Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies

www.criminologyandjustice.uoit.ca

UNIVERSITY OF ONTARIO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

TABLE OF CONTENTS
DEAN’S MESSAGE WELCOME TO THE FACULTY OF CRIMINOLOGY, JUSTICE AND POLICY STUDIES UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS COMMUNICATION CRIMINOLOGY AND JUSTICE LEGAL STUDIES PUBLIC POLICY CONCURRENT PROGRAMS BRIDGE PROGRAMS GRADUATE STUDIES LEADING-EDGE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT GLOBALLY EXPERIENCED FACULTY HELP BROADEN YOUR KNOWLEDGE OUR FACULTY ACCESS TO HANDS-ON RESEARCH EXPERIENCE GAIN REAL-WORLD EXPERIENCE FROM LEADING EMPLOYERS ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FINANCING YOUR EDUCATION STUDENT LIFE HERE FOR STUDENTS EVERY STEP OF THE WAY LIVING AND LEARNING – RESIDENCE STUDENT SUPPORT – WE’RE AT YOUR SERVICE 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 10 10 11 12 13 14 18 19 19 20 21 21 22

PUBLISHED BY UOIT, SEPTEMBER 2009.

WELCOME FROM THE DEAN
On behalf of the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies, thank you for your interest in our programs and in the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), an academic community committed to learning and teaching. We are guided by a strong commitment to our students, by a creative and entrepreneurial frame of mind, and by an awareness of the local, regional, national and global world in which the university exists. It is an exciting and evolving time for the faculty. We are offering a number of undergraduate majors and specializations, as well as a Master of Arts degree in Criminology with a specializations in Crime and Inequality, or Cybercrime. These market-driven programs are taught by globally experienced professors who are internationally recognized scholars, innovative researchers, award-winning teachers, and dedicated to sharing their knowledge and ideas with you. We look forward to partnering with you as you take your place as an independent thinker and an active and contributing leader in a rapidly changing social, political and natural environment. As a student you will work closely with faculty members who are excellent teachers in the classroom and superb mentors in independent study plans and research projects. During your undergraduate studies you move your education beyond the classroom through our hallmark practicum program where you apply your classroom knowledge to many other types of real-world experiences. Whatever your future path includes we will provide you with an education that prepares you to excel. Our graduates have been accepted into Canada’s leading law and graduate programs and accepted employment with the Ministry of the Attorney General, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Ontario Provincial Police (OPP), other regional police services, private security agencies, Pixar studios, the Ministry of Finance, leading investment firms, and social services. Whichever path you select, please be assured that everyone at UOIT is committed to ensuring it is a rewarding journey that you will look back upon as one of the highlights of your life. Thank you for your interest in our faculty. We welcome an opportunity to meet with you and discuss how a UOIT education offers everything you need to succeed.

Sincerely,

Dr. Nawal H. Ammar Dean

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WELCOME TO CRIMINOLOGY, JUSTICE AND POLICY STUDIES AT UOIT
UOIT’s award-winning campus has grown to more than 5,500 students since opening its doors in Fall 2003 and today more than 1,000 are proud to call the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies home. As an undergraduate, you will be able to take a comprehensive approach to your studies or specialize in a specific area of interest. You may decide that the Bachelor of Arts in Criminology and Justice program is best suited to meet your career objectives and choose to further specialize in Criminal Justice; Gender Sexualities and Justice; Race, Ethnicity and Justice; or Youth, Crime and Justice. Alternatively, you may choose our Bachelor of Arts in Legal Studies program where you will have the opportunity to specialize in Human Rights, Alternative Dispute Resolution or Information Law or one of the two new undergraduate programs that we have added: :: Public Policy with specializations in Equity Policy, and Technology in Society; and :: Communication with specializations in Commerce and Marketing, Health Sciences and Digital Media. We also offer minors in: :: Alternative Dispute Resolution; :: Communication; :: Criminology and Justice; :: Human Rights; :: Information Law; :: Legal Studies; and :: Psychology and Law. If you decide to further your education, we offer a Master of Arts in Criminology with areas of focus in Crime and Inequality, or Cybercrime. In addition, UOIT has partnered with Durham College to offer a concurrent program that provides UOIT Legal Studies students with the opportunity to work towards their degree, while also earning a diploma in Court and Tribunal Agent/Paralegal, or Legal Administration. We also have bridge programs that will help turn your diploma in Police Foundations, Child and Youth Worker, Journalism – Print and Broadcast, Public Relations, Advertising or graduate certificate in Youth Corrections and Interventions into a degree. All undergraduate programs are taught in a leading-edge learning environment that allows you to connect with your professors and peers any time, anywhere. Our professors are experts in their fields from around the world and bring leading knowledge and experience to the classroom. Through the power of diverse and critical thinking, UOIT’s outstanding professors broaden your knowledge of social science and communication theory and methods, and collaborate with you to turn innovative ideas into real solutions that will allow you to contribute to the well-being of society when you graduate.
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We are deeply committed to the success of each of our students and our goal is to provide you with an educational experience that will help you reach your greatest potential. Our combination of award-winning professors, innovative programs and state-of-the-art facilities positions you for success in the new economy. As you read through this viewbook, you’ll discover more about our faculty and innovative programs, but we also invite you to tour our campus with your family and friends and explore everything UOIT has to offer. Visit www.criminologyandjustice.uoit.ca to learn more.

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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies offers a number of unique Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degrees. The programs provide you with the broad range of skills required to work in a variety of fields, including: :: Advertising; :: Criminal and youth justice; :: Event planning; :: Government; :: International human rights; :: Law; and :: Social services. Our programs also serve as excellent preparation for law school or related graduate programs. Through the application of theory and handson activities, you develop the knowledge, holistic thinking, teamwork and interpersonal skills essential for success.

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS)
:: Communication Specializations: :: Commerce and Marketing :: Health Sciences :: Digital Media

BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS)
:: Criminology and Justice Specializations: :: Criminal Justice; :: Gender, Sexualities and Justice; :: Race, Ethnicity and Justice; and :: Youth Crime and Justice.

BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS)
:: Legal Studies

FOUNDATION YEAR
Many programs within the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies begin with a foundation year that provides you with a range of knowledge and skills and an introduction to different areas within your scope of study. Once you have completed your foundation year you can choose to continue with the comprehensive program or one of many specializations.

