaxed, activities of the
afternoon are enjoyed in the sunroom at the western end of the site
refecting back on the outdoor yard and pool, watching the cinematic
shadows play across the irregular face of the Barrows extension.
The extensive openable window and bifold door arrangement
accompanied by Barrows orientation allows for abundant natural
light and ventilation to infltrate the spaces, decreasing reliance on
electrical and heating/cooling systems.
The entirety of the design also employs materials reused from the

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Awarded:
Award winner at the 2009 Australian Timber Design Awards
parts of the previous house as well as recycled or found elements,
decreasing the carbon footprint of the design and also adding
character to the spaces.
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Marcus Beach House
Location: Queensland, Australia Designer: Bark Design Pty Ltd Photographer: Christopher
Frederick Jones Completion date: 2009
North facing, the beach house celebrates an existing sculptural
Moreton Bay Ash tree on its coastal site. Two contemporary timber
pavilions, sited to embrace the tree and create a calm landscape
courtyard, are lightly connected with a high level glazed bridge.
Layers of screening are used to flter light and shadow, whilst giving
privacy and fltering sea breezes. The main pavilion accommodates
living spaces focused around a double height northeast deck space.
The parents retreat spaces above are accessed via the translucent
stair tower. The east pavilion provides space for cars and services
below, with children and guest bedrooms above and a shared north
east deck. The house embodies casual coastal living with a light and
embracing relationship to the landscape.
On approach from the street, the sloping terrain naturally guides
an axial timber boardwalk under a simple timber pergola structure
arriving in the courtyard opposite the Moreton Bay Ash. The main
pavilion to the west accommodates living spaces focused around a
double height deck space overlooking the swimming pool and northern
garden. The master bedroom suite is accessed via a polycarbonate
clad stair tower that is by day a contemplative space and by night, a
lantern. The Moreton Bay Ash casts shadows onto the polycarbonate
further animating the edges of the courtyard and bringing the
landscape inside the house. The recent additions of a study pop out,
enclosed passage link below the bridge, laundry and powder room
further animate the edges of the courtyard space whilst responding to
the needs of its new occupants.
The house is open and light and possesses simple sustainable design
principles to passively defend the occupants from the elements.
Windows and doors are strategically positioned to capture the
prevailing breezes whilst roof overhangs are generous protecting the
house from direct summer sunlight. Air conditioning has not been
installed nor is it desired. Artifcial lighting is kept to a minimum due to
the generous amount and position of glazing, particularly facing north.
The roof over the master bedroom pavilion rises to the north providing
a band of high level, operable, clerestory glazing capturing daylight
and allowing any warm air to escape, setting up an effective stack
effect natural cooling process.
The connection between the deck and living spaces is dynamic and
direct. As the heart of the house, the covered double height outdoor
room is actively used all year round as dappled sunlight is fltered
through a timber batten screen hung below the roof structure. Indoor
and outdoor realms are connected through an interlocking series of
alcoves and nooks like a low edge deck seat and reading nook pop-
out located off the stair landing. The courtyard and Moreton Bay Ash
are a focal point in which almost all rooms within the dwelling enjoy a
connection.


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Awarded:
Noosa Living Smart Design Awards
Description:
An Australia Local Award with different catalogues
Climate & Context (above $200K category)
Awarded Reason:
The Marcus Beach House celebrates a natural, coastal setting
providing its occupants with an inextricable relationship to the
landscape and sensitive surrounding environment. The dwelling
explores lightness, fltering natural breezes, layers of transparency and
integrating indoor outdoor spaces within dynamic patterns of light and
shadow, being a simple frame to enable a contemporary sustainable
lifestyle to unfold.
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06
02
03
05
04 07
08
09
metres
0 1 5 10
18
10
01
11
12
01. Driveway
02. Entry
03. Library
04. Kitchen
05. Living / Dining
06. Laundry
07. BBQ
08. Deck
09. Pool
10. Studio
11. Toilet
12. Outdoor Shower
13. Bedroom
14. Bathroom
15. Ensuite
16. Walk-in Robe
17. Water Tanks
18. Tandem Carparking
19. Bin Store
20. Double Height Space
19
18
Lower Level
Scale 1:200
Noosa Hinterland House & Studio
Location: Noosa Hinterland, Tinbeerwah, Australia Designer: Bark Design Pty Ltd
Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones Completion date: 2007
Barks Hinterland House at Tinbeerwah, in Queenslands Sunshine
Coast Hinterland contains two main interconnected, steel framed
volumes for living and sleeping, perched high on the site to take in
broad views of the Pacifc coastline with the forested hinterland in
the foreground. The main spaces step down and run with the natural
topography, connecting in section via the double height living and
northern pool deck space, whilst a separate silver shed art studio
projects out across the fall of the slope, creating a south lit, plywood
lined space for painting, high in the trees.
Taking some cues in architectural language from the adjacent Bark
Studio, the house explores Case Study ideas of expressing a legibility
of construction, with simple clean spaces contained by a series of
steel portal frames and glazing, in contrast with economic modules of
lightweight sheet and hardwood chamferboard cladding. The house
explores lightness, fltering natural breezes, layers of transparency
and integrating indoor outdoor spaces within dynamic patterns of light
and shadow, being a simple fexible frame to enable a contemporary
lifestyle.
The house is located as high as possible on the site in order to
maximise views, sunlight and natural ventilation. This also provides
easy vehicular and pedestrian access, whilst maintaining privacy from
both adjoining neighbours. Outdoor spaces are oriented towards north
and ample protection from the south-eastern winds is created using
louvres and adjustable fenestration, whilst enhancing views to the
coast.
The building has been designed to maximise passive temperature
and ventilation through cross ventilation and stack effect principles.
It minimises the need for artifcial/mechanical systems for lighting,
ventilation, heating and cooling. The building envelope utilises passive
(non-mechanical) systems for temperature, lighting and ventilation
control through considered fenestration, screens and roof ventilators.

Tinbeerwah
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2009 Bark Design Pty Ltd
Noosa Hinterland House & Studio
This hinterland house contains two main interconnected,
steel framed volumes for living and sleeping, perched
high on the site to take in broad views of the Pacic
coastline with the forested hinterland in the foreground.
The main spaces step down and run with the natural
topography, connecting in section via the double height
living and northern pool deck space, whilst a separate
silver shed art studio projects out across the fall of
the slope, creating a south lit, plywood lined space for
painting, high in the trees.
Taking some cues in architectural language from the
adjacent Bark Studio, the house explores Case Study
ideas of expressing a legibility of construction, with
simple clean spaces contained by a series of steel portal
frames and glazing, in contrast with economic modules
of lightweight sheet and hardwood chamferboard
cladding.
Project Name: Noosa Hinterland House and Studio
Location: Noosa Hinterland, Tinbeerwah
Floor Area: 320 sq.m
Completed: 2006
Awards: Noosa Living Smart Design Awards Glossies
Climate & Context 2007
Above: Entrance among the gum trees Above: Suspended plunge pool
Below: Bringing the outside in
Living Level and Studio Plan
The building has been designed to maximise passive
temperature and ventilation through cross ventilation
and stack effect principles. It minimises the need for
articial/mechanical systems for lighting, ventilation,
heating and cooling.
The house explores lightness, ltering natural breezes,
layers of transparency and integrating indoor / outdoor
spaces within dynamic patterns of light and shadow,
being a simple frame to enable a contemporary lifestyle.
Awarded:
Award name: Noosa Living Smart Design Awards Glossies Climate & Context 2007
Awarded Description:
An Australia Local Award with different catalogues
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The Bay House
Location: Lota, Queensland, Australia Designer: Fairweather Proberts Architects
Photographer: Jon Linkins Completion date: April 2005
The residence is designed for an active, young family and occupies a
steeply sloping site facing east over Moreton Bay. The house is derived
from simple liveable spaces that tier down the site and are separated
to allow maximum views and ventilation. The focus is the large open
living spaces where sliding glass panels slide completely away to
allow a seamless connection through the living space to the front
yard overlooking the bay and to the courtyard behind. Large insulated
louvres at the higher level allow the whole faade to open to the east
and complete the connection to the bay and the outdoors.
The house responds to its context by providing a sense of repose
within the streetscape and its landscaped bay edge. The placement
of the house close to the street allows space and a varied edge to the
landscaped rear. At the street the house is nestled into the hill. The
forms are articulated and jumbled down the hill to engage with its
context at a domestic scale.
The arrangement, and ultimately form, of the house is generated by
the movements and activities of the family. Spaces are arranged by
the arrival sequence, sleeping, working and activity zones. At arrival
the user can access the major zones of the house through a central
stair and circulation space. The mid level houses parents and young
child sleeping areas along with study spaces. Older childrens sleeping
areas are at the upper level and the living and active zones are
connected to the landscape at the lower level.
The house utilises an honest language in its use of materials that are
undisguised with their natural qualities expressed and articulated. The
large simple spaces responded to the long term yet casual nature of
the relationship that the client has with their location. This approach
served to provide relatively simple structural solutions which enabled
the clients to achieve a lot of house for their large family.

