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CLAREMONT AND LA VERNE MOVE ONE STEP CLOSER TO WATER DEAL/PAGE 4
Friday, March 7, 2014 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

THREE CHEERS FOR

SEUSS

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Kindergarten and pre-school students are delighted by Jory Rickman’s reading of “The Cat in the Hat” on Monday as part of the national Read Across America event at Mountain View Elementary School. Students were treated to a reading fair held on the school’s playground that included games and prizes aimed at encouraging reading . / PAGE 14

Climate change walkers

get warm welcome/PAGE 5

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff

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CHS grabs the win in season opener/PAGE 16

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger

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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 9

LETTERS/ PAGE 2 AND 7 CALENDAR/ PAGE 18

So much to do. So much to see. Visit our website: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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Safe passage on Towne
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

READERS’ COMMENTS
Not a small undertaking by any measure, but one that would make passage to Sumner, Griffith Park and other areas north and south of the freeway much safer to navigate for our children and families on foot and bicycles than the current mess on Towne Avenue. And, specifically, the four intersections created by the 210. I am not sure if this was ever discussed during pre-freeway planning or if it was simply overlooked. It certainly should have been considered during the construction of the freeway. Regardless, now is the perfect opportunity to pass all or a portion of the costs to the developers who are profiting from the very people who will directly benefit from such an improvement. They certainly have the means to pay for it. The landscape of Base Line between Towne and Monte Vista is going to change drastically. This controversial topic is, in itself, a discussion for another day but, we should be sure that we address the safety of the residents who will want to travel to the park, school and friends’ homes in different neighborhoods of Claremont.
Campbell Wright Claremont

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
The city of trees blossoming jacarandas, sycamores, tall pines.
—Nancy Arce Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

[Editor’s note: The following letter was addressed to the Claremont City Council and City Manage Tony Ramos with a copy forwarded for publication. —KD]

Editor Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Sports Reporter
Alex Forbess sports@claremont-courier.com

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Dear Editor: With the recent onslaught of highdensity housing on Base Line Road being approved, it seems the perfect opportunity to address safe passage traveling north and south on Towne Avenue. My oldest son, who is now in college, attended Sumner Elementary School in fifth and sixth grades. He would sometimes ride his bike to school down the Thompson Creek Trail. This was after the 210 freeway opened to the 15 freeway. After several near death incidents at the on- and off-ramps of the 210, we decided it best for him to discontinue his bike riding to school. The truth is, people entering and exiting the freeway are not as in tune to pedestrians and bike traffic as they are exiting or entering the freeway and getting on to their next destination. This brings me to the reason for my letter. It seems that one of the requirements the city should impose on the builders of these new properties is to further the Thompson Creek Trail across Base Line and under the 210 freeway.

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Monday, March 10 Foothill Boulevard Neighborhood Meeting City Hall, Citrus Room, 7 p.m. Planning Commission Special Meeting Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 11 City Council Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 12 Architectural Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m.

READERS’ COMMENTS/page 7

Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Back Page Sammy
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Production
Ad Design Jenelle Rensch Page Layout Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch Website Peter Weinberger

Advertising
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K C A L B HITE W urier

(And Read All Over!)
Extra! Extra! Read all about it: Put on your snazzy black or white attire for an evening at The Depot for the COURIER’s first-ever Claremont Community Foundation Party Parade event.
Guests will be treated to beer from Dale Bros brewery, wine courtesy of Packinghouse Wine Merchants and an array of hors d’oeuvres from Claremont favorites Eureka Burger, Euro Café and Viva Madrid. Come mingle with the press off-the-record and make headlines in our fantastic photo booth. Select photos will be featured in an upcoming edition of the COURIER. It will be a night to remember, as long as no one ends up in the Police Blotter!
Hosted by The Claremont COURIER.

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Classified Editor Jessica Gustin
classified@claremont-courier.com

Friday, March 7. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. The Claremont Depot, 200 W. First St., Claremont. $40 per person. 75 guests.

Business Administration
Office Manager/ Legal Notices Vickie Rosenberg
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Visit www.claremontfoundation.org/news/party-parade to register for this and other events.

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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2014 Claremont Courier

one hundred and sixth year, number 9

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Claremont Lock and Key manager Marty Moreno works with a customer on Wednesday at the Village area business. Mr. Moreno will be speaking at the next Claremont Chamber of Commerce breakfast about steps business owners can take to secure their shops.

City remains active addressing Claremont crime issues

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rime in Claremont is at a 34-year low. A total of 936 assaults, thefts and related Part I crimes—violent crimes against persons and those against property—were recorded in 2013. Last year’s rate, representing a one percent decrease from that reported in 2012, is the fourth lowest recorded in ClareCRIME mont in more than three decades, according to the city’s annual crime report recently submitted by the Claremont Police Department. It was pleasant news for many Claremont folks, who have been fighting a surge of neighborhood crime in recent months, particularly residential burglary. In fact, residential break-in rates decreased by two percent this past year, from 163 in 2012 to 159 in 2013, according to Claremont Captain Jon Traber. Commercial crime rates are a different story. As residential crime rates decreased, commercial burglary rose by more than 89 percent, Capt. Traber relayed. An estimated 121 commercial burglaries were reported in 2013 as compared to 64 in 2012. By May 2013, the reported commercial burglaries for the year had exceeded all of the commercial burglaries reported in 2012, the police captain added. The Claremont Police Department attributes the swell in commercial crime to a couple of burglary rings that were targeting Foothill communities last spring. Following some key arrests, however, commercial crime rates dropped from an average of 14 incidents in a month to about seven. The work is far from over. Police continue to collaborate with the Claremont Chamber and local business owners to ensure the city’s business districts remain safe. “Ultimately it’s just trying to keep people aware and cognizant of what going on,” said Claremont Lieutenant Mike Ciszek.   In partnership with the area’s first responders, the Chamber continues with its business crime alert email system, notifying shop owners whenever criminal activity takes place within the city’s marketplaces. The

alert system remains the Chamber’s most popular correspondence, according to the Chamber’s Chief Executive Officer Maureen Aldridge. She attributes the success to Claremont PD’s enthusiastic partnership. “It’s really great that our police department is willing to share information and allow us to get it out to our members,” Ms. Aldridge shared.   In addition to the business crime alert system, the Chamber has set up a “Business Watch” group similar to that of neighborhood watches. With stickers to place in front windows and brochures to hand out to customers, shop owners are equipped with an additional resource to keep crime at bay. Business owners are also playing their part. Last April, more than 50 local proprietors gathered at the Claremont Chamber to take matters into their own hands. An educational forum with Claremont police advised business owners with the tools they needed to prevent crime. These include installing a proper alarm system—with the police department as the first pointof-contact when the alarm is activated—increasing the lighting at businesses, especially after hours, and refraining from obscuring the view in glass storefronts. Commercial burglaries are not yet a thing of the past, though only two have been reported recorded so far in 2014, according to Lt. Ciszek. Business owners continue to take steps to keep crime out of Claremont’s business centers. Claremont Lock & Key is not just known for its expertise in supplying local establishments with highquality security features. Marty Moreno, the store manager, notes the business has taken extra steps to secure their own safety amidst the increased crime. In addition to the shop’s security system, the local locksmith has lined the glass of his storefront with a security film to further deter burglars. The film won’t stop the window from breaking, but will keep it from shattering, he says. Mr. Moreno and other shop owners have taken to the Business Watch program, pleased to play their

part in keeping Claremont’s business community safe. “The police can’t be everywhere. It’s important the community does their part,” Mr. Moreno said. Mr. Moreno and the crew from Claremont Lock & Key will be giving a presentation on their company and security measures at the upcoming Chamber breakfast, taking place this Tuesday, March 11 from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton hotel in Claremont, located at 555 W. Foothill Blvd. The cost is $15 for Chamber members ($17 at the door) or $20 for potential members by reservation only. RSVP by today, March 7, by calling (909) 624-1681 or e-mail marlene@claremontchamber.org.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Spring forward this Sunday
It’s that time of year again. Daylight Savings Time begins this Sunday, March 9. Don’t forget to set your clocks forward an hour before going to sleep and enjoy the extra hour of sunlight at the end of your day.

Moderate-income housing applications being accepted
Taylor Morrison of California, LLC, developer of the Citrus Glen at Pitzer Ranch housing development at Base Line Road and Monte Vista Avenue, is now accepting prescreening applications for two of the project’s seven affordable housing units. These spaces are available to moderate income households. Interested persons may contact Taylor Morrison’s sales team for Citrus Glen to start the prescreening process. Contact: Sales Team for Citrus Glen at Pitzer Ranch, attention Denise Phillips or John Laughlin, at 924 E. Base Line Rd., Claremont, CA, or reach them by phone at (909) 3664110.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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CUSD gives Brandywine extension to develop new plans

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he Claremont Unified School District has extended the deadline for the final sale of a vacant lot at 2475 N. Forbes Ave., a 9.7-acre parcel once home to the now-defunct La Puerta Intermediate School.

The school district awarded the surplus property to Brandywine Homes of Irvine, California, who bid $18,875,000 in December with the hopes of developing a 59-unit luxury home complex at the site. CUSD and Brandywine have since entered a period of due diligence, during which the developer may choose to pull out of the deal with the district if it is determined financially unfeasible. Though the contract was set to end on February 27, CUSD heeded Brandywine executives’ request for an extension, says Lisa Shoemaker, CUSD’s superintendent of business

services. The new deadline is Friday, March 28. “We extended the due diligence period so [Brandywine] could revise their plan and take it back to the city,” Ms. Shoemaker said. As of Wednesday, director of community development Brian Desatnik confirmed he had yet to see the real estate company’s new plans. He did note, however, that another preliminary review of Brandywine’s concept is tentatively set for the March 18 Planning Commission meeting. Brandywine’s early development plans—brought forward for a preliminary review at a packed planning commission meeting last month—include 59 twostory homes, ranging from 3550 to 4000 square feet each on 6000- to 7000-square-foot lots. Residents at the meeting were supportive of building on the vacant land, but overwhelmingly opposed to the developer’s plan. More than a dozen residents spoke out against the development because it proposed building homes

much larger than those currently in the North Forbes neighborhood. The adjacent neighborhood, comprised of mostly one-story homes, is zoned as residential with singlefamily homes that are required to be situated on a minimum 13,000 square-feet lot. The developer would need to proceed with a zone change should those plans persist. The lot is currently zoned public and does not allow for residential development. While Brandywine executives remain unresponsive to requests for comment, Ms. Shoemaker noted the developer is revisiting their plans in an attempt to make things work. “[The developers] are crunching the numbers again to see if they can incorporate the concerns expressed by the community and see whether or not they can bring that project to fruition,” she said in an interview earlier this month.   —Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont takes next steps in seeking water operations partner

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he La Verne City Council voted unanimously on Monday night to move forward with a study analyzing the feasibility of potentially becoming Claremont’s new water system operator. La Verne’s decision comes a week after the Claremont council’s approval of the study. All local council members voted in favor of the inspection with the exception of Councilmember Corey Calaycay, who abstained because he is already a paying customer of the La Verne utility. While the agreement begins the next step in the water system acquisition process, there is still a long road ahead before any new operator is selected. Golden State Water Company, Claremont’s current operator, maintains its intent to continue running the water system. Claremont officials have made it clear they will not give up the fight, even if it means obtaining the water system through eminent domain proceedings. There also remains a lot of work to be done in finding a suitable replacement should the city inherit the system. The approved feasibility study does not commit La Verne as the water system operator should Claremont obtain its system from Golden State, insists City Manager Bob Russi. “It just outlines the parameters to allow us to do the

analysis we need to consider if we can operate this system should Claremont acquire it,” Mr. Russi said. A report released by Claremont administration last month notes the city’s acquisition team is still reviewing the possibility of other local public water suppliers who may be interested and able to serve as the operator of the Claremont system. These prospects include the cities of Upland and Pomona, the Monte Vista Water District or even another private third-party operator. The agreement dictates that Claremont officials will not be able to use the approved feasibility study being conducted by the city of La Verne’s Public Works Department to negotiate with another possible operator. Further, should Claremont decide not to operate its water system in conjunction with La Verne, the city’s costs will be reimbursed. Until then, each city will be in charge of its own costs involved in the study.    The feasibility study is being conducted by La Verne’s Public Works Department, led by Director Dan Keesey, and is estimated to be completed in the next three to six months, according to Mr. Russi. “It really depends on the coordination. We still need to meet with Claremont staff and outside consultants. There is a lot involved,” he said.

The Claremont City Council will hold a public hearing on potential water system operators on Tuesday, March 25 at 6:30 p.m. The meeting has been moved to Taylor Hall, 1774 N. Indian Hill Blvd., to allow for a larger attendance. As the city moves forward with acquisition efforts, officials continue to fight a lawsuit filed by Golden State Water Company. The water company filed the suit last November, alleging the city has not complied with the California Public Records act, which declares all public records in the state of California to be open and available to anyone. Last week, the Claremont City Council approved the use of $150,000 of the city’s unassigned General Fund money for its defense against Golden State Water. In a statement last week, City Attorney Sonia Carvalho maintained Claremont officials have the right to refuse disclosure because of claimed attorney-client and work product privileges, and for allowed exemptions in the California Public Records Act.   “I see no other alternative in this situation unless the city were willing to completely jeopardize its position in this acquisition,” she said.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Stolen credit card leads police to gold mine over the weekend
On Saturday afternoon, police responded to the DoubleTree Hotel, 555 W. Foothill Blvd., where a man had used a stolen credit card to pay for his stay and more than $300 in room service. Christian Gutierrez, a 36-year-old transient, was contacted and found in possession of at least 100 Social Security , driver’s license and credit card numbers, according to Claremont Lieutenant Shelly Vander Veen. Police say Mr. Gutierrez was also in possession of methamphetamine. He was arrested for identity theft, drug possession and an outstanding warrant. Police made their way to another room at the hotel, paid for using the same stolen credit card. There, officers found two more subjects in possession of stolen checks and driver’s licenses, card readers and at least 50 stolen credit card numbers. Methamphetamine and heroin were allegedly also found in the room. James Pinto, a 26-year-old transient, and Colin

POLICE BLOTTER
Nash, a 32-year-old West Covina resident, were also arrested for identity theft and drug possession. An arraignment was held Tuesday. Thursday, February 27 Problems persisted for residents in the 700 block of Lancaster Circle last week as three homes were targeted in evening burglaries. All took place between 7:15 p.m. and midnight. In two of the incidents, burglars entered the home by prying open the front door. In the other, a glass windowpane was broken in the door. More than $2500 in electronics, wallets and cash was taken from one of the houses. Nothing was reported missing in the other. In the final case, the resident was home when burglars forced their way in. She screamed and the crooks fled, according to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek. Police were unable to locate them. A report was taken. Saturday, March 1 A little too much imbibing led two Claremont visitors into unsuccessful and accidental attempts at breaking-and-entering early Saturday morning. At 1:30 a.m. Justin Bean, a 33-year-old Rancho Cucamonga resident, attempted to hitch a ride with a complete stranger, allegedly trying to open the car door while the vehicle was stopped at a red light at Indian Hill Boulevard and First Street. Down the road, Brandon Wulf, a 35-year-old Montclair resident, was knocking incessantly at the back door of an unknown apartment in the 600 block of South Indian Hill Boulevard. Both men were arrested for public intoxication. Tuesday, March 4 Less than three weeks after an El Roble student was struck by a car on her way to school, police responded to yet another similar incident at the local intermediate school. A student informed

school officials she was hit by a woman driving a white SUV while walking across Harrison Avenue. Though the girl said she was not injured, she was transported to the hospital and her parents were notified. The driver of the vehicle has not come forward. **** A robber remains at large after stealing an undisclosed amount of cash following the Tuesday dinner rush at a local eatery. Around 8:10 p.m., the man entered World Famous Grill, located at 806 S. Indian Hill Blvd., and demanded the cashier give him money. The robber claimed he had a gun. The cashier gave him the cash and the man took off. The crook is described as a Hispanic male in his late 20s, about six feet tall with a thin build. Police arrested a man shortly after the incident. It was later determined he was not the suspect and he was released. Any information on this crime should be reported to the Claremont Police Department at (909) 399-5411.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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Claremonters provide respite, respect to activists

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he city of Claremont was a welcome stop for weary travelers on Tuesday. Locals gathered at Larkin Park in the afternoon sun to greet a pack of protesters undertaking a 3,000-mile journey on foot from Los Angeles to Washington, DC, all part of the Great March for Climate Action.

The trek kicked off last Saturday from Wilmington, California, just outside of Los Angeles, where an estimated 1500 gathered to call attention to the effects of the climate crisis. The torrential downpour did little to dampen spirits as around 50 marchers began the first leg of their crosscountry caravan in the name of political reform. “Historically, marches have helped create a shift in consciousness,” said Shari Hrdina, administrative director of the march. “The Women’s Suffrage March, Martin Luther King’s Civil Rights Movement and Gandhi’s Salt March are all great examples. The purpose of our march is to help bring attention to the issue and change people’s consciousness so action can happen quicker.” Thousands are expected to join in the cause by journey’s end, tentatively set for November 1, 2014. The now-sweeping movement started from humble beginnings. The idea was first sparked by former Iowa Senator Ed Fallon, a progressive talk radio show host and an area coordinator for the Great Peace March for Global Nuclear Disarmament. Held in 1986, the Great Peace March was a similar effort to the Great March for Climate Change, seeking to bring attention to the dangers of nuclear weaponry and advocate for its eradication. The experience was eye-opening for some. For Mr. Fallon, it was transformative. “It inspired me to see people of all backgrounds and economic levels so excited about what we were doing,” he said. The state of global warming inspired Mr. Fallon into action once more. Plans for another Great March began in February, and while the road to the kick-off was long and tedious, the idea of a peaceful protest has latched on with activists across the nation. Lala Palazzolo, a Michigan native who is also a veteran of the Great Peace March, is one of many who have taken to the concept. A recent “empty

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Climate change marchers John Abbe and Ethan Phillips, center, share an evening meal with Pilgrim Place residents John Forney, left, Jim Dwyer and Vern Vissick on Tuesday at Mr. Forney’s residence. The marchers stayed the night in Claremont on their way walking across the country to raise awareness about the issue of climate change.