Specializations: :: Alternative Dispute Resolution; :: Human Rights; and :: Information Law.

BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS)
:: Public and Social Policy Specializations: :: Equity Policy; and :: Technology in Society.

“There is much more personal interaction with the professors and a lot more opportunity for one-on-one time. Every professor I’ve had knew me by name, which was nice, and you probably won’t find that at most universities. Student services are great as well. They give you the opportunity to find a job on campus, help you with writing skills, have volunteer opportunities, can help you with financial planning and also help you with any personal problems or disabilities you may be facing. Everything is very easy to find and the school is designed with the student's priorities in mind.” Victoria Freitag, first-year Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Criminology and Justice student

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COMMUNICATION
COMMUNICATION COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM
If you are planning a career as a communication professional and wish to combine a broad array of communication courses with a solid selection of humanities and social science courses, the comprehensive program will be of particular interest to you. This program will offer a thorough grounding in the theory, practice, skills and technology of communication. Foundation courses in the evolution, theory, and social impact of communication will be followed by courses that apply this knowledge to business, technology, human relations and public affairs.

DIGITAL MEDIA
This specialization will help to prepare you for a career in the rapidly expanding communication technology and digital media industry. As a student you will gain the knowledge and understanding of communication technologies that will enable you to combine your expertise in communication with the ability to work together with communication technology specialists. You will follow the core Communication program but will use your free electives to take additional introductory courses in computer programming, software systems development, imaging, digital media, multimedia systems, web programming, and computer networks and more.

Courses include: :: Computers and Media; :: Digital Media; :: Internet-Based Media; :: Narrative Structure in the Digital Age; and :: Photographic and Image Processing Techniques.

Courses include: :: Business Communication; :: Fundamentals of Professional Writing; :: Interpersonal Communication; :: Intercultural Communication; :: The Media and Communications in Canada; :: Oral Communication and Public Speaking; :: Web Design and Multimedia Authoring; and :: Writing for Publication.

HEALTH SCIENCES
This specialization will prepare you for a career as a communicator in the health-care sector. As a student you will gain the knowledge and understanding of the key issues and principles of health management, which will prepare you to work together with health professionals in the private and public sectors. You will follow the core Communication program but will use your free electives to take additional courses in health management, health informatics, epidemiology and health inquiry, health finance, health- care issues and more.

SPECIALIZATIONS COMMERCE AND MARKETING
This specialization is intended to prepare you for a communication career in the business and marketing sector. You will follow the core Communication program but will use your free electives to take additional courses.

COURSES INCLUDE:
:: Critical Appraisal of Statistics in Health Sciences; :: Health and Wellness; :: Introduction to Health-Care Systems; and :: Understanding Health Care and Therapeutics in Canada.

Courses include: :: Advertising and Market Communication; :: Economics for Professionals; :: Introduction to Entrepreneurship; :: Management of the Enterprise; and :: Marketing Communications.

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CRIMINOLOGY AND JUSTICE
CRIMINOLOGY AND JUSTICE COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM
If you are looking to pursue a career in criminology, justice, social service or prepare for graduate school, the comprehensive program will be of particular interest as it provides an extensive understanding of crime and the justice system.

Courses include: :: Gender, Sexuality and the Law; :: Hate Crime; :: Issues in Diversity; :: Punishment in Society; and :: Social Control.

RACE, ETHNICITY AND JUSTICE
The Race, Ethnicity and Justice specialization provides historical and sociological perspectives on the intersection of race/ethnicity, crime and criminal justice. You will discover how practices of criminal justice come to reflect aspects of societal organization, including inequality, conflict and social change.

Courses include: :: Alternative Methods in Justice; :: Cybercrime; :: Criminal Gangs; :: Issues in Diversity; :: Leadership and Administration; :: Policing; :: Psychological Explanations of Criminal Behaviour; :: Understanding Recidivist Criminals; and :: Women in the Criminal Justice System. Courses include: :: Aboriginal Issues and the Law; :: Race in the Criminal Justice System; and :: Race, Ethnicity and the Law.

YOUTH, CRIME AND JUSTICE
As a student in the Youth, Crime and Justice specialization you will look at youthful offending and victimization, as well as systems of youth justice in Canada and elsewhere. Particular emphasis is given to contemporary issues in youth justice and the effectiveness of the youth justice system in dealing with young people who come into conflict with the law.

SPECIALIZATIONS CRIMINAL JUSTICE
As a student in the Criminal Justice specialization, you will explore the foundations of historical and contemporary patterns of social control, and then turn to more focused consideration of the three main institutions of formal control; police; courts; and corrections. Courses include: :: Children’s Rights; :: Youth, Crime and Violence; and :: Youth Cultures. In addition to these specializations, students in the Criminology and Justice program will have the opportunity to minor in: Courses include: :: Emerging Patterns of Policing; :: Prosecution and Sentencing; :: Punishment in Society; and :: Terrorism. :: Alternative Dispute Resolution; :: Human Rights; :: Information Law; or :: Legal Studies.

GENDER, SEXUALITIES AND JUSTICE
The Gender, Sexualities and Justice specialization is designed for an indepth exploration of the important and under-studied intersection between gender, sexualities and crime. As a student you will examine topics such as the social construction of sexualities and gender, theoretical explanations for male and female offending and the differential experiences of men, women and members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual community within the criminal justice system.

LEGAL STUDIES
LEGAL STUDIES COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM
The Legal Studies comprehensive program provides an extensive understanding of law and theoretical perspectives on law, human rights, international law, constitutional law, alternative dispute resolution, intellectual property and other areas of law. The program offers a range of courses in socio-legal areas and satisfies career and/or graduate study orientations.

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SPECIALIZATIONS ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION
Alternative Dispute Resolution typically includes arbitration, mediation, early neutral evaluation, and conciliation and sentencing circles. It also offers a less expensive and faster alternative to settling disputes and disagreements. In this specialization you will learn about the increasing importance placed on alternative ways of solving disputes outside the courtroom. Courses include: :: Employment and Mediation; :: Family and Personal Mediation; :: Human Rights Mediation; and :: Restorative Justice.

