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In This Issue:
I. II. III. IV. V.

U.S. Edition March 2006

U.S. NGOs and Government Collaborate to Shape New Strategies on Human Trafficking Vital Voices Anti-Trafficking Activities U.S. Government Anti-Trafficking Activities U.S. NGO Anti-Trafficking Initiatives Calendar of Events and New Resources

The Trafficking Alert is published by Vital Voices Global Partnership as part of our work to promote effective partnerships between government officials and NGOs across the United States and around the world to fight modern-day slavery.

Dear Friends: Welcome to the March 2006 Trafficking Alert: U.S. Edition. We are pleased to present the new format of our enewsletter and hope you will continue to take advantage of additional resources offered on Vital Voices’ website. In this issue, we would like to bring your attention to the Fourth Annual Freedom Network conference held in Chicago, Illinois. The Freedom Network USA is the only anti-trafficking network in the United States consisting of approximately 30 non-governmental organizations, most of which provide direct legal and social services to victims of human trafficking. This year's Paul and Sheila Wellstone Award was presented to the Coalition of Immokalee Workers from Florida (CIW) for their survivor-empowerment approach. Many of CIW's employees are survivors of labor trafficking. Keynote speakers included the US Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez and Helga Konrad, OSCE's Anti-Trafficking Representative. In the first quarter of 2006, Vital Voices has been busy raising public awareness about human trafficking in the United States. In February, Vital Voices co-sponsored Ending Violence Against Women in the 21st Century conference in San Francisco with eight other organizations in the Bay area. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered a video speech. Susan Estrich, author and law professor, gave a compelling keynote speech, using her family members' stories as examples of rampant violence against women in today's American society. Other featured articles include Vital Voices' testimony before the U.S. Congress on human trafficking in China, a new Vital Voices Anti-Trafficking Toolkit in Chinese available for download and distribution, as well as U.S. government anti-trafficking initiatives and up-coming events. Vital Voices' 2006 Global Leadership Awards and Benefit, Women Changing Our World, will be held at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC on April 27. This year's honorees are global heroines from Nigeria, Kuwait, Israel, and Pakistan. Featured hosts and presenters include: Christiane Amanpour, Liz Cheney, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison, Andrea Koppel, Lisa Ling, and Julia Ormond. For more information or to secure your sponsorship, please call 202-636-8745 or click here. Thank you, as always, for your continued support and feedback. Wenchi Yu Perkins, Managing Editor Jessica Forrest, Editor

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I.

U.S. Edition March 2006

U.S. NGOs and Government Collaborate to Shape New Strategies on Human Trafficking

The Fourth Annual Freedom Network USA conference convened more than 200 participants on March 14-16, 2006 in Chicago’s Kent Law School, Illinois to tackle the growing challenge of human trafficking. Participants included service providers, advocates, US government officials, and international NGO representatives. The three-day conference enabled practitioners to exchange best practices, viable solutions and challenges in their anti-trafficking work. Keynote speakers included Alberto Gonzales, US Attorney General of the US Department of Justice, and Helga Konrad, OSCE Special Representative on Combating Trafficking in Human Beings. In addition to encouraging further collaboration between NGO service providers and law enforcement, Gonzales also announced the release of the US Department of Justice’s new publication entitled Report on Activities to Combat Human Trafficking Fiscal Years 2001-2005 that evaluates his department’s anti-trafficking efforts during this period. (See U.S. Government Anti-Trafficking Initiatives for more information). Konrad represented OSCE, an inter-governmental organization that consists of 55 member states mostly in Europe. She gave a broader overview of challenges facing groups in Europe, especially on government policy and responses to human trafficking. Speaking on less effective governmental responses, she noted, “Immediate deportation of trafficking victims is often the beginning of a vicious circle.” She also called on all Attorney General Alberto Gonzales governments to consider the “safe migration” policy as one of the responses to human addresses conference trafficking. Besides high profile speakers, NGO representatives, and survivors of human trafficking, there were participants from several government agencies: US Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, Department of Labor, Department of Health and Human Services, FBI and US Attorney’s Offices. Every year, the highlight of the conference comes when the Freedom Network gives out the Paul and Sheila Wellstone Award to an individual or a group that has contributed significantly to the anti-trafficking movement in the United States. This year’s recipient is the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) from Florida. The CIW has successfully advocated for farm workers’ rights, including helping to pass federal and state legislation, and empowering trafficking victims. Some of its advocates today are survivors of trafficking. Lou DeBaca, a US DOJ attorney who led the prosecution in two cases with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers and the 2005 award recipient, presented the award to the group. “The Coalition of Immokalee Workers has taken a multi-faceted approach to empower trafficked persons since its foundation. While we welcome new groups joining this movement, we also need to honor those who have been with us since the first day.” Laura Germino speaks on behalf of Coalition of Immokalee Workers; Lou DeBaca also pictured at the far right.