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger Climate marchers head north on Mountain Avenue just before ending their day at Larkin Park in Claremont on Tuesday.

nester,” Ms. Palazzolo said she felt compelled to put her protest prowess back to work, and was in turn inspired by Mr. Fallon’s cause.   “I’m done sitting back at home being passive,” she said. “I want to give back to the bigger picture. Apathy is worth rebelling against.” Ms. Palazzolo and fellow marchers

were prepared to do just that, spending the next 243 days braving the elements in their crusade to Capitol Hill. The weather, however, isn’t the only obstacle they’re facing. Every day presents a new challenge as event organizers search for shelter and other accommodations along the way. While showers are scarce and some days participants have nothing but tents

and open land after a long day’s travel, Ken Snyder, a walker from Long Island, New York, says he has been moved by the outpouring of support from community groups and local churches. In their usual way, Claremont volunteers stepped up to the plate to provide the travelers a little respite from the burden of the road. After two nights of camping and several days without a shower, protesters had the opportunity to stay in the comforts of home Tuesday night before hitting the road for Rialto on Thursday. The campaign is far from over and many more uncertainties lie ahead, but marchers walk into the unknown with open arms. They hope others will remain equally open to their conversation promoting environmental justice, sustainability and nonviolent action.   “This [march] is an impetus for change,” Ms. Palazzolo said. For more on the Great March for Climate Change or to track the walkers’ progress, visit climatechange.org or check out the Facebook page.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Scripps ceramics exhibit highlights nationally-recognized curators

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he Scripps Ceramic Annual, on view through April 6, is celebrating its 70th anniversary this year. It is the longest-running exhibition of contemporary ceramics in the nation. Scripps is paying homage to the show’s storied history by highlighting 60 works from 20 artists who have served as curators for the Annual, from the show’s earliest days in World War II to the present. The first group of curators includes Scripps professors of ceramics who organized many years of exhibitions, including William Manker (1945 to 1946),

Richard Petterson (1947 to 1958), Paul Soldner (1951 to 1991) and Nobuho Nagasawa (1992 to 1995). In 1996, the Williamson Gallery director began inviting guest curators from outside Scripps. Artist curators are selected on the strength of their proposals, and how their ideas advance a different theme or concept. Guest curators included in this year’s Annual include Kris Cox, Douglas Humble, Cindy Kolodziejski, Kathleen Royster Lamb, David Furman, Adrian Saxe, Nancy Selvin, Karen Koblitz, Tony Marsh, Steven Portigal, Tony Hepburn, Phyllis Green, Adam Davis, Wayne Higby, Tim Berg and Virginia Scotchie.

The selection is national in scope, including artists from California, Colorado, Illinois, New York, South Carolina, Texas and Utah. Many of these artists are also educators who built or led major programs in ceramics, such as Adrian Saxe at UCLA, Karen Koblitz at USC, Tony Marsh at Cal State Long Beach, Tony Hepburn at Cranbrook, and Wayne Higby at Alfred. Admission to the Scripps Ceramics Annual is free. The gallery is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m., during exhibitions. For more information, call (909) 607-3397.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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Claremont close to, far from the world
By John Pixley

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ever mind having my own private airplane. This was like having my own private airport.

It was 8 o’clock on a recent Friday morning, and I was flying to Portland, Oregon with a companion for the weekend. Being dropped off at Ontario International Airport was exciting—I don’t fly much and love getting to do so. It was also weird. This is an international airport? A ghost town was more like it. Okay, it wasn’t a ghost town, but it was certainly quiet. There were cars, but I wouldn’t say there was any traffic, and the curb looked like it was begging to be used. Apparently, we were the only ones getting dropped off. Like I said, it was like having my own private airport. Inside, there were people getting tickets and checking baggage, but there were no lines at the counters. Going through security was a breeze, or as much of a breeze as going through security can be, and the large halls were all the larger with a few people scattered here and there. It was a surprise when the plane turned out not to be my own but own but full—where did all these people could from?—although it was a pretty small plane. This was weird, but it really wasn’t. Apparently, Ontario International Airport is now like this much of the time. I have been seeing reports in the last two years or two that the airport is struggling. Or, more correctly, the airport is in the middle of a struggle. For some years, the city of Ontario has been saying that the Los Angeles International Airport Association (LAIAA), which runs the airport in Ontario along with others including Los Angeles International Airport, has been ignoring the Ontario airport, letting it languish, in favor of LAX. Ontario has been trying to take over the local airport’s operation, saying it can do a better job

observer
and also eyeing the revenue it can raise for the city, but the LAIAA refuses to let it. So there’s a stand-off here, and the loser is clearly this all-but-empty airport. As nice as an uncrowded, if not private, airport is— certainly better than when I flew out of LAX several years ago—it would be a real shame if the Ontario airport ended up being shut down. And not just because I have sweet memories of going there as a child to pick up visiting relatives. (This was when there was only the ticket counters, waiting rooms and baggage claim, all in a row, before there were those great long halls with practically a city of shops, restaurant and cafes, long before the post-9/11 screening, and when passengers walked on the tarmac and used those airplane stairs and loved ones could join them right up to the tarmac.) At the very least, getting to the Ontario airport is so much easier than getting to LAX. For as long as I can remember, I have heard people sigh, grumble, groan when saying that they are taking someone to or picking someone up at LAX. Indeed, whether someone in Claremont will give a ride to or from LAX may well be the ultimate test of friendship. LAX may be the bane of our existence out here in Claremont—how could it be possible that no one is using the Ontario airport?—but the reality is that going to and from anywhere in LA is a crapshoot. Sometimes LA is just so far away. Like on a recent Saturday night. I had seen a play at the Odyssey Theater in LA, it was after 11 and getting back home suddenly seemed like a huge ordeal. It didn’t help that the

on-ramp to the 405 was closed—no, it wasn’t the “Jamzilla” weekend—and that there was suddenly a bank of very dense fog. I told my friend it would be nice to have an apartment out there where I could crash. Once we finally got on the 10, after ending up on the 405 south of the 10 and having to get off and get back on heading north, it wasn’t bad. Still, I found myself saying, “This is when I hate being in Claremont.” I told myself a number of years ago that I would stay in Claremont with it being easy or at least not too hard to get to LA. (The Metrolink train and the 210 freeway extension helped in this decision.) At times like this, it feels like the deal is being broken. Sometimes, it’s just late by the time I start heading out of LA, especially the west side, and I wish I could go right to bed—I’m not 25 anymore—rather than have to take the trip home. Sometimes, there is traffic on the way home at 10:30 on a Saturday night or going to LA at 7 p.m. on a Saturday or at 2 p.m on a Sunday. The fact is that “the 5 o’clock traffic” doesn’t mean anything anymore. (It sounds quaint, doesn’t it?) There is, or can be, traffic anytime, anywhere. It is frustrating having to leave my house by 6:30 for an 8 p.m. show in LA, knowing that I might get there at 7:15 but also that if I leave at 7, I may well get stuck in traffic and be late. (Having GPS with a traffic feature helps.) All the more frustrating is knowing that I was recently able to get home one evening from the Mark Taper Forum in half an hour. Perhaps this isn’t the best—not with this griping now and then, not to mention wondering about the handy local airport—but it’s certainly the better part of both worlds. Or perhaps of all worlds. Especially when, also in recent weeks, I’ve been able to see Avenue Q performed at the high school (the intrepid Krista Elhai and her brave crew strikes again!) and a Leonard Pronko-directed production of Moliere’s Tartuffe at the colleges here.
CLAREMONT HERITAGE/page 12

Have you noticed more American men are growing beards?

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

7

Conservation

Dear Editor: I find it interesting that articles and conversations surrounding conservation only seem to come up when there is a drought. I must admit that I am guilty of this as well. As our family has been discussing what we need to do to conserve, I am reminded of my parents’ efforts in this regard. My parents, who passed away nine and four years ago, respectively, at the ages of 90 and 91, practiced conservation until their dying days. They turned off lights whenever they left a room until they needed a bit more for failing vision. When they showered, they turned off the water while they soaped and turned it back on to rinse. When they brushed their teeth, they wet their toothbrushes, turned off the water while they brushed and then turned it back on to rinse. They did this every day, drought or no drought. Simple actions? Yes, but every little bit helps.
Cynthia Cervantes McGuire Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS
United, which allowed political operatives like Karl Rove, on the right, and Bill Burton, on the left, to raise and spend unlimited amounts of secret money in candidate elections. By stopping 501(c)(4) organizations from spending on “candidate-related political activity,” the IRS can stop the abuse in its tracks. For 94 years, the league has played a unique role in our elections by providing truly nonpartisan voter services and information to voters across the country. Unfortunately, the IRS proposal as it stands would jeopardize our work because it does not provide any exception for truly nonpartisan voter service activities like those carried out by the league. This is a terrible mistake, both for voters and for our democracy. The League of Women Voters of the Claremont Area urges you to contact the IRS to urge the agency to work to support voter service work and stop dark money from polluting our elections.
Ellen Taylor VP for Advocacy LWV of the Claremont Area

Dirty money: Citizens United

Dear Editor: The Internal Revenue Service has proposed very significant changes in the regulations that govern what kind of political activity and how much of that activity a Section 501(c)(4) organization can carry out. This step is our best chance to rein in the secret “dark money” that has been polluting our elections since the Supreme Court’s terrible decision in Citizens United. At the same time, the current proposal would undermine the League’s ability to conduct truly nonpartisan voter service activities across the country. While the national League has commented to the IRS on this proposal, we need the help of citizens all over the USA. Reforming IRS regulations is our single best opportunity to respond to Citizens

Will the City of Trees and PhDs remain free?

Dear Editor: I have no problem with “action groups” such as Sustainable Claremont lobbying our city in regards to initiating or improving upon a public policy in regards to trees on public property. I have a huge problem, however, with the city even contemplating a policy whereby a property owner’s freedoms are further curtailed beyond present limits. I understand that we need building codes, zoning restrictions, etc. in a city for public safety. We all want Claremont to look beautiful and inviting. That is ex-

actly why I moved here 30 years ago. I do not accept, however, any further erosion of our individual rights as citizens for the “pleasure” of a few activists in the community. How I trim my trees, how I mow my grass, the flowers that I choose to plant or not plant...those rights are mine and not yours. I get to choose the clothing that I wear, the car that I drive, the foods I eat, the occupation I choose to pursue, the art that I like, the books I read, the news I watch, the church I go to, etc. You may not like the way I trim my trees and I can assure you that I don’t like your piercings, tattoos and rusty car with the Obama sticker on the back window. This concept is called “freedom” and it is exactly why so many have immigrated to the United States from other countries to help build the greatest nation in the history of this planet. “Freedom.” however. has become an endangered word in our society and if we don’t act now, it will soon become extinct. Few would argue that professionally trained arborists could do a better job of trimming trees than a homeowner or untrained tree trimmer but at what cost? What about the homeowner that can’t afford the trained arborist? Will the city supply one? Will the city pay for the trained arborist from a “tree fee” that each property owner is assessed for each tree that is on his or her property? It is “policy” like this, with good intentions, that eventually morphs itself into unintended consequences leading to poverty for many and it further necessi-

tates the further expansion of government into our private lives. Does the concept of “affordable” housing in Claremont only apply to the purchase price or should it apply to the cost of maintenance as well? I concur with Ronald Reagan when he said the most terrifying words in the English language are “I’m from the government and I’m here to help”. I urge the city and Sustainable Claremont to simply provide the public with information on the “suggested” way to trim their trees and then let the homeowner decide how they wish to proceed or if they wish to proceed. It is the God given diversity of ideas, the uniqueness of the individual and the freedom to pursue and express those differences among us that has made our society great. Let’s not interfere with God’s original plan for all people to be free or destroy the dreams of our country’s Founding Fathers. “I have a dream that one day I will live in a free City of Trees, PhDs with less fees!”
Kris M. Meyer Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS
Send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words. We cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters and viewpoints will be published at the discretion of the editor.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

8

Foothill Gold Line to Azusa is halfway complete:
by Sam Pedroza
Chair, Metro Gold Line Foothill Extension Phase II Joint Powers Authority Board of Directors; Vice Chair, Metro Gold Line Foothill Extension Construction Authority Board, and City of Claremont Council member

I

n 2010, the Foothill Gold Line to Azusa was the first Measure R rail project to break ground and has remained on time and on budget as work as progressed. The project has recently reached a major milestone—the 11.5-mile light rail project from Pasadena to Azusa is more than halfway complete.
Displays of this progress are visible throughout the five-city corridor and the excitement is building as it becomes more and more apparent that the Gold Line will soon arrive in the cities of Arcadia, Monrovia, Duarte, Irwindale and Azusa. When completed, the nearly $1 billion Measure R light rail project will include six new light rail stations with intermodal parking facilities; two dozen new and rebuilt bridge structures; 14 at-grade street crossings; 3.6 miles of shared corridor with BNSF Railway; a 24-acre, $265 million Operations Campus to house up to 84 light rail vehicles; and much more. At the halfway point, eight at-grade street crossings, 15 bridge structures, 40

percent of the Operations Campus, and 70 percent of the utility work is now complete. The majority of the freight track has been fully realigned to its new position south of the future light rail tracks, and more than half of the overhead electrical system foundations have been put in place. Just recently, the first light rail tracks were installed. While the Gold Line extension to Azusa still has a significant way to go to substantial completion, the progress already made provides the confidence that the project will be delivered on schedule and on budget. The Foothill Gold Line Construction Authority (Construction Authority), the agency overseeing the planning, design and construction for the Foothill Gold Line projects, anticipates turning the Pasadena to Azusa segment over to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) in September 2015 for testing and prerevenue service. Metro will decide when the project opens for passenger service. As we hit this important milestone for the Pasadena to Azusa segment, the construction authority is kicking-off the next phases of work for the Azusa to Montclair and Ontario Airport extensions. Detailed design work for the 12.3-mile Foothill Gold Line from Azusa to Mont-

VIEWPOINT
clair will begin later this year. The nearly two-year advanced conceptual engineering phase will bring the project’s design to a point at which it will be “shovel ready” for a design-build procurement. The Azusa to Montclair segment, which includes our station here in Claremont, as well as stations in Glendora, San Dimas, La Verne, Pomona and Montclair, was environmentally cleared early last year. Unlike the current segment, the Azusa to Montclair segment is a fully shared corridor with BNSF Railway, and partially shared with Metrolink (Pomona east to Montclair). The design needs to allow all three systems to work harmoniously within a single corridor. Light rail will not share tracks with the freight or Metrolink trains, however. Significant work will be needed to develop the design for the shared corridor, as well as each at-grade crossing, bridge structure, station and parking facility, the communication system, and much more. This segment includes three new light rail bridge structures over streets that currently do not have bridges, adding to the project’s complexity.