:: Education; :: Equity; :: Health; :: Housing; :: Poverty; and :: Workplace/employment.

SPECIALIZATIONS EQUITY POLICY
As Canadian society becomes more diverse, it will become increasingly important for human service workers and decision-makers to have the skills necessary to understand and respond to the needs of all citizens and residents. The Equity Policy specialization is designed to offer an interdisciplinary approach to analyses of policies that have threatened principles of equality and inclusion, and that might instead facilitate social inclusion. This specialization will prepare you to provide leadership and guidance to the public sector, social advocacy and social movement organizations, and a wider public.

HUMAN RIGHTS
One of the major components of Canadian and international law is human rights. As a student in this specialization you will learn the complex relationship between the law, rights and the state, while being exposed to Canadian and international human rights discourses and instruments.

Courses include: :: Equity Policy; :: Poverty and Social Policy; :: Community Development Policy; and :: Social Justice and Conflict.

Courses include: :: Canadian Human Rights Law; :: Disability and the Law; :: International Human Rights Law; and :: Race, Ethnicity and the Law.

TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY
The public and private sectors are faced with adapting to and making decisions about the development and implementation of technologies that are affected by social policy considerations, including privacy, workplace safety, security, communications, automation, information retrieval and transportation. As a student in the Technology in Society specialization you will gain the knowledge and skills required to deal with the impact of technology on modern society from a social policy perspective.

INFORMATION LAW
New challenges brought about by technology to the legal and social control systems in modern society continue to rise. As a student in the Information Law specialization you will examine a variety of emerging socio-legal issues that have resulted from rapid technological development, including law and technology, intellectual property, cybercrimes, privacy laws and economic espionage.

Courses include: Courses include: :: Information and Privacy Law; :: Intellectual Property; and :: Internet Law. :: Computer and Information Law; :: Cybercrime; :: Public Understanding of Technology; and :: Technology Invention and Diffusion.

PUBLIC POLICY
This interdisciplinary undergraduate degree provides you with strong preparation if you are interested in policy and administration in the private and public sectors. The program draws on disciplinary strengths in sociology, political science, geography, philosophy, psychology and economics to allow you to attain appreciation and mastery of public and social policy analysis, development and administration. You will be able to choose specialized courses in the following social policy areas: :: Community development;
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MINORS
In addition to these comprehensive programs and specializations, students will have the opportunity to minor in: :: Alternative Dispute Resolution; :: Communication; :: Criminology and Justice; :: Human Rights; :: Information Law; and :: Legal Studies; :: Psychology and Law.
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CONCURRENT PROGRAMS
Our collaborative relationship with Durham College allows you to earn a Legal Administration diploma or Court and Tribunal Agent/Paralegal diploma through the college while working towards your Legal Studies degree. With diploma courses counted towards elective credits within the degree, this unique program option gives you an opportunity to pursue a clear career-oriented goal in conjunction with a university education.

BRIDGE PROGRAMS
COMMUNICATION
If you have already earned an Ontario college diploma in Print and Broadcast Journalism, Public Relations or Advertising you can apply your diploma to a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Communication degree through UOIT’s Communication Bridge program. Diploma students wishing to bridge into the Communication program are required to take two or three bridging courses during their diploma studies (embedded into their program) and will take two further bridging courses in place of other free electives during their third- and fourth-year of studies.

CRIMINOLOGY AND JUSTICE
If you have already earned a two- or three-year Ontario college diploma in Correctional Worker/Community and Justice Services, Police Foundations or Law and Security Administration, you can apply your diploma to a BA (Honours) in Criminology and Justice through the UOIT Criminology and Justice Bridge program. Students who have earned either a college diploma in Child and Youth Worker or a graduate certificate in Youth Corrections and Interventions and who complete the appropriate bridge courses with an overall B average are eligible for admission into the third year of the Criminology and Justice (Honours) program or the specialization in Youth, Crime and Justice.

LEGAL STUDIES
If you have already earned a two- or three-year Ontario college diploma in Tribunal Agent or Legal Administration, you can apply your diploma to a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Legal Studies through the UOIT Legal Studies Bridge program. Once you have successfully completed the required four bridge courses with an overall B average and no individual course grades below a C, you are eligible for admission into the third year of the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Legal Studies program.

GRADUATE STUDIES
The UOIT Master of Arts in Criminology has two subfields: Crime and Inequality, and Cybercrime. Two options in either subfield are available: a thesis option consisting of coursework and a thesis, or a non-thesis option consisting of coursework and a final major paper. Graduate students choosing either option should be able to complete their degree in 24 months of full-time study. Areas of research conducted by faculty are listed on Page 14 under Access to hands-on research experience. Please visit the Graduate Studies website at www.gradstudies.uoit.ca for further information on deadlines, admission requirements, tuition, scholarships and specific courses.

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LEADING-EDGE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
Most of the courses taught through the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies have an online component that ranges from posting assignments and marks, to conducting in-depth discussions and sharing new learning. Professors develop sophisticated course content using WebCT Vista, a campus-wide learning management system that provides more interaction through increased access to interactive communication tools and online access to course materials. Some courses are also offered in a hybrid delivery format that combines the traditional lecture/discussion approach to teaching with web-based learning. You spend some of your scheduled class time learning inside the classroom and some of it outside the classroom engaged in webbased activities such as online group exercises, research tasks, online debates and web-quests. Each of these activities is designed to enhance your writing, communication and argumentation skills, while deepening your understanding of course material through active learning.