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Awarded:
2007 RAIA Residential Architecture Houses Commendation
The house has a particular relationship to its environment due to
its east west orientation and bay aspect. In responding to this the
house opens to invite the often gentle cooling breezes and light in
through its bay/eastern aspect to flter through the levels and spaces
of the house. The major volumes are single room width to maximise
this effect.
Alternatively this aspect can completely close down to protect against
strong winds whilst allowing the lee-side to remain open. Large format
lourves have been customised to provide solid insulated barrier to
the aspect and palpable change to the experience of the space when
open. The street side of the house faces west and is an insulated and
solid barrier that is sculpted and screened to provide protected light
and ventilation.
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SECTION
SITTING BED 1
DINING KITCHEN LIVING
BASEMENT
TERRACE LAWN COLD
ROOM
BED 4 BATH BED 3 BED 2
KIDS RETREAT LDRY
STORE
Tugun Residence
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia Designer: Fairweather Proberts Architects
Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones Completion date: January 2004
The design approach allows the house to capture northeast to
southeast breezes and brings them through the living spaces to the
rear of the house. The northern side of the house is dedicated to a
circulation spine due to the imminent neighbouring development.
Openings at the upper level are sparing and protected for privacy. At
the lower level these openings are expansive and protected by the
external fence. The design approach also extends the perceived living
areas at the lower level. The bedrooms are facetted to the southeast
on the upper level where a response over the existing conditions allow
privacy and glimpsed views of the ocean.
A simple steel structural system provided large open spaces and
allowed the use of concrete and glass to create the external fabric of
the building and for the concrete to become the robust edge of the
major living spaces.
Where exposed to the southeast, the concrete is playfully sculpted to
create an ambiguous form in the street that responds to its casual
beach context. The concrete panels are facetted and varied to achieve
the expression. It required a close collaboration of architect, engineer
and specialist sub contractor to ensure its shape and balance for
lifting along with its resolution at junctions with openings all whilst
maintaining the casual and varied form. The glass front is a low
maintenance and simple form in deference to the concrete edge.
Awarded:
2007 RAIA Residential Architecture Houses Commendation
2007 RAIA Regional Commendation & House of the Year
The Tugun Residence provides a living space on the beach edge that
allows the beach environment to inhabit the house. Its ground foor
plan is elevated providing protection and privacy from the street and
neighbouring property. Its simple lower plan allows the edges to be
fully opened when the weather permits to create an under the house
feel. Robust materials are used in response to its location and these
materials are expressed in an honest fashion.

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Vader House
Location: Fitzroy, Melbourne, Australia Designer: Andrew Maynard Architects Photographer:
Peter Bennetts Completion date: 2008
The extension is a framed steel skeleton which envelopes the
unusually high masonry boundary wall built prior to height restrictions,
reclaiming it into the interior. The roof then responds to site setbacks
which result in a distorted and subverted answer to regulations. This
produces high folded internal planes, allowing double height ceilings,
a mezzanine level and spacious interior.
The refned material and colorful palette of the extension, wrapped
in a heavy roof form distinguishes itself from the dark masonry clad
terrace from which it emerges. These two opposing forms are united
by a transparent glass corridor along the Northern boundary wall,
framing an outdoor courtyard.
Strategic planning located the courtyard at the heart of the site,
allowing both the terrace and extension to have direct contact
with this outside space. It creates a central demilitarised zone that
allows activities from the surrounding living spaces to spill into. This
courtyard ensures that the entirety of the site is utilised.
Defnition between these internal and external environments is barely
distinguishable.
Transparent bifold doors allow for constant physical and visual
interaction, between these environs. The extension is at once inside
and out. The courtyards location also provides abundant natural
light and ventilation into both the terrace and extension, importantly
decreasing reliance on mechanical heating and cooling systems.
The anatomy of Vader House also extends far below the site. The
timber deck in the courtyard doubles as a retractable deck, when
pulled aside reveals a hidden spa, right at the very heart of Vader.
Similarly the timber foor boards in the extension form a trapdoor
that when opened exposes a cellar, extending far beneath Vader.
When these doors are opened, they alter the nature of their spaces
signifcantly, providing the extension with a dynamic and chameleon-
like interior.
The lack of formal zoning of the extension refects a desire to make
this space a versatile, and thus economical solution, where multiple
programs are able to symbiotically co-exist. This fexible design,
accompanied by its carefully composed material and colour palette,
results in an extension that will adapt to function, clients desire and
most importantly the demands of time.

2008

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Awarded:
2009 Vision Award
Emerging from behind its high boundary wall, the distorted roof form of
Vader House interrupts the symmetrical roof line typical of Fitzroy, and
breathes new life into this Victorian Terrace. The open and seemingly
simple nature of Vader House reveals itself to be one of complexity
and ambiguity. Many elements of the design prove to serve multiple
functions. The bold stair case becomes part of the kitchen joinery,
the louvres act as light control as much as privacy screening, and the
boundary external wall doubles as the internal kitchen wall.
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Helal New Moon Residence
Location: Dubai United Arab Emirates Designer: Ehrlich Architects (Design Architect),
Godwin Austen Johnson (Executive Architect) Photographer: Erhard Pfeiffer, Irfan Naqi
Completion date: 2007
The three-part plan separates the reception area (majlis) for male
guests at the west from the womens area behind the central grand
hall and the familys sleeping quarters to the east. In a dance
between ancient and modern, massive stone walls are counterpoint
to large expanses of glass and taut elements of steel. Shadows of
contemporised Islamic patterns from the mashrabiyya are cast onto
stone foors and shimmer in the refecting pools.
The main entrance is approached through date palm grove aisles. A
refecting pool, which fows indoors and provides cooling, surrounds
the front faade. A mashrabiyya, the traditional lattice sunscreen,
flters direct sun. Gardens, fountains, shady courtyards, and terraces
surround and penetrate the buildings, making it a desert paradise.
The whole structure suggests a giant Bedouin tent, with the football-
feld-sized roof, cantilevered 30 feet on each side, casting a giant
swathe of shade.
Awarded:
2008 Cityscape Architectural Awards; Seal of Distinction
Islamic culture is embodied and reinterpreted through modern
technology and design in this 35,000-square-foot residence, located in
the Persian Gulf. Searing temperatures and ample desalinated water
allowed the desert site to be transformed into an oasis with pools and
landscaping.
Sheathed in shimmering aluminum, a massive curved roof shelters
and unites the compounds series of two-story buildings. In section,
the canopy forms a crescent moon, the symbol of new life that tops
the minarets of Islam. The canopy is supported by stone-clad columns
that function as mechanical exhaust vents; they pierce the roof and
project up to the sky, reminiscent of traditional wind-catchers in the
age before air conditioning.


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Hover House
Location: Hiroshima, Japan Designer: Tetsuya NAKAZONO Photographer: Naf Architect &
Design Completion date: March 2007
Rice felds surround the site, with natural sceneries around such
as a national park, a pond of water shield a kind of waterweeds
threatened with extinction and bamboo trees. Stretching out east
and west, the site bends like a Japanese character < with its corner
facing north. Roads are on both northwest and south sides; the former
is higher than the latter by 1 to 1.5 metres. Not to mention the natural
environment, to take advantage of the height differences is the key to
enhance the potential of this building.
Depending on where to put equipments, the energy effciency can
be quite ineffcient because of the comparatively long shape of the
building. This time, the burden to the equipment can be decreased
as possible by installing in proper places. In addition, it is easy to
maintain and repair those equipments in open-spaced under foor.
Indoor, it consists only of structure and furniture, and bulkheadings
are simple, wooden custom-ordered fush panel so that they can
be easily removed. All rooms are placed to surround the elevated
deck terrace facing south. A pool was installed in the deck terrace to
effectively utilise the under-foor-space.
This building is a two-storey and 50-metre-long bungalow. It is featured
in the methods of masonry construction of the foundation, steel beams
and the RC materials. Speaking of the foundation, the designers built
steel construction on steel pipe-piles not only for the request from the
client that demanded the building to be higher than the road by one
metre, but also for the ground which used to be a feld. The ground is
too weak to support direct foundations unless it reaches more than
one metre. The steel pipe-piles can be pulled out with inverse rotation
so that the site will be remained as a feld again. This type of pile
foundation requires tailored designing because the maintenance for
those varies respectively depending on the environment.