The nearly $1 billion needed to construct the Foothill Gold Line from Azusa to Montclair is currently being sought; however, Measure R is funding the majority of the cost associated with the upcoming design work (San Bernardino County is coming up with their proportional sum). Stay tuned to hear more about this next phase of work that will bring us closer to the Gold Line arriving in Claremont! Finally, the construction authority also intends to begin work later this year on the next required study for the Ontario Airport Extension, which will connect the line to the airport in an eight-mile final link from the Montclair TransCenter. This segment is years away from fruition, but the construction authority continues to be committed to working toward the goal of a terminus at the airport. The preferred option identified through the upcoming work will then move forward to environmental review. The construction authority is proud of our record of success with the first two segments of the Gold Line, and we look forward to continuing that success into the future as we seek construction funding for the Azusa to Montclair segment and continue planning for a final connection to Ontario Airport.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

9

Michael Heilpern
Conservationist, community-builder, jazz lover
Michael Zachary Heilpern died peacefully at his home in Claremont on February 15, 2014. He was 63 years old. He was born December 15, 1950 in the Bronx, New York. Much of his childhood was spent in the idyllic Westchester County neighborhood of Peekskill. He was the first child born to Jacob Heilpern, a certified public accountant, and Betty Wogman Heilpern, a kindergarten and special education teacher. In the fifth grade, young Michael met the love of his life, Linda Weber. His equal in all ways, their good-natured academic rivalry eventually turned to romance and they began dating at the age of 15. Inseparable from that point on, they participated in many school extracurricular activities together and ultimately both graduated from Lakeland High School with honors. Just prior to his death, Mr. Heilpern and Linda marked their 43rd wedding anniversary and celebrated 54 years of knowing one another. At a very early age, Mr. Heilpern’s parents instilled in him a love of learning and a deep appreciation for music. In addition to taking classes at the Berklee College of Music, Mr. Heilpern attended Wesleyan University, earning a bachelor’s degree in music education in 1975. Blessed with an inherent aptitude for music and a wonderful singing voice, he studied guitar, piano, harmonium, tabla and harmonica. In more recent years, he became a dedicated amateur jazz vibraphonist, receiving instruction from noted musician and composer Eldad Tarmu. Mr. Heilpern was a curious student of the world, a serious and sensitive thinker who enjoyed learning about different religions, cultures and avenues of social change. The late ‘60s and early ‘70s marked what the Heilperns would later call their “hippie years.” They studied yoga, experimented with communal living, actively campaigned for peace and eagerly explored the burgeoning whole foods movement. Mr. Heilpern also undertook a musical tour of India, playing the tabla to large crowds in many towns. Mr. Heilpern married his beloved Linda in 1971, and they celebrated the birth of their daughter Harsimran three years later. Harsimran, a Sanskrit word meaning “constant meditation on the universal music of God,” is an apt name for the daughter of a man whose life was so thoroughly steeped in music. “My dad had a profound influence on my life, inspiring me to cultivate and pursue what I found meaningful, to be kind and compassionate to others, and to live an honest and ethical life,” she related. Those who knew the couple can attest to the strong and loving bond that made them such a capable and dynamic team, whether raising their daughter, fighting for social change or working side-byside to run a small typesetting business that they began in 1979 when they first moved to California. Their dedication to a 2011 review of a gig by pianist Rique Pantoja demonstrates Mr. Heilpern’s gift for words and reverence for music. “His melodies are so lyrical and organic that I was inclined to take them for granted, like the under-appreciated virtues of a beautiful friend you have known for many years. Seduced into a dreamlike state by the apparent simplicity of his opening lines, I was surprised to find just moments later that we were flying in the musical stratosphere in a realm of great rhythmic and harmonic intensity.” In 2004, the California Jazz Arts Society (CalJAS) was three months into its first performance series—held in the Claremont Forum in the old COURIER building—when Mr. Heilpern learned about the organization. He was shocked that some of LA’s best jazz artists were performing in his backyard and that so providing high-quality service to their few people knew about it. He became a clients was always balanced by a deep tireless CalJAS booster, serving for a interest and concern for their employees’ time as director on the board and donatwell-being. ing his time and staff to develop a webFor over three decades, they have nur- site for the organization. tured and guided Highpoint Inc. through “Michael’s love for jazz was enora sea of industry changes to its current mous. He loved the freedom and creincarnation as a web consulting company ativeness of jazz, and appreciated the that serves membership organizations, artists who went well outside the norm,” public agencies and local businesses. CalJAS president Dale Boatman said. Mr. Heilpern’s ongoing commitment “Michael’s early support, promotion, efto better himself and the business led to fort and generosity on our behalf were an his enrollment at the Peter F. Drucker integral part in the development of our School of Management, where he earned organization. He will be missed by us, his master’s degree in business adminis- and the entire jazz community.” tration in 2004. Though frequently pressed for time, Around this time, Ms. Heilpern de- Mr. Heilpern, a Claremont resident since cided to step away from the business to 1995, devoted countless hours to his pursue her lifelong interest in healthy community. Mr. Heilpern had a long ascuisine and become a personal chef. sociation with the Claremont CommuWhether eagerly cultivating specialty nity Foundation (CCF), serving on the produce in their organic garden or help- board for a time and helping the noning her brainstorm recipes and promo- profit strengthen its branding. Over the tional ideas, Mr. Heilpern was his wife’s years, he and his wife also organized biggest fan and never tired of her culi- many gatherings for the organization’s nary inventions. annual Party Parade fundraiser. CCF exMr. Heilpern had a passion for forging ecutive director Nicki Cleaves said online communities, spaces where peo- working with Mr. Heilpern was a stimuple with common interests, devotion to a lating experience. shared cause or geographic proximity “Every time we achieved a goal, he could connect. He was the creator and would be pushing us to the next. He publisher of an innovative local commu- wanted us to reach our full potential,” renity website called ClaremontCalen- ports Ms. Cleaves. dar.com, which features free, A steadfast conservationist, Mr. comprehensive listings of community Heilpern made an impression on the events and local non-profit programs. He physical landscape of Claremont as well and his wife have personally sponsored as on the social landscape. He was intethis site as a labor of love so that Clare- gral in the fight to secure Johnson’s Pasmont residents can “enjoy and participate ture for the city. in the community in which they live.” Mr. Heilpern’s most recent environMr. Heilpern founded another com- mental efforts involved founding Susmunity website in 2004, LAjazz.com, tainable Claremont’s Tree Action Group which serves as a resource for jazz mu- (TAG) with the help of his wife. sicians and aficionados across southern Barnabas Path met Mr. Heilpern a litCalifornia. The site permits jazz artists tle over a year ago when they both atand club owners to list their upcoming tended a city council meeting to protest performances and emails subscribers no- the proposed removal of mature pine tifications of jazz-centric events. The site trees from the Claremont Club neighis now largely regarded as the finest on- borhood. They became fast friends and line jazz resource serving a single market soon were serving as co-chairs of TAG. in the United States. Today, the group boasts 11 members Along with serving as publisher, Mr. who are providing valuable input to a Heilpern also wrote many articles for city in the midst of updating its tree polLAjazz.com. The following excerpt from icy.

OBITUARIES

“One of Michael’s best qualities was his ability to keep this group together and grow it,” Mr. Path said. “He was able to take all these different ideas and blend them together in a way that kept our eye on the prize, which is to help the city in its efforts to manage our urban forest.” Susan Schenk, who serves on Sustainable Claremont’s board of directors, has been impressed with Mr. Heilpern’s contribution to the ongoing conversation about how to care for Claremont’s leafscape. “He was really good at framing things in a tactful manner and getting people to talk about things,” Ms. Schenk said. “He helped things go more clearly, more smoothly.” The last several months of Mr. Heilpern’s life were spent, in part, drafting a public policy document outlining a responsible strategy for the maintenance of this town’s trees. Kathleen Trepa is director of community and human services for the city of Claremont. She said that Mr. Heilpern’s input—which has included appearances at tree policy workshops as well as the submission of a thick binder with suggestions on maintaining and growing the city’s urban forest—has been valuable. “I think what [TAG members] did is they challenged us,” she said. “Michael was passionate about trees. At the same time, he was very articulate and very moderated and respectful in how he presented his opinion to city staff.” The Reverend Butch Henderson, who serves as chair of the Human Services Commission and of the city’s tree committee, said Mr. Heilpern’s contributions represent the kind of input that make the community function. “He in a way has become the conscience of our urban forest in Claremont,” Rev. Henderson said. “He had so much conviction and passion and he absolutely presented his concerns in a very gentlemanly but prophetic way.” Many were aware that Mr. Heilpern battled with the challenges of a chronic and painful autoimmune disease, but that was hardly the most memorable thing about him. Family, friends and even those who only knew him casually remember him for his generous heart and booming laugh, for his warm and outgoing nature, and for his unstoppable desire to experience and foster the truly transcendent elements of life. Mr. Heilpern is survived by his wife, Linda Heilpern, of Claremont; his brother, Slim Heilpern, and sister-in-law, Penny Hanna, of Aptos, California; and by his daughter, Harsimran “Harsi” Heilpern, and son-in-law, Ezra Parker, of Vashon, Washington. A public memorial service will be held at the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden this upcoming spring on a date still to be announced. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Tree Action Group of Sustainable Claremont or to LAjazz.com.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

10

David Scott Sanders
Professor, author, veteran, baseball fan
David Scott Sanders, emeritus professor and former chair of the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at Harvey Mudd College, died on February 23, 2014 in Carlsbad, California where he had lived for 18 years after moving from Claremont following his retirement from academic life. He was 87. The only child of David Scott Sanders and Marjorie Elizabeth Wheat, he was born June 14, 1926 in Kellogg, Idaho where his father was a mining engineer. He had strong ties to southern California from his earliest years through his mother’s family, who settled in Redlands in the 1870s. During the Great Depression, the family moved several times, spending much time in Redlands. Eventually they moved to South America where they lived principally in Cerro de Pasco, Peru, a mining center in the Andes situated at an elevation of more than 14,000 feet. At the age of 12, young David entered boarding school at Colegio Santa Rosa outside of Lima where he perfected his Spanish, which he delighted in speaking throughout his life. When he reached high school age, his parents remained in Peru and he moved to Los Angeles where he lived with family and family friends and atand earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees (1956). His first professorial appointment was at the University of Maryland in 1956, and he joined the faculty at Harvey Mudd in 1959, the second year of the college’s existence. In 1970, he left Harvey Mudd to accept an appointment at Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York where he was chair of the Department of Humanities for three years. In 1973, he returned to the faculty at Harvey Mudd to serve as chair of the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. For more than two decades, he and Mrs. Sanders traveled to the North Country of New York to spend summers at the house they owned on Lake Ozonia in the Adirondacks. At Harvey Mudd, he was the first to hold the Louisa and Robert Miller Professor of Humanities Chair, served a term as chair of the faculty and retired in 1991. Mr. Sanders published numerous articles on 20th century American authors and American humor from all periods. He wrote a book on the Pulitzer Prize-winning American author John Hersey that, late in Hersey’s life, was completely revised and reprinted in an expanded second edition. He also pub-

OBITUARIES
lished a comprehensive bibliography of the works of the novelist John dos Passos, a contemporary of Hemingway. Mr. Sanders had a lifelong passion for baseball and was the baseball editor for the Journal of Popular Culture. In 1966, he was a Fulbright Professor at the University of Salamanca in Spain where he lectured in Spanish on 20th century American literature. In 1985, he was an invited visiting professor at National Taiwan University in Taipei. Mr. Sanders was a member of the Audubon Society and an avid bird watcher who participated in numerous bird counts and other birding events in the Claremont and Carlsbad areas. Mr. Sanders is survived by his wife of 66 years, Mary Frances; by their three children, Scott Sanders of Albuquerque, New Mexico, Bonnie Hall of Carlsbad, California and Peter Sanders of Greenville, South Carolina; by six grandchildren, Jennifer, Susannah, Cory, Tristan, Madeline and Hope; and by three great-grandchildren, James, Ruby and Wolf. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to the general scholarship fund of Harvey Mudd College, or to the American Cancer Society.

tended University High School, from which he graduated in 1943. Mr. Sanders began college studies at UCLA that were interrupted in 1944 when he enlisted in the Navy. He served as a radioman on the destroyer USS Waller, seeing action in the Pacific near the end of World War II. After his discharge from the Navy in 1946, he returned to Los Angeles and re-enrolled in UCLA where he met Mary Frances Finch of Los Angeles, and they married in February of 1948. While at UCLA, Mr. Sanders wrote for the Daily Bruin

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
accounting Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA 140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E Claremont, CA 91711

For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761. architect attorney MIKE F. O’BRIEN
Attorney at Law

architect/contractor
HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD

WHEELER & WHEELER
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attorney
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
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attorney Kendall & Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law 134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
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child & family therapy
ANN BINGHAM NEWMAN, PH.D., MFT
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Children have problems at home, at school and with friends... Is your child having difficulties? I can help. Individual, Child and Family Therapy

chiropractor
DR. MARTIN S. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.

414 Yale Avenue, Suite K Claremont, CA 91711

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

11

Inger Stewart Soto
Multiple business owner, sports fan, great friend
Inger Stewart Soto, a former Claremont resident, died from pneumonia complicated by the H1N1 virus at Kaiser Permanente, Ontario on January 9, 2014. He was 44. “Stu” was born on April 15, 1969 in Chicago, Illinois. He grew up in La Verne and graduated from Bonita High School in 1987. He attended UCLA from 1989 to 1991, and earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology with an emphasis in organizational studies from Pitzer College in 1992. After graduating from Pitzer, he continued to live in southern California and purchased a home in Rancho Cucamonga in 2003. Mr. Soto obtained a master’s degree from Cal State Los Angeles in rehabilitation counseling in 1997. He owned and managed three companies including Vocational Results, AAA Copy and Copy Review Services, established in 1991, 2006 and 2011, respectively. He was a rehabilitation counselor for over 20 years, and he had significant experience in workers’ compensation. As a highly skilled reviewer and litigation expert, Mr. Soto was hired to be an expert witness to supply testimony and depositions in Sacramento to fight for peoples’ rights against the insurance industry. He took great satisfaction in helping to expose and rectify fraud within the industry. Mr. Soto’s more recent copy work was focused on helping claims professionals contain high costs. In 2009, he began dating Stephanie, whom he had met in high school. They were married on July 7, 2012. The couple enjoyed attending sporting and cultural events and also undertook some memorable vacations, most recently a trip to the east coast Faith was an important part of Mr. Soto’s life, and he often turned to scripture when he was in need of strength. Those who knew him describe him as a wonderful and generous person—he was never too busy for a friend— and many attest to his helpful and loving ways during

OBITUARIES

their tough life situations. True to his caring nature, Mr. Soto took many of his friends’ children under his wing, and became a surrogate father to them.   Mr. Soto enjoyed getting together with former classmates. He was a volunteer on his high school reunion committee, helping to plan his 10th, 20th, and 25th alumni reunions, as well as attending Pitzer College reunions annually. Mr. Soto is remembered for his remarkable zest for life. He played a great game of tennis, winning several trophies in his local tennis leagues. He was an enthusiastic fan of the Dodgers, the Bruins, and the Lakers, especially Kobe Bryant. He treated many friends to Laker games with his season tickets as well as to an evening at the Magic Castle, where he was a member. In music, he appreciated Oingo Boingo, Depeche Mode and heavy metal. Technology was another passion, with Mr. Soto waiting with bated breath for the newest versions of the iPhone and iPad. “He was a very fun-loving guy. He had a certain opti-

mism that allowed him to enjoy almost anything,” his Scripps friend Denise Armijo shared. “If anyone was able to squeeze a lifetime’s worth of laughter and smiles into 44 years, it was Stu Soto.”   Pitzer friend Catherine Caporale shared, “Stu was a fantastic friend and extremely fun. We will miss his infectious laughter and his caring friendship. He brought us many years of happiness. Stu was the epitome of what a good friend should be.” Mr. Soto is survived by his wife, Stephanie; by his mother and stepfather, Linda and Moustafa Aly; by his father and stepmother, Salvador and Anna Soto; by his brothers, Douglas Rodriguez and Adam Aly; and by his sisters, Amina Aly, Erica Soto Nedza and Sonia Soto. He also leaves many godchildren, both official and unofficial, especially Kevin, whom he called son for 11 years. Stu’s college group of Pitzer and Scripps friends say they will always remember his fun and loving ways. They encourage everyone to receive the flu vaccine.

Rufus L. Turner

Rufus Turner, a longtime resident of Claremont, died at home on Thursday, February 27, 2014 at age 85. As a respected architect and interior designer, he had just celebrated 50 years in business as Turner & Associates. He was recently honored by Claremont Heritage with a Lifetime Achievement Award. A memorial service will be held on Friday, March 28, 2014 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Padua Hills Theatre. A full account of Mr. Turner’s life will appear in a future edition of the COURIER.

PROFESSIONAL
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For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761.

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Certified Public Accountants 675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300 Claremont, CA 91711

design/build SRS GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
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dentist
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S. D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
Cosmetic & General Dentistry
615 W. Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 626-2623
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1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers, White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.

energy efficiency

financial consultants
PAMELA J. ZEDICK
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® Securities and advisory services offered through National Planning Corporation. Member of FINRA/SIPC, a registered investment advisor

financial consultants
SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN
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optometry
Ann M. Johannsen, O.D. Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.