“The professors at this university are amazing. Not only do they ensure that the information presented to their students is understandable, but they make themselves available outside of classes. However, what appeals to me the most are the small class sizes. This allows less of a disturbance for the rest of the students and enables the professor to focus more on students on an individual basis.” Andrew Lee, second-year Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Criminology and Justice student

STAY CONNECTED FROM ANYWHERE ON CAMPUS
You’ve never experienced education like this before. UOIT’s national award-winning mobile learning environment allows you to connect with your professors and peers any time, anywhere – and puts you one step ahead come graduation. UOIT is a leader among North American universities in implementing and using course- and industry-specific software for laptop learning. You will receive a high-end laptop at the beginning of your studies and your professors will develop sophisticated course content using a powerful campus-wide online learning management system. One of the greatest advantages of the mobile learning program is that all students have equal access to the same technology, resources and services. Inside or outside of the classroom, you can make quality computer-based presentations, conduct Internet research, work electronically on your own or with other students and have seamless access to all online resources. An annual mobile-computing fee covers the use of your hardware learning tools, extensive technical support, virus protection, high-speed Internet, printing services, insurance and a wide range of program-specific software. In addition, all laptops are refreshed with appropriate software each year and upgraded every two years. We’re committed to giving you even more value for your education and your investment in technology while studying at UOIT. www.uoit.ca/mobile

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GLOBALLY EXPERIENCED FACULTY HELP BROADEN YOUR KNOWLEDGE
Establishing a strong faculty depends largely on attracting outstanding professors. At UOIT, our professors are experts in their field from around the globe. Our innovative teaching approach and commitment to research excellence have attracted some of the world’s best and brightest minds and we have one of the highest rates of professors with PhDs among Canadian universities. Professors in the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies collectively speak more than 10 languages and hold degrees from Canadian and international universities. They inspire you to push your boundaries of thinking and learning while broadening your knowledge of your chosen field so you are one step ahead come graduation.

:: Mass media and global politics; :: Organized crime; :: Poverty and crime; :: Race and culture; :: Refugee and immigration law; :: Science, technology and social change; :: Social inequality; :: Social media; :: Stereotyping; :: Violence against women; :: Ways to improve lie detection; :: Welfare; :: Wrongful conviction; and :: Youth crime in Canada.

They are also award-winning, published authors on topics such as domestic violence, hate crime, discriminatory practices against children and mediation. Please visit www.criminologyandjustice.uoit.ca to view our faculty’s publication list in its entirety. Our professors have also received major awards, including the American Society of Criminology’s Division on Women and Crime’s Distinguished Scholar Award and the Division on Critical Criminology’s Critical Criminologist of the Year Award, and have been finalists for other honours such as the C. Wright Mills Book Award. In addition, their high quality of teaching has been recognized with awards such as the Northern Arizona University Teacher-Scholar Award, the Louie Award (student-nominated teaching award) and UOIT’s teaching awards. Faculty members have also received major grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the United States Department of Justice, Health Canada, the United States Department of Health and Human Services, the Ontario Victim Services Secretariat, the U.S. Department of State, the United States Department of Agriculture, the National Homelessness Initiative, the Open Society Institute, and the National Endowment for Democracy. Their authoritative research work is used in policy reports and decision making at both national and international levels. Some examples include: :: Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly’s Resolution on Religion and Women in Europe; :: Ministry of Children and Youth Services on Reintegration Leave; :: United Nations’ Basic Principles on Restorative Justice, Human Rights Watch reports; :: United Nations’ State of the World Population reports; :: World Health Organization’s Violence Against Women reports; and :: Youth Criminal Justice Act and the National Homelessness Initiative.

Our faculty members are multidisciplinary, covering areas such as: :: Anthropology; :: Communication; :: Cultural Studies; :: Education; :: History; :: Law; :: Media Studies; :: Philosophy; :: Political Science; :: Psychology; :: Sociology; and :: Women’s Studies. They research: :: Black youth gang violence; :: Children’s rights; :: Comparative justice; :: Crime prevention through environmental design; :: Cybercultures; :: Detection of deception on the Internet; :: Filmmaking; :: Graphic novels; :: Hate crime; :: Homicide; :: Human rights; :: Information technology; :: Issues of violence against women; :: Labour law; :: Media representation of crime and violence;
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The faculty is also home to three academic journals: Critical Criminology: an International Journal, the official journal of the American Society of Criminology’s Division of Critical Criminology; Law and Human Behavior, the official journal of the American Psychology-Law Society (APLS)/Division 41 of the American Psychological Association (APA); and the student-run journal Circle@UOIT. .
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OUR FACULTY
PROFESSOR AND DEAN
Nawal Ammar, BSc, MSc, PhD

PROFESSORS AND ASSOCIATE DEANS
Shahid Alvi, BA, MA, PhD Barbara Perry, BA, MA, PhD

PROFESSORS
Ronald Bordessa, BA, PhD Brian Campbell, BA, MPhil, PhD Liqun Cao, BA, MA, PhD Tony Chan, BA, MA, PhD Brian Cutler, BA, MA, PhD Walter DeKeseredy, BA, MA, PhD Ronald Hinch, BA, MA, PhD Mari Peepre, BA, BPhE, MA, Fil Lis. PhD

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS
Kimberley Clow, BA, MA, PhD Wesley Crichlow, BA, MEd, PhD Hannah Scott, BA, MA, PhD Andrea Slane, BA, MA, JD, PhD

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS
Sasha Baglay, Dip. Law, LLM, DJur Carla Cesaroni, BA, MA, PhD Aziz Douai, BA, MA, PhD Steven Downing, BA, MA, PhD Molly Dragiewicz, BA, MPhil, PhD Shanti Fernando, BA, MA, PhD Judith Grant, BA, MA, PhD Ganaele Langlois, BA, MA, PhD Amy Leach, BA, MA, PhD Sharon Loverock, BA, MA, PhD Patrik Olsson, BA, MA, PhD Diane Sivasubramaniam, BA, MA, PhD Arshia Zaidi, BA, BSc, MA, PhD

COMPLEMENTARY FACULTY
Robert Coke, BA, MA, MPhil, LLB Alyson King, BA, MA, PhD Mojgan Rahbari, BA, MA, PhD
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F A C U L T Y O F C R I M I N O L O G Y, JUSTICE AND POLICY STUDIES

ACCESS TO HANDS-ON RESEARCH
Our Student Work Assistance program gives you a chance to gain valuable research experience working directly with members of our faculty. Additionally, our faculty members have hired several students as research assistants. Practicum students have also benefitted from the opportunity to do their placement with a faculty member. Here are some examples of the innovative and exciting research that our professors are engaged in:

Dr. Anthony Chan was a television reporter with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and a media manager at Television Broadcasting Ltd. in Hong Kong, China before entering academics as a communication educator and scholar. He also served as an anchor, senior producer and television journalist. As a print journalist, he has written for The Globe and Mail newspaper, Cinemaya (Mumbai), and Snoecks (Ghent Belgium) magazines. Dr. Chan was also the founding editor of New Scholars – New Visions in Canadian Studies in Seattle, Washington and the co-founder of The Asianadian: An Asian Canadian Magazine in Toronto, Ontario. He has written five books and numerous scholarly articles and essays. As a filmmaker, he has produced and directed many documentaries.