DeBaca worked with members of CIW in the case of United States v. Miguel Flores, where 120-400 Mexican immigrants were exploited for labor slavery. Later in 1997, the DOJ once again helped CIW prosecute the case of United States v. Cuello, bringing justice to 34 Mexican immigrants who were in slave-like labor conditions. “It is our highest honor to receive an award from our peers” thanked Laura Germino, CIW’s coordinator. She expressed her gratitude to civil rights advocates for inspiring today’s anti-trafficking movement by quoting a famous civil rights activist. “We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes.” Coalition of Immokalee Workers Award Recipients Freedom Network is the only US network of about 30 NGOs serving human trafficking victims. Their mission is to empower trafficked and enslaved persons, and help them reintegrate into society. For Continued on Page 3 the Freedom Network USA, please more information about visit http://www.freedomnetworkusa.org/. © Vital Voices Global Partnership

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U.S. Edition March 2006

II. Vital Voices Anti-Trafficking Activities Vital Voices Testifies on Trafficking before the Congressional-Executive Commission on China
Vital Voices’ Anti-Trafficking and Human Rights program testified before the Congressional-Executive Commission on China in a Commission hearing entitled Combating Human Trafficking in China: Domestic and International Efforts, on March 6, 2006. Senator Chuck Hagel, Chairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, and Co-Chair Representative Jim Leach presided. The Commission heard additional testimonies from: Representative Christopher H. Smith, Vice Chairman, Committee on International Relations; Ambassador John R. Miller, Director, Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons; Mr. Roger Plant, Special Action Program to Combat Forced Labor, International Labor Organization; and, Mr. Abraham Lee, Director of Public Affairs, Crossing Borders. Human trafficking in China remains pervasive despite Chinese government’s support for some international efforts to stop trafficking and a framework of domestic laws to address the problem. Roger Plant and Wenchi Yu Perkins testify for the Congressional-Executive Commission on China

Chinese victims of trafficking are often forced into sexual and labor exploitation. Not only are they psychologically and physically abused by their traffickers, they are held in indentured servitude or as bonded labor. Some of them leave their homes, believing that they will marry men in Taiwan, Japan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, or other Asian countries, but instead fall victim to trafficking, becoming forced prostitutes or laborers. Some become mail-order brides, only to find out too late that their husbands are different from what the marriage brokers claimed, and often fall prey to abuse. In such cases, their uncertain immigration status and fear of losing child custody often leads many women to endure extremely abusive and dehumanizing situations simply because they feel they have no other options. To read the full statements of Senator Hagel, Senator Brownback, Ambassador Miller, Mr. Plant, Ms. Perkins and Mr. Lee, visit: http://www.cecc.gov/pages/hearings/2006/20060306/index.php?PHPSESSID=152bff42dc301e405962aa2fbf2c0987.