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(909) 992-3214
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OPTOMETRY
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

12

Claremont’s water history
by John Neiuber

A

s I sit down at the desk in my study looking out onto Indian Hill Boulevard, I am prepared to write about a totally different topic, but the first sizeable rainstorm of the season has arrived and it is taking my attention away from the computer screen.
Our dog, Gus, is fascinated by the downpour, not to mention the squirrels that are scrambling for cover. The traffic is slowing to a crawl, as sheets of windblown rain compromise visibility and thunder rolls across the valley. It is difficult to think about being in the middle of an historic drought with all that rain pouring down, the Japanese maple outside my window and the elms on Indian Hill already budding and leafing-out, having been completely fooled during most of the winter that spring had arrived. I begin to think about the water and what difference it may or may not make to our current drought situation, and that gets me to thinking about the local water company and the city’s efforts to acquire the water service. Water has been a crucial aspect of the history, growth and development of California and the west, and no less to the history, growth and development of Claremont. More than 200 years ago, before the missions, before the land grants and ranchos, and before the Santa Fe Railroad envisioned Claremont, artesian springs were common and year-round streams flowed through what is now the city. The Gabrielino-Tongva tribe, who lived in a vil-

lage they called Torojoatnga, did so because a stream flowed past Indian Hill Mesa. Springs bubbled up in and around where Memorial Park and Sycamore School are now located, and a stream created by the springs flowed across what is now Eighth Street, down Seventh Street and into a swamp that is now occupied by Pilgrim Place. Young men from Pomona College hunted ducks in the swamp for recreation. As the city developed, and as the citrus industry burgeoned, wells were dug that lowered the level of the groundwater, drying up the springs and the swampy areas. As late as the 1980s and into the 1990s, heavy rains have occasionally caused artesian wells to flow again, especially along Seventh Street and in and around Pilgrim Place. The source of the local water that creates the large aquifer that Claremont and the valley sit upon is San Antonio Creek. The Cucamonga and Palomares ranchos were the first to use the water from the creek after being established in the 1830s. Like most western states where water was a scarce commodity, the claim to the land was created by first usage—one settles the land and establishes water rights. The Palomares family dug a sevenmile ditch from the mouth of the canyon for their

irrigation needs that yielded water year-round, albeit only a trickle during the hottest parts of summer. But then severe drought hit in the 1860s and the water dried up. The drought caused economic hardship as cattle and other livestock literally died of thirst. The Palomares rancho never recovered and, in 1862, the worst year of the drought, a smallpox epidemic devastated the GabirelinoTongva tribe. During the boom of the 1870s, the water rights to San Antonio Canyon were purchased by the Revered C.F. Loop and A.R. Meserve from the Palomares family. They also acquired more than 2,000 acres of land in what is now south, west and central Claremont. In 1882, Rev. Loop and Mr. Meserve contracted with M.L. Wicks and Cyrus Mills to transfer the majority of the water rights to San Antonio Canyon. The condition of the sale required Wicks and Mills to construct, at their own cost, an aqueduct for the purpose of supplying water to Pomona. The agreement required them to build the aqueduct out of concrete, stone or iron and also required them to deliver water to the Loop and Meserve land holdings—all within 18 months of the execution of the contract. The system was completed for $65,000 in 1883, a large sum in those days. Out of this deal, the Pomona Land and Water Company was born. The company, however, was not the only one with claims to the San Antonio Canyon water. Before the company could begin in earnest, the water rights had to be settled. The Chaffey brothers, who owned the land upon which Ontario is now located, had claimed the entire flow of the canyon. The claims were settled to everyCLAREMONT HERITAGE/next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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CLAREMONT HERITAGE/ continued from previous page

one’s satisfaction, giving Pomona and Ontario each a half of the natural flow. Water was plentiful at the time and, even with half, each side was left with plenty of water. By 1886, the Pomona Land and Water Company had 61 artesian wells in operation, ranging in depth from 100 to 200 feet, and maps of the day show the majority of those in what is now Claremont. Unfortunately, most of this “Claremont water” flowed south, given that Claremont did not exist at the time when the valley water rights were structured. Had Claremont existed, perhaps most of the underground and canyon water would have served the city rather than Pomona. On the other hand, if Pomona had not

fought for the Santa Fe Railroad line, Claremont would not have been established during the boom of 1887. Domestic water became an issue once the city began to grow. The townspeople did not have the benefit of a citrus ranch well and by 1898, the need for a domestic water system was on everyone’s mind. The Union Water Company of Pomona made a presentation to the residents of Claremont during a town meeting. The company promised a water system, complete with those “new-fangled meters.” The water supply, or lack of it, would soon be a hot topic of conversation, which Pomona College’s The Student Life newspaper reported was “always a very dry subject in Claremont during the summer.” The Union Water Company, however, soon could not meet the needs of the

Sister Terry Dodge receives accolades from Senator Liu
Sister Terry Dodge, executive director of Claremont nonprofit Crossroads, is being honored by Senator Carol Liu as one of this year’s “Women of the Year.” Each year sate senators honor women in their districts who have made unique and often unsung contributions to enhance the quality of life for others.

OUR TOWN
Sister Terry has led Crossroads, Inc., a residential treatment program for formerly incarcerated women, since 1989 and continues to commit herself to serving this often-forgotten population and ending the cycle of crime. Sr. Terry and the other four honorees will be recognized at a celebration to be held on Friday, March 28.

growing community. A local company was established and authorized during a Town Meeting of 1902. Thus, Claremont had its own city water company. It was known as the Citizens’ Light and Power Company; however, the name was changed in 1904 to the Claremont Domestic Water Company after it abandoned its attempt to provide hydro-electric power. The city operated the water company for 27 years until it was purchased by the American States Water Public Service Company and Southern California Water Company in 1929. The company, an investor-owned utility, produced water from local wells and continued to expand by purchasing wells and small mutual water companies as residential development replaced the citrus industry. Eventually, the company changed its name to Golden State Water Company, which is now a subsidiary of American States Water Company with operations in California and Arizona. The city’s water comes from two sources. Sixty percent comes from local groundwater supplies, which Golden State Water Company maintains, and the remainder is imported from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California by way of the Three Valleys Municipal Water District. The rain subsided for a bit, but has begun pouring down again. Gus has lost interest in the goings on outside, now that the squirrels have found shelter from the

storm. I am thinking about all this water coming down and all this water history. The history of water in Claremont has, indeed, been crucial to the development of the city. As I have researched this, I am struck by the difference between the establishment of Citizens’ Light and Power Company that was created by a town meeting to fulfill a basic need for the citizens and American States Water Company, which “is committed to maximizing shareholder value through a combination of capital appreciation and cash dividends,” whose mission is designed to “deliver superior financial performance for our shareholders.” Okay, I am a capitalist, I don’t have a problem with people making money, but...this is water, this is the stuff of which life is made, the stuff that sustains us. Shouldn’t the higher purpose here be about people and the quality of life, not capital appreciation, cash dividends and shareholders? The music streaming over the Internet from my computer is The Beastie Boys and so, with apologies to them, perhaps a city does need to “fight for its right to water.” [Acknowledgements are due to Judy Wright’s, Claremont: A Pictorial History and Frank Wheeler’s Scrapbooks, available online through the Claremont Colleges Digital Library.]

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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Cat in the Hat themed event has students ‘feline’ good

B

ooks were the order of the day on Monday at Mountain View, when the local elementary school commemorated the National Education Association’s Read Across America Day.

The nationwide reading extravaganza is celebrated each year in conjunction with the March 2 birthday of acclaimed children’s author Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. First, it was off to the multi-purpose room for an 8:30 a.m. assembly starring Jory Rickman, resplendent in a Cat in the Hat costume. Ms. Rickman made for a convincing cat, and why not? The mother of seven Mountain View alums and a former librarian at the school, she has been taking on the rhyming role for 19 years. Ms. Rickman read The Cat in the Hat, the story of a feline visitor who wreaks havok on a home while the two resident kids’ parents are away. She also talked a bit about Geisel, an American writer and cartoonist who beginning in 1950 transformed the world of early reading with a catalog of fun and fanciful books beloved by children to this day. Green Eggs and Ham, The Lorax, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, Fox in Sox, Horton Hears a Who! and How the Grinch Stole Christmas are just a few of his famous tales. The story of how Dr. Seuss’ most recognizable character sprang to life is an interesting one. Life magazine published an article in 1954 about on the prevalence of illiteracy among school children. The story attributed the problem to a simple cause. Kids weren’t learning because only boring books were available to young readers. The director of Houghton Mifflin’s educational division asked Geisel to take 250 words he deemed crucial for first-graders to learn and turn them into “a

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Dressed as Dr. Seuss’ famous cat, Claremont resident Jory Rickman reads from “The Cat in the Hat” on Monday at Mountain View Elementary School. The local storytime was part of the national Read Across America event, which celebrates the birthday of Theodor Geisel, aka Dr. Seuss, who wrote numerous children’s stories including, “The Cat in the Hat.”

book children can’t put down.” Nine months later, he submitted The Cat in the Hat. The book was a resounding success and remains so, selling 452,258 copies in 2009. After the assembly, the upper graders engaged in independent reading while the younger kids filed out to the playground, where the blacktop was crowded with reading-centric booths. Kids could pick up a free bookmark and toy from representatives of the Friends of the Claremont Library, grab a copy of the COURIER and engage in an array of Seussical activities. For instance, youngsters could get their faces painted like The Cat in the Hat, or play a game in which they attempted to toss beanbags through the holes in boards bedecked with iconic images from Dr. Seuss books. There was music as well as words wafting through
SEUSS/continues on next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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Wearing his selfcreated Dr. Seuss hat, Noel Routhe listens to Jory Rickman read “The Cat in the Hat” on Monday during a Read Across America assembly at Mountain View Elementary School. FAR LEFT, Adrian Ruiz smiles as he shows off his cat whisker face paint. Adrian later complained to his teacher that the paint made his lip itch, but she assured him it would stop itching once the paint dried. COURIER photos/ Steven Felschundneff

SEUSS/continued from previous page

I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells.
—Dr. Suess

Mountain View Elementary students line up to get a free book, bookmark and toy from the Friends of the Claremont Library on Monday during a Read Across America assembly and fair at the school. The Friends were also giving away applications for student library cards.

bers of the Claremont Community School of Music (CCSM). This included a harp played by CCSM faculty member Andrea Puente. This writer, a lifelong bookworm, was reminded of the enchanted harp from the first Harry Potter book, which lulled to sleep a three-headed dog guarding the Sorcerer’s Stone. CCSM instructors Homero Chavez and Clifford Keating played cello and trumpet/clarinet, respectively, while the school’s executive director, Matthew Keating, played cello. Kids had the chance to try their hands at some simple instruments, including a rainbow-colored assortment of bells.

After students in the primary grades filed back into their classrooms, the upper graders took their turn at the reading fair. The city’s homage to reading will continue on Sunday, March 29 when the Friends of the Claremont Library mark the local reading nook’s 100th birthday during their third annual Children’s Book Festival. The event, which will run from 1 to 4 p.m., will include a slew of fun activities including crafts, storytelling, face painting and magic. Every child in attendance at the free event will receive a book to take home, while supplies last.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont High School junior Jeremiah Maldonado slides into home just under the tag of Pasadena High School catcher Sergio Rey on Tuesday during the first game of the 2014 baseball pre-season. The Pack took advantage of several opportunities late in the game to beat the Bulldogs 6-3.

Wolfpack baseball prevails in season opener

Claremont High School’s Trent Troncone and Jack Pavlisin have Pasadena High runner Sumner Smith trapped on Tuesday during varsity baseball action at CHS. AT RIGHT: Jeremiah Maldonado waits at first base as the Pasadena team warms up a new pitcher. Claremont High School right fielder Lucas Arias snags a pop fly in the fifth inning of the Pack’s 6-3 victory over Pasadena High School.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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Stamp Your Heart Out owner Joan Bunte embraces longtime customer Susan Sasaki moments after Ms. Bunte locked the shop’s door officially closing her 25-year-old business last week. Ms. Sasaki has been shopping at the Village craft store since it opened and wanted to be the last customer. Ms. Bunte will retire from the retail trade but will continue her involvement in the Village Marketing Group. COURIER photo/

Education takes center stage at Democratic Club meeting
Charles Kerchner—emeritus professor at Claremont Graduate University and the author of many articles and books, the latest being Learning from LA: Institutional Change and American Public Education—will discuss “The California Exception: Our Big Bet on the Common Core and Local Control Funding” at the next meeting of the Democratic Club of Claremont on Friday, March 14. The meeting will be held at Casa de Salsa Restaurant on Foothill Boulevard in Claremont. Buffet lunch costs $17 including tax, tip and non-alcoholic drinks. Lunch is from noon to 1 p.m.; Professor Kerchner’s talk will occur from 1 to 2 p.m. There is no charge to attend only the talk. Everyone is welcome.

Friday, March 7 through Saturday, March 15

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

18

CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

Performing arts
Pomona College Theatre presents Tartuffe at the Seaver Theater.

Galleries
Claremont Art Walk listings and walking tour map.

Page 20
was immigration reform. “Nuns on the Bus” tours received significant attention and support across the nation from religious communities, elected officials, media and the general public. For information, call (909) 626-3596.

Page 23
ing the program. Guests are welcome. For more information and reservations, call Kathleen at (909) 629-2711.

March Friday

7

ART WALK Visit Claremont Village art exhibitions between 6 and 9 p.m. for this month’s opening receptions. Meet the artists and enjoy refreshments at participating galleries. See the gallery listings for a schedule and map. BLACK AND WHITE (AND READ ALL OVER) Put on your snazzy black or white attire for an evening at The Depot for the COURIER’s first-ever Party Parade event. Guests will be treated to beer, wine and an array of hors d’oeuvres. Come mingle with the press off-the-record and make headlines in the photo booth. Select photos will be featured in an upcoming edition of the COURIER. It will be a night to remember, as long as no one ends up in the Police Blotter! 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. $40 per person. Limited to 75 guests. Claremont Depot, 200 W. First St.

March Saturday

8

FARM VOLUNTEER HOURS All ages and skill levels are welcome to as-

sist with work on the Pomona CollegeOrganic Farm. Volunteers can take produce home. 10 a.m. to noon. 130 Amherst Ave., Claremont. (909) 6078341, farm@pomona.edu or visit www.farm.pomona.edu. FOOD TENT Hillbilly Tacos is setting up at Claremont Craft Ales after 4 p.m. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 204C, Claremont. THEATER Join the Curtain Raisers of the Claremont Colleges for their annual dinner and theater night, with a performance of Tartuffe with comments before the show from Pomona College professor of theater Leonard Pronko. 6 p.m. Pomona College’s Blue Room in the Frank Dining Hall, 260 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Tickets are $40. Contact: (909) 621-8189 or hilary.laconte@pomona.edu. NUNS ON THE BUS Sr. Simone Campbell, nationally-renowned organizer of “Nuns on the Bus,” will be visiting Our Lady of the Assumption Church at 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public; refreshments will be served in the auditorium at 435 Berkeley Ave., Claremont. In 2012, the bus drew attention to Catholic nuns’ work with the poor and protested planned aid cuts in the US congressional budget (Sr. Simone spoke at the 2012 Democratic Convention.) In 2013, the theme of the cross-country tour

March Sunday March Monday

March Tuesday

11

9

LIVE JAZZ performance on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. (909) 946-1398.

10

SHAKESPEARE CLUB The Shakespeare Club of Pomona Valley will hold its next meeting at 2 p.m. at the Joslyn Senior Center, 660 N. Mountain Ave. in Claremont. The speaker will be actress, director, teacher and producer Lisa Wolpe. Ms. Wolpe is the artistic director of the Los Angeles Women’s Shakespeare Company, an award-winning allfemale, multi-cultural theater company that she founded in 1993. Her presentation is titled, “Her Hamlet.” She has taught and directed Shakespeare and all levels of acting, as well as directing courses for many theater companies and universities. A tea will be served follow-

NASA John Grotzinger (NASA, Jet Propulsion Lab, Caltech), chief scientist of the Curiosity Mission, will speak on “The NASA Curiosity Rover’s New Findings from Mars.” 11 a.m., Pomona College’s Rose Hills Theater, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. Contact: (909) 621-8675 or lorraine_keala@pomona.edu. KIPLING IN AMERICA Pomona College Professor Thomas Pinney will talk about Rudyard Kipling’s American connections. Buffet lunch at 11:30 a.m. for $12 or dessert and coffee for $6. The University Club meets Tuesdays at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP Free Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group, facilitated by Laura Van Dran of The Alzheimer’s Association and Assisted Transition Inland Empire. This meeting, which is open to the public, will cover helpful strategies and provide
9-DAY CALENDAR continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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9-DAY CALENDAR continued from the previous page

real solutions for the caregiver of a loved one suffering with Alzheimer’s or dementia. 7 to 9 p.m. The Claremont Club, 1777 Monte Vista Ave, Claremont. For more information, call Laura Van Dran at (909) 921-1033. COMPUTER CLUB Bring your questions for “Ask the Gurus Night” to get their insight and answers. The Claremont Senior Computer Club meets on Tuesday evenings at the Hughes Community Center at 1700 Danbury Rd. Meetings begin at 7:30 p.m., but are open for “social time” at 7 p.m. Newcomers are always welcome. Find more information on their website at http://cscclub.org. LECTURE “Eldridge Cleaver Visits Pyongyang, Hanoi and Peking: Afro-Asian Internationalism, Radical Orientalism, and Global Feminism” presented by Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, professor of history and women’s, gender and sexuality studies at Ohio State University. 7:30 p.m. Garrison Theater, Scripps College Performing Arts Center, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont.

March Wednesday

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE Joseph Thomas, director of the National Center for

12 March Thursday

the Study of Children’s Literature at San Diego State University, will deliver a talk titled, “The Devil’s Favorite Pet: Shel Silverstein, an American Iconoclast.” Mr. Thomas has published Poetry’s Playground: The Culture of Contemporary American Children’s Poetry, which was the Children’s Literature Association’s Honored Book in 2009, and a book of poetry titled Strong Measures. He is working on an analytical biography of Shel Silverstein. 4:15 p.m. at Pomona College’s Crookshank 108, located at 140 W. Sixth St., Claremont. For more information, email vac04747@pomona.edu. SUSTAINABLE CLAREMONT GARDEN CLUB presents “Edible Garden Tidbits” with Connie Newport, who will give tips on how to get gardens up and running for spring. She’ll be sharing herb garden ideas, container garden designs, information on raised beds and help with watering for drought. Come share any questions, ideas, plants or seeds you might have. Free and open to the public. 7 p.m. Pilgrim Place’s Napier Center, 660 Avery Rd., Claremont. For more information, visit www.sustainableclaremont.org.

13

FARM STAND Produce from the

Pomona College Organic farm will be available for purchase. 4 p.m. Pomona College’s Smith Campus Center Courtyard, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. Contact: (909) 607-8341 or farm@pomona.edu or visit www.farm.pomona.edu. HOLMES LECTURE Anne A. Cheng, professor of English and director of the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University, will present a talk on “Ornament and Law: 22 Lewd Chinese Women.” 4:15 p.m., Pomona College’s Crookshank 108, 140 W. Sixth St., Claremont. Contact (909) 607-2212 or nancy.jugan@pomona.edu. ART AFTER HOURS Live music co-sponsored by KSPC accompanies Pomona College Museum of Art exhibitions and programming. 5 to 11 p.m., Pomona College’s Museum of Art, 330 N. College Ave., Claremont. Contact: (909) 607-7543 or museu minfo@pomona.edu. COOKING DEMO with full tastings of the menu, wine or a non-alcoholic beverage and recipes to take home. The menu includes Vietnamese chicken, ginger sesame udon noodles, mushroom duxelles on brie, soupe au pistou with crusty bread, giardiniera vegetables on crisp greens, cilantro Sriracha slaw, whiskey truffles and herbaceous skin butter. The cost will be $35 per person. Call the store at (909) 399-0256 or stop by to reserve admission 6 to 8 p.m. Vom Fass Claremont, 101 N. Indian Hill Blvd., in Village West. CLAREMONT HERITAGE Filmmaker Peter Kirby will be screening recently-edited interviews with local art giants Sam Maloof and Karl Benjamin. The Sam Maloof interview was filmed at his workshop in 1990 as he prepared furniture for a commission from Pacific Enterprises. He demonstrates some of his working methods and his feelings about his work. The Karl Benjamin interview was filmed in the artist’s home and studio in 2009 for the Getty Research Institute as part of the Pacific Standard Time initiative. Mr. Benjamin talks about how he became interested in painting, his career and his approach to work. 7 to 8:30 p.m. $10 admission. Claremont School of Theology’s Mudd Theater, 1325 N. College Ave., Claremont. (909) 621-0848.