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Awarded:
2007 Selected Architectural Designs, JIA
The Japan Institute of Architects (JIA) is the most established Japanese
professional organisation of free and autonomous architects as well
as the Japanese section of the Union Internationale des Architectes
(UIA). The institution was founded in 1987 and includes about 4,800
members today.
Honours of the JIA include: JIA Award, JIA Grand Prix, JIA Young
Architect Award, JIA Sustainable Architecture Award, JIA 25 Years
Award (every two years), and JIA Architect of the Year.
:
2007JIA

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JIA
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Shell House
Location: Nagano, Japan Designer: ARTechnic Architects Kotaro Ide Photographer:
ARTechnic Architects Completion date: 2008
A large shell shaped structure fnds itself in the middle of the woods.
It is hard to determine what exactly the structure is, and unlike the
surrounding caves and rocks, it clearly is not a part of nature nor is it
a ruin. A frame, made at a completely different place for a completely
different purpose. Within this shell shaped structure will one fnd
foors constructed, wall separating spaces, and rooms furnished. The
scenery conjures a flm-like image, in which locals inhabit over an
abandoned spacecraft. With time, trees start to grow encircling the
spacecraft, harmonising it into the landscape.
It goes without saying that villas should not only be functional spaces
for the weekend. Their greatest goal is to provide owners with good
rest, leisure, and picturesque views that never become dull all in
the vicinity of nature. In the style of many modern sculptures, the
designers aimed to enhance the surrounding nature by incorporating it
within the spatial structure.
The plan was to build the villa around the big fr tree as the centre
of the site, with a row of pine trees as the main view. Initially,
the designers had planned to build a shell structure with three
dimensionally curved surfaces, and the C shaped section was to
surround the fr tree and the plan of the building resembled the letter
J In addition, certain parts were planned to hold double volume space.
Yet, going over the budget, construction method and fnish, the plan
was revised down to a shell structure of two dimensionally curved
surfaces. The top of the oval shaped building wall thickens by 330mm
and its width continuously increases up to 730mm at both sides to
meet the structural requirements. The free-curved lines appear on
the edge, and the three dimensionally curved surface with a twist
partly appears on the cut surfaces. However the entire structure was
composed by two dimensionally curved surfaces. The foor is built
1400mm above the ground, with the lower half of the shell structure
protruding greatly towards the outside, supporting the terrace of the
same height. All air and exhaust outlets are installed beneath the
sash, letting air run outside through the terrace louver. In addition,
by devising unfxed windows, the designers tried to maximise natural
ventilation (the designers havent arranged air conditioning in general
parts). While at a glance, the oval shaped cylinder space might appear
as wasteful use of space, the functional use of space is maximised by
the installation of furniture in the lower half of the oval cylinder.


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Awarded:
2008 Minoru Takeyama Award by the Department of Architecture,
Musashino Art University
This is an architecture award named after a Japanese professor on
architecture Minoru Takeyama. The Shell House was awarded for
its outstanding design concept: Being in sync with nature isnt about
yielding to nature its about coexistence. The existence of the
structure depends on its power to endure nature. By isolating living
space from the wilderness, and upgrading its quality as a shelter, the
house will be protected from nature and will provide a comfortable
environment. With this, the house will be taken care of and used
frequently and continuously. Specifcally in cases of villas, frequent
use is what leads it to blend in with its surroundings.
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Symbiosis House in a Forest


Location: Tokyo, Japan Designer: Naoi Architecture & Design Office Katsutoshi Naoi,
Noriko Naoi Photographer: Hiroshi Ueda Completion date: 2007
This is environmental symbiosis type house for echo-life. The designers
think nature is equivalent to architecture, and they achieved to
decentrally-arrange volume of the house without cutting trees.
They formed the three volumes of the house to chair shapes, and
tried to make them ft into the surrounding forest. The form assumes
a role of stretcher, which bears the amount of the second foor walls
structurally. They created the original language (design) for the
inevitability of the function and the form.
As other parts of the house are half outdoor spaces, people can feel
atmosphere of the forest. It is like camping every day, and when
people spend time in living and dining area, they might feel as if they
were under a tarp, and if they step in, they will fnd private rooms,
which give people enfolding impression like tent.
If this architecture becomes as if it had existed here from long time
ago like trees in the forest, the distance between resident and nature
will be closer.
Awarded:
2008 The 29th INAX Design Contest, 2nd Prize
The INAX Design Contest was initiated in 1977, specialised in the
design of residence buildings and improvement in construction. At the
beginning, the contest was started for the purpose of an increasing
competence in construction technology, to improve every project for
a better inhabitation and usability. Through competition, INAX wants
to provoke comfort life and more room for thinking, through the
improvement of products, for a high-quality life.


2007

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Zen House
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Zen House
1000 500 0 5000 mm
Room o f view
Zen House
Location: Hiroshima, Japan Designer: Ryuichi Furumoto Photographer: Seiichiro Ohtake
Completion date: 2004
This is the residence of an industrial designer couple in their 20s. The
lot is situated in a typical suburban housing development in Japan,
among an array of terraced modest sites. The majority of the houses
in the development are of prefabricated, two-story construction,
seemingly disconnected from their surroundings. The designer chose a
differentcreation path from those houses because the designer rather
admired the character of the lot with its optimum solar exposure,
distant scenic view, and access from the road via pre-existing exterior
stairs. By linking those assets closely to the architecture, the designer
attempted to generate an ideal living environment for the designer
occupants that would maintain their tranquility, yet stir their creativity.
The designer calls this home Zen House.
The building s structure is a mere 11 square meters wide, its one-
story height reinforced concrete. The interior fnishes, as well as
the exterior ones, remain exposed concrete without cladding. As a
result of constraining the architectural composition to a minimum,
the house has been streamlined to implement an extremely effective
design. It draws attention to the beauty of natural elements, highlights
scenic charm, and smoothly integrates human creation with the
larger environment. In particular, the water court planned for outdoor
meditation acts as a signifcant trigger to enhance the lure of the
house. The water court surfaces, that is, the walls, foors, eaves,
and even the water itself, reveal delicate impressions of shadow,
transforming winds into visible moir patterns, and refecting varied
indoor and outdoor scenes. The void above the court allows the
whole ceiling of the Zen House to expand, giving the impression that
the ceiling expands to the sky. Moreover, the architectural plan that
positioned the court within the heart of the house frees endless layers
of space and location sequences. Such design also creates an effcient
and fexible area for living.

2004
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Awarded:
2007 Architect Institute of Japan Selected Architectural Designs
When entering this house, against the backdrop of a striking view
and through a front door reminiscent of a nijiri, one s expectations
increase that such a dramatic architectural experiment diminishes
the stress of busy life. Upon stepping into this house, one can indeed
discover the ideal place to rest easy. You begin to feel more you. The
physical building may be as static as concrete and its other materials,
but Zen House also feels active, without limits, on or off the premises,
a place that is spiritually free.
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Beuth Residence
Location: West Hollywood, CA, US Designer: Zoltan E. Pali (FAIA) Photographer: John E.
Linden, Julius Shulman Completion date: 2006
Zoltan Pali put his designing creativity into it, making it a luxurious
modern house. Zoltan inserted a lower foor in the 20-foot tall
crawlspace that had existed underneath the original home along
the steep hillside, successfully enlarged the house according to
its surroundings. In this way, the house appears to be a three-foor
architecture, which is actually four-foured.
The masters bedroom is located on the top foor. The architect clad
the upper residential level of the home in warm, teak plywood panels.
A magnifcent vista through four-foot high windows is visible from the
master bed. Steps from the bedside, a sitting lounge eases the journey
to wakefulness with Barcelona chairs. Behind the master bed, a
transparent shower partitions the bedroom from its luxurious master
bath.
Apart from that, the house includes three other bedrooms and a
Miesian steel-and-glass reading room, perforating the smooth teak
style on the top foor. The third foor is the most clean, transparent
level of the house, where site the living room, dining room, and
kitchen, surrounded by glass. The long, glass plinth cuts horizontally
through the buildings mass at the centre, offering the most open view.
Main furniture is located centrally and low to the walnut foor so as not
to block views to the outside.
Awarded:
2007 AIA/LA Merit Award
2007 ATD Magazine (S. Korea)
2007 Custom Home Magazine Grand Award
2006 LA Business Council Residential Design Award
One of the most successful aspects of the home is the fact that the
client was intensely involved and made good decisions that enhanced
the design cache and made modern living both practical and sensual,
summarised architect Zoltan Pali.

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Brosmith Residence
Location: Beverly Hills, CA, US Designer: Zoltan E. Pali (FAIA) Photographer: John E.
Linden Completion date: 2006
The 4,400 square foot Brosmith Residence locates on a ridge line of
Mulholland Scenic Parkway, overlooking the San Fernando Valley of
southern California.
Architect Zoltan Pali designed the residence to fulfll the mission
of indoor/outdoor living available from every area in the home.
Courtyards with disappearing wall segments take advantage of the
near-perfect California climate, alternatively welcoming sunshine and
cool breezes according to which windows and doors are operating.
The house is organised along a central spine, broken into segmented
living pods for different uses. Each pod is outftted with its own
version of an indoor-outdoor courtyard space, and each is connected
independently to the central spine of the house. The architecture
captures exterior space as living space within each of these courtyards.
The pods include the master suite, the childrens quarters, offces,
caretakers quarters, and public living space.
The public living space rambles at a slight grade down the hillside,
from family room to kitchen, then dining room to formal living room.
Furniture is kept low to the ground so as to keep views unobstructed,
and the taller kitchen cabinetry suggests division between the homes
public space and its central spine. Entering the public living areas, one
is met with breathtaking vistas of the San Fernando Valley climaxing
on the main patio, where a glass-like swimming pool disappears
entrancingly over the crisp clean horizon of the sites northern edge.
Awarded:
2006 Residential Architect Magazine Grand Prize Award
The energy-conserving structure uses passive siting and natural
shading to reduce its dependence on mechanical environmental
conditioning systems. Courtyards are sited to take advantage of
prevailing breezes. Innovative uses of standard materials create
much of the custom feel of this residence, where concept and design
elevates the feel of every room. A sliding louvered screen in the Master
uses an off-the-shelf, affordable aluminum frame (echoed elsewhere
in the house) ftted with aluminum louvers, creating a unique seamless
integration with the clean lines of the house.