Voice of America interviews Vital Voices on Human Trafficking and Cross-Strait Marriage
Voice of America’s Mandarin Chinese TV show interviewed Vital Voices’ Anti-Trafficking and Human Rights Program Director, Wenchi Yu Perkins, on February 19, 2006. The topic was Cross-Strait Talks and focused on human trafficking between China and Taiwan, as well as cross-strait marriages. “Human trafficking is different from human smuggling. There has been quite a lot of news coverage about human smuggling from China to Taiwan. Unfortunately, these reports do not distinguish trafficking from smuggling. Trafficking victims are deceived, forced, or coerced into sexual or labor exploitation; and smuggling is a crime against a country’s borders,” explained Ms. Perkins. Speaking on the increasing challenge of integrating immigrant brides, including those from Mainland China, into the Taiwanese society, Ms. Perkins called for a change of society’s attitude towards new immigrants. “Taiwan has become a developed economy, a democracy, and an immigrant society. The Taiwanese government should have policies to deal with these new immigrants by helping them and their children adapt to the new society. The Taiwanese people should not tolerate discriminative attitudes towards these new Taiwanese.” There have been increasing numbers of immigrant brides from China and Southeast Asia to Taiwan. Brides from Mainland China reportedly have to wait up to 10 years to obtain permanent residency and work permit. Without economic independence, these brides often fall victim to domestic violence. Besides politics, Ms. Perkins also called for comprehensive policies to address both root causes and demand for human trafficking, as well as proper regulations of the mail-order brokerage industry. “People should have the right to choose where they want to live and move to. However, they need to be informed of all possibilities and potential dangers involved in the migration process. Their vulnerabilities should not be taken advantage of and government has the responsibility to provide appropriate information.”

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U.S. Edition March 2006

Human Trafficking: A Global Challenge, Congressional Briefing by Vital Voices and UNODC
Wenchi Yu Perkins, Vital Voices Anti-Trafficking and Human Rights Program Director and Simone Monasebian, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Chief, held congressional briefings for both the US House of Representatives and Senate about the on-going efforts to combat modern day slavery on February 17, 2006. The briefing was organized by the office of Congresswoman Millender-McDonald (CA) and the Humpty-Dumpty Institute, a New York-based nonprofit organization seeking to improve relations between the US Congress and the UN. Ms. Monasabian began by commending the positive working relationship between the US and the United Nations and the important bi-partisan leadership role the US has taken on the issue. She spoke about UNODC’s work around the world, which is often in conjunction with NGOs like Vital Voices. She also showed some of the public service announcements UNODC has funded, which can be viewed through their website: http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/trafficking_human_beings.html. Ms. Perkins addressed the US’s current commitment to fighting human trafficking through the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children, and the Trafficking and Violence Prevention Act of 2005 (TVPRA). She urged members of Congress to ensure that the Bush administration's Appropriations Bill includes the full $361 million allotted by the TVPRA to fight human trafficking.

Simone Monasebian discusses UNODC’s anti-trafficking campaigns.

This money is critical for law enforcement training, programmatic activities, direct services and awareness campaigns. Ms. Perkins also stressed the need to raise awareness about the problem of human trafficking in the US as well as internationally.

Vital Voices Anti-Trafficking Toolkit Now Available in Chinese
Vital Voices now offers a Chinese-language version of the Anti-Trafficking Toolkit, which includes the latest laws and information on human trafficking. The Toolkit was designed for distribution primarily to professionals, such as local law enforcement, health care workers, social service providers, or faith-based organizations, who may encounter trafficking victims in the course of their work, and may be able to help them. The Anti-Trafficking English toolkit was also recently updated to reflect changes made by the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 including new provisions such as extraterritorial jurisdiction in cases involving federal employees and contractors involved in human trafficking abroad. To download the toolkit in Chinese, Arabic, English, French, Japanese, Khmer, Russian, Spanish, Thai or Ukrainian visit: http://www.vitalvoices.org/desktopdefault.aspx?page_id=37.

Ending Domestic Violence and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century Conference
Vital Voices Global Partnership, in collaboration with Family Violence Prevention Fund, Global Fund for Women, International Museum of Women, Mills College, Partners Ending Domestic Abuse, the San Francisco Domestic Violence Consortium, UCSF National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health, and Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach cosponsored the first-ever Ending Domestic Violence and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century summit in San Francisco, California on February 13, 2006. Roughly 450 business leaders, health care providers, educators, advocates, faith leaders and policy-makers in San Francisco attending this one-day symposium reinforced the growing response and efforts by businesses, health care systems and faith communities to combat violence against women. "These barbaric practices have caused far too many women and families to exist in a perpetual state of fear and vulnerability. Through our combined efforts we can work at the grassroots and legislative levels to end the cycle of abuse and trafficking,” said Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton via a video address (pictured right).