4 p.m. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 204C, Claremont. DEMOCRATIC CLUB OF CLAREMONT Charles Kerchner, emeritus professor at Claremont Graduate University, is this month’s speaker. Noon to 2 p.m. Buffet lunch is $17 including tax and tip. All are welcome. Casa de Salsa, 415 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.

March

Saturday

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March Friday

14

MEDICINAL PLANTS OF CALIFORNIA A walking tour through the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden (RSABG) with herbalist William Broen, exploring medicinal and edible plants and their related lore. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Limited to 20 participants. Bring water, a sack lunch or snack and wear sunscreen or a hat. $20 for RSABG members or $25 for general admission. RSABG, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. (909) 625-8767. FARM VOLUNTEER HOURS All ages and skill levels are welcome to assist with work on the Pomona College Organic Farm. Volunteers can take produce home. 10 a.m. to noon. 130 Amherst Ave., Claremont. (909) 6078341, farm@pomona.edu or visit www.farm.pomona.edu. FREE CONCERT FOR CHILDREN Claremont Young Musicians Orchestra, conducted by Roger Samuel, presents a concert for children featuring the music of Russia with a special guest appearance by Russian composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Experience the music of the Nutcracker Ballet, the 1812 Overture and more. Come early to see the instruments up close. Enjoy 60 minutes of music, audience participation and prizes. Admission is free. 10:30 a.m. Pomona College’s Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. (909) 624-3614. CLAREMONT PIE FESTIVAL Enjoy a Village fair with themed booths, music, pie eating contest, pie baking contest, demos, apron parade, classes, classic car display and pie recipe card hunt contest. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission. Visit www.claremontpiefestival.com or call (909) 621-5152 for more information. FOOD TENT Serendoggity is setting up at Claremont Craft Ales after 4 p.m. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 204C.
CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: Deadline:
Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com.

FOOD TRUCK Slummin’ Gourmet is stopping by Claremont Craft Ales after

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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PERFORMING ARTS
BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. (909) 607-2671. —Friday, March 7: Friday Noon Concert featuring Quartet Lykos and music by Menzies and others. 12:15 p.m. —Friday, April 4: Friday Noon Concert featuring music by Schoenberg and Pärt. 12:15 p.m. —Friday, April 11: Friday Noon Concert featuring Brahms: String Quartet No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 51, No. 1. 12:15 p.m. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box-office hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online; you can easily choose seats at www.pomona.edu/bridges. —March 14 and 15: Claremont High School Choir Department presents Disney’s “The Little Mermaid In Concert.” $8 for general admission or $7 with CHS ASB card. 7 p.m. For more information and to purchase tickets, call (909) 624-9053, ext. 30462. Tickets are not available through the Bridges Auditorium box office. Tickets are only available through Claremont High School. —Saturday, April 5: Western Semifinal of the International Championship of Collegiate a cappella. This family-friendly event will feature the top two placing groups from each of the five Western Quarterfinal events, who will compete for first-place and to continue on to the International Finals in New York. 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at www.pomona.edu/bridges, or through the box office. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College,

Image courtesy of Pomona College Theatre and Dance Orgon, played by Oliver Shirley, left, pledges his daughter Mariane, played by Yasmin Adams, center, to the pious Tartuffe as her mother Elmire (Sonia Marton, right) and maid Dorine (Allegra Breedlove) look on in “Tartuffe” at Seaver Theater.

150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. (909) 607-2671. —Saturday, March 8: Senior recital featuring Roger Sheu on piano. Music by Beethoven, Schumann and Chopin. 8 p.m.

—Saturday, March 15: Claremont Young Musicians Orchestra conducted by Roger Samuel presents “A Concert for Children Featuring the Music of Russia” with special guest appearance by Russian composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Experience the music of the Nutcracker Ballet, the 1812 Overture and more. Arrive early to see the instruments of the orchestra up close. Enjoy 60 minutes of fun music for all ages with audience participation and prizes. 10:30 a.m. Admission is free. For more information, call (909) 624-3614. —Sunday, March 16: Free Claremont Symphony Orchestra concert titled “Let’s Dance,” with orchestra associate conductor Ruth Charloff. Selections include Tchaikovsky’s Waltz from Eugene Onegin, Arnold’s Four Cornish Dances and Delibes’ Sylvia Ballet Suite. 3:30 p.m. —Sunday, March 30: Chamber Music of Aaron Copland featuring pianist Robert Edward Thies and members of the Long Beach Symphony. Music from “The Red Pony” and “Rodeo.” 8 p.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. (909) 6261254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through March 16: My Fair Lady. DRINKWARD RECITAL HALL: 320 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont at Harvey Mudd College. —Tuesday, March 11: The Eclipse String Quartet of Los Angeles will present a program of music by women composers, including Gubaidulina, Beyer, Wolfe, Jeanrenaud and Saariaho. Free admission. 8 p.m. LYMAN HALL: Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. —Tuesday, March 11: Pomona College Jazz Ensemble with director Barb Catlin and music for big bands from across the decades. 4:30 p.m. —Wednesday, April 2: Student recital. 8:15 p.m. SEAVER THEATRE COMPLEX: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. The box office is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and one hour prior to curtain times. Call (909) 607-4375 or e-mail seaverboxoffice@pomona.edu. —Through March 9: Pomona College Department of Theatre and Dance presents Tartuffe by Molieré, adapted by Richard Wilbur and directed by Professor Leonard Pronko. Mr. Pronko has been teaching at Pomona College for 57 years and directed Tartuffe as his first production in 1962. Tickets are $10 for general admission, $5 for students, staff and seniors. Showtimes are 8 p.m. on March 7 and 8 and at 2 p.m. on March 8 and 9.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: Earnest & Celestine [PG], Mr. Peabody & Sherman [PG], Philomena [PG13], Non-Stop [PG13], Tim’s Vermeer [PG13], 300 Rise of an Empire [R], The Great Beauty (subtitles) [NR]. —Saturday, March 8: Child’s Rose [NR] at 10:45 a.m., Twenty Feet from Stardom [PG13] at 11a.m., Like Father, Like Son (subtitles) [NR] at 11 a.m.
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, CA 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

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57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m.; second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. (909) 397-0218. —March 8 through April 26: 57 Underground presents two solo shows, “Flow,” gestural abstractions by Karen Duckles, and “BreakThrough,” spiritually-inspired textural paintings by Lisa Brugger. Mona Jean Cedar’s poetry is composed simultaneously in spoken word and American Sign Language. She will be presenting her original poetry Saturday, March 8 at 7 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. General admission is $7, students and seniors admission is $5 and members and children 12 and under may enter for free. Visit www.amoca.org or call (909) 865-3146. —Through March 30: “Best Kept Secret—the Scripps College Ceramics Collection” at AMOCA in the Main Gallery. The exhibition is organized by The Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College. Curated by Kirk Delman, collections manager and registrar, the exhibition features work from the Scripps College Ceramic Collection. The show provides viewers insights into the contributions of individual donors and an opportunity to assess the RCWG’s achievements as a collecting institution for more than six decades. This exhibition of more than 180 objects will include works from the Otis group and will also highlight many others, including Laura Andreson, Robert Arneson, Hans Coper, Phil Cornelius, Shoji Hamada, Jun Kaneko, John Mason and Jim Melchert. —Through March 30: “Patsy Cox: Romanesco Fractals,” a visually stimulating, multi-part installation in “THE VAULT” special project space. Curated by Rody Lopez, associate curator, the exhibition features Patsy Cox and illustrates her exploration through ceramics of the naturally occurring fractal forms of the Romanesco Broccoli, an edible variant of the cauliflower. This striking form found in nature presents itself as a natural fractal, with each bud made up of a series of smaller buds arranged in a logarithmic spiral. Ms. Cox’s forms are meant to overwhelm the eye and environment with repetition and activity in celebration of the power and beauty found in the natural world. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. (909) 626-3322. www.buddhamouse.com. —March 7 through 31: “Sitting in a Circle,” paintings and paper art by Franny Werthwein. Growing up on a farm in New Jersey, Ms. Werthwein spent many hours daydreaming in tall fields of grass and branches of orchard trees. As an observer of nature, she has always felt a deep spiritual connection with the land and sea. She began painting in watercolor because of its ethereal qualities and is currently working in

GALLERIES

acrylics. Because of her fascination with textures, she was inspired to study the art of handmade paper and collage, which includes found objects, paper and organic material. Opening reception: Friday, March 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254 W. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. (909) 624-7238. —Through March 5: “Speaking Through Sediment,” featuring Cindy Rinne and George Comer. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 398-1060. —Through March 31: “At Your Service,” featuring weavings, altars, prints, spirit dolls and drawings by Jan Wheatcroft. Opening reception: Friday, March 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in the Packing House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. (909) 626-3066. —Through April 2: “Perceptions,” artwork by IB Visual Arts students at Claremont High School. Opening reception: Friday, March 7 from 6 to 9 p.m. Artists reception: Friday, March 21 from 6 to 8 p.m. CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART: www.claremontmuseum.org. —Through March 30: “Betty Davenport Ford: Capturing the Animal Spirit,” an exhibit of sculpture presented by the Claremont Museum of Art, is on view in the gallery of Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden through March 2014. One of Claremont’s most prolific sculptors, Ms. Ford is well known for her unique style and honest craftsmanship. Working in clay and bronze for over 60 years, she simplifies form to abstract the natural essence of the wild creatures she depicts. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The exhibit is open Friday-Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Garden admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students, $4 for children and free for CMA and RSABG members. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until 9 p.m., with live music at 8 p.m. Visit www.loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com for information about purchasing monthly wall space for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of gallery space. Call Vicki at (626) 224-7915 or (626) 9634238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior high and high school age students. —Through March 29: Photographer Andrew Vasquez compiles a collection of black and white photography with a nod to classic Calvin Klein and GUESS ads employing high contrast photo processing. Taking fashion photography to a new level, Mr. Vasquez takes a more personal approach and highlights each model’s personality in every selection. Each piece has its own unique character. Opening reception: Friday, March 7 from 6 to 9 p.m. Light

Image courtesy of The Colony at Loft 204 Photography by Andrew Vasquez is on exhibition at The Colony at Loft 204 in the Claremont Packing House through the end of March, focusing on fashion and personality.

refreshments will be served. For more information and to RSVP visit www.facebook.com/Loft204. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (909) 626-5455. —Through May 16: “Fresh Work,” a group show, which features six emerging talents from the First Street Gallery studio. This exhibition presents work that is rich and expressive, whose lightness belies its rigor. Vicente Siso offers a loose yet descriptive line layered over deep fields of color, while Jackie Marsh creates whimsical animal forms and exuberant technicolor floral arrangements. Opening reception: Friday, March 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. featuring an eGood launch party. First Street Gallery will celebrate the kick-off of their involvement with eGood, a company guided by the principle that, “Ordinary actions can create extraordinary change.” THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Through March 31: The Annual Silent Art Auction for the Friends of the Bernard Field Station (FBBFS) includes paintings, jewelry, ceramics and more by local artists can be seen in the window of the Folk Music Center. The FBBFS is a local non-profit dedicated to education and the environment. The auction ends at 5 p.m. on March 31. GALERIA DE PÉROLAS: 532 W. First St. #211, Claremont Packing House. Open by appointment. —Tuesdays: “Tribe Tuesday,” an open studio session for artists to share the space and work on their pieces. Open to artists of all levels from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Space is limited to 10 people per session. Call (909) 236-1562 or visit www.face book.com/galeriadeperolas. —Through March 7: “Broken Hearts, Lessons Learned & Cupid’s Revenge: Anti-Valentine.” Artists participating in the exhibit include Jill Carol, Sandee Hex, MAD, Maia Donadee, Ashley Misner, Johnnie Dominguez, JoeDed, Gore and ARoseLittle. Closing reception: Friday, March 7 from 7 to 10 p.m. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034

Harvard Ave., Claremont. (909) 6240548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Ongoing: Visitors welcome, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. GINGER ELLIOTT EXHIBITION CENTER: 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont in the Garner House at Memorial Park. Open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or by appointment. Claremont Heritage, (909) 621-0848. —Friday, March 7: “Dreaming in the Sun,” paintings by Jen Rosen. 6 to 9 p.m. INTREGRATIVE BODYWORK: 114 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. (909) 239-8313. —Friday, March 7: Mixed media paintings by Claremont-based artist, Gina Nelson and acrylic “Sacred Mandala” paintings by local artist, Jonella Ramsey will be on exhibit. 5:30 to 9 p.m. MARTINEZ GALLERY: 504 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. www.martinezgallery.weebly.com. (909) 527-9177. —March: The featured artist is Richard Martinez. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412, info@malooffoun dation.org or www.malooffoundation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features drought-tolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. PEGGY PHELPS GALLERY & EAST GALLERY: Claremont Graduate University, 251 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (909) 621-8071. —March 10 through 14: Sally Bruno MFA thesis show. East Gallery. Opening reception: Tuesday, March 11 from 6 to 9 p.m. —March 10 through 14: Gabriel Luis Perez’ “Rope-A-Dope”. Peggy Phelps Gallery. Opening reception: Tuesday, March 11 from 6 to 9 p.m. with an artist talk from 7 to 8 p.m. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Rd., Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 BCE to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. (909) 399-5544. —Through April 30: “A Long Time Ago, in a Kingdom Far Away—China Before the Ming.” Inaugurating a yearlong series of exhibits highlighting Chinese history and culture, the Petterson Museum will be showing 150 pieces from its collections of ancient artifacts dating from the Shang Dynasty (1700-1027 BCE) to the Yuan Dynasty (1279-1368). This is the first
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time in the history of the museum that these ceramic, stone and metal objects will all be on display at the same time. Supplementing these will be ink rubbings from early Han dynasty ancestral shrines (206 BCE-220 CE) as well as later Nestorian Christian sites from the Tang Dynasty (618-906 CE). POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 333 N. College Ave., Claremont. Open Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Open through December 5; closed Thanksgiving day. For more information, visit www.pomona.edu/museum. Contact Pomona College Museum of Art by email at museuminfo@pomona.edu or call (909) 621-8283. —Through April 13: The exhibition “Mowry Baden: Dromedary Messanine” includes immersive, large-scale sculpture. Dromedary Mezzanine represents the first showing of this artwork in the western United States and the first time the work has been on view since becoming part of Pomona College’s permanent collection. One of Canada’s most accomplished artists and one of Pomona College’s most distinguished alumni, Mr. Baden has been creating kinesthetic sculptures and public artworks for four decades. Mr. Baden graduated from Pomona College in 1958 and returned 10 years later to take on the roles of professor of art, department chair and gallery director. Mr. Baden’s works, which invite viewers to physically operate the sculpture, have always involved a more collaborative approach to viewers that prefigures much contemporary work today. —Through April 13: The exhibition “Andrea Bowers: #sweetjane” includes new work by Los Angeles-based artist Andrea Bowers that examines the notorious Steubenville, Ohio high school rape case. In addition to a new series of drawings, “#sweetjane” includes a video based on Ms. Bowers’ three trips to Steubenville that documents the protest surrounding the trial and activities of “hactivist” group Anonymous. Her return to Ohio to document the Steubenville case is a form of personal mapping of 30 years of violence against women. The exhibition unfolds over two campuses and is the second collaborative project between the Pomona College Museum of Art and the Pitzer College Art Galleries. At the Pomona College Museum of Art, this exhibition is “Project Series 48” and is supported in part by the Pasadena Art Alliance. —Through April 13: “Gathering the Work of Frederick Hammersley: Portraits, Abstractions” and “In-Between: Gathering the Work of Frederick Hammersley” present a selection of drawings, paintings and prints drawn from Pomona College’s collection. The late Frederick Hammersley taught painting for several years at Pomona College. He came to prominence in 1959 in the landmark exhibition “Four Abstract Classicists,” which brought together the work of Mr. Hammersley, Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson and John McLaughlin. In over 60 years as an artist, Mr. Hammersley produced a wide range of draw-

ings, from naturalistic portraits to computer-generated renderings. This exhibition showcases the range of Mr. Hammersley’s work and is made possible in part by the donation of art works from the Frederick Hammersley Foundation. It is curated by Hannah Pivo, Josephine Bump, Shayda Amanat, Graham “Bud” and Mary Ellen Kilsby. —Through April 13: The exhibition “Witness: Käthe Kollwitz” features German artist Käthe Kollwitz, who lived and worked in the midst of tremendous political and social upheaval. “Witness: Käthe Kollwitz” features works in several graphic mediums—wood block, lithography, etching and drypoint—drawn from Pomona College’s collection. The exhibition includes self-portraits from the 1920s and 1930s alongside images that unflinchingly depict death, poverty and violence against women. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with the West Coast premiere of the song-cycle “KollwitzKonnex” (...im Frieden seiner Hände), composed by Ralf Yusuf Gawlick and performed by Scripps faculty member Anne Harley and internationallyrenowned guitarist Eliot Fisk. The performance, which will be held on March 27, is co-sponsored by the Pomona College Museum of Art, Scripps Department of Music, Intercollegiate German Studies and the Scripps O’Brian Fund. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., at 11th and Columbia Streets on the Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. (909) 607-3397 or
www.scrippscollege.edu/williamson-gallery/.