Dr. Shahid Alvi’s research agenda includes violence against immigrant women, responding to hate crime, youth crime and social exclusion.

Dr. Nawal Ammar’s research focuses on comparative criminology and justice. Her research explores issues related to battered immigrant women and service delivery, violence against women and children in Egypt and other Islamic societies, and environmental justice. Dr. Ammar’s work has been used by human rights organizations and the United Nations in making or recommending policy, as well as in court cases to support asylum for abused immigrant women.

Dr. Sasha Baglay’s research interests lie in the area of Canadian and comparative immigration and refugee law. Her current research projects include security certificates and detention of non-citizens suspected of links to terrorist organizations, citizenship law and policy, refugee protection and assistance programs for victims of human trafficking, and other issues of domestic and comparative immigration and refugee law.

Dr. Kimberley Clow has multiple ongoing research projects in psychology and law and social psychology. One stream of research investigates how individuals involved in the justice system are perceived, the consequences of those perceptions, and possible ways of altering those perceptions. For example, Dr. Clow and Dr. Amy Leach are currently working together to examine how individuals who have been wrongfully convicted are stereotyped. Dr. Clow and Dr. Brian Cutler are planning studies that explore the role of stereotypes and decision-making in the judgments of defence lawyers. Another stream of research concerns gender stereotypes. Different research studies explore how gender is portrayed, perceptions of individuals in domains that are not stereotypic for their gender (e.g. men in nursing), cues that trigger gender stereotypes, and differing forms of masculinity and femininity. Dr. Clow also enjoys collaborative research with students and colleagues in the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies, colleagues from other faculties at UOIT, colleagues from other universities and colleagues from the community.

Dr. Liqun Cao’s research interests include comparative studies, criminological theory, gun ownership, and policing. His research essays have appeared in many national and international journals, including the top journals of Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Journal of Criminal Justice, and Policing.

Dr. Carla Cesaroni is interested in the pains of imprisonment. Her research seeks to examine the stress and adjustment of incarcerated individuals. Additionally, she is interested in the role of punishment in the criminal justice system and in the public psyche. For the last decade she has studied the experiences of adolescent males serving custodial sentences. She is currently conducting a study of 200 youths in detention centres throughout Southern Ontario.

Robert Coke brings substantial academic and professional experience to the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies. He is a graduate of the University of Manitoba where he received his Master of Arts in Economics degree. In 1972, he received a Rhodes Scholarship to attend the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, where he continued his graduate studies in Economics and obtained his Master in Philosophy degree in 1975. After a brief time with the Ministry of Finance in British Columbia, Coke entered the University of Toronto where he completed his Bachelor of Laws degree in 1982. Following law school, he held a number of senior positions with the Ontario government including senior tax policy advisor for the Ministry of Finance, director of Labour Policy with the Ministry of Labour, senior vice-president of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB), vice-chair of the WSIB Appeals Tribunal and assistant deputy minister with the Ontario Ministry of Finance. Coke has also acted as a consultant to a number of clients, including the Toronto Stock Exchange, Canada’s Department of Human Resources and Development and the Council of Ontario Universities. For the past few years, he has taught a number of courses at UOIT, including Business Ethics, Leadership and Public Administration.

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F A C U L T Y O F C R I M I N O L O G Y, JUSTICE AND POLICY STUDIES

Dr. Wesley Crichlow’s research interests focus on mediation, race, gender, power and cultural differences, youth restorative justice, black youth gang violence, social inequality, theoretical and legal approaches to the study of race, human rights, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual rights, racial profiling, moral regulation, new immigrant employment and accreditation training, judicial reform and racialized community mediation as an alternative to criminal justice and Section 15 criminal law Charter challenges.

Dr. Molly Dragiewicz’s research interests include violence and gender, anti-feminist fathers’ rights groups, battering and child custody, and human trafficking. She has recently been published in the areas of human trafficking, fathers' rights activists and feminist perspectives on woman abuse. Dr. Dragiewicz is currently working on a book about legal efforts to undermine anti-violence policies and services in the context of neoliberalism. She is also conducting a new study on the ways that support for and resistance to anti-violence work have changed over time.

Dr. Brian Cutler has multiple ongoing psychology and law research projects with his students, colleagues from UOIT, and colleagues from other universities. One stream of research examines methods of improving the accuracy of eyewitness identification. This research investigates alternatives to traditional identification procedures. For example, his experiments examine whether the risk of false identification can be reduced, and the likelihood of accurate identification increased, through modification of instructions to eyewitnesses, alternative methods of presenting lineups and photo arrays, and the use of technology. Another stream of research is aimed toward understanding and reducing the risk of wrongful conviction. In this research, Dr. Cutler and his colleagues have thoroughly examined the roles of legal safeguards designed to protect defendants from wrongful conviction resulting from mistaken eyewitness identification. In collaboration with Dr. Kimberley Clow, Dr. Cutler recently launched a program examining the role of ineffective legal counsel in wrongful conviction.

Dr. Shanti Fernando has published the book Race and the City, which studied the political and community mobilizing of Chinese Canadians and Chinese Americans in Toronto and Los Angeles. This spoke to broader issues of justice and equity as it impacts racialized communities. She has also written in the areas of regional differences in Canada and the importance of clear ethical guidelines in public service. Currently Dr. Fernando is conducting research in the area of diversity policy in Canada and the United States as well as labour policy, and immigration and settlement policy in Ontario. All of this revolves around her primary concern, which is the creation of strong communities and working towards greater systemic equity and social cohesion. These are both vital elements of a healthy and vibrant society.

Dr. Walter DeKeseredy focuses much of his work on creating safer and healthier public and private environments for women. Working with researchers in Canada and other countries, Dr. DeKeseredy conducts quantitative and qualitative studies that generate data that can be effectively used to help end the psychological, physical, sexual and economic abuse of women in intimate relationships and public places. Dr. DeKeseredy’s research has helped raise awareness about violence against women and has contributed to the creation of effective policies aimed at enhancing women’s quality of life.