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Hamptons Beach House
Location: New York, US Designer: Alexander Gorlin Architects Photographer: ESTO
Michael Moran Completion date: 2008
At the entrance, the second foor cantilevers outward from the
principal mass of the building in a bold formal gesture, creating a
sheltered patio adjacent the main entry. From here, an open staircase
rises through a two-story glass atrium to the main level.
Inside, the house is organized around a large, open living area. A
central freplace subtly partitions the space, creating an informal
dining room to one side and a sitting area to the other. A light monitor
in the ceiling above adds volume to the space and washes the room
in a diffuse light. The living room opens onto a terraced patio and pool
beyond. Above, a great wing-like canopy extends from the building,
shading the house.
At the roof, a terrace offers spectacular views of the ocean and the
sound. Bold sculptural elements, clad in a pale metal, punctuate the
expanse. Their surfaces gray and fat in the morning light take on a
warmer hue as the sun rises in the sky. At sunset, they are set ablaze
with color.
Awarded:
2008 AIA New York Chapter Design Excellence in Housing Award
This striking, modern summerhouse is set on a narrow spit of land
between the ocean and the bay. While simple in form, the house is rich
in texture, color and detail, with African teak offsetting pale limestone.

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Kelly Residence
Location: Los Angeles, CA, US Designer: Abramson Teiger Architects Photographer:
Richard Barnes Photography, David Lena Photography Completion date: 2006
Sustainable design is at the heart of this house without being overtly
expressed in the external aesthetic. The house is designed with
photovoltaic cells hidden on the roof, grey water reclamation, artifcial
lawn, and rain-screen faades to help thermal stability, fash hot water
heating, bamboo foors and ponds of water to promote evaporative
cooling in front of large expanses of glass.
Kelly Residence is an exploration of balance: between solid and. void,
formal order and. intimate grace, private and. public, and stoic and.
playful, all relative to achieving a higher sense of spatial freedom
within an architectural home.
The residence is articulated as boxes, each fnished in white plaster,
and raised on steel pilotis. Instead of being complete four-sided
objects, each box has one side which is replaced by high-density
wood panels coated with phenolic resin. The panels, manufactured
from sustainable products, are installed as a rain-screen and are
punctured with stainless steel inserts, further articulating the idea that
the cladding is non-load bearing.
The architects divided the spaces into public below and private above.
The house has a parents side and a childrens side, allowing each
their privacy, with an umbilical cord given form as a bridge between
the two parts. Bedrooms are up in the air, while on the ground foor
large expansive openings allow the garden to run under the house.
The interior spaces are oriented to draw the garden in.


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Awarded:
2008 American Architecture Award Chicago Athenaeum, Museum of
Architecture and Design
American Architecture Award, Chicago Athenaeum/Metropolitan Arts
Press with the European Centre for Architecture Design and Urban
Studies, 2008
The American Architecture Awards have become the foremost,
prestigious awards program for public recognition for Excellence in
Architecture, both nationally and internationally. The awards identify
the new cutting-edge design direction, urban philosophy, design
approach, style and intellectual substance in American Architecture
today.
Established over 10 years ago, the awards recognise the most
signifcant new contemporary architecture, landscape architecture,
interiors, and urban planning by the most renowned American
and international design frms practicing in the U.S. Winning
projects represent many U.S. states, but also Austria, Egypt, France,
Kazakhstan, Korea, Kuwait, China and the United Arab Emirates. Only
sixty-fve awards were given out of hundreds of submissions.
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2008
&2008


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Lago Vista Guesthouse
Location: Beverly Hills, CA, US Designer: Aleks Istanbullu Photographer: David Lena, Tim
Street-Porter Completion date: 2008
Dividing the program into two pure volumes, a tall dominant cube
that houses the retreat space and low parallel rectangle with the
living areas, the balance between proportion and procession creates
distinct, comfortable spaces. At the threshold, four granite stepping-
stones, which seem to foat in a pond, mediate the transition between
the landscape and the building.
The sense of space in the retreat also benefts from the carefully
placed windows that open to the sky and the canyon. Here glass is
used in unexpected ways including a polished glass void at the corner
with a view out to a lily pond and down the hillside.
Inside the high-ceilinged retreat, the impression of thickened walls
with deep window recesses, foor-to-ceiling bookcases and casework
and built-in desk and divan, calms and quiets the space. The peaceful
open room with its soft natural light and views of canyon and city is an
ideal place for study, repose and connecting with nature.
With water conservation a major concern in the region conservation
measures include: minimal use of impervious surfaces around the
house, water capture in planters, landscaping succulents and native
plants with low water needs and subsurface irrigation, the irrigation
sub-surface with reclaimed water. All plumbing fxtures are low fow.
Awarded:
2008 Merit Winner of Residential Architect Design Award
The design of the retreat takes maximum advantage of a tight, highly
landscaped site at the top of a steep canyon. The project was designed
and built according to sustainable principles. To protect the natural
canyon environment, the siting minimised disturbance to the earthworks
and balanced cut and fll on the site. The building volumes were massed
to minimise the visual impact on the surrounding environment. Both the
siting and massing decisions were made to preserve all existing mature
trees. Working within strict height and setback requirements on the
constrained site, the architecture sets the building comfortably into the
landscape and captures the sweeping views.


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Geometry of Project vs. Coastline Views Diagram
Movement & Light
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2nd Floor
Landscape Plan
Point Dume Residence
Location: Malibu, CA, US Designer: Griffn Enright Architects John Enright, Margaret Griffn,
Mathew Gillis Photographer: Fotoworks Benny Chan Completion date: Fall 2007
The 60,000 square feet property and 6,350 square feet house is on
the top of Point Dume in Malibu and is accessed from below by a
driveway, an existing retaining wall bisects the site and moves along
the geometry of an existing knoll. Panoramic views of the ocean are
availed by the geometric morphologies of the residence. These major
views delineated the shifts in geometry apparent in the angled shape
of the plan and created the sinuous sequence from the entrance to
the landscape and view. Three primary geometries of the main hall
and pool, the living room and the master bedroom, relate to the three
primary geometries to the coastline below. Movement in the house
shifts from one geometry to the other and back again enhancing
distant views.
The stepped topography allows entry midway between the upper and
lower foors. One arrives into the main hall, and descends through a
vertical sky lit fuid space that twists around to the horizontal space of
the living area where a panoramic view of the Pacifc ocean is revealed.
From the main hall, curved walls create sweeping paths through the
house to the master bedroom above and the living area below. The
living area literally extends to the exterior with two large sliding doors
that afford an eleven feet by twenty-two feet wide opening. The walls
of the house extend out from the internal path to become the edge of
a lap pool and a porch. An over scaled system of horizontal louvers
extends along the rear of the residence to control light, incorporate
library shelving and become the railing system for the master bedroom
terrace above. The second foor is peeled away from the louvered
plane to simultaneously reorient to distant ocean views and create a
private master bedroom terrace. A catwalk extends from the bedroom
over the lap pool along the louvered guardrail where it engages the
nexus of house, outdoor porch and pool.
Three bent lines of clerestory windows lift up from the roof beginning
at the entrance and extend through the main hall, the master bedroom
and bathroom to provide natural light on the sinuous surfaces
revealing fuid slippages as various movement systems converge. This
language of light extends between the living and kitchen area through
backlit translucent resin panels and extends to the terrace beyond.
Sinuous echoes are also extended to the landscape with gravel,
concrete, and plant material to enhance paths of fuid movement
systems throughout the property.


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Main Path through House
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Paths align with prevailing winds
and allow natural ventilation
Awarded:
2008 California Council SARA Award of Excellence
This house takes the typical paths of domestic movement and
manipulates them to weave the exterior landscape and site into the
house while enhancing natural airfows and views. An interest in
the continuity of landscape, circulation, and the bodys sequential
movement through space has lead to an exploration of continuous
spatial relationships in this residence. Smooth, sinuous surfaces
delineate zones of space while maximising the sites topography,
views, and circulation. Volumes are differentiated through a slicing
of surfaces and materials, emphasising the horizontal while allowing
a multiplicity of spatial conditions to develop through the interaction
of these forms, surfaces and volumes. These spatial intersections
accumulate the more static elements of the house, while breaking
down edges between inside and outside, allowing a more open and
engaging relationship between the land and the house.
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Pool House
Location: Wilton, Connecticut, US Designer: Hariri & Hariri Architecture Photographer: Paul
Warchol Completion date: 2007
The architecture of the pool house hovers over a 48x20 pool like a
vessel in the water. On the North there is a spa and an outdoor/indoor
shower, and on the south there is a roofed veranda acting as an
indoor/outdoor dinning area with a large opening on the wall framing
the landscape beyond. The area around the pool becomes a sunken
courtyard paved in travertine with steps and walls of stone.
The interior of this pool house contains a living/entertainment room,
kitchen &bar area, simple bathroom and a variety of terraces and
decks. It is enclosed by series of metal and glass sliding panels that
would allow the structure to be transparent and open up towards
outside. A wall of green mosaic tiles cover the wet areas (both inside
and out side showers) and becomes part of the main composition of
the faade bringing color and tactility to the place.
The main frame and the ceiling of the structure are in Ipe wood
(Brazilian Walnut) and make the place warm, nautical and sculptural at
the same time. The wood foors stretch out from the interior hovering
over the pool and becoming a deck for refecting and simply sitting
around and putting your toes in the water.
A fre pit on the south side of the structure creates an intimate space
on the end of the terrace for gathering around in the cold, making
marshmallows and enjoying the place.
Awarded:
2007 Interior Design Magazine Best of Year Award
This 1200 square feet structure was designed as a minimalist
sculpture in the landscape. It is part of a 3.5 Acre property in
Connecticut. The architecture of this pool house is in contrast to the
traditional architecture of the existing house yet the design sets up a
dialogue between the two.


