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Triple Jump Technique Tim Cawley - Colorado State University Timothy.cawley@colostate.edu Identify Talent o o o lways loo!

o! for athletes with "oth speed and coordination. If an athlete has speed# you can train the coordination. Start coordination trainin$ early. %ncoura$e tryin$ many events.

pproach & 'unway o o 1( to 1) Steps 'hythm * phases+ ,ush# -ift# Turnover ,ush-,ush--ift--ift-Turnover-Turnover-Turnover .the rhythm when countin$ only 1 foot down the runway/ o o Start ,ositions+ Standin$# Ta!in$ some steps# or S!ip into the run ,ush ,hase o ,urpose is to create inertia. Shoulders should "e almost in front of the athlete0s hips at the start of the first push. 1hen pushin$ you want a full "ody lean with full# or triple# e2tension.

-ift ,hase The push phase will $radually transition into the lift phase as the athlete rises. The lift refers to the athlete0s hips liftin$ into position# which should create $ood !nee lift. It should ta!e a few steps to lift up into a $ood upri$ht position.

Turnover ,hase t this point the athlete should "e in a $ood up ri$ht runnin$ position and close to top speed. This phase "e$ins "etween 3 to ) steps out from the "oard. This is where visual steerin$ starts. The athlete should increase arm cadence and accelerate throu$h the "oard. Try and put your foot 4ust "ehind the "oard - not on it - and you will "e on the "oard.

Triple Jump Technique Tim Cawley - Colorado State University Timothy.cawley@colostate.edu Ta!eoff 5 See 6i$ure 1 o ,enultimate o Technically# yes 5 there is a second to last step. 7ut the athlete does not lower the hips. 8eed to conserve hori9ontal momentum throu$hout the 4ump.

Ta!e :ff Step The last step should "e the same len$th# if not sli$htly shorter than the steps leadin$ up to it. The ta!eoff should land dorsi-fle2ed and flat footed.

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The ta!eoff is a pushin$ action. s the athlete0s foot leaves the $round# the ta!eoff le$ should "e in full or triple e2tension ;aintain speed into the 4ump. 'un throu$h# or off# the "oard. <rive =nee The free le$# or swin$ le$# at ta!eoff should swin$ into a $ood drive !nee position. s the athlete leaves the $round# the drive !nee should "e parallel to the $round and perpendicular to the upper "ody. The drive !nee should not "e hi$her than parallel to the $round. The foot should "e under the !nee in a dorsi-fle2ed position.

t the moment of ta!eoff# there should "e $ood !nee separation# creatin$ a $ood stretch refle2.

Ta!eoff&6irst ,hase - rms o o o The arms at ta!eoff should ideally "e a sin$le arm punchin$ action. This will !eep more of a runnin$ motion throu$h the "oard# helpin$ maintain speed into the 4ump. dou"le arm action can wor!# "ut the athlete must focus on not deceleratin$ in order to achieve the arm action. Sin$le# <ou"le# <ou"le ;odel The arm that was driven "ac! at the ta!eoff will stay "ac! and the arm that was punched forward will swin$ "ac! in the same position as the other arm. 8ow the arms are ready for a dou"le arm action for the second phase. Creates a sin$le# dou"le# dou"le# arm action throu$hout the 4ump.

Triple Jump Technique Tim Cawley - Colorado State University Timothy.cawley@colostate.edu o Sin$le# Sin$le# Sin$le ;odel

The arm that was driven "ac! at the ta!eoff will swin$ out and around to the front stretched out. ;eanwhile# the arm that was punched out in front at ta!eoff will now swin$ "ac! "ehind the athlete - ready to punch a$ain.

6irst ,hase 5 See 6i$ure 1 o ir ;echanics s the athlete leaves the $round# the free le$ drops down and swin$s "ac!# fully e2tendin$ the hip with a sli$ht "end in the !nee. This creates a stretch refle2. t the same time and in opposition# the ta!eoff le$ swin$s into a $ood drive !nee position. The stretch refle2 position created at ta!eoff should help this action. :n the way "ac! down. s the athlete is comin$ "ac! towards the $round# the ta!eoff le$ that is in a $ood drive !nee position will now e2tend out# castin$ the foot out in front of the !nee. The foot must "e dorsi-fle2ed. $ood coachin$ cue is to >show the spi!e plate?. This will naturally cause a sweepin$-li!e motion to the $round. The athlete will land flat footed with the foot sli$htly in front of the hips. There should "e minimal "end in the le$.