ART WALK: FRIDAY, MARCH 7

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Bonita Avenue

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Second Street Indian Hill Blvd.

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Yale Avenue

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Harvard Avenue

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First Street

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Claremont Art Walk takes place the first Friday of each month between 6 and 9 p.m. and exhibits studio and fine art. Use this walking tour map as a guide to this monthʼs participating galleries.

1. Buddhamouse Emporium
6 to 8 p.m. 134 Yale Ave., Claremont
“Sitting in a Circle,” paintings and paper art by Fanny Werthwein.

2. Bunny Gunner Gallery
6 to 9 p.m. 254 W. Bonita Ave., Claremont
“Speaking Through Sediment,” featuring Cindy Rinne and George Comer.

—Through April 6: 2014 Scripps College’s Ceramic Annual, the longestrunning exhibition of contemporary ceramics in the United States, will celebrate its 70th year. Traditionally an “artist’s choice” event, this year’s exhibition will bring together a large number of past curators from the show’s long history to celebrate art in clay. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every six weeks. Call (909) 6219091 or email info@squareigallery.com. —Through March 31: For over 35 years, Robin Temaiana Repp has been documenting and commenting on our contemporary society with different photographic methods. Beginning in 1969-70 as a student at UC Berkeley, she created photo silk-screen images and transformed them into protest posters. Since then, she has presented photo imagery in paintings, woodcuts, lithography, drawings, collages and sculptures. Her current work is digital infrared photography, which portrays the emotions of fear and anticipation in the landscape. The use of infrared photography suggests a surrealistic and dream-like future state. Infrared wavelengths are not visible to the human eye, but become apparent in the photograph. In this same way that people are fascinated by the landscape but fear what it may hold, infrared photography shows us a hint of the unknown from a safe distance. Opening reception: Friday, March 7 from 6 to 8 p.m.

3. Claremont Community Foundation
6 to 8 p.m. 205 Yale Ave., Claremont
“At Your Service,” featuring weavings, altars, prints, spirit dolls and drawings by Jan Wheatcroft.

4. Claremont Forum/Prison Library Project
6 to 9 p.m. 586 W. First St., Claremont Packing House
“Perceptions,” artwork by Claremont High School IB Visual Arts students.

5. The Colony at Loft 204
6 to 9 p.m. 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House
“Expresssions: A Photography Collection by Andrew Vasquez.” Refreshments will be served.

6. First Street Gallery Art Center
6 to 8 p.m. 250 W. First St., #120, Claremont
“Fresh Work” a group show featuring six emerging talents from the First Street Gallery studio.

7. Galeria de Pérolas
7 to 10 p.m. 532 W. First St., #211, Claremont Packing House
Closing reception for “Broken Hearts, Lessons Learned & Cupidʼs Revenge: Anti-Valentine.” Meet and greet the artists and enjoy refreshments, live painting and music.

8. Ginger Elliott Exhibition Center
6 to 9 p.m. 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
“Dreaming in the Sun,” paintings by Jen Rosen.

9. Integrative Bodywork
5:30 to 9 p.m. 114 Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
Mixed-media paintings by Gina Nelson and acrylic paintings by Jonella Ramsey.

10. Martinez Gallery
6 to 9 p.m. 504 W. First St., Claremont Packing House
Featured artist Richard Martinez.

11. Square i Gallery
6 to 8 p.m. 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont
Robin Reppʼs digital infrared photography.

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Upcoming events at Party Parade

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he Claremont Community Foun- Black and White (And Read All Over!) dation invites you to become a Friday, March 7 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. The ClareDepot, 200 W. First St., Claremont. $40 per perpart of a Claremont tradition that mont son. 75 guests. embodies the true meaning of “commu- Extra! Extra! Read all about it: Put on your snazzy nity”—people from all walks of life black or white attire for an evening at The Depot for coming together, getting to know one the COURIER’s first-ever Party Parade event. Guests another and working cooperatively to will be treated to beer, wine and an array of hors keep our community strong and healthy. d’oeuvres. Come mingle with the press off-the-record
and make headlines in the photo booth. Select photos will be featured in an upcoming edition of the COURIER. It will be a night to remember, as long as no one ends up in the Police Blotter! Hosted by The Claremont COURIER newspaper.

The 18th annual series of special hosted events provides a variety of themes, food and entertainment to appeal to every taste. Participants will meet new and interesting folks and share food, fun and friendship while benefiting the foundation. The dozens of event hosts, as well as many community businesses, have generously contributed their time, talent, food and supplies so that all guest reservations and contributions can directly benefit the Claremont Community Foundation. Due to potentially heavy demand for some events, parties with more paid reservations on the opening date than spaces available will be filled by lottery. Remaining spaces will be filled on a first come, first serve basis. Confirmation of reservations will be made by email or telephone prior to the date of the party. Hosts and sponsors support all costs of the parties themselves. One hundred percent of your participation directly supports the foundation and its programs. Once reservations are confirmed, no refunds for guest cancellations are possible. Reservations will be accepted as long as spaces are available. Visit www.claremontfoundation.org/news/party-parade to register. Upcoming events include:

Claremont Home Brews
Saturday, March 8 at 4 p.m. The home of Kathy and Matt Croughan, 314 Teasdale Ave., Claremont. $40 per person. 45 guests. Tenth Annual Beer Tasting: Another fun afternoon of beer-tasting—this year with a twist! We will feature a small selection of home-brewed beers straight from some of Claremont’s finest beer cellars for your tasting delight. We’re also making this a competition, so come lend your palate to the tasting and vote for the best features of these locally-brewed beers. Beer and hearty nibbles will be provided. Hosted by Kathy and Matt Croughan, Cheryl and Tom Donnelly, Brenda and John Hill, Teresa Shaw and Jeff Groves and Rita and John Watts.

Image courtesy of Pomona College

Japanese theater presents series in Claremont
atsushige Udaka is a Noh actor from the Kongo School who started his career as a Kokata actor when he was three years old. He has extensive teaching experience in Noh Theatre and takes part in almost 100 Noh plays per year.

An Evening in Northern Italy
Saturday, March 8 at 6 p.m. 150 S. College Ave., Claremont. $70 per person. 8 guests. Turin, Italy, located in the Piedmont region of northern Italy, is recreated in the Claremont home of chefs Duane and Lee Jackman. Begin your Italian adventure with salumi assortitie formaggi (assorted salamis and cheeses) served with grissini and the vineyard’s most flavorful wines. At the table, enjoy the warmth of zuppa di matrimonio (wedding soup), insalata di carciofi arrosto (roasted artichoke salad), and a Turin hallmark entrée: gnocchi con sugo di Gorgonzola (gnocchi with gorgonzola sauce). The evening will conclude with Piedmont region favorites: Chocolate and hazelnuts, as you enjoy pot de crème, caffe, served with a Frangelico digestiv. Hosted by Lee and Duane Jackman.

Stinging for Their Suppers
Friday, March 7 at 6:30 p.m. 1269 North Harvard Ave., Claremont. $25 per person. 25 guests. “How Women in Prison Nourish Their Bodies and Souls.” Join the Women of Crossroads for an evening of sampling and storytelling. From potato soup to lemon pie, the women of Crossroads will demonstrate how they made various dishes with a “stinger” (aka immersion heater), explain the hazards of stinger cooking and share stories of laughter and celebration while striving for normalcy within a harsh environment. Hosted by Sister Terry Dodge/Crossroads Inc. and the women of Crossroads.

T

RESTAURANT ROW

Over the past decade, he has performed and given workshops and lecture-demonstrations not only in Japan but also in South Korea, France, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, Russia and the United States. Haruna Tanaka graduated with a degree in movement theater from Pitzer College and earned her master’s in theatre arts from Kyoto University of Art and Design. She received her instructor certificate from the Kongo School in 2004, and has been Mr. Tatsushige’s assistant for his workshops and lecture-demonstrations abroad. Natsuko Hishinuma belongs to Sencha Tea Ceremony of Ohbaku baisa-ryu school (Leaf Tea) and studies under the grand master Nakazawa Hiroyuki Tsusen and the young master (the successor), Nakazawa Takanori. She earned her associate instructor certificate in 2011, and received her tea name (a name bestowed upon a tea ceremony practitioner) “Shousen” from the grand master. She takes part in a national conference of Sencha Tea Ceremony every year and assisted the grand master in a tea ceremony for the imperial family of Thailand.

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

Schedule of free Claremont events: —Monday, March 10: Noh Theatre Class, Large Studio, Seaver Theatre, 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. —Tuesday, March 11: Sencha Tea Ceremony, Large Studio, Seaver Theatre, 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. Lecture and demonstration in Seaver Theatre. 7 p.m. —Wednesday, March 12: Lecture and demonstration, Asian languages and literatures/Asian Studies. Mason 5. 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. —Friday, March 14: Noh Theatre Class, Large Studio, Seaver Theatre, 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. The Seaver Theatre Complex is located at 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 7, 2014

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NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. (909) 445-1200. —Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. —Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. —Friday, March 21: Disgrace Land with special guest Tequila Slam Dance (1980s and punk). 9 p.m. to midnight. EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909) 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, March 13: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music featuring Los Whateveros. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: (909) 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at 8 and 10 p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and Sunday at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —Friday, March 7: Dat Phan from Last Comic Standing. 7 and 9:30 p.m. —Saturday, March 8: Dat Phan from Last Comic Standing. 7 and 9:30 p.m. —Sunday, March 9: Two Milk Minimum at 4:30 p.m. and Silly Sundays Open Mic/Auditions at 9 p.m. —Thursday, March 13: First Timer Funnies with Matt Davis. 8 p.m. —Friday, March 14: Sarah Tiana from Reno 911. 7 and 9:30 p.m.

—Saturday, March 15: Sarah Tiana from Reno 911. 7 and 9:30 p.m. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: Two-drink minimum. Info: (909) 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, March 7: Flattop Tom and his Jump Cats (jump blues/swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, March 8: Phat Cat Swinger (swing/big band). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, March 9: The Happiness Jazz Band (jazz). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, March 11: Technopagan (electronic). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, March 12: Open Jam Night with Geno’s Standard Band. 8 p.m. —Thursday, March 13: Sand Storm. 7 p.m. —Friday, March 14: Big Joe and the Night Train. 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, March 15: Little Faith (gospel/soul). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and over after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. (909) 625-4808. —Friday, March 7: Miss Shevaughn & Yuma Wray (Americana). 10 p.m. —Saturday, March 8: Claremont Voodoo Society (blues). 10 p.m. —Sunday, March 9: Piano Sunday with Patrick Vargas at 6 p.m. followed by Cinema Sundays featuring The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus (1968) at 9:30 p.m. —Tuesday, March 11: King Trivia Night. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, March 12: Wine Wednesday with music by Joe Atman at 9:30 p.m. —Thursday, March 13: Vintage Music with Mark and Patrick (jazz) at 8:30 p.m. and DJ Sharp at 11 p.m. —Friday, March 14: Lovey Dove (indie/rock). 10 p.m. —Saturday, March 15: O Sensei (rock). 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on FriCrossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #253
Across
1. Word in an Ernest Hemingway title 5. Musical literary piece 8. Shoot 12. Classic Valentino role, with "the" 14. Windmill part 16. Spark 17. Japanese fencing 18. Wraps up 19. Citrus peel 20. Hot dog cover 22. Just a bit 23. Mandela's polit. party 24. The "Opera" guy 26. CHS principal, Brett 30. Sunny-side-up item 31. Somewhat, in music 32. Spanish dance 35. Classy org.? 38. Opening for peace talks

days and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). (909) 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. Happy hour specials are only valid in the bar and lounge areas. (909) 767-2255. —Margarita Mondays: $2 house margaritas, $3 house wine, $3 delirium tremens and $3 bolawnies. —Tequila Tuesdays: $2 house tequila, $3 house wine, $3 Coronas and $3 nachos. —Whiskey Wednesdays: $2 house scotch or bourbon, $3 house wine, $3 Stella and $3 bruschetta. —Thirsty Thursdays: Half-off all drinks and appetizers all evening. —Finest Fridays: $2 house vodka, $3 Pomona Queen, Green Flash and Hanger 24. Plus $3 house wine, $4 nachos and $6 classic burger and fries all evening. Kimera performs Gypsy Kings-style music. —Saturdays and Sundays: $3 Bloody Marys, mimosas and Afghan fries from opening to closing. Live jazz music is performed on weekends.

COURIER CROSSWORD

39. Join in marriage 40. Scarf material 41. Funk band 42. Noblewomen 45. Creole veggie 46. Census datum 47. Necklace adornments, often 49. He's been named CUSD president, Steven _____ 53. Train-reversing track arrangement 54. Home for Samuel Beckett 55. Affection 61. Crowning point 62. Small sewing gear holder 63. Weird 64. In the home of: French 65. Gets dark 66. Charleston, e.g. 67. Harbor 68. Tiffany Network

69. Dregs of wine

Down
1. Expresses curiosity 2. Perlman of "Cheers" 3. Computer offering 4. Far __ of the moon 5. Cram too many people into 6. Partner of Fox on "The X-Files" 7. Finally do 8. Activity on a range 9. Pinhead 10. Slowly in music 11. "Call Me ___," Berlin musical 13. It means "book" in Arabic 15. Job preceder 21. Door opener 25. A while back 26. Chooses 27. Small salmon 28. Tapi____ 29. End of a parent's order 33. Hawaiian garland 34. Song in The Sound of Music 35. Creep (along) 36. Civil wrong 37. "___, poor Yorrick" Hamlet 40. Chinese food pan 42. Romanian currency 43. Plant used to prevent erosion on banked roadsides 44. Protein-full bean 46. Allergic reaction 48. Waxed, old style 49. Robin of "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" 50. Chinese fruit 51. Security system status 52. Madcap 56. Silly 57. Breakfast, lunch, dinner 58. Sea eagle 59. Likable 60. Some souvenirs

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #252

909.621.4761
Friday 03-07-14

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

26

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS
EMPLOYMENT MARKETPLACE
Antiques
A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 909-593-1846. www.kensoldenoddities.com. La Verne. AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 214 W. Foothill Blvd. 909-621-6628.

BULLETINS
Business
REDUCE your cable bill! Get an All-Digital Satellite system installed for free and programming starting at $24.99 per month. Free HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, so call now! 877-366-4509. (Cal-SCAN) REDUCE your cable bill! Get a whole-home satellite system installed at no cost and programming starting at $19.99 monthly. Free HD/DVR. Upgrade to new callers, so call now, 1-866-9829562. (Cal-SCAN) DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1888-806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT
Coordinator
ILS/SLS Coordinator to supervisor and direct service for persons with disabilities who reside in the community. Seeking a professional who has management skills, is well organized, a self starter, flexible with their schedule, passionate about empowering and advocating for those in our communities. Must have valid driverʼs license, auto insurance, a reliable vehicle, minimum of five years in the Human Service System, two years experience in supervising others, proficient in Word and Excel, awareness of community and government programs, awareness or willingness to learn sign language is a plus. Call 909 599-3184 ext. 540 for more detailed info.

rentals..............26 services...........27 legals..............30 real estate.......32
RENTALS
Condo For Rent
BEAUTIFUL three bedroom, three bathroom condo. Hardwood floors and granite counters in the kitchen. Fireplace in family room. Private patio and balcony. Inside laundry hookups. Association pool, spa and clubhouse. $1725 monthly. CBTC 909-621-6761.

Help Wanted
TRUCK drivers, obtain Class ACDL in two-and-a-half weeks. Company sponsored training. Also hiring recent truck school graduates, experienced drivers. Must be 21 or older. Call 866275-2349. (Cal-SCAN) OUTSIDE sales. Part-time, full-time. Work from home. Make your own schedule. Commission based program. Self-starter, motivated, experience in advertising sales a plus! Send resume to cecelia@cnpa.com or fax 916288-6003. No phone calls please! (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: A-CDL train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. 877-369-7091.
www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com.

Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free towing, 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

City of Claremont
Community and Human Services Manager $6,668 - $8,056 per month (38 hour work week) We are looking for a highly motivated, self-starter with excellent customer service skills to manage, plan, direct, organize and supervise public works maintenance/operations including parks, facilities, sewer, storm drain and roadway infrastructure. Qualified applicants will have five years of experience in community services, including three years in a supervisory capacity and a Bachelorʼs Degree. A Masterʼs Degree is highly desirable. Additional information about job duties and qualifications are available on the city website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us or from the Personnel Office at (909) 399-5450. Completed application required position is open until filled, first review date is April 3, 2014. EOE.

Financial
STRUGGLING with your mortgage and worried about foreclosure? Reduce your mortgage and save money. Legal loan modification services. Free consultation. Call Preferred Law, 1800-587-1350. (Cal-SCAN) GUARANTEED income for your retirement. Avoid market risk and get guaranteed income in retirement! Call for a free copy of our safe money guide plus annuity quotes from A-rated companies! 800375-8607. (Cal-SCAN)

Apartment For Rent
ONE bedroom, one bathroom upstairs unit in Quail Creek. Water and trash included. Onsite laundry. $1100 monthly. WSPM 909-621-5941.

(Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know 144 million US adults read a newspaper print copy each week? Discover the power of newspaper advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com. (CalSCAN) AUTO accident attorney. Injured in an auto accident? Call InjuryFone for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don’t wait, call now. 1800-958-5341. (Cal-SCAN) DID you know that not only does newspaper media reach a huge audience, they also reach an engaged audience? Discover the power of newspaper advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN) DID you know newspapergenerated content is so valuable it’s taken and repeated, condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted, copied, edited and emailed countless times throughout the day by others? Discover the power of newspaper advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN) DID you know seven in 10 Americans or 158 million US adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the power of newspaper advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Health
LIBERATION by American Standard Walk-In Bath. Don’t struggle getting out of a normal bathtub. Stay in your home longer, safely, independently. Liberation WalkIn Baths commended by the Arthritis Foundation. Best lifetime warranty in the industry. Hydrotherapy, chromatherapy, aromatherapy no extra cost. Installation included! Get $1000 off. Call toll-free today, 1-866599-2186. (Cal-SCAN) MEDICAL Guardian-Top rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a second waterproof alert button for free and more. Only $29.95 per month. 800761-2855. (Cal-SCAN) SAFE Step Walk-In Tub alert for seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets. Less than four-inch step-in. Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American made. Installation included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 off. (Cal-SCAN)

House For Rent
THREE bedrooms, two bathrooms. Fireplace. Community center, pool and spa. One-car garage, plus one. $1850. Euclid Management BRE#00933411. 909-981-4131. WONDERFUL four bedroom single-story home on almost 1/4 acre lot. Three-car garage and RV parking. Remodeled kitchen and family room. Master bedroom with sliding door to spacious backyard. Located in north Claremont close to wilderness park and trails. $2800 monthly. CBTC 909-621-6761.

Garage Sales
MOVING sale. 2911 Rhodelia Ave., Claremont. Saturday and Sunday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Furniture, micellaneous.

MARKETPLACE
Gigantic Neighborhood Yard Sale

For Sale
SAWMILLS from only $4897. Make and save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free information/DVD. www.NorwoodSawmills.com. 1-800-5781363, ext.300N. (Cal-SCAN)

30 plus homes! Saturday, March 8 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
City of Claremont, north of Base Line, south of Alamosa, east of Indian Hill and west of Mills. Start location 421 Miramar. Follow the signs and join the fun! Deborah Danhof and Yolanda Maldonado, your community partners.

Studio For Rent
SPACIOUS studio. Two bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms, built-ins, forced a/c, fireplace, two- car attached garage, private patio. Evenings, 909-982-3732.

Want To Buy
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime, 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
EARN $500 a day. Insurance agents needed. Leads, no cold calls. Commissions paid daily. Lifetime renewals. Complete training. Health/dental insurance. Life insurance license required. Call, 1-888-713-6020. (Cal-SCAN) ATTENTION drivers: 60 years of stability. Up to 50 CPM plus quality hometime. $1000 weekly, CDL-A required. 1-877258-8782. www.ad-drivers.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800-945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
ONE call, does it all! Fast and reliable handyman services. Call ServiceLive and get referred to a pro today: Call 800-958-8267. (Cal-SCAN) DIRECTV two year savings event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirectTV gives you two years of savings and a free Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-291-0350. (Cal-SCAN)

AUTO

Coyote Sightings
DOG attacked by coyote on Sixth Street near Indian Hill Boulevard. at 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 27. Always make sure to keep close watch on small animals.

Beautiful 2001 BMW 740i. Original owner. 42,000 miles. All paperwork. M Sport package. Must see! Asking $15,000. Contact Joe, 909-784-8889.

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 03-07-14

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

27

Carpet Service
ED EY The Carpet Guy. Carpet repairs and re-stretching. Claremont resident. Free estimates. 909-621-1867. ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 909-621-1182.

Contractor
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 909-946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

Electrician

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Handyman
Claremont Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area. HOME Repair by Ken. Local for 11 years. We can get it done for you! 909-374-0373.

Serving Claremont Since 1995. Residential, Commercial.
Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, troubleshooting, landscape lighting, rewires and LED lighting. Free estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 909-626-3933.

Cooking

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149 Fresh Healthy Food Personal Chef Special Diets Tasty Party Fare Cooking Classes Private Lessons www.LotsaFlavor.com Chef Linda Heilpern 909-625-9194

Fences & Gates
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 909-920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 909-621-4761.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. Garden Maintenance Hand-pull weeding, mowing, trimming, sprinkler work, monthly service, cleanups and junk removal. Free estimates. David, 909-374-1583

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Drywall

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways. THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

909-599-9530

House Cleaning
Shirley's Cleaning Service 28 years in business. Office/residential No job too small. Free estimates. We do spring cleaning! 909-730-8564 EXPERIENCED cleaning lady will clean offices, homes, apartments. Great worker with references! Free estimates. 909-618-5402. ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate. Licensed. 909-986-8009. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 25 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Hauling. Move in/out. In home care. House/pet sitting. 10 percent discount to Claremont College faculty. Robyn, 909-621-3929.

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909241-7671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-251-2013. Lic.922000

Girl Friday
I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-6260027, anytime!

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Garage Doors

Contractor Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 909-945-7775. www.bath-brite.com PPS General Contractor. Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows, electrical and plumbing. Serving Claremont for 25 years. Lic.846995. 951-237-1547. WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

SERVICE * REPAIR * INSTALL Doors, Openers, Gates Same Day 24/7 Emergency Service 909-596-3300 accessdoorsco.com

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwill doit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to finish remodeler. Kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting. Lots more! Paul, 909-919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

Hayden’s Services Inc.

Gardening
JIM Hunt's Gardening Service. Free estimates. Senior/Veterans discount. One time clean-ups and hauling. www.creeksidelandscape.org. 909-489-3758.

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

SERVICES
Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Friday 03-07-14

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

28

Landscaping
Dale's Tree & Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting, irrigation and yard cleanup. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381

Painting
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron 909-615-4858 Lic.778506 COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTER, stucco, drywall, texture. Small job specialist. 909-629-7576. Unlicensed. Local 30 years.

Sprinklers & Repair
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 909-621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604.

Tutoring
CLASSROOM teacher, formerly of Lindamood-Bell, available to tutor all subjects, K-8. Specializing in literacy for those with learning issues. Upland, Claremont, surrounding areas. Gina 510-301-6004.

Plumbing
STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 * Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Upholstery

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

Tile

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Hayden’s Services Inc.

Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888-764-7688. MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray, 909-731-3511.

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

Weed Abatement
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Please call 909-989-9786.

Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning and removals. Landscaping, corrective and restoration trimming and yard clean up. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 909-946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909-629-6960. Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call: 909-946-1123 951-522-0992

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

Learn Japanese

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-922-8042. www.vjpaint.com.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.917874. 909-945-1995

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday afternoons/evenings. All levels welcome. Excellent brain exercise for seniors! 909-228-4256.

Party Staffing

Roofing
Professional Servers and Bartenders Set-up, serve, clean-up 25 years experience 909-628-2866
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 909-624-5080, 909-596-4095. D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

BAUER TREE CARE 40 plus years in Claremont. Pruning of your small and medium perennials. 909-624-8238 www.bauertreecare.com

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

Sprinklers & Repair
JIM Hunt's Sprinkler Service. Installation and repairs. Save money on your water bill, convert to drought tolerant landscaping and irrigation. www.creaksidelandscape.org. 909-489-3785.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 909-984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691

909.621.4761
Friday 03-07-14

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

29

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2014 033738 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as GLOBAL HOMESTAY SERVICES, 511 Clarion Place, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Shane Jason Valdez, 511 Clarion Place, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 01/02/2014. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Shane Jason Valdez Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/07/14. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 14, 21, 28 and March 7, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2014 032564 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as WILD BIRDS UNLIMITED OF CLAREMONT, 911 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 6035 Hilton Head Ln., Fontana, CA 92336. Registrant(s): Christopher R. Verma, 6035 Hilton Head Ln., Fontana, CA 92336. Angelica S. Verma, 6035 Hilton Head Ln., Fontana, CA 92336. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Christopher R. Verma Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/06/14. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 14, 21, 28 and March 7, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2014 032322 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as NITRO TEA, 1035 Fuller Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Nancy Jones, 1035 Fuller Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. Richard Jones, 1035 Fuller Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 02/01/2014. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Nancy Jones Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/06/14. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 14, 21, 28 and March 7, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2014 023536 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as SOUL FOOD & GOODS, 2581 Jasmine Ct., La Verne, CA 91750. Registrant(s): Cinthia Kay Karim, 2581 Jasmine Ct., La Verne, CA 91750. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Cinthia Kay Karim Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 01/29/14. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 28, March 7, 14 and 21, 2014

LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA13-592781-AB Order No.: 8350065 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/28/1984. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): ARDALAN POURTEYMOOR AND BONNIE LEE MARIE POURTEYMOOR, HUSBAND AND WIFE. Recorded: 7/11/1984 as Instrument No. 84-828955 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 3/21/2014 at 9:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $26,213.45 The purported property address is: 135 NASSAU PLACE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8671-031-031 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-13-592781-AB . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-13-592781-AB IDSPub #0062315 2/28/2014 3/7/2014 3/14/2014 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA13-589090-JP Order No.: 130166156-CA-API YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/20/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): JOYCE M HAWK, UNMARRIED Recorded: 10/20/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2331642 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 3/20/2014 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: At the Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, in the Vineyard Ballroom Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $340,980.03 The purported property address is: 142 BRYN MAWR RD, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8322-003-011 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-13-589090-JP . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 800280-2832 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-13-589090-JP IDSPub #0062297 2/21/2014 2/28/2014 3/7/2014

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 7, 2014
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: KS017708 Petition Of BURKE SCOTT WILLIAMS, For Change of Name and Gender TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: BURKE SCOTT WILLIAMS Has filed a petition with this court for a decree changing petitioner’s name to (Proposed Name): NANCY SCOTT BURKE WILLIAMS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 28, 2014 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept.: O Room: 543 The address of the Court is: Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Pomona Courthouse South A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 /s/ Robert A. Dukes Dated: February 14, 2014 Judge of the Superior Court Petitioner: Burke Scott Williams 737 Lander Circle Claremont, CA 91711 Tel.: 909-607-1603 PUBLISH: 02/21/14, 02/28/14, 03/07/14, 03/14/14 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2014 019470 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as STRAIGHT ARROW LEGAL SERVICES, LEGACY LAW LEGAL SERVICES, 562 Clark Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: PO Box 248, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Teresa Lynn Morrell, 562 Clark Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Teresa Lynn Morrell Title: Principal / Owner This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 01/24/14. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 21, 28, March 7 and 14, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2014037362 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as GRIDWORKS LOUNGE, 685 West San Jose Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Edwin Villa, 685 West San Jose Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Alexander Baracskai, 234 East College Way, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by Copartners. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Edwin Villa Title: Copartner This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/11/14. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 21, 28, March 7 and 14, 2014 ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO: 2011139828 Current file no. 2014053838 The following person has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name BOON COMPANION, located at (street address of principal place of business) 145 Harvard Ave, Claremont, CA 91711. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on 12/06/2006 in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: Boon Companion Inc, 145 Harvard Ave, Claremont, CA 91711. The business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/ County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/28/14. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Reed Johnson Title: Secretary Publish: March 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2014

30

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2014 050916 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as JOE’S CAB COMPANY, 6714 Golondrina Dr., San Bernardino, CA 92404, San Bernardino County. Registrant(s): Maria Luisa Salcedo, 6714 Golondrina Dr., San Bernardino, CA 92404. Jose W Salcedo, 6714 Golondrina Dr., San Bernardino, CA 92404. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 02/06/2014. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Maria Luisa Salcedo Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/25/14. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2014 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: KS017762 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: ANNE PUTNEY SWIRE Filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ANNE PUTNEY SWIRE to Proposed name: ANNE ELIZABETH SCOTT-PUTNEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 2, 2014 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept.: J Room: 418, Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 East District – Pomona Courthouse South A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 /s/ Dan T. Oki, Dated: February 24, 2014 Judge of the Superior Court Attorney for the Petitioner: Thomas C. Brayton SBN: 41272 Law Offices Of Thomas C. Brayton 250 West First Street, Suite 320 Claremont, CA 91711-4741 Tel.: 909-447-8500 PUBLISH: 03/07/14, 03/14/14, 03/21/14, 03/28/14 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2014026180 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as THINK TANK MEDIA, THINK TANK LOCAL, 337 E. Arrow Hwy., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Rande Vick, 250 College Park Dr. T16, Upland, CA 91786. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. /s/ Rande Vick Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 01/31/14. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 28, March 7, 14 and 21, 2014

LEGAL TENDER
Notice of Public Hearing for Proposed Amendments to Titles 16, 17, and 18 of the Claremont Municipal Code, Revising and Updating Various Chapters and Sections, and Determination of CEQA Exemption Notice is hereby given that the Planning Commission of the City of Claremont will hold a PUBLIC HEARING to consider proposed amendments to Title 16 (Zoning), Title 17 (Subdivision Ordinance), and Title 18 (Signs) of the Claremont Municipal Code. The Public Hearing will be held on Tuesday, March 18, 2014, beginning at 7:00 p.m., in the City Council Chamber, located at 225 West Second Street, Claremont. At the conclusion of the Public Hearing, the Commission will be requested to make a recommendation to the City Council regarding the approval of the amendments. Proposed amendments to Title 16 (Zoning) will do the following: • Delete permit requirement for the rental of bedrooms within a single-family unit. • Delete code provisions pertaining to Residential Unit Developments. • Revise Table 16.051.A, Permitted Use Chart for Commercial and Industrial Districts, as follows: o Revise the regulations for some uses that currently require a Conditional Use Permit, to permit with a Special Use and Development Permit. o Revise uses permitted in the Freeway Commercial district, to prohibit several uses that are currently permitted. o Revise uses permitted in the Business/Industrial Park district, delete requirements for Conditional Use Permit for some uses, permit some uses that are currently prohibited, and prohibit a use that is currently permitted. o Clarify/revise requirements and permitted locations for some uses including: Massage, Educational/Instruction/Day Care, Electronic Cigarettes, Hooka Lounge/Smoking Rooms, Fortune Telling, Cash for Gold and Diamond, and Photocopying and Photo Developing. • Delete references to the City Redevelopment Agency. • Revise the review process for Institutional Master Plans. • Revise regulations and review requirements for Commercial Antennas and Wireless Telecommunications Facilities. • Simplify language regarding non-commercial flags and balloons, clarify restrictions on flagpoles, and allow large flags with sign permits. • Add bus stop facilities to the list of off-site improvements the City may require for new development. • Revise noise measurement standards to make more meaningful. • Amend and condense general architectural review criteria to make more understandable. • Delete definitions for terms not used elsewhere in Title 16, amend definitions of terms that need clarification in order to be consistent with State law, and add definitions of new terms in the Glossary. Proposed amendments to Title 17 (Subdivision Ordinance) will do the following: • Add bus stop facilities to the list of off-site improvements the City may require of new development. • Revise requirements for parcel mergers. Proposed amendments to Title 18 (Signs) will do the following: • Clarify provisions pertaining to the review and approval of sign applications. • Correct definitions for illegal and abandoned signs, and update language for periodic inventories and abatement of such signs. • Clean up language for non-commercial flags and provide necessary flexibility for permitting flagpoles in setbacks. • Make changes to the language to simplify references to commercial freeway-oriented signs. • Simplify references to non-commercial flags, and authorize the Director of Community Development to approve flags, pennants and windsocks meeting certain requirements. • Authorize the Director of Community Development to approve non-substantial amendments to sign programs. Notice is also given that the City has determined that the amendments are exempt from the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the State CEQA Guidelines pursuant to State CEQA Guidelines Section 15061, subsection (b)(3), because it can be seen with certainty the amendments would not have the potential or possibility for causing a significant effect on the environment. Written comments may be submitted to the Director of Community Development Brian Desatnik, P.O. Box 880, Claremont, CA 91711. The public may also make comments on the proposed amendments at the scheduled public hearing. Questions may be directed to the City of Claremont Planning Division at (909) 399-5470. Copies of the proposed amendments are available for review at Claremont City Hall, located at 207 Harvard Avenue. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), if you need special assistance to participate in the above-mentioned public hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (909) 399-5461 “VOICE” or 1 (800) 735-2929 “TT/TTY.” Notification three (3) working days prior to the meeting, or time when special services are needed, will assist City staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide access to the meeting. Publish: March 7, 2014