Dr. Judith Grant’s research interests include drugs and gender, women and addiction/recovery, violence against women, public policy issues, criminology, and qualitative research methods. Her current research project focuses on men’s stories of addiction and recovery in the region of the Ozarks in the United States. As well, Dr. Grant was also a research partner in Summer 2008 with the Central East Local Health Integration Network (LHIN), working on the qualitative aspect of the Research Project: Assessment of Addiction Problems and Service Needs for the Central East LHIN.

Dr. Ronald Hinch’s primary research interests are in the policing of violent crime. He has been published on the policing of Canadian sexual assault laws and the policing of domestic assault, and has current research interests in the policing of serial murder.

Dr. Steven Downing is currently researching informal social control within various online subcultures of software piracy, and on the offline front is involved in a forthcoming project studying the link between formal and informal socialization and the United States’ gun culture. Other forthcoming projects encompass a broad spectrum of topics, including high-value online and offline larceny, crime fiction as an agent of social control, and the emerging concerns regarding the practical utility and threat of artificial intelligence in criminal justice practice and beyond.

Dr. Aziz Douai’s research focuses on mass media and global politics, and media reform in developing democracies. His recent publications include Offline politics in the Arab Blogosphere in International Blogging: Identity, politics, and Networked Publics, and In Democracy’s Shadow: The 'New' Independent Press and the Limits of Media Reform in Morocco in the Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture Journal. He is currently working on a book manuscript about the United Statessponsored Al-Hurra Television and Arab Public Opinion.

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F A C U L T Y O F C R I M I N O L O G Y, JUSTICE AND POLICY STUDIES

Dr. Alyson King’s current research projects focus on how children, adolescents and young adults read and understand non-fiction graphic novels/texts, and how children learn and play in online virtual worlds. Other research interests include the history of women and higher education, the role of science, technology and education in creating a modern Canada, and the history of educational technologies.

Dr. Mari Peepre has published books on Canadian literature including Hugh MacLennan’s National Trilogy, critical theory and practice such as Reading Our World, and has most recently written about her research on transcultural issues in Transcultural Travels. She is interested in how migration and the formation of diaspora communities affect cultural production.

Dr. Ganaele Langlois' research focuses on critically assessing the new practices of online communication that have emerged with the rise of Web 2.0, online social networking (e.g. Facebook, MySpace) and usergenerated content websites ( e.g. Youtube, Flickr, Wikipedia, etc.). She is interested in the cultural role of software and the new politics of information that are emerging in the online context.

Dr. Amy Leach is primarily interested in issues related to deception detection and young witnesses. Dr. Leach’s recent lie detection projects have focused on second-language deception, the reliability of performance and ways to improve lie detection. Her previous work with child witnesses has centred on children’s deception and the effects of different interviewing procedures. In addition, Dr. Leach is engaged in ongoing collaborations with colleagues. For example, she has been working with Dr. Kimberley Clow at UOIT to examine the stigma associated with being wrongfully convicted. Also, in conjunction with researchers at several other universities, she is examining the effects of viewing conditions, bias, and lineup size on eyewitness identifications.

Dr. Barbara Perry has written extensively in the area of hate crime, including In the Name of Hate: Understanding Hate Crime, Hate and Bias Crime: A Reader, and three other books. Her latest books deal with racial violence against Native Americans, and disparate policing in Native American communities. She is also general editor of a five-volume set on hate crime (Praeger), and editor of Volume 3: Victims of Hate Crime of that set. Dr. Perry continues to work in the area of hate crime, and has begun to make contributions to the limited scholarship on hate crime in Canada. Here, she is particularly interested in anti-Muslim violence, and hate crime against aboriginal people. Currently, she is conducting innovative research with Dr. Shahid Alvi about the community impacts of hate crime.

Dr. Sharon Loverock is interested in how students and faculty communicate with one another and learn by using technology. She has published articles in the areas of laptop learning and use of technology in teaching. Current research projects in this area involve using text messaging in teaching and quantifying attention span while using technology in class. Dr. Loverock is also engaged in research on spiritual communication. She is currently examining how the media affects spirituality and spiritual growth.

Dr. Teresa Pierce’s research focuses on the way we use the Internet to advocate for social change. The primary focus of her dissertation research was on the gendered discourse and personal narratives of cyberactivist women, or cyberconduits. As a communication scholar, Dr. Pierce focuses on the ways society integrates communication in our everyday lives and how these, in turn, globalize communication strategies. She has published in the areas of communication and the environment, and in the gendered politics of information and communication technology. New interests include issues surrounding communities of practice, media ecology, and the political rhetoric of science.

Dr. Mojgan Rahbari is a specialist in international migration and integration, policy studies, multiculturalism, race and ethnic studies, and identity and citizenship studies. She also has research interests in domestic and comparative immigration and refugee law, socio-cultural aspects of migrant integration, globalization, and citizenship policy.

Dr. Patrik Olsson has conducted comparative research on discriminatory practices against children at risk in Southeast Asia, South America, Africa and Europe for more than a decade. Dr. Olsson’s research has predominantly focused on children in conflict with the law and the sociolegal conditions surrounding this vulnerable group. Furthermore, he is involved in research concerning critical perspectives on information technology and recently published the article Law and Cyber Society: Socio-legal Perspectives on the Internet, which discusses the culture of the Internet and the legal predicaments that have arisen lately due to problems that involve various jurisdictions and legal cultures.