The free le$ will "e "ehind the athlete# prepared to swin$ into a $ood drive !nee in the second phase. @ips are in a neutral position. s the athlete comes to the $round there will "e a quic! firin$ action of the arms.

Second ,hase 5 See 6i$ure ( o Around ;echanics 1hen the foot is stri!in$ the $round# the hands pass the hips# and the free le$0s !nee will "e passin$ the ta!eoff le$0s !nee 5 re$ardless of sin$le or dou"le arm action. The second phase is a pushin$ action. :nce a$ain as the ta!eoff foot is leavin$ the $round# the ta!eoff le$ should reach full# or triple# e2tension. The free le$ should swin$ into a $ood drive !nee position as the athlete leaves the $round# creatin$ $ood separation of the !nees. rm ction

Triple Jump Technique Tim Cawley - Colorado State University

Timothy.cawley@colostate.edu 6or dou"le arm action# the arms fire throu$h to$ether .thum"s up/# hands passin$ throu$h ti$ht to the hips# and hittin$ a "loc!in$ position in front of the athlete - endin$ at a hei$ht 4ust under their chin. @ands should never "e hi$her than the shoulders. 6or sin$le arm action# the arms will "e in fire in opposite directions of each other and of the correspondin$ le$. @ands will pass throu$h ti$ht to the hips# hittin$ a "loc!in$ position in front of the athlete - endin$ at a hei$ht 4ust under their chin. @ands should never "e hi$her than the shoulders. 1hether dou"le or sin$le arm action is "ein$ used# the hands should never "e hi$her than the shoulders until preparin$ for landin$. o ir ;echanics :nce the athlete is in the air# there should not "e a lot of movement until stri!in$ the $round a$ain to "e$in the third phase. Some refer to this phase and the lac! of movement as the statue phase. The athlete should have $ood posture and have the head in a neutral position. :nce the athlete has left the $round# there should "e a sli$ht fle2 in the "ac! le$. Aood !nee separation must "e maintained throu$hout the phase. 6or dou"le arm 4umpers# while the le$s are remainin$ relatively still# the arms will drop out and away from the "ody and the "ac!. @ands will "e "elow shoulder hei$ht with the thum"s pointin$ down. 6or sin$le arm 4umpers# the arms will remain in $ood separation 4ust li!e their le$s. :n the way "ac! down. s the athlete is comin$ "ac! towards the $round# the free le$ that is in a $ood drive !nee position will now e2tend out# castin$ the foot out in front of the !nee. The foot must "e dorsi-fle2ed. $ood coachin$ cue is to >show the spi!e plate?. This will naturally cause a sweepin$-li!e motion to the $round. The athlete will land flat footed with the foot sli$htly in front of the hips. There should "e minimal "end in the le$.

The ta!eoff le$ will "e "ehind the athlete# prepared to swin$ into a $ood drive !nee in the third phase. @ips are in a neutral position. s the athlete comes to the $round there will "e a quic! firin$ action of the arms.

Third ,hase 5 See 6i$ure * o Around ;echanics 1hen the foot is stri!in$ the $round# the hands pass the hips# and the free le$0s !nee will "e passin$ the ta!eoff le$0s !nee 5 re$ardless of sin$le or dou"le arm action.

Triple Jump Technique Tim Cawley - Colorado State University Timothy.cawley@colostate.edu The second phase is a pushin$ action. 8ote that the ta!eoff le$ and free le$ switch in this phase. The third phase is a pushin$ action.

:nce a$ain as the foot is leavin$ the $round# the ta!eoff le$ should "e at full or triple e2tension. The free le$ should swin$ into a $ood drive !nee position as the athlete leaves the $round# creatin$ $ood separation of the !nees. rm ction o 6or dou"le arm action# the arms fire throu$h to$ether .thum"s up/# hands passin$ throu$h ti$ht to the hips# and hittin$ a "loc!in$ position in front of the athlete - endin$ at a hei$ht 4ust under their chin. @ands should never "e hi$her than the shoulders. 6or sin$le arm action# the arms will "e in fire in opposite directions of each other and of the correspondin$ le$. @ands will pass throu$h ti$ht to the hips# hittin$ a "loc!in$ position in front of the athlete - endin$ at a hei$ht 4ust under their chin. @ands should never "e hi$her than the shoulders.

ir ;echanics 'e$ardless of dou"le or sin$le arm action# after the arms hit the "loc!in$ position# the arms will meet e2tended up a"ove the head. :nce the athlete has achieved full or triple e2tension# the athlete must "rin$ the ta!eoff le$ up to meet with the free le$# which is still in a drive !nee position. It should loo! li!e the athlete is in a seated position in the air 5 li!e sittin$ in a chair. This seated position with "oth arms stretched a"ove the head should "e held until the athlete approaches the sand.