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HARIRI & HARIRI
39 WEST 29 TH STREET, #12A
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10001
T. 212 727 0338 F. 212 727 0479
ARCHITECTURE
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[10]
SINGLE, FOLDED SURFACE
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[2]
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Study Model
Study Model
Study Model
Folded Sequence & Resultant View Frames
Folded Sequence
[1]
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[5]
Awarded:
2008 AIA/CC Award (American Institute of Architects California
Council) 2008 Los Angeles Architectural Awards (Los Angeles Business
Council)
The Skyline Residence displayed a sparkling point in architectural
design, that is, infnite architecture can be achieved with limited
budget. An excellence with low cost itself deserves praising.
Meanwhile, a full use of local resources is what we advocate
nowadays.
The low budget didnt prevent Skyline Residence from becoming
an excellent architecture. The simplicity of modernism is enhanced
by an outdoor projecting wall; humanity is showed through indoor
decoration and outdoor entertainment section. Besides, the designers
paid special attention to the details of interior physical environment,
achieving a comfortable and healthy interior.
Skyline Residence
Location: Los Angeles, CA, US Designer: Belzberg Architects Hagy Belzberg
Photographer: Fotoworks Benny Chan Completion date: 2007
Perched atop a ridgeline in the Hollywood Hills, the presence of the
Skyline Residence represents an economical approach to creating an
environmentally sensitive building within a limited budget. The pre-
existing site presented a challenge in terms of constructability as the
client presented the challenge of limited allowable expenses.
Beyond incorporating sustainable building product systems, the
budgetary limitations imposed on material choice forced the architect
to implement strategies for using resources in close proximity to the
site. Therefore, the general concept adopted for this project stems
from Carbon Neutral Economics, or the purchasing of goods which
are manufactured locally to save carbon transportation emissions. In
a low budget architecture project where high-tech systems such as
photovoltaic panels, wind turbines and recycled products are out of
economical reach, the Skyline Residence reverted back to purchasing
locally, minimised grading and capitalising on natural characteristics
of the site.

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SITE PLAN
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Auto Court
Main House
Adjacent Residences
Skyline Drive
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Two Story Guest House + Car Port
Auto Court / Outdoor Movie Seating
Outdoor Viewing Deck + Garage Below
Living Room / Dining Room
Kitchen
Guest Bedroom
Master Bathroom
Master Bedroom
Infinity Edge Pool
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Suntro House
Location: Oaxtepec, Mxico Designer: Carlos Rubio Martinez Photographer: Paul Czitrom
Completion date: 2007
It is located in the residencial area of Oaxtepec, Mexico among
delightful natural surroundings, with the luxuriant slopes of Tepozteco
to the north and the highway leading to Haciendas de Yautepec to the
south. The lot is oriented to the northeast with a splendid sight of the
Tepozteco. The sunlight falling on this white volume creates striking
images produced by the whimsical movements of shadows and
refections.
The wide open room which unites the dining and living rooms offers a
fuid space and a complete openness to the outside. Situated at the
same level as the terrace, it extends all the way to the pool; in this way
creating more space if weather permits. The uncluttered style of the
place is respected by the white furniture which features very refned
lines.
The organisation takes place in a clear division in the horizontal
direction of the house locating in the ground foor the public and
recreation areas and in the high foor the dormitories connected with
the lower foor by an inner-outer circulation. The different habitable
spaces ft in a transparent area that makes its continuity with the
exterior by the concrete foor that extends to the open areas, allowing
to the users to move in a fuid space without obstacles.
The foating volume rising above the living room and dinning room
suggests a seductive lightness which simultaneously, depending on
ones perspective, creates the effect of illusionary planes with its
interplay between volumes and empty spaces: a rationally controlled
formal exercise. In keeping with the simplicity of the outlines, the
interior emphasises the sculptural character of the building, making
use of fundamental elements such as contemporary design items and
various works of art, most notably the Victor Reyes painting and the
sculptures of Alfonso Magaa.
In the garden, next to the swimming pool, the Gandiablasco Spanish
furniture selected from Designet provides the perfect complement,
creating a sense of freshness and peace.


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Awarded:
July 2007 House of The month for The World Architecture News in
London
The shape responds to the high local temperatures and the spaces
are organised to make the best of the setting and to promote the
continuous circulation of air, thus ensuring cool interiors even at the
height of the summer. The exposed concrete foor creates a sense
of continuity, devoid of obstacles, beyond the glassed-in areas. The
topography presents an unevenness that was approached for the pool
to stay at streets level letting the rest of the house uprooted midlevel.
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Surfhouse
Location: Manhattan Beach, CA, US Designer: XTEN Architecture Monika Haefelfnger,
Austin Kelly (AIA) Photographer: Art Gray Photography Completion date: 2008
The Surfhouse appears as an abstract block of ebonised cedar a
few blocks from the Pacifc Ocean in Hermosa Beach. The site is
very small. While typical lots in the area measure 120 x 40, the
allowable building area for the Surfhouse measures just 33 x 24. The
architects approached the project by subtracting the larger program
areas from a solid volumetric form that conformed to the zoning
regulations and sought to maximise space, light, and views while also
creating a sense of privacy and retreat for the young owners on a busy
beachside street.
The domestic program is stacked vertically on the lot. Services and
bedrooms are on the lower foors, with larger rooms pushed to the
corners for light and views in multiple directions. The top foor and
decks are completely open as continuous indoor / outdoor living
spaces open to the beach and ocean. The faade is made from rough
sawn, black stained cedar planks with volumetric openings at primary
program spaces and a system of identical 2 x 5 casement windows
arrayed across the secondary elevations for specifc views and
ventilation. The interior is all light and air, with bamboo foors and walls
of glass that slide away to bring the beachside environment inside.
Awarded:
2008 American Architect Competition Winner
This is a national competition. The design of the Surfhouse is simple
and delicate. The volume of the house is restricted by the requirement
of local conditions, thus the designers adopted a kind of subtraction
to achieve a quite unique confguration of the building. Unique but
not overdrawn, the fgure of the house is perfectly integrated into the
surrounding environment. In the limited interior, the designers made
maximum use of space and arranged every function appropriately.
Meanwhile, the internal physical environment is deliberately designed.
The outdoor vista is introduced to the interior, making a connection
between the outside and the inside. This didnt interfere with the
privacy of the interior; quite to the contrary, the quiet interior space is
separated from the noise of the outside street.

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The Xeros Residence
Location: Phoenix, Arizona, US Designer: Blank Studio Photographer: Bill Timmerman,
Timmerman Photography, Inc. Completion date: January 2006
The Xeros project is sited within a late 1950s neighbourhood where
the urban grid of Phoenix, Arizona is overtaken by the organic land
forms of the north phoenix mountain preserve. Located at the end
of two deadend streets, the Xeros Residence is positioned upon the
upward slope of a 50x 250 double lot facing the mountain preserve
to the north and the city centre to the south.
The building includes a two-storey lower level design studio that
descends down into the earth with a single storey residence that
exists above the studio that is accessed solely by an external stair. The
path to the studio level requires that the guests pass behind the mesh
screen and descend a short fight of stairs into an exterior, mesh-
enclosed forecourt. A stainless steel water feature leads you down
the steps and terminates at a refecting pool. A one metre wide by 6
metres tall steel-framed glass door offers entrance into the studio from
the courtyard. To access the residence, the visitor ascends an exterior
steel staircase to an upper level balcony before entering the common
room (sitting, dining, and kitchen). The visitor continues through a
central gallery towards the cantilevered master suite media room. This
space is completely glazed on the north faade to enjoy the mountain
preserve views. To complete the cycle of movement, a cantilevered
yellow-glass framed Romeo and Juliet balcony allows views back to
the city and across the long axis of the building.
The primary building material is exposed steel (as structure, cladding,
and shading) that is allowed to weather naturally and meld with the
colour of the surrounding hills.
Called Xeros (from the Greek for dry) is as a reminder that all
design solutions should be in a direct response to the environment
in which the project exists the building has several environmentally
responsible decisions. The form turns an opaque face towards the
intense western afternoon sun and the more exposed faces to the
south and east are shielded by an external layer of woven metal shade
mesh. The long, narrow lot precipitated a very tall form with a petite
foot print, allowing the maximum amount of site to be retained for
vegetation. The low-water use vegetation is positioned around the
residence to add to the shading effect of the screen. The site itself
was recycled in that new life was injected into a neglected plot in a
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Awarded:
Awards: AIA Western Mountain Region, Honour Award (2006);
The AIA Western Mountain Region is the regional chapter of the
American Institute of Architects that Honour architectural works
created in the region or projects by architects based within that region.
AIA Arizona Honour Award (2006);
The AIA Arizona is the state chapter of the American Institute of
Architects that Honour architectural works created in the state or
projects by architects based within that state.
Architectural Record Record House Award (2006);
Architectural Record is a professional publication for architects in
the United States. Every year they select examples of exemplary
residential design from around the world.
Residential Architect Project of the Year Award (2008);
Residential Architect is a professional publication for architects in the
United States focusing on residential design. Every year they select
examples of exemplary residential design from around the country.
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Torres House
Location: Monterrey, Nuevo Len, Mxico Designer: GLR arquitectos Gilberto L.
Rodrguez Photographer: Jorge Taboada Completion date: 2008
Up in the eastern Sierra Madre, in the Palmillass zone in Garza Garcia,
the Torres House seeks to establish a close contact with the natural
environment in which it is located.
Relatively opened towards the street, the access to the house is
experienced by walking across a fountain, from which an amazing tree
emerges, both beautiful and huge. Once in the portico, a great door
receives you, simulating a mural made with marble, wood and steel.
After you have crossed it, the foyer greets you with its marble foors
and its volcanic stone walls, while offering a visual continuity towards
the rest of the house and the garden, where designers tried to respect
as much as possible the existing oak forest.
The living room, conceived almost as a crystal box, gives you the visual
freedom of seeing both the mountain and the garden, due to its large
windows facing north and south, whereas its chimney invites you to
enjoy the fre heat in those occasional nights that can be extremely
cold due to the altitude of the site.
From both the dining room and the TV room it is possible to access the
roof's deck, where a large terrace allows you to enjoy the magnifcent
views of both the Sierra Madre mountain range as well as the whole
Monterrey metropolitan area.
In this way, the house gradually reveals itself in a sequence of spaces
that takes you from the public areas to the most intimate ones, and up
into the roof, always in visual contact with the garden, as well as with
the existing natural environment.

