MARINA SKENDZIC TITLE OF LESSON  Exploring The Human Condition: Art Production  Lesson 5 in a six week unit on exploring

the human condition CURRICULUM AREA & GRADE LEVEL  English / Grade 11  May be adapted for any high school grade level DATE OF LESSON  TBA CA COMMON CORE STANDARD  W.11-12.7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

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CA ELD STANDARDS  C. Productive / Emerging: 10b. Writing: b) Write brief summaries of texts and experiences using complete sentences and key words (e.g., from notes or graphic organizers). BIG IDEA ADDRESSED/ENDURING UNDERSTANDING:  Students will understand that the similarities between all human beings far outnumber the differences (i.e. “we’re all red inside”). ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS 1. How does understanding the human condition help you to be a self-actualized human being? 2. How does understanding the human condition help you to be a tolerant, understanding, and global citizen? OBJECTIVE(S) OR LEARNING GOAL(S)  Cognitive: Students will be able to answer questions on how social justice, art work, and the human condition are interrelated after completing an Art Splash to illustrate their ideas and then completing a Think-Tac-Toe activity.

ASSESSMENTS  Diagnostic - entry level & Formative - progress-monitoring: Art Splash (performance/presentation) and handout (attached)

PREDICTION OF LIKELY DIFFICULTIES STUDENTS MAY ENCOUNTER WITH THIS MATERIAL  This is a very abstract idea for young students and may be hard to grasp at first. They may not have ever heard of the human condition, so the topic needs to be introduced properly and thoroughly. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: What the teacher does Anticipatory Set

Greet class & take roll. Pull up Google on projector and type in “art splash” on the image search selection. Show students depictions of what an art splash looks like (5-7 minutes).

Instruction

Tell students they will have 45 minutes to do their own art splash. Instruct students that they are to use their self-generated ideas/reactions &/or quotes/excerpts on the human condition as it relates to global thinking, tolerance, acceptance, & social justice. Students are allowed to use ANY resources and handouts in ANY content area to collect information/image ideas for their art splash. Ask if students have questions – and to take out these resources (5 minutes).

Guided Practice

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Instruct students to brainstorm in their pre-selected groups and draw a sketch of the art they transfer to an art splash (10 minutes). Explain to students to make this brainstorm quick! Next, have students go somewhere on campus to do their art splash. When finished, they should take a picture of it an email it to the teacher for display after the chalk in gone. (45 minutes)

Independent Practice MARINA SKENDZIC Spring 2014

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Closure

Have students begin the Think-Tac-Toe activity. Depending on the time left in the class period, this may or may not need to be assigned for home-work to complete.


Transfer

Have students tour other groups’ art splashes to make meaning of this lesson and see what other ideas/depictions there are.

Explain to students that they will we applying the learning they did in this lesson in their history class during the closing lesson for this unit.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES: What the students do Anticipatory Set

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Students look at depictions of what an art splash looks like (5-7 minutes).

Instruction Students listen. Students take out ANY resources and handouts in ANY content area to collect information/image ideas for their art splash. Students ask questions if needed (5 minutes).

Guided Practice

 

Students to brainstorm in their pre-selected groups and draw a sketch of the art they transfer to an art splash (10 minutes). Students go somewhere on campus to do their art splash. When finished, they take a picture of it an email it to the teacher for display after the chalk in gone. (45 minutes)

Independent Practice


Closure

Students begin the Think-Tac-Toe activity. Depending on the time left in the class period, this may or may not need to be assigned for home-work to complete.


Transfer

Students tour other groups’ art splashes to make meaning of this lesson and see what other ideas/depictions there are.


Students listen.

INFO ABOUT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Student 1 o Readiness: CELDT Scaled Score: 610 – Early Advanced. Level 4. o Interests: Fashion/make-up, family o Learning Profile: Intuitive/sensing Student 2 o Readiness: CELDT Scaled Score: 602 – Early Advanced. Level 4. o Interests: Travel, reading o Learning Profile: Prefers partner work to group work or individual work Student 3 o Readiness: CELDT Scaled Score: 611 – Early Advanced. Level 4. o Interests: Family, football o Learning Profile: Visual, needs reinforcement of directions Student 4 o Readiness: CELDT Scaled Score: 652 – Advanced. Level 5. o Interests: Shopping, poetry o Learning Profile: Highly social Student 5 o Readiness: CELDT Scaled Score: 608 – Early Advanced. Level 4. o Interests: Cooking o Learning Profile: Shy, visual-kinesthetic Student 6 o Readiness: CELDT Scaled Score: 616 – Early Advanced. Level 4. MARINA SKENDZIC Spring 2014

MARINA SKENDZIC o Interests: Family o Learning Profile: Visual, shy, does not like presenting in front of the class Student 7 o Readiness: CELDT Scaled Score: 587 – Intermediate. Level 3. o Interests: Soccer (playing & watching) o Learning Profile: Audio-kinesthetic, works well in small groups

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DIFFERENTIATION FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS - choose area(s) as necessary based on information above  Content: Students will learn the same content as the rest of the class.  Process: I will approach these students to make sure they are not stuck on any steps.  Product: Students will produce the same product as the rest of the class. INFO ABOUT STUDENTS W/ SPECIAL NEEDS  Student 1 (IEP) o Disability Category: Autism o Learning Preference: Visual learner, friendly, aims to please o Modifications: extended time on tests, extended time on long assignments, break larger assignments into smaller units, access to safe room, alternate setting for tests (Room 317), needs 1-1 help at times, needs to be told explicitly the expectations. o Processing Deficits: theory of mind, executive processing, auditory/memory deficits. o Academic Ability: Difficulty with inferencing and higher level comprehension (abstract thinking). Writes an essay well but needs help editing & adding details. Student 2 (IEP) o Disability Category: Specific Learning Disability. o Learning Preference: Multi-modal. o Modifications: extended time on tests, alternate setting for tests, clarify directions. o Processing Deficits: visual & motor processing, short-term auditory memory. o Academic Ability: Reading & writing skills are at the Advanced level. Student 3 (IEP) o Disability Category: Autism. o Learning Preference: Multi-modal; speech & language services. o Health Concerns: glasses, history of asthma, & was born with a right club foot. o Modifications: extended time on tests, clarify directions. o Processing Deficits: Expressive & receptive language delays. o Academic Ability: At times, struggles with comprehension of grade-level material. Able to write a 5 paragraph essay with a thesis statement & supporting details, but may lack flow and consistent use of details. Student 4 (IEP) o Disability Category: Specific Learning Disability. o Learning Preference: No specified. o Health Concerns: General health is good. o Modifications: extended time on tests, clarify directions. o Academic Ability: Reading in the average range and functioning close to grade level. Write in the low average range but close to grade level. Student 5 (IEP) o Disability Category: Autism. o Learning Preference: Multi-modal; speech & language services. o Health Concerns: wears contacts – no current medications. o Modifications: Preferential seating, extended time of long assignments, alternate setting for tests (Room 317). o Processing Deficits: Executive functioning/theory of mind, speech-articulation/rapid speech. o Academic Ability: Strength is reading. Written expression – low average. Does very well despite low test scores. o Other: Has a tutor at home, he is a great golfer, can get stressed out because he wants all A’s.

DIFFERENTIATION FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS - choose area(s) as necessary based on information above    Content: Students will learn the same content as the rest of the class. Process: I will approach these students to make sure they are not stuck on any steps. Product: Students will produce the same product as the rest of the class.

RESOURCES:  Graphic organizer handout MARINA SKENDZIC Spring 2014

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Writing utensils Chalk for art splash

REFLECTION: Questions to consider after the lesson  Not applicable.

MARINA SKENDZIC Spring 2014

MARINA SKENDZIC Name: _____________________ Date: ______________________ Period: _____________________

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THE HUMAN CONDITION: THINK-TAC-TOE
Directions Choose three questions to answer from the Think-Tac-Toe below. You must answer three questions in a row to get Think-Tac-Toe! Circle the questions you want to answer, then answer them on the back side of this handout.

What does your art idea say Should we care for the weak about social justice? &/or poor, or let them fend for themselves?

How does studying the human condition help you to be more tolerant?

What is a natural environment, equality or hierarchy?

How should society treat their environment?

What is the best way to live together?

How is curiosity related to ideas of the human condition?

How does studying the human condition help you to be more understanding?

Is civilizations positive or negative?

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Think-Tac-Toe: Questions Answered
Selected QUESTION 1:

Selected QUESTION 2:

Selected QUESTION 3:

MARINA SKENDZIC Spring 2014

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