Dr. Hannah Scott was the sole administrator and co-principal investigator on a study examining homelessness in Durham Region, which she worked on with Dr. Wendy Stanyon and Dr. Shahid Alvi in 2006-2007. During that time the team conducted two censuses and carried out 64 qualitative interviews on the homelessness experience. She has recently created and received a patent for an instructional film series for the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 16.0. Dr. Scott has worked with Dr. Nawal Ammar to develop a centre for evaluation and survey research at UOIT. She is currently writing a victimology text with Oxford University Press; working on the analysis of the qualitative data generated from the Homelessness Initiative; and running an evaluation of the Durham Regional Drug Treatment Court. She has recently developed an interest in victims of fraud, e-crime, and organized crime

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F A C U L T Y O F C R I M I N O L O G Y, JUSTICE AND POLICY STUDIES

Dr. Diane Sivasubramaniam has a number of ongoing research projects in the area of psychology and law. Her research focuses on how people perceive the role of justice in the legal system, including restorative justice procedures. Restorative justice is an approach to wrongdoing that emphasizes psychological healing of the wounds of victims, offenders and communities caused by crime, rather than focusing on punishing an offender. Restorative justice procedures are emerging rapidly in legal systems worldwide, as an alternative to traditional court procedures, but very little is known about the psychological mechanisms underpinning people’s responses to them. Her work focuses on how people behave in and respond to these procedures. Dr. Sivasubramaniam and her collaborators are also interested in authority subordinate differences in justice reasoning. Recent research has highlighted some important differences in the way that decision-makers (e.g. judges, police) and decision recipients (e.g. disputants, citizens) think about justice. The current program of research explores the conditions under which this disparity between authorities and subordinates occurs, and the reasons for its existence.

Dr. Andrea Slane’s research interests are in privacy, information law, law and technology, and intellectual property. Her projects primarily deal with law's encounter with and management of new communications technologies, in particular the Internet.

Dr. Arshia Zaidi’s research focuses on issues of immigration, race, gender, sexuality, family and culture. Most of this work focuses on the South Asian community. She recently received a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant for a project with Dr. Eleanor MatickaTyndale (University of Windsor): Heritage or Host Country? Scripting of South Asian Youths’ Cross-Gender Relationships and Ethnic Identities.

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GAIN REAL-WORLD EXPERIENCE FROM LEADING EMPLOYERS
Fieldwork is an essential component of UOIT’s Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies undergraduate programs. The fieldwork practicum represents a vehicle for experiential learning, as it equips students with a first-hand perspective of the interconnectivity of services required by the community. Fieldwork is an important learning tool that provides you with opportunities to confront the relationships between theory and practice, to acquire workplace knowledge and skills, and to cultivate a sense of personal development. In collaboration with your field supervisor, you receive feedback on your capacity to manage a series of workplace-related goals and learning objectives, and are evaluated on your ability to identify the relationship between theory and practice. Your practicum experience also gives you the opportunity to make positive connections and contributions to participating organizations and the community at large.

OPENING THE DOOR TO CHALLENGING AND REWARDING CAREERS
UOIT’s strong partnerships with leading employers open the door to challenging and rewarding careers, and the analytical and problem-solving skills you gain can be applied to any number of exciting occupations. You are limited only by your imagination! Your degree will profoundly impact your future. Demand is increasing rapidly for people with the knowledge and skills learned through the UOIT Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies. Employers in areas such as police services, corrections, customs, immigration, law, human rights, e-commerce, private business, speech writing, social services, victims’ agencies, legal research and administration, advertising, mediation and dispute resolution, grants writing, and government services have all confirmed a need for well-prepared graduates. Through our challenging programs, you learn a broad range of skills in areas including criminal justice, social policy, social services, communication, digital media, evaluation research, advertising, law and human rights. These prepare you well for a career in the criminal justice, social services, communication and management fields, or entry into graduate or law school.

PRACTICUM OFFICE
Dan Walters, practicum officer, BA, MA Patti Lyn Cheesman, practicum assistant “UOIT provides students with an unparalleled opportunity to explore new and exciting research topics that are both local and global in nature. With smaller class sizes than most universities, UOIT enables its students to collaborate with their professors and to work on projects that are truly innovative and benefit both the world of academia and society as a whole.” Angela Heagle, fourth-year Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Criminology and Justice student

“Once again I have been nothing but impressed with the students from the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies. They were all eager to participate and learn, and the quality of their work for us was excellent. We could not do much of our work so well without their assistance. You should be very proud of the students that you have in your faculty and all of the wonderful work that they are doing in this community. I thank you on behalf of the Community Development Council Durham and our many community partners, and I look forward to continuing our work with your students and faculty in the future.” Benjamin Earle, manager, Social Research and Planning, Community Development Council Durham

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ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Current Ontario secondary school students must complete the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with a minimum overall average of 70 per cent on six 12U or M credits, including English (ENG4U). Students with previous college or university education may also be eligible for advanced standing and transfer credit.

SCHOLARSHIPS NOT REQUIRING AN APPLICATION
Awards of Recognition These awards recognize secondary school academic accomplishments in the following way:

$12,000 ($3,000 x four years) 95 per cent or higher $8,000 ($2,000 x four years) 90 to 94.9 per cent $6,000 ($1,500 x four years) 85 to 89.9 per cent $5,000 ($1,250 x four years) 80 to 84.9 per cent

Please note:

FINANCING YOUR EDUCATION
Because your education is one of the most important investments you’ll ever make, our Financial Aid and Awards office works hard to ensure you have everything you need to meet your financial obligations. UOIT is committed to helping support the financial aspect of your post-secondary journey and encourages you to take advantage of budget counselling and on-campus and summer employment opportunities to assist with the cost of your tuition, books and other fees. In addition, thanks to the generosity of donors, there are a variety of bursaries and other student awards available to you if you are in financial need and in good academic standing. The Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) and the Canada Student Loans Program will also provide financial assistance if you qualify. UOIT also offers a variety of scholarship awards and bursaries to help you meet the cost of a university education. If you are a full-time Canadian secondary school student you can apply for the following awards by February 26, 2010. They are given to applicants who demonstrate academic achievement (minimum 85 per cent average), exceptional leadership and community involvement. Applications are available at www.uoit.ca/scholarships.

:: Values are subject to change; :: Awards of recognition and scholarships are only available to students applying to UOIT from secondary school within 18 months of graduation; :: Summer school and upgrading marks are not included in grade calculation for awards; :: Students must not have attended a post-secondary institution; :: Students must be enrolled full-time at UOIT; :: Minimum GPA of 3.7 required for renewal; and :: Students may not hold more than one UOIT scholarship simultaneously.

SCHOLARSHIPS REQUIRING AN APPLICATION
Chancellor’s scholarship – one valued at $28,000 President’s scholarships – two valued at $24,000 each Founder’s scholarships – two valued at $20,000 each *Renewal is subject to maintaining a minimum 3.7 grade point average (GPA).