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Awarded:
2008 Crystal Calli, XV Architecture Biennial of Nuevo Leon
Different from other residential buildings in cold areas, the Torres
House is quite open and transparent, offering more natural and
comfortable space. The design of plant is eye-catching, particularly the
giant tree at the entrance, and also the plants in the inner courtyard.
The decorations are colourful yet not too famboyant, matching the
surrounding plants, to achieve a casual and romantic atmosphere.
The connections between different spaces, for example, from the
dining room to the roof terrace, continue the same atmosphere. In
this way, the designers hope to bring the clients the most comfortable
living space.
In order to resist coldness in the area, the designers particularly made
some warm-keeping design for the house. For example, the indoor
chimney and freplace offer warmth to the house and in the meantime,
become interior decorations for the space.
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Villa NM
Location: New York, US Designer: UN Studio Photographer: Christian Richters Completion
date: May 2007
Set on a hill not far from New York City, UN Studios Villa NM is shaped
like a living body and appears to have its own soul and eyes. Lots
of eyes, like screens looking out at the landscape, refecting it and
inviting it into the innermost parts of the house.
The setting of VilLA NM was the summer refuge of well-off Americans
in the 1920s and 1930s; in 1969 it became world-famous for the
Woodstock festival. In later years the Catskills were less popular, but
they have recently seen rehabilitation and new development and have
once again become a preferred destination for young New Yorkers
escaping the stress of the Big Apple.
The house has 250 square metres of foor space and enjoys all-round
views of the forest. The slight slope of the land inspired the design
and organisation of the built volumes. A single box literally forks into
two separate buildings: one of them follows the slope to the north,
while the other rises on the hill to create an indoor parking space
and gives rise to an internal layout on different levels. The structure
of the volumes is generated by fve parallel walls revolving around a
horizontal axis, so that dividing elements are sometimes foors and
sometimes vertical walls.
Inside, the homes different levels are linked by a system of ramps
designed as walkways with views over the valley below. The bathroom,
kitchen and freplace are positioned along the home's vertical axis,
keeping the exterior walls free. The living room is on the lower levels,
with cosier, more intimate, inward-looking bedroom areas on the upper
levels. All the other rooms open up to the outdoors with large glass
walls.
The materials employed are cement, glass and metal. Glass refects
the landscape and reproduces it on the skin of the house; metal picks
up the warm hues of the earth and invites them to dialogue with the
colours of the home.
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Awarded:
2008 Second Prize Wallpaper*Design Award
VilLA NM is a brilliant example of the potential for interaction between
prefabrication systems and quality architecture. Use of a standardized
prefabricated structure cut the cost of construction without penalizing
the aesthetic qualities of the home in any way.
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Zeidler Residence
Location: Aptos, CA, US Designer: Ehrlich Architects Photographer: Matthew Millman
Completion date: 2008
Awarded:
2009 Custom Home Award
Located on the bluffs overlooking the Pacifc Ocean, the 3,500-square-
foot Zeidler Residence arranges interior and exterior living spaces
to maximise views, natural light, and ocean breezes within a subtle,
sophisticated material palette.
Designed for a retired couple with grown children, the house sits
on a relatively fat corner lot with expansive views of the Pacifc and
vegetated cliff that leads from the site, down to the beach. The
program is divided into two main structures connected by a sheltered
courtyard. On the ocean side, the two-and-a-half-storey main house
features a double-height living space, with full-height glass doors that
open the interior onto the exterior spaces. A mezzanine is oriented
towards the view. At the end of the stair tower, a full-sized roof deck
accommodates various entertaining confgurations and provides
strong connections to the landscape and views beyond. The front yard
even incorporates a petanque court, a favourite pastime of the client.
The rear structure accommodates separate living quarters for friends
and family in three oversized bedrooms. The second level studio has a
full kitchen and expansive deck with views towards the ocean. The two
primary structures frame a landscaped courtyard with lap pool and
built-in barbecue. A trellis with overhead panels covers a walkway from
the main house to the guest house.
A minimal palette ties the entire composition together and includes
steel-troweled stucco, exposed concrete block, and Rheinzink.

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Biscuit Lofts
Location: Los Angeles, CA, US Designer: Aleks Istanbullu Photographer: Tom Bonner
Completion date: 2007
The adaptive reuse converts the 104,000 square foot, 7-storey building
into 104 new residential lofts, including 17 multi-story lofts, each with
their own garden patio, as well as ground foor retail. Nearly all original
foor fnishes, including bathroom terrazzo, concrete vaults, and maple,
have been preserved and restored, to create a seemingly random quilt.
Additional materials such as steel-clad columns, exposed brick interior
walls, and bronze windows remain vital aesthetic attributes of the lofts.
There are 50 different unit plans with distinct shapes and details such
as alcoves and high ceilings from single-story units ranging from 605
to 2115 square feet, to seventeen unique 2- to 4-storey units varying
from 1694 to nearly 6000 square feet, each with individual rooftop
garden patios. Ceiling heights are 13', 16', 20' and 30'. The largest unit,
a 4-story penthouse villa, was converted from the original water tower,
and includes a rooftop terrace with sweeping views of Downtown Los
Angeles. The 3-bedroom loft has 3500 square feet of living space,
plus 2500 square feet of private outdoor terrace. The unit has 30' high
ceilings and a private elevator.
Awarded:
2008 Los Angeles Business Council Architectural Award of Excellence
The architectural redesign preserves the original spirit and detail of
the building, following the natural grain of the building, respecting
its parameters at the same time that it exploits the structure, spaces
and materials from the standpoint of new use. The process was part
discovery and part adaptation the search for spaces that would feel
comfortable to modern urban residents while re-purposing of as much
of the original material and detail as possible. This juxtaposition of
the clearly industrial historic features with the clean contemporary
design of the new spaces and detail achieves an authentic loft feel
that maximises the available square footage to give residents as much
space and light as possible.

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Collage Paris
Location: Paris, France Designer: Emmanuel Combarel Dominique Marrec (ECDM)
Photographer: Benoit Fougeirol, Philippe Ruault Completion date: July 2008
Located at the intersection of the homogeneous and haussmannian
landscape along Gossec Street, and of the disparate architecture
made up through time on Picpus Street, the site on which this 63
social housing program is established is an element of a typical
collage-city landscape, also characterised by a double movement of
the natural soil: the connection, on its front part, to the deep slope of
the Picpus Street, and, on its backyard limit, to a landmark garden,
1.50m higher than the average level of the soil.
The project is a proposition to link these opposite typologies and soil
movements. Two parallelipedic buildings, respectively seven and six
levels high aligned in parallel on the front and back limit (north and
south) of the plot are set up on stilts above two long ribbons which
concentrate all the accommodations of the residence on the street
side and keep clear a wide open space way far unto the landmark
garden.
On Picpus street, West side, the project is connected to the truncated
bow of the haussmannian building at the angle of Gossec Street, as
if the site was a corner lot. East side, the project is aligned with the
roof of the smooth faade of a building from the 70s, also continuing
the fxture and the components of the adjacent building, marked by a
withdrawal that completes the project.
Elevated on two parking levels, the ground foor slab appears like
a mineral kaleidoscope, appropriate to dissolve the handicapped
requirements in an opportunistic and playful mid-mineral mid-vegetal
landscape. One enters the residence through a metallic curtain by a
wide porch in the axis of the project, and then each building has its
own entrance hall. The common areas are generous, clear, without
residual spaces and beneft from natural light.