The -andin$ 5 See 6i$ure * o The athlete will stretch the le$s out in front of them# while at the same time also reach the hands out in front of them. The hands will pass "y the feet and run up the outside of the le$s until the hands come to rest at the small of the "ac!. 1e call this >,uttin$ on the ,ants?. t this time# the "ac! of the heels should "e hittin$ the sand first. The le$s should collapse and the "utt should land sli$htly off to one of the sides of the feet in the sand. The head should remain in a neutral position.

Tempo & 'hythm

Triple Jump Technique Tim Cawley - Colorado State University Timothy.cawley@colostate.edu o s technical as the triple 4ump can "e# it is all a"out rhythm or the tempo of the 4ump. o

To optimi9e the phases# one must understand and feel the rhythm of the 4ump# which only comes with practice. Some athletes pic! this up quic!ly and others will never feel or understand the rhythm. The hardest part that athletes have with the rhythm of the triple 4ump is transitionin$ from the hi$h cadence turnover of the approach to the slow patience of the 4ump. Sometimes as the athlete fi$ures out the rhythm# the technique "ecomes a "yproduct. <on0t $et cau$ht up in all the details# watch the system as a whole. The easiest way to do this is to watch the rhythm of the 4ump. If there is a part of the 4ump that does not seem to have the correct rhythm# that is often where you will find a pro"lem and what you mi$ht need to wor! on. 1atch the hips.

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Jump Trainin$ o o lways @i$h intensity. Dolume of Jumps o Dery dependent on the individual and trainin$ a$e. %arly season+ hi$her volume. -ate season+ lower volume.

6requency of Jumps 6or some athletes# the meets themselves are the only practice they do for the 4umps. In season# I practice 4umps once a wee! to not at all.

Speed Trainin$ o o o lways @i$h intensity. B)-E( hours of recovery "efore hittin$ the ener$y system a$ain. Fou must act li!e a sprint coach when coachin$ the 4umps. o <evelop proper sprint mechanics. %mphasi9e speed.

cceleration vs. Top Speed

Triple Jump Technique Tim Cawley - Colorado State University

Timothy.cawley@colostate.edu cceleration is how much you can chan$e your speed. Fou must accelerate at ta!eoff in the lon$ 4ump. Top speed is the ma2imum speed you are capa"le of achievin$. If an athlete hits their top speed "efore they reach the ta!eoff "oard# they will not "e acceleratin$ off the "oard# and may even "e slowin$ down at ta!eoff.

cceleration# Top Speed# 'un-Throu$hs ,re-Season 6ocus on acceleration. I li!e to wor! on parts of the run-throu$hs. %arly Season 6ocus on acceleration and top speed. ,ut it all to$ether and practice the whole run-throu$h. -ate Season 6ocus on top speed. I almost always do speed wor! or run-throu$hs two days out from competition.

1arm-Up for Competition o o o o lways wa!e up at least four hours "efore competition. 8o static stretchin$ within two hours of competition. <ynamic warm-up. <o at least two full approach run-throu$hs with pop-offs. The pop-off provides feed"ac! to the coach as to which step is the athlete0s ta!eoff# where it is occurrin$# etc. <o at least two short approach 4umps. o ;a!e the last couple of short approach 4umps a little lon$er to ma!e it feel li!e the real thin$. 8ever do full approach 4umps in warm-up.

<o some full "oundin$ in the warm-up.

=ISS and %n4oy o ;y coachin$ philosophy.

Triple Jump Technique Tim Cawley - Colorado State University Timothy.cawley@colostate.edu o =eep It Simple StupidG o nd en4oy the processG

There is a $ood deal of technique in the triple 4ump and all !inds of thin$s to loo! for in a 4ump# "ut don0t overwhelm your athlete or yourself. 6ind three thin$s at most that your athlete needs to wor! on or do to $et "etter# and !eep those as the theme of the year. :ne step at a time# en4oy the process and the outcome should come.

Figure 1 Takeoff & First Phase

Figure 2 Second Phase

Figure 3 Third Phase & Landing