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.: 1312537 Loan No.: 0500068291 A.P.N.: 8673-020039 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE Section 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO ABOVE IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 4/15/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor: HELEN SALIM. A WIDOWED WOMAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Carrington Foreclosure Services, LLC Recorded 4/20/2005 as Instrument No. 05 0915333 in book , page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Described as follows: PARCEL 1 OF PARCEL MAP NO. 26238,IN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT,IN THE COUNTY OF LA,STATE OF CALIF., AS PER MAP FILED IN BK-308 Pgs. 62 and 63 OF PARCEL MAPS,IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY Date of Sale: 4/1/2014 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,061,039.14 (Estimated) Street Address or other common designation of real property: 3888 STRASBOURG CT CLAREMEONT, CA 91711 A.P.N.: 8673-020-039 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1312537. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 02/28/2014 Carrington Foreclosure Services, LLC 1610 E. Saint Andrew Pl., Suite 150F Santa Ana, CA 92705 Automated Sale Information: (714) 7302727 or www.lpsasap.com for NON-SALE information: 888-313-1969 Shirley Best, Trustee Sale Specialist A-4445939 03/07/2014, 03/14/2014, 03/21/2014 T.S. No: D543325 CA Unit Code: D Loan No: PENNINGTON AP #1: 8314-012-029 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.D. SERVICE COMPANY, as duly appointed Trustee under the following described Deed of Trust WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (in the forms which are lawful tender in the United States) and/or the cashier's, certified or other checks specified in Civil Code Section 2924h (payable in full at the time of sale to T.D. Service Company) all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property hereinafter described: Trustor: SHAMILLA PENNINGTON Recorded June 19, 2007 as Instr. No. 20071471966 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County; CALIFORNIA , pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded November 14, 2013 as Instr. No. 20131622451 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County CALIFORNIA. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED JUNE 6, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. 180 CLAREMONT BOULEVARD, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 "(If a street address or common designation of property is shown above, no warranty is given as to its completeness or correctness)." Said Sale of property will be made in "as is" condition without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest as in said note provided, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. Said sale will be held on: MARCH 27, 2014, AT 10:30 A.M. *NEAR THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA POMONA, CA 91766 At the time of the initial publication of this notice, the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the above described Deed of Trust and estimated costs, expenses, and advances is $363,667.72. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 480-5690 or (800) 843-0260 ext 5690 or visit this Internet Web site: salestrack.tdsf.com, using the file number assigned to this case D543325 D. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Date: February 28, 2014 T.D. SERVICE COMPANY as said Trustee JOANNA L. DEVELASCO, ASSISTANT SECRETARY T.D. SERVICE COMPANY 4000 W. Metropolitan Drive, Suite 400 Orange, CA 928680000 The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 4805690 or (800) 843-0260 ext 5690 or you may access sales information at salestrack.tdsf.com. TAC# 968026 PUB: 03/07/14, 03/14/14, 03/21/14

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 7, 2014

31

ORDINANCE NO. 2014-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CLAREMONT CITY COUNCIL ADOPTING A ZONE CHANGE FROM MIXED USE 4 (MU4) TO RM MEDIUM RESIDENTIAL RM 3,000 (FILE #13-Z02) FOR A PROPERTY OWNED BY CV URBAN LAND, LLC., LOCATED AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF BASE LINE ROAD AND TOWNE AVENUE. APPLICANT – CV URBAN LAND, LLC. WHEREAS, an application for a Zone Change was submitted on June 11, 2013, at which time a request to rezone the subject property from MU4 to RM 3,000 was requested for the western half of the proposed project; and WHEREAS, the applicant has entered into agreements to purchase the subject properties with the intention of developing a residential project; and WHEREAS, on December 17, 2013, the Planning Commission conducted a duly noticed public hearing on the Tentative Tract Map (TTM) #71420, Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND), General Plan Amendment (GPA), and Zone Change (ZC), at which time all interested parties were heard; and WHEREAS, on December 17, 2013, on a 5-11 vote, the Planning Commission, recommended approval of TTM #71420, GPA and ZC to the Claremont City Council; and WHEREAS, on December 17, 2013, the Planning Commission recommended approval of the above referenced projects’ MND; and WHEREAS, on February 11, 2014, the City Council conducted a noticed public hearing regarding the proposed TTM #71420, GPA, ZC and MND, at which time all interested persons were heard. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED that the Claremont City Council does ordain as follows: Section 1.The City Council finds in light of the whole record, that the project will not have a significant effect on the environment adopted as City Council Resolution No. 2014-11, the MND reflects the independent judgment of the City Council, the City Council finds the MND as prepared by staff be adopted, and directs staff to file a Notice of Determination. Section 2.The City Council hereby finds that the zone change to RM Medium Density Residential (RM 3,000) shown in Attachment A is in the best interest of the City based on Section 16.315.000 of the Municipal Code because such changes will further several goals and policies of the General Plan, which include the following: Goal 2–2: Preserve the City’s distinctive residential character by maintaining land use patterns that strengthen our neighborhoods. Policy 8-3.1: Provide for sites that can facilitate and encourage the development of a variety of housing consistent with the City’s identified local needs and its regional housing responsibility. Policy 8-3.4: Encourage affordable housing to be distributed throughout the City to create economically diverse neighborhoods and to minimize concentrated impacts on the schools in areas of the City with existing affordable housing. Section 3.The City Council hereby changes the zoning designation on the property attached as Attachment A from MU4 to RM 3,000, based on the reasons specified in Sections 1 and 2 above. Section 4.The documents and materials that constitute the record of proceedings are located at the City of Claremont City Hall, 207 Harvard Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711, and are available for public review during normal business hours of the City. Section 5.The Mayor shall sign this ordinance and the city clerk shall attest and certify to passage and adoption of it, and within fifteen (15) days, publish in the Claremont Courier, a semi-weekly newspaper of general circulation, printed, published, and circulated in the City of Claremont, and thirty (30) days thereafter it shall take effect and be in force. Passed, approved, and adopted this 25th day of February 2014. ________________________________ Mayor, City of Claremont ATTEST: _____________________________ City Clerk, City of Claremont Approved as to Form: _____________________________ Publish: March 7, 2014 City Attorney, City of Claremont

909.621.4761
Friday 03-07-14

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

32

REAL ESTATE

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New Listing!

1221 HARVARD AVE., CLAREMONT Listing Agent: Carol Wiese Rare, historic Claremont Village two-on-alot! The main house is a 1911, two-story Craftsman with four bedrooms, 1.75 remodeled bathrooms on 2,034 sq. ft. Covered front porch, hardwood flooring, beamed ceiling, elegant fireplace, built-ins, bay window plus upgrades to plumbing and electric. Back house, circa 1930, has separate alley access, three bedrooms, 1.75 bathrooms, covered porch, fenced yard and carport. $985,000. (H1221)

CLAREMONT WEST ARMS CONDO Two bedroom, two bathroom end unit. New carpet, paint, kitchen sink, granite counters, dishwasher, updated master bathroom and much more. Spacious living room with cozy fireplace. Three community pools. Walking distance to the Village, Metrolink, Claremont Colleges, parks and schools. Affordably priced at $262,500. (I615) 918 ST. CATHERINE WAY, CLAREMONT Outstanding customized pool home located on a cul-de-sac in the Thompson Creek neighborhood of prestigious north Claremont. Four bedrooms and four bathrooms including two master suites. Spacious family room has a fireplace and surround sound. The open floorplan features a spacious foyer with stone flooring, a gorgeous eat-in kitchen with an enormous peninsula, granite counters and stainless appliances. Large patio with ceiling fans, lights and speakers. Fountain, putting green, spa and pool. Crown molding, shutters, copper pipes, dual-pane windows, skylights and more! $789,000. (S918)

Sales Associates: Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Carol Curtis, Broker

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

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107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 7, 2014

33

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

Mason Prophet

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Absolutely very professional. Smoothest transaction I have ever experienced when comparing to any other large purchases I have ever made. Mason has really raised the bar for me to evaluate any other customer service in any field. He is very knowledgeable, has great rapport and was absolutely on top of [every step]. I had some very tight deadlines in purchasing my home and I feel very fortunate that I came across Mason as I consider him an integral part of why I was able to meet my purchase goals and deadlines. My parents are now considering moving into the area and of course, this is a no-brainer, they will call Mason when they are ready. —Andy P.

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302 Fairway, Placentia - Board & Care Facility

115 Taylor, Montebello - 8 Unit Income Property

551 Columbia, Pomona - Pending

13852 Dartmouth, Chino - Sold

1693 Chattanooga, Claremont - Sold

597 San Francisco, Pomona - Sold

1572 Excel Court, Upland - Sold

15164 Jackrabbit, Fontana - Sold

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LA VERNE OAKS HILLSIDE ESTATE - $3,200,000
Six bedrooms and seven bathrooms on two-acres of landscape. Wine cellar and cigar bar, skylights and a masonry fireplace. Approximately 10,000 sq. ft. of living space, crown molding, wrought iron doors, custom lighting, French doors and windows with plantation shutters. Master suite is on ground floor with full bathroom, formal dining and living rooms, gourmet kitchen, music room, media room, guest wing with two suites and chauffeur quarters. Wrap around driveway, four-car garage and three-car portecochère. Pool with three waterfalls and Jacuzzi. (B25553)

JUST SOLD!

SALE PENDING!

CLAREMONT VILLAGE SPANISH - $725,000
Historically known as the Hugh S. Shaw residence, designed and built by M.D. Hershey circa 1926. Mediterranean architectural elements including arches and patio colonnade. Wood accents and oak hardwood flooring plus wrought iron fixtures. Four bedrooms and two bathrooms. Large living room with coved ceiling and fireplace. Formal dining room. Kitchen with breakfast nook and separate laundry room. Bolted foundation. Two-car garage. Beautiful garden setting with tall mature trees and multiple patio and balcony areas. Spacious lot nearly 1/4 acres. (E505)

2346 SIENA CT., CLAREMONT
Single-story home with five bedrooms, three bathrooms and 3,155 sq. ft. of living space. Situated on a 16,162 sq. ft. lot. Offered at $830,000. BRE#00896039

SALE PENDING!

VILLAGE SPANISH COMMERCIAL - $415,000
Just blocks away from the downtown Claremont Village. With prime Arrow Highway frontage, just west of Indian Hill. Built circa 1932. Although presently used as a professional office for decades, there is a potential formal living room with fireplace and adjacent dining room.Two bedrooms plus tandem room off second bedroom. Kitchen with eating area. Inside laundry room. Covered porte cochere parking plus detached converted garage (used for storage only). (A445)

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SPRAWLING CUSTOM RANCH
This amazing San Antonio Heights immaculate custom is minutes to shopping and freeways yet very secluded in its magnificent foothill setting situated far back from the street. Warm and inviting home creates a flowing and flexible floorplan with windows and glass doors that allow an abundance of natural light. The comfortably casual great room opens to the gourmet kitchen with lots of workspace. Private master suite is situated separately from the other bedrooms, and master bathroom has been stylishly updated with travertine and marble appointments. Entertaining is a breeze from the front courtyard to the generous bonus room boasting a large wet bar, and continues outdoors with beautifully manicured grounds. Don't wait, call for your private tour, 909-398-1810. $730,000. (M2431)

ABSOLUTELY STUNNING ESTATE
Situated in northeast Claremont on just under one acre is this beautifully maintained property. The circular drive surrounded by impeccable grounds welcomes you to enter into the open and bright foyer. Formal living and dining rooms that spill over into the spacious family room is also open to the kitchen boasting double islands with granite counters. The spacious game room allows for family fun and opens to the backyard, making informal entertaining a breeze. Play tennis on the north/south court or relax on the tasteful patio. The interior offers two downstairs bedroom suites plus an office, making the ideal floorplan for extended family, a nanny or working from home. Move upstairs to find the master suite with cozy sitting area featuring a dual-sided fireplace. This home gives many options upstairs including additional rooms that can be utilized as a teen room or a library area. A rare find, call now to schedule a tour, 909-398-1810. $1,750,000. (P767)

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CALIFORNIA LIVING
Spacious five bedroom home with chic decor in the highly desired neighborhood of the Colonies! The comfortably casual family room with fireplace is open to the kitchen creating a great room effect. Prepare gourmet dinners in the kitchen with granite counters and contemporary cabinetry. Formal dining room. Manicured backyard with mature palms and lush lawns. The built-in BBQ with its granite top is ready for grilling parties. 909-398-1810. $574,900. (R1860)

AN UNEXPECTED PLEASURE
Charming single-story home in a desirable neighborhood of Claremont. Home boasts beautiful hardwood floors, newer windows, sliding glass door, upgraded kitchen cabinets, newer heating and air. Family and friends will gather around the cozy fireplace in the family room. The backyard is a great size for entertaining! Call for your appointment today on this three bedroom plus den home so you do not miss this Claremont find! 909-398-1810. $510,000. (A957)

CHELSEA PARK
Completely renovated home has been tastefully upgraded and updated. Enter to find gorgeous laminate flooring, fresh paint and decorator window treatments. Prepare gourmet dishes in the beautiful kitchen with granite counters and brand new stainless steel appliances that have never been used! Spectacular master bedroom and bathroom feature newly tiled separate shower and free-standing tub. 909-398-1810. $475,000. (S1400)

EXCEPTIONAL LIVING
Beauty, grace and masterful design define this gorgeous home ideally situated on an interior cul-desac. Entertain guests in the formal living and dining areas, and enjoy family moments in the family room with its gorgeous stacked stone fireplace. Enjoy cooking in the gorgeous kitchen where the most discerning chef would be impressed! Versatile floorplan features a bedroom and bathroom downstairs, and a huge open loft upstairs. 909398-1810. $625,000. (O1848)

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CLAREMONT
Only once in a blue moon will you find a fantastic one-of-a-kind custom home. Look no further than this fabulous single-level Henderson-built custom estate, brilliantly created with a designer's eye and craftsman's hand. The formal living and dining rooms provide the perfect backdrop for entertaining while the remodeled kitchen opens to the generously-sized family room that boasts a cozy fireplace. The kitchen nook overlooks the hillsides and allows streaming sunlight into the space. Distinctive four bedroom, 2.5 bathroom home with level and open backyard features fruit trees and plenty of room with a pool and access to RV parking. In addition there is an oversized 2.5-car garage and additional parking area. Ideally situated close to Thompson Creek Trail on a quiet street. Discover your dream home for the exemplary price of just $599,999! Call now for your personal appointment to see this lovely home, 909-398-1810. Hurry, this won't last! (L2219)

WORLD CLASS RESIDENCE
Experience the majestic presence of this enchanting northeast Claremont custom estate beautifully situated on a rural acre. Enter through the mahogany double entry doors where masterful design unfolds from the imported crystal chandelier to the architectural columns and custom ceiling detailing. Exciting options abound in this spacious floorplan where all living is done downstairs with the exception of a fabulous master bedroom retreat located upstairs. There is a second master bedroom downstairs. This is an ideal scenario for multi-generational living. An aura of elegance surrounds this gracious estate, which boasts fountains as well as a pool and spa with a lovely manicured grass area perfect for playing croquet or badminton. Totally private with mountain views, this is a must see! 909-398-1810. $1,692,500. (H3624)

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UPLAND Must see! Spacious, remodeled, tri-level home located in Upland. New paint, carpet, tile, kitchen cabinets, granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances. Large fenced front and backyard with all new landscaping and alley access. Large covered patio. Central air and heat throughout house with new windows and patio door. Nice back yard for entertaining. Automatic sprinkler system to keep the yard green all year. Two-car garage with lots of space in the driveway. Three bedrooms and a bathroom on third level, master bedroom/master bathroom on second level and common areas and guest bathroom on first level. Floor plan is great for entertaining! If you are looking for a turnkey property, this is it! $429,000. (Upl1337Arr)

CHINO Four bedroom, three bathroom home is situated in a cul-desac and features upgrades. Wood floors, crown molding and granite counter tops. The kitchen opens to the family room rounding to a downstairs bedroom and a full bathroom. A large laundry room connects to an office space with a hide-a-way room. Upstairs master bedroom, two more bedrooms and another full bathroom. Outside built in BBQ and an in-ground spa by a pool-sized unit. $525,000. (Ch13234Chuk)

FONTANA This three bedroom, two bathroom property is located on a cul-de-sac with a large lot. New roof. Beautiful double door entry. Interior light fixtures feature combo ceiling fan with contemporary upgraded dining room light and master bathroom light fixtures. Recessed lighting in living room and master bedroom. Upgraded kitchen has granite counter tops with stainless steel appliances and refrigerator (included). Faux wood blinds throughout house with easy to care for wood laminate flooring. Full guest bathroom with upgraded counter/vanity and bead board on wall with tile flooring. Remodeled master bathroom with mosaic tile shower and upgraded shower fixtures. Washer/dryer with gas dryer hookup in finished garage. Backyard has covered patio, new vinyl fencing. $285,000. (Fon16757Mal)

BEAUMONT Beautiful six bedroom, four-and-a-half bathroom home on quiet cul-de-sac with mountain views. Double door entry, formal living room, formal dining room and family room with fireplace. Kitchen has granite counters, breakfast bar attached to island, eating area, pantry, stainless steel convection oven, built-in microwave and a five-burner stovetop. Downstairs contains one bedroom and a den, which could be used as sixth bedroom (with no closet) and 1.5 bathrooms. Upstairs has four bedrooms, three bathrooms, two loft areas and laundry room with sink and storage. The master bedroom is complete with double door entry, walk-in closet, fireplace, oversized tub, dual sinks, separate shower and toilet areas. The yard includes shaded patio, RV parking pad and sand area for play equipment. Three-car attached garage and driveway for additional parking. Home is located in the neighborhood of Seneca Springs near parks, schools and freeway access. $365,000. (Beau1262Jack)

CLAREMONT This wonderful single-story, four bedroom home on a quiet cul-de-sac offers a spacious and open floorplan. The home sits on a nearly one-quarter acre lot with east/west exposure. The backyard affords views of the nearby mountains. The kitchen has been remodeled and updated. Cheerful and sunny kitchen and family room with fireplace. RV parking behind a gate and a three-car garage allow for generous parking and vehicle storage. Located in prestigious north Claremont close to wilderness park, only a few minutes away from the Village and Colleges. $629,000. (Clar2178Ursin)

CORONA Awesome ground level unit in a quiet complex surrounded by nature, bike and hiking trails. The complex features a pool area with club house and an additional spa area situated close to the unit as well as a beach volleyball court and basketball area. This one bedroom, one bathroom with walk-in closet unit is nicely equipped with granite counter tops and is very close to the assigned covered parking spot. Washer, dryer and refrigerator are included. Conveniently located near shopping and easy freeway access to 91, 241 toll road and 71. A spacious patio with access to living room and bedroom facing west allows for quiet lounging and relaxing. $179,000. (Cor2350Del)

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February 2014
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Hermam Janssen
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