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Awarded:
2009 Timber Design Award
The project presents two colours, four specifc faades conceived
to respond to very specifc solicitations, all characterised by wide
windows, opened on large terraces or balconies (depending on their
orientation), protected by coloured glass treated like sunglasses.
Sustainability requirements were emphasised for the conception of
this social housing building. Also, standards for energy use were up to
30 % stricter than legally binding standards in France at the time the
building permit was delivered.
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GreenCity Lofts
GreenCity lofts is comprised of 62 loft condominiums in fve buildings
ranging from three to fve stories in height over structured parking.
The frst design decision was to design around the concept of single
loaded circulation, allowing for natural daylighting from at least two
sides of almost every unit. The 62 residential units have been divided
into fve buildings, which created 19 units with three exposures (again
for daylighting). The fve buildings are positioned to create three well-
proportioned, yet different and unique, courtyards for the use of all of
the residents. Open-air circulation combined with open planning allow
for natural ventilation, avoiding the need for air conditioning. Thirteen
unit types are included, ranging from 500 square feet to over 2000
square feet, in three basic spatial confgurations fats, townhouses,
and lofts.
Formally, the project has been designed to project two images
residential and industrial refecting the changing character of the
neighbourhood. At the base of the building, up to the 30 height
that roughly aligns with neighboring buildings, the image is clearly
residential, with reverse bay windows of stucco and inset glass,
balconies, stairs and stoops. Above the 30 datum, however, the
design morphs into a tighter skin of fber cement panels, topped with
low slope standing seam roofs, a nod to the industrial history of the
site. Bright orange multi-level bay windows or lanterns have been
designed to make the sidewalk experience lively and exciting, and to
highlight the podium entrances and street corner.
Location: the Oakland / Emeryville, CA, US Designer: Swatt Architects Photographer:
Cesar Rubio Completion date: 2006
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Awarded:
2007 GRAND AWARD: The 27th Annual Bulilders Choice Design &
Planning Awards, Green/Sustainable Project
2007 GOLD NUGGET GRAND AWARD: Pacifc Coast Builders
Conference, Best Sustainable Residential Neighborhood
- 95% of the pre-existing paint factory was recycled, contaminated dirt
was remediated.
- Foundations were designed with high fy-ash content concrete.
- The buildings are framed with steel, which has high post-consumer
recycled content.
- Durable exterior fnishes were used integral coloured stucco, fber-
cement panels, and metal roofs.
- The buildings use healthy interior materials and fnishes
formaldehyde free wheat-board cabinets, FSC Certifed wood fooring,
wool and recycled content carpeting, sheet linoleum fooring, low
VOC paints, formaldehyde free insulation and low VOC construction
adhesives.
- For comfort and sustainability a hydronic radiant in-foor heating
system was used.
- In order to qualify as an Energy Star Partner, the whole project
needed to exceed the requirements of Californias Title 24 by 15%.
:
200727
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WRIGHT LANE
BOUNDARY
BOUNDARY
Location: Sydney, Australia Designer: Turner+As sociate Photographer: TBA Completion
date: 2007
Silkwood is located on the fringe of the city centre occupying a
disused triangular parcel of land between a robust turn of the century
warehouse building and a mock Georgian styled apartment building.
The auditorium, which occupies a former laneway adjacent to the
warehouse building, emphasises the nature of the lane and provides
an appropriate separation between the warehouse building and
main building form. The location of the entrance to the internal foyer,
the height of internal spaces and clear glazing at either end of the
auditorium allow for the continued physical and visual access through
the lane. The external nature of the lane is further heightened with the
continuation of external materials into the auditorium and the existing
warehouse building faade being visible within the foyer area. The use
of corten on the external facades strengthens the contrast between
the main building forms whilst, as a material, is a sympathetic
neighbour to the masonry.
The commercial spaces occupy the majority of the lower levels of
the building and assist in creating a base to the building. Sculptural
skylight elements clad in corten project into the residential courtyard
space over and further enhance the amenity gained from a clear span
foor plate. The extent of glazing and introduction of playful elements
such as the timber tube not only provide an appropriate scale and
level of detail but also assist in activating the street frontages.
Located over the commercial spaces the apartments take on a
courtyard typology. A solid off-form concrete entrance with oversized
building address cast into the concrete, cantilevered canopy and
bamboo formwork to internal walls provides a clear identity for the
residential foyer whilst the metal clad box over assists in holding
the street corner and provides a jump in scale between the overall
building form and adjoining apartment building. With a mix of single
and double storey apartments orientated around a central courtyard
the majority of apartments are able to be north facing, cross ventilated
and have multiple aspects. Access to apartments is via corridors
located on every second or third level to maximise the number of
through or cross ventilated apartments. Views to the city skyline and
surrounding area can be captured through single and double height
openings contained within the stitched precast concrete faade.
Materials selected have been considered in response to the existing
context. At street level tactile materials including timber, stone,
masonry, corten and galvanised steel are used maintaining the variety
found in the adjoining buildings. On the upper levels a more robust
palette is used, predominantly precast concrete with metal cladding to
highlight the corner box and top foor mezzanine apartments.
Silkwood

TBA 2007
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B ISSUED FOR INFORMATION 30/05/03 JMB
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Date: Tuesday, 19 August 2003
1:100 @B1
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CAR PARKING SPACE, RESIDENTIAL

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"SAMPLE" WALL TYPE: PLEASE REFER TO
WALL SCHEDULE FOR DETAIL

G2
INSITU CONCRETE
PRECAST CONCRETE
RITEK WALL
LIGHTWEIGHT/STUD WALL

LIFT OVER RUN

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CONCRETE BLOCK WALL
BRICKWORK WALL

Awarded:
2007 NSW (New South Wales) RAIA Award for Multiple Housing
The building designed by Nicholas Turner, Dan Szwaj, responds to
the transition in scale between the warehouse building and the taller
apartment building creating a highly modelled and legible form. With
a balanced tri-partite approach, the width and size of the openings
maintain the rhythm and proportion of the warehouse grid whilst
the metal clad box responds to the height and scale of the adjoining
apartment building. Sentimentality with previous architectural styles
has been avoided. A mixed-use brief with a residential, commercial
and auditorium programme has permitted the development of a
building with several identities.

:
2007

329
330
331
Strandkanten
Location: Troms, Norway Designer: 70N arkitektur Photographer: 70N arkitektur
Bjrn Jrgensen, Ivan Brodey, Marius Fiskum, Yngve Olsen Sbbe, Magdalena Haggrde
Completion date: 2009
Troms is a city with 70.000 inhabitants that is situated on a small
island in Troms, North-Norway (70N). The city has a university
and several research institutions and it is the commerce centre of
the region, as well as a lively cultural centre. Troms has a strong
historical standing in the high north, and this standing has recently
been strengthened because of the national venture of this area and
the Barents region.
Strandkanten is a new housing area just south of the centre of
Tromso, attractively situated on a reclaimed area in the Troms strait.
This area is an important part of the citys development strategy,
where a concentrated growth from within will strengthen the activity in
the centre and reduce the need for transportation. The entire area is
expected to be developed with 900 dwellings.
In 2003-2007 area III was built with 70N arkitektur as architect. K9
in area V, also by 70N arkitektur is to be fnished in 2009. In addition
to area III, construction has also been started in area II, IV, VII and
VIII, with buildings of several different architects as well as 70N
arkitektur.
Strandkanten was discovered as an area for development in
connection with an urban development investigation that was called
The Troms Game. The strategy of the Game has been to point out
certain areas in the city and give these areas new roles and value.
Certain terms have been introduced to outline the quality of each area.
Strandkanten is an area of 8800 square metres where approximately.
45% of the area is public outdoor spaces. Strandkanten is mainly
free of cars, and it is of great importance that it is a safe and
good environment for children. E.g. there is a special program for
playgrounds and outdoor spaces for children.
The area has a clear landscape profle, both in the plan and in the
transversal sections. The extent of the area consists of several parallel
movement lines. There is a main path right through the area, a
promenade along the quay front and also a shielded trail between the
buildings.
The cross section integrates the natural landscape curves from
Strandveien of approximately the height of two stories. In addition
there will be an artifcial landscape on top of the car park building, so
that a shielded outdoor area is conceived in between the buildings.
The different parts of the cross section have different character and
treatment.
The sea front is included in a future extended quay promenade
between the centre of Troms and the outdoor recreation areas on the
southern part of the island of Troms.

70N 70N 2009


7


332
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334
Awarded:
2009 AR Award
The development plan is concentrating on ensuring the quality of the
outdoor areas as well as maintaining the high density. The contents
and quality of the outdoor areas will be a deciding factor for the
development of the area. The main structures of the initial plans for
the area are maintained. This will show intriguing new architecture
and high quality outdoor spaces different from the ones that are given
in Troms today.
:
2009AR

900

2003200770NVK92009
70N

880045

335
336
337
Miravalle Tower
Location: Monterrey, Nuevo Len, Mxico Designer: GLR arquitectos Gilberto L.
Rodrguez Photographer: Jorge Taboada, Alejandro Rodrguez Completion date: 2007
Miravalle Tower is a multifamily housing project consisting of 84 high
level apartments, plus four luxury penthouses.
The fnal solution is a 26 storey tower plus three underground parking
levels, solving the building in a four apartment per foor scheme,
with an integrating central core for vertical circulation. The standard
apartments will be in the range of the 160 square metres, while the
penthouses are solved in two levels, having an area of 320 square
metres, providing each housing unit with parking for two vehicles, as
well as some storage room.
As an additional feature, the project has a large swimming pool, as
well as a party pavilion, within the existing gardens. The site, with a
spectacular vegetation density for the area with pecan trees up to
25m suggested a maximum respect for the existing green areas.
Awarded:
2008 XVI International Cemex Awards, Second Place
Miravalle Tower is quite outstanding for its unique design. In the
project, every part has been taken into consideration: the underground
garage, the lofts and storerooms are all arranged according to their
functions. On the plan, the combination of the four layouts shows the
originality of the designers for saving space. In addition, the internal
environment of the building is also specially designed to the detail.
The confguration and the faade are combined to show simplicity and
uniqueness of the design.
Further needs mentioning is the general plan, together with the
consideration for the surrounding environment; the entertainment
facility and the plantation offer inhabitants with ample leisure
opportunities.

