Lesson Planning Waynesburg University Pre-Instructional Planning: The thought process that leads to the development of quality

, meaningful lesson plans
Guiding questions that will provide the framework for the lesson. (Respond to each question.)
Who will you be teaching? (Identify student grade level as well as academic functioning level and specific needs of individual students) First Grade Students; Average grade level functioning Who (if anybody) will assist with the presentation of this lesson, and what will their role be? No assistants What is the long range goal(s) that is tied to this lesson? Recognize the five senses and identify what body part is used for each sense What is the specific learning objective(s) for this lesson? After viewing a PowerPoint presentation on the five senses, the student will restate the five senses and body part used for each sense with 100% accuracy on 2 out of 3 trials. After a teacher-model and given a worksheet, the student will correctly identify by circling what senses are used to explore different objects with 80% accuracy. After teacher-directives are given, the student will work in a small group and create a Glog visually depicting 3 characteristics of one of the five senses with 80% accuracy as outlined on rubric. Using student-created Glog, the student will work in a small group to visually and orally show 3 characteristics of one of the five senses with 80% accuaracy as outlined on rubric. What prerequisite skills/knowledge will students need to effectively access and participate in this lesson? Basic reading and writing skills; auditory processing skills; ability to follow basic oral directions; awareness of body parts; knowledge of describing words; group work; knowledge of cooperative group roles; basic understanding of how to work a computer (mouse, keyboard, etc.) When within the stages of learning will this lesson be presented? (Is it a learning acquisition lesson, learning fluency lesson, learning maintenance lesson, or learning generalization lesson?) Learning acquisition lesson When will this lesson be completed? (Will it be a one-day lesson or a multiple day lesson?) 3 days Where should this lesson be presented to ensure maximum student access and participation? (computer lab, classroom, science lab…) AND what materials will be needed? Classroom Materials: Lesson 1 computer; PowerPoint; Glogster account; projector; worksheets; pencils, 5 senses chart; actual objects pictured on worksheet; “What can I do now that I’m through” chart Lesson 2 Teacher computer with glogster account; 4 Student computers with glogster accounts; basket with 20 linking cubes in basket (5 of each color); matching color cards with a sense pictured on it; 4 baskets with cooperative learning roles in each; 4 “Learn About the Senses: Life Science” cds; projector; visual timer; rubric

Lesson 3 Animoto on 5 senses; 4 student computers with glogster accounts; projector; rubric Why are you planning to teach this lesson? Why must this information/skill be presented to the students? Students will learn about their senses because it meets the PA academic standards for first grade. Also, it is important for students to understand how they can obtain information using their senses related to the world around them. These lessons will bring awareness to aspects of our being that we take for granted on a regular basis. How does this lesson relate to the PA Academic Standards? PA 3.2.4.B (Inquiry and Design): Describe objects in the world using the five senses. • Recognize observational descriptors from each of the five senses (e.g., see-blue, feel-rough). • Use observations to develop a descriptive vocabulary.

Assessment Anchor: S4.A.3.3 Identify and make observations about patterns that regularly occur and reoccur in nature. Reference: 3.1.4.C, 3.2.4.B 1.6.3.E (Speaking and Listening): Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations. • Participate in everyday conversation. • Present oral readings. • Deliver short reports 1.6.3.F (Speaking and Listening): Use media for learning purposes. • Show or explain what was learned (e.g., audiotape, computer download). How does this lesson relate to the previous lesson? How does this lesson relate to future lessons?

How will you determine if students have met the lesson objective? (Think assessment) Successful completion of student worksheet; student participation in glog creation; glog creation; student presentation How should this lesson be presented to ensure maximum student access and participation? (lecture, whole group activities, small group activities, cooperative learning groups…) Whole group introduction Cooperative learning groups for exploratory portions and glog creation

Lesson Planning Waynesburg University Writing the lesson plan: Translating thoughts into a plan of action _____________________________________________
Pennsylvania Academic Standard(s) addressed during this lesson: (Provide Standard number and statement) PA 3.2.4.B (Inquiry and Design): Describe objects in the world using the five senses. • Recognize observational descriptors from each of the five senses (e.g., see-blue, feel-rough). • Use observations to develop a descriptive vocabulary.

Assessment Anchor: S4.A.3.3 Identify and make observations about patterns that regularly occur and reoccur in nature. Reference: 3.1.4.C, 3.2.4.B Lesson Objective(s) (Stated in observable and measurable terms)

After viewing a PowerPoint presentation on the five senses, the student will restate the five senses and body part used for each sense with 100% accuracy on 2 out of 3 trials. After a teacher-model and given a worksheet, the student will correctly identify by circling what senses are used to explore different objects with 80% accuracy. Assessment Plan (What will be done to determine if lesson objectives have been met?) Accurate completion of worksheet Informal teacher observation of students working in groups Student responses to questions and probes Materials: computer; PowerPoint; Glogster account; projector; worksheets; pencils, 5 senses chart; actual objects pictured on worksheet; “What can I do now that I’m through” chart Inclusion Techniques for Students with Special Needs: Student(s) will walk in the front of the line during walk Student(s) seated near front of the room Teacher to provide individualize or small group assistance as needed Use of multiple modalities Repetition of directions, concepts, and questions Worksheet with a reduced number of items shown to explore (if needed) Enrichment Techniques: Student can visit the “What do I do now that I’m through chart” that will have additional exploration activities using the senses. Lesson Differentiation (What modifications/accommodations will be made to ensure that ALL students have access to and are able to participate in the lesson): All students—Use of multiple modalities: visual, kinesthetic, tactile, auditory Lower—any technique mentioned above in inclusion techniques Higher—more objects to explore; list describing words related to applied senses for objects; visit “What can I do now that I’m through” chart for additional activities (including webquests, stories, journaling, listening center, etc.)

Lesson Presentation
Introduction/Motivational Activities/Anticipatory Set: Explain to students that we are working on a new unit. Take students on a walk (approx. 10-15 min) throughout the school and on school grounds asking the students questions throughout the walk such as (but not limited to): Look at all the students’ work; I see many bright colors. What do you see? Lunch sure does smell delicious; I wonder what they’re making? How would you describe the smell? When students return to the classroom from their walk, provide them with a small drink. Detailed Teaching Sequence: (Provide sufficient detail that would enable a substitute to effectively present this lesson. Bulleted statements are preferred)

Ask students what they experienced on their trip. If they do not mention something that describes each of the five senses, ask questions to guide them such as: Did you smell anything? What did you hear? See? Feel? When you smelled the cafeteria food, could you taste it?

Ask what parts of their bodies they used to get all this information?

Guided Practice/Independent Practice/Assessment Activities

Guided • • • • • • • • • • • Closure: Have students return to their seats. Ask the following questions: • • • Why do we need our 5 senses? What can we do with our five senses? What part of my body would I use to see/hear/touch/smell/taste? Show PowerPoint presentation to discuss how we learn from seeing, hearing, touching, smelling and tasting as well as the body parts used for each sense. Explain that we are going to do a little activity based on the information we’ve learned. Hold up a small ball and ask the students to look at it with their eyes. What does it look like? Record their answers on the “5 Senses Chart.” Pass the ball around and asking them to feel the ball. What does it feel like? Record their responses. Ask the students if they would need to use their taste, smell, or hear senses for the ball. (Depending on the type of ball, the smell may apply) Explain that though we have all these senses, we do not explore every object using every sense. Divide students into cooperative groups Send them to a location in the room where they can find various objects to explore using their five senses. Have the students complete a worksheet related to these objects identifying which senses they would use for each object. Collect worksheets (Student responses to closure questions) Independent

Assessment

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