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San Francisco Continued from Page 4 Vital Voices Chair of the Board, Ms. Melanne Verveer, spoke on why human trafficking is a concern to everyone. “Government, civil society, and business community all have the responsibility to help address this issue,” remarked Ms. Verveer. She also complemented California for passing state legislation to outlaw human trafficking and to mandate a state-level taskforce of law enforcement and NGOs to collaborate on counter-trafficking efforts. In the session, Confronting Global Human Trafficking: An International Perspective on Violence Against Women, Vital Voices Global Advisory Council Member, Marina Pisklakova-Parker, Founder and President of ANNA Center of Russia, thanked organizations such as Global Fund for Women and Vital Voices Global Partnership for providing critical financial support and capacity building to NGOs around the world.

U.S. Edition March 2006

Melanne Verveer (middle), addresses conference on why human trafficking is a universal concern.

In Russia, we don’t have a comprehensive law. We have no government funding, no shelter or anything in place. So your support and providing networking opportunities become most important to sustain our work.” Dr. Zimrin of Israel spoke about dealing with cultural differences when providing services to victims, especially children. Ms. Kavita Ramdas, President of Global Fund for Women, brought the audience’s attention to the conditions of women and girls and root causes of human trafficking. Ms. Wenchi Yu Perkins, moderator of the panel, concluded that human trafficking is more than sex trafficking, and victims are men, women and children of all ages. “The exploitation of the vulnerabilities of migrants cannot be tolerated.” The summit benefited greatly from a wide range of business and individual supporters and will have a follow-up advocacy leadership training on March 31st at the Mills College. For more information about this training, please contact wenchiyuperkins@vitalvoices.org.

Georgetown University Students Stopping Trafficking of People (SSTOP) Hosts Trafficked conference

The Trafficked conference from February 24th – 26th at Georgetown University was organized by student members of SSTOP: Students Stopping the Trafficking of People. SSTOP co-founder and Vital Voices’ Anti-Trafficking and Human Rights Program intern, Rebecca Bavinger, helped bring together professionals, law enforcement officials, media experts, government officials, and service providers to educate students in the area about the problem and how they could become more involved in combating human trafficking. For three days, around 150 students from 40 universities across the United States gathered to learn about the problem and how they could become more involved in the fight against human trafficking. The conference began on Friday night with a discussion from Maria Velinkonja, former FBI prosecutor and advisor to the International Criminal Tribunal to Yugoslavia and a showing of “Fields of Mudon,” a Florida State University student-made film about child labor in China. On Saturday, the keynote address was delivered by the Ugandan Ambassador to the US, Her Excellency Edith Sempala. Each participant then chose different panels to attend, including Child Trafficking, Health Implications/Organ Trafficking/Ritual Abuse Torture, NGO & Rehabilitation Efforts, Media & Journalism, and Law Enforcement. That evening, SSTOP hosted a Black and White Gala which raised $800 to provide services to trafficking survivors in the DC area. Vital Voices’ representative, Jessica Forrest, spoke on the NGO and Rehabilitation Efforts panel along with Andrea Rossi of UNICEF; Professor Christine Schiwietz, UN Women’s Guild and UN Mideast Peace Alliance; Bob Goff, Restore International and Jessica Derder, International Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Ms. Forrest spoke about Vital Voices’ multi-stakeholder approach to encourage collaboration between business, government, civil society and the media. On Sunday, participants heard from several students who shared their personal efforts to combat human trafficking, such as founding a vocational training school for women in Sierra Leone and hosting a film festival for women’s empowerment in Albania. The conference concluded with remarks SSTOP Faculty Advisor Denise Brennan on the relationship between human trafficking and the wider spectrum of labor exploitation in the US. For more information about SSTOP, visit their website at http://www12.georgetown.edu/students/organizations/sstop/about.html. © Vital Voices Global Partnership

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III. U.S. Government Anti-Trafficking Initiatives

U.S. Edition March 2006

US Department of Justice Releases Report on Activities to Combat Human Trafficking, FY 20012005
The US Department of Justice released its first report to summarize accomplishments made during the years 2001-2005 to fight trafficking through “aggressive, proactive investigations that reflect a victim-centered approach.” In the report’s introduction, Attorney General Gonzales highlighted the importance of a victim-centered approach. “We promote effective federal and state laws, sophisticated investigatory techniques, and tough federal and state prosecutions that work collaboratively with federally supported crime victim services and outreach programs... our efforts have also involved the international community, where we have shared our victim-centered approach with foreign nations.” The report describes the scope of the problem, tools for investigating and prosecuting human trafficking, successes in halting trafficking for sex, labor, and incidents involving minors. Also available is information on human trafficking prosecutions and indictments, foreign and local assistance programs, and a model state anti-trafficking criminal statute. To view the full report, visit: http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/crim/trafficking_report_2006.pdf.