GLRL
2007
84
26
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25

:
200816

338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
MTN
When asked to design a new project next to the just completed VM
Houses for the same client, of the same size and on the same street
BIG decided to conceive it as an evil twin and explore new territory.
The brief was to make two separate buildings: a 10.000 square metres
condominium next to a 20.000 square metres parking structure.
Copenhagen is largely reclaimed land, and as a result fat as a
pancake. Rather than erecting a standard apartment slab next to a
boring parking block, they decided make to the parking a podium for
living. The Parking structure is sloping upwards in a serpentine zigzag
from south to north. The housing is schemed in an even layer over the
top. Rather than stacking fats on top of each other, the apartments
are transformed in to courtyard houses with big gardens and
generous views. Like the neighbouring suburb crossing the canal and
overfowing the parking block all the way from the ground to the 11
th

foor. On the north side an open parking structure, on the south side
a stepped hillside of private backyards. The terrace houses are based
on Jrn Utzons L-shaped courtyard typology, and their large gardens
combine all the splendours of a suburban lifestyle in a dense open
context. A sloping elevator (Denmarks frst) gives access to the houses
from underneath.
The south faade is a cascade of barbeques and deckchairs, while
the north faade, facing the city, is just a parking. The naturally
ventilated parking requires a perforated faade, to allow air to pass,
while keeping rain and snow out. The perforation factory just got a
new machine that can punch holes in 6 different sizes (5 to 30 mm)
based on the input of a rasterized image. Since the designers have
always referred to the project of a mountain, they choose an image of
the Mount Everest massive to become the worlds largest black and
white photo. From within an organic pattern, from outside a razorsharp
image of the Himalayas.
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark Designer: BIG Bjarke Ingels, Jakob Lange Photographer:
BIG | Bjarke Ingels Group Completion date: 2008
MTN
VMBIG

1000020000
BIG

6 530

BIG BIG
2008
346
347
348
Awarded:
2009 The Forum AID Awards Best Nordic Architecture
2008 World Architecture Festival Best Housing Winner
2008 Mies Van der Rohe Award Nominee
The World Architecture Festival was launched as an annual event by
Emap, a media group that runs other festivals, including the World
Retail Congress and Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival,
as well as publishing various journals, including within the feld of
architecture the Architectural Review, and the Architects Journal. The
frst annual World Architecture Festival was held in Barcelona, Spain
on 22-24 October 2008. The second festival was held in Barcelona in
November 2009.
For the 2008 awards, international juries shortlisted what they
regarded as the best recently completed buildings into 17 categories.
All the shortlisted architects then had to present their work to live
juries and audiences at the Festival. On the fnal day of the festival the
17 category winners had again to present the work, competing against
each other to win the frst architectural Prix de Barcelona.
:
2009AID
2008
2008
EmapEmap

20081022-24200911

200817
17

349
350
351
Museum Residences
Location: Denver, Colorado, US Designer: Davis Partnership Architects Photographer:
Daniel Libeskind Studio Completion date: 2007
Museums are the carrier of city culture. Opposite to the Museum
Residences, the museum with its unique fgure represents the
culture of this city. This poses requirement on the confguration of
the residences to match the museum, which is quite memorial. The
Museum Residences make an inspiring contribution to the cultural
nexus of the city and complement the neighbouring extension.
The designers chose to adopt a kind of addition for the design of
the fgure of the residences. Irregular volumes are used to change
the confguration of the building, matching the museum and subtly
attributing different functions to the different volumes. However, in the
interior of the building, there are regular spaces. On the design of the
faade of the building, the soft qualities of the translucent glass skin,
combined with the metal-clad geometric forms, provide an elegant
partner to the titanium-clad Museum. As a sub-correspondence to the
museum, the materials further emphasised the relationship between
the residences and the museum.
The residences are six storey high, including 16,000square kilometers
residential area. The designers planed the space according to the
surrounding environment: Out of the seven foors, the top six are
residential, with 16,000 square feet of space on the ground foor
dedicated to retail, further enhancing the vitality at the street level. Its
56 luxury units range from 800 square feet studios to 5000 square
feet penthouse suites.
The Museum Residences are a joint venture with Davis Partnership
Architects, working with MilenderWhite Construction Company.


2007

16000
56800
5000

352
353
354
Awarded:
2007 Merit Award for Multifamily
The project won this award in an international architectural
competition held in 2007. This project locates by a uniquely-confgured
post-modernist museum, and the fgure of the residences well
continues and complements the architectural style of the museum.
The artistic yet not too much famboyant confguration design
emphasised the function of the new project, being different from that
of the museum, forming an innovative residential style. The choice of
materials for the project also corresponds to the museum, contributing
to a comfortable space for living. The delicate interior partition is
achieved with careful design. With consideration of the environment
of the street, the designers made the ground foor a retail space,
making a multifunctional residential building possible.
:
2007
2007

355
356
357
Lefevre Beach House
Longhi Architects
Mirindiba House
Marcio Kogan
Panama House
Marcio Kogan
Pentimento House
Jose Mara Sez, David Barragn
Capece Venanzi House
Giovanni Vaccarini Architects
Esker House Rooftop Apartment
Plasma Studio
Harbour me, Celia!
Hai Merlin Studio
House in Carabbia
Davide Macullo Architetto
IJburg House
Marc Koehler Architects
J2 House
3LHD
Milhundos House
Francisco Portugal e Gomes Arquitecto
Redondela House
Jesus Castro Irisarri, Guadeloupe Piera Manso
Steigereiland
Kerkhofs montagebouw
Villa G
Saunders Architecture Todd Saunders
Villa Marstrand Wadt
CORNELIUS + VGE Dan Cornelius, Nanna Vge
Villa Petersen
CORNELIUS + VGE Dan Cornelius, Nanna Vge
Villa Storingavika
Saunders Architecture Todd Saunders
Barrow House
Andrew Maynard Architects
Marcus Beach House
Bark Design Pty Ltd
Noosa Hinterland House & Studio
Bark Design Pty Ltd
The Bay House
Fairweather Proberts Architects
Tugun Residence
Fairweather Proberts Architects
Vader House
Andrew Maynard Architects
Helal New Moon Residence
Ehrlich Architects
Hover House
Tetsuya NAKAZONO
Shell House
Fairweather Proberts Architects
Index

J2
3LHD



Kerkhofs montagebouw
G


+

+


Fairweather Proberts

Fairweather Proberts

Fairweather Proberts

358
Symbiosis House in a Forest
Naoi Architecture & Design Office
Zen House
Ryuichi Furumoto
Beuth Residence
Zoltan E. Pali (FAIA)
Brosmith Residence
Zoltan E. Pali (FAIA)
Hamptons Beach House
Alexander Gorlin Architects
Kelly Residence
Abramson Teiger Architects
Lago Vista Guesthouse
Aleks Istanbullu
Point Dume Residence
Griffin Enright Architects
Pool House
Hariri & Hariri Architecture
Skyline Residence
Belzberg Architects
Suntro House
Carlos Rubio Martinez
Surfhouse
XTEN Architecture
The Xeros Residence
Blank Studio
Torres House
GLR arquitectos Gilberto L.Rodrguez
Villa NM
UN Studio
Zeidler Residence
Ehrlich Architects
Biscuit Lofts
Aleks Istanbullu
Collage Paris
Emmanuel Combarel Dominique Marrec (ECDM)
GreenCity Lofts
Swatt Architects
Silkwood
Turner+As sociate
Strandkanten
70N arkitektur
Miravalle Tower
GLR arquitectos Gilberto L.Rodrguez
MTN
BIG
Museum Residences
Davis Partnership Architects


E

E


XTEN


GLR
NM
UN


ECDM


70N

GLR
MTN
BIG

Author: Zelda Liu



Print version (Hardcover) - 2010
ISBN 9787538160666
Published by Liaoning Science & Technology Publishing House
Shenyang, Liaoning, China
eBook version - 2012
ISBN 9781619870451
Published by Profession Design Press Co., Ltd
California, United States of America
Distributed by Actrace, United States of America
Website: www.actrace.com, www.ArchitecturalBookstore.com
Copyright2011 Liaoning Science & Technology Publishing House
License agreement: www.architecturalbookstore.com/auxpage_license
Unauthorized copying prohibited.
50 AWARD WINNING HOUSE
50

- 2010
9787538160666

- 2012
9781619870451

Actrace2011
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