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CHALLENGE YOURSELF IN AND OUT OF THE CLASSROOM
Your university experience is about what you do in and out of the classroom, so join one of our diverse clubs or take up a new activity. Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies students have an opportunity to join several faculty-specific campus clubs, including Students Against Social Injustice (SASI), the Justice Society, the UOIT Debating Club and UOIT Law Club. SASI promotes social justice within the community and encourages compassion and respect for fellow human beings. Members are student activists who volunteer their time and resources to address the needs of marginalized communities through immediate action, education and awareness. Past initiatives include the adoption of a family affiliated with Rose of Durham, a support services organization for young parents; organizing food drives for the Gate 3:16 outreach centre; and co-ordinating a campus and communitywide prison book drive in collaboration with five correctional institutions across Canada. SASI members work with the philosophy that you can do no great things, just small things with great love. They combine their efforts and passions to make a positive difference in the lives of others. The Justice Society is the faculty club of the Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies. Society membership is automatically given to all Criminology and Justice students who have a course load of 40 per cent or higher. Committed to promoting the faculty internally and externally within the communities of UOIT, other universities, the city of Oshawa and the rest of Canada, the mission of the Justice Society is to create a greater collective effectiveness among students, staff and faculty to promote academic and social growth. It encourages student advocacy and leadership, social involvement and academic excellence. The UOIT Debating Club promotes intellectual scholarly discussions and debates of concern and relevance while supporting public speaking in a positive learning environment. It encourages our students as well as those from the broader UOIT community to actively engage in discussions and debates. It also acts as a learning tool and medium for discussion to promote UOIT and the community. The UOIT Law Club aims to create a unique atmosphere for pre-law students and those interested in the fields of law and justice to connect and interact. The club focuses specifically on issues of social justice and law reform to allow for students to create their own unique identity as future lawyers. The club also sponsors a number of charities every year that promote social justice within our community, and are used to connect our members to the real-world aspect of what we do.

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HERE FOR STUDENTS EVERY STEP OF THE WAY
The Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies provides support services to students, including academic advising, learning support and career and professional planning. Through your academic advisor, you also have access to many personalized advising services that are designed to help you make choices that will lead to academic and personal achievement.

CHALLENGE YOUR MIND AND BODY
The Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies also offers you many additional benefits, including plenty of opportunity to stay active if you want to challenge your body as well as your mind. Our spectacular Campus Recreation and Wellness Centre includes five gymnasiums, an elevated indoor walking/jogging track and the Flex, a 10,000-square-foot fitness centre featuring state-of-the-art cardio and weight machines. www.campusrecreationcentre.com

Your academic advisor is your main faculty contact and is available to help, support and encourage you in a variety of different areas, including: :: Addressing academic difficulties; :: Addressing questions and concerns related to all aspects of your student life; :: Assessing and discussing academic progress and standing; :: Assisting with selecting appropriate classes, particularly if you miss or fail a course; :: Connecting you with campus services; :: Discussing and evaluating study habits and skills; :: Discussing issues that affect your academic performance; :: Establishing realistic educational goals and future planning; :: Interpreting academic policies and procedures; :: Keeping information discussed confidential; :: Providing advice regarding withdrawals or adding/dropping courses; :: Providing guidance for successful progression towards graduation; and :: Providing tips for academic success.

LIVING AND LEARNING – RESIDENCE
At UOIT, we offer the best of both worlds when it comes to residence – all the comforts of home in a unique campus community. Our residences offer convenience, great friendships and the chance to connect with all that campus life has to offer. The Simcoe Village and South Village residences offer accommodations for 1,360 students and if you’re a first-year student, you’re guaranteed a spot in residence if you meet the deadlines for accepting UOIT’s offer of admission and applying to residence. A number of new apartment-style residence units opened in 2008 and 2009. These spaces are designed for students in their upper years of study. Each 27-unit building can house a total of 108 students.

ACADEMIC ADVISING OFFICE
Amy Anderson, academic advisor, BA Emily Laverty, academic advising assistant, BA Patricia MacMillan, academic advising assistant

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STUDENT SUPPORT – WE ARE AT YOUR SERVICE
At UOIT, success is always a team effort. Our commitment to your success includes a range of student services backed by friendly, knowledgeable and caring staff.

CAMPUS HEALTH CENTRE
The Campus Health Centre features a full-service pharmacy and medical clinic that offers extended hours of service, on-site doctors and nurses, on-site counselling and a variety of alternative health services, including massage therapy, physiotherapy, acupuncture, nutritional counselling and chiropractic and orthotic services. Also contributing to our students’ healthy education is the Sexual Health Resource Centre. www.uoit.ca/campushealthcentre

HIRED CAREER SERVICES
Hired Career Services offers comprehensive assistance and a variety of valuable resources to meet your ongoing career development needs. Career advising, job market information and assistance with resumé writing, interview preparation and job search strategies are available year-round. During the academic year, job and career fairs, employer information sessions, internship and co-op programs, and interviews are hosted on campus. hired.mycampus.ca

DIVERSITY OFFICE
UOIT’s Diversity office supports you by working at a grassroots level with students, faculty and staff to help celebrate our diverse campus. The Diversity office assists in the production of campus cultural events, investigates actions connected with discrimination and provides diversity training and workshops. Our goal is to promote equality in celebration of our wonderful multicultural campus. www.uoit.ca/diversity

STUDENT LIFE OFFICE
The Student Life office is committed to helping you smoothly transition into the university community during your first year and to support your development throughout your post-secondary journey. In addition, the Student Life office works with student leaders to plan a variety of engaging events during Orientation Week. The office encourages you to get involved in campus life by connecting you to existing campus opportunities and assisting with the development of new initiatives. UOIT, through the Student Life office, offers a unique Co-curricular Recognition Program that acknowledges your participation and leadership in campus activities. www.uoit.ca/studentlife

CAMPUS LIBRARY
Our award-winning Campus Library provides quality information resources and services to assist you. The library offers both wired and wireless connections with comfortable study spaces and a reading room, complete with fireplace. Resources are offered in both paper and electronic format. Electronic resources, including e-books, electronic periodicals and recommended