Images of Human Trafficking State Department Photos
Since 2001, the US Department of State has released an annual Trafficking in Persons report as required under the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Prevention Act of 2000. In 2005, the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons assigned a U.S. photographer, Kay Chernush, to take photos in India, Thailand, Italy, and Hong Kong to illustrate the report. There are three categories of photographs: Sexual Exploitation, Labor Exploitation and At Risk, Rescued and Sheltered, which help connect faces to victims and survivors of different forms of human trafficking. To view and download the photos, visit: http://www.gtipphotos.state.gov. Photo of Burmese children taken by Kay Chernush for the U.S. State Department.

Department of Justices Sentences Miami Man to 14 Years in Prison for Federal Child Prostitution and Sex Trafficking Crimes
The U.S. Department of Justice convicted three men of crimes of trafficking children for sexual exploitation and transporting a minor between states for purposes of prostitution in Florida. Mark Madison, 22, of Miami was the third of the defendants to be sentenced to 14 years in prison and 10 years of supervised release during which he must undergo health, drug and sex offender treatment. According to the Department of Justice, one of the victims, identified as Jane Doe No.2, was introduced to Madison when she was 16 years old. The victim began working as a prostitute for Madison, staying at his residence, at hotels and occasionally at a co-conspirator’s residence. Madison kept all the money earned and verbally and physically abused the young woman. The investigation and undercover operation, was lead by a task force that includes FBI Special Agents and detectives from the City of Miami, Miami Beach and Miami-Dade county. The task force was formed as part of Operation Innocence Lost, a program sponsored by the FBI’s Crimes Against Children Division, the Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS) of the Criminal Division, and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Operation Innocence Lost, announced in early 2003, is a nationwide initiative focusing on child victims of interstate sex trafficking in the United States. To date, the Innocence Lost Initiative has resulted in at least 139 open investigations, 505 arrests, 70 indictments and 67 convictions. To read the DOJ press release, visit: http://www.usdoj.gov/opa/pr/2006/March/06_crm_146.html

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IV. U.S. NGO Anti-Trafficking Initiatives

U.S. Edition March 2006

The Royal Thai Embassy and Project Hope International Host Discussion on Anti-Trafficking Prevention, Prosecution and Protection in Thailand
More than 80 people, predominantly government officials from the U.S. Justice, Homeland Security and State Departments and NGO representatives, gathered at the Royal Thai Embassy on March 2, 2006 for a panel discussion on current antitrafficking strategies in Thailand. In particular, the focus was on collaboration between government and civil society. Christina Arnold, Director of Project Hope International, moderated the panel and speakers included: Mr. Pravit Roykaew, Attorney General for International Affairs Department, Thai Ministry of Justice; Police Major General Krerkphong Pukprayura, Deputy Commissioner, Office of the Commissioner General, the Royal Thai Police; and Ms. Sudarat Sereewat, Director of Fight Against Child Exploitation (FACE). One of the topics during the discussion surrounded the merits of a temporary visa status for trafficking victims. All panelists, including government and NGO representatives, had the same statement that there was no need for a temporary visa system in Thailand. “If they are real victims of trafficking, they don’t want to stay in Thailand because their experience in Thailand is horrible and they just want to go home,” said Sudarat Sereewat, who stated that none of her victims wanted to stay in Thailand. For more information on Project Hope International’s work in Thailand, visit: http://www.phi-ngo.org/.

V. Calendar of Events and New Resources Calendar of Events
March 31, 2006, Advocacy Leadership Training: Ending Violence Against Women, Oakland, California. As a follow-up to the Ending Domestic Violence and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century conference in San Francisco, California, on February 13th, 2006, Vital Voices Global Partnership, in collaboration with Mills College, will conduct a leadership training on March 31st, 2006 to equip future leaders with communication and advocacy skills to further their policy advocacy work to end violence against women. For more information, email Wenchi Yu Perkins, wenchiyuperkins@vitalvoices.org. April 5, 2006, Oksana Horbunova, Vital Voices Global Advisory Council Member and Human Trafficking Expert, to Speak at Global Philanthropy Forum Conference and Georgetown University, Washington, DC. As part of the 5th Annual Global Philanthropy Forum Conference, Policy, Philanthropy and Social Entrepreneurship: Advancing Social Change, Ukrainian Human Rights Advocate and Vital Voices Global Advisory Council Member Oksana Horbunova will take part in a panel discussion entitled “Human Rights and Tolerance: Advocacy to fight Human Trafficking.” Other panel speakers include Ambassador John R. Miller, Director, U.S. Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, and Tina Frundt, Outreach Coordinator, Polaris Project. Women’s Funding Network President Christine Grumm will moderate. This panel is open only to registered participants and will take place on Wednesday, April 5th from 10:00 – 11: 15 a.m. For more information, visit: http://www.philanthropyforum.org/conference/2006/index.htm Vital Voices, Georgetown University’s SSTOP: Students Stopping the Trafficking of People and the Mortara Center for International Studies, will host Oksana Horbunova to lead a discussion on Anti-Trafficking and Gender Empowerment in Ukraine. The event will take place on April 5th at 5:30 on Georgetown University’s main campus in the Leavey Building. This event is free and open to the public. To RSVP or for more information, email ATHR@vitalvoices.org. April 6-8, 2006, The Chains That Remain: The Nature of Human Trafficking in a Global Context Conference, Chicago, Illinois. The Northwestern University Conference on Human Rights (NUCHR), in coordination with the first annual National Summit of the Campus Coalition Against Trafficking (CCAT), will host a national student conference on human trafficking to bring talented undergraduate and graduate student leaders and activists from colleges across the United States to Northwestern’s Evanston campus. Featured speakers include Ambassador John Miller of the State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, and Ambassador Olara Otunno, the former U.N. Special Representative for Children in Armed Conflict and Ugandan Ambassador to the United Nations. This conference is free and open to the public. For more information visit their website at: http://www.nuchr.org/. Continued on Page 8 © Vital Voices Global Partnership

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Calendar of Events
Continued from page 7

U.S. Edition March 2006

April 11, 2006, The International and Immigration Law Forums of the Women’s Bar Association of the District of Columbia hosts Human Trafficking: Legal and Policy Strategies for its Eradication and How You Can Become More Involved in the Fight, Washington, DC. This brownbag lunch discussion will focus on the legal and policy issues encountered in the fight against human trafficking. At the forum, Vital Voices’ Wenchi Yu Perkins will discuss the importance of NGO and civil society collaboration in the fight against and prevention of human trafficking; Sharon Cohn of the International Justice Mission will talk about enforcing existing local laws to rescue trafficking victims and prosecute perpetrators; and Michael Smith of the Salvation Army will provide an overview of the causes of human trafficking, dynamics of its spreading around the world, and its societal impacts. Register for this event at www.wbadc.org. Click on “Calendar of Events,” and then “Registration.” April 27, 2006, Vital Voices' annual Global Leadership Awards and Benefit, John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, DC. Annually, Vital Voices hosts its Global Leadership Awards to celebrate and honor courageous women leaders from around the world who have made outstanding contributions in promoting democracy, strengthening economies, and safeguarding human rights. With the support of Vital Voices Honorary Co-Chairs, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton and Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison, the awards ceremony showcases the remarkable achievements of the honorees to a host of guests, including members of the diplomatic, corporate and government sectors, as well as civil society. Through this signature awards event, the honorees are recognized for the significant difference they are making in their countries. This year’s honoree of the AntiTrafficking and Human Rights will be from Israel. Other honorees included outstanding women from Kuwait, Nigeria, and Pakistan. Women around the world are voices of moderation and progress. They are often first to bridge divisions in their countries. They are transforming the face of leadership and safeguarding human rights. Join us in honoring global heroines-vital voices--who are leading social, economic and political progress worldwide. For more information or to secure your sponsorship, visit: http://www.vitalvoices.org/desktopdefault.aspx?page_id=5. April 21, 2006, Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota hosts United Front for Children: Global Efforts to Combat Sexual Trafficking in Travel and Tourism, Minneapolis, Minnesota. This conference aims to bridge the gap between businesses, NGOs and government and explore the relationship between tourism and child sex trafficking. Vital Voices’ Melanne Verveer and Wenchi Yu Perkins will both participate. Other speakers include Ms. Ann Veneman, Executive Director of UNICEF, Ambassador John R. Miller, Director of the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking In Persons of the U.S. State Department and Marilyn Carlson Nelson, Chairman and CEO, Carlson Companies. Please visit www.hrusa.org/workshops/trafficking for more information and a full list of conference sponsors. April 22, 2006, Isadora Productions to perform Becoming Natasha at George Washington University, Washington, DC. “Becoming Natasha” is a multimedia production inspired by the book The Natashas by Victor Malarek that follows the stories of 6 trafficked women and their capacity to survive at any cost. Isadora Productions will perform selected scenes from the play at George Washington University. Following the play there will be a panel discussion. The play will begin at 7:00 p.m. in Kendall Auditorium on the first floor of Duques Hall. To RSVP email RSVPnatasha@yahoo.com For more information about the play and producers please visit: http://isadoraproductions.org/natasha.htm.

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New Resources

U.S. Edition March 2006

Staff Melanne Verveer Chair of the Board Sara Vandepeute Office Administrator Alyse Nelson Bloom Senior Program Director Global Leadership Network Natasha Marks Director Global Leadership Institute Wenchi Yu Perkins Director Anti-Trafficking and Human Rights Melissa Peterson Associate Director Development Contributors Rebecca Bavinger Jessica Forrest Emily Weaver

Vital Voices: Women Changing Our World, edited by Alyse Nelson Bloom and Vinca LaFleur, introduction by Vital Voices Chair Melanne Verveer, epilogue by Dr. Carol Lancaster. In honor of International Women's Day, Vital Voices released Vital Voices: Women Changing Our World. This new publication highlights the stories of twelve influential women from Asia to Latin America to Africa who are leading significant political, social and economic change. Three of the spotlighted women work on issues of domestic violence and human trafficking: Rita Chaikin, Anti-Trafficking Project Coordinator at Isha L’Isha-Haifa Feminist Center in Northern Israel; Marina Pisklakova-Parker, Founder of ANNA – the first Russian organization to provide a crisis hotline and counseling services for domestic violence victims; and Carmelita Nuqui, Executive Director of the Development Action for Women Network (DAWN). Become a member of Vital Voices and receive your complimentary copy of this publication: http://www.vitalvoices.org/desktopdefault.aspx?page_id=318. Hope Betrayed: An Analysis of Women Victims of Trafficking and their Claims for Asylum, researched by Sarah Richards, co-authored by Sarah Richards, Mel Steel and Debora Singer, published February 2006 “Hope Betrayed” considers all the asylum claims made by women who were trafficked into the UK and subsequently supported by the UK POPPY Project from March 2003 until August 2005. Of the 32 women who claimed asylum during this period, only 1 was granted asylum prior to appeal. After appeal, 80% were granted either refugee status or humanitarian protection (this is 6 times higher than the acceptance rate of asylum appeals overall). The report compares reasons for refusal letters and asylum determinations by the adjudicators/immigration judges in the context of key aspects of the Refugee Convention, namely, sufficiency of state protection, convention reason and credibility. The report also suggests a number of potential reasons for the different appeal results and urges the government to put more of its energies into supporting women who have been trafficked into the UK. To read the full report visit: http://www.asylumaid.org.uk/New%20RWRP/RWRP%20Publications/Hope%20 Betrayed%20March%202006.pdf.

Vital Voices Global Partnership 1150 Connecticut Avenue, NW Suite 600 Washington, D.C. 20036 TEL: 202-861-2625 FAX: 202-861-4290 www.vitalvoices.org

To receive the Trafficking Alert, please go to the sign-up page: www.vitalvoices.org/desktopdefault.aspx?page_id=38 To submit or give your feedback, please email Jessica Forrest jessicaforrest@vitalvoices.org. To learn how you can support Vital Voices and its work to advance the economic, political and social status of women around the world, please contact 202-861-2625 ext. 3010 Vital Voices is a 503 (c) (3) nonprofit organization. This publication was made possible with funding from the Office . of Refugee and Resettlement, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

© 2006 by Vital Voices Global Partnership. All Rights Reserved © Vital Voices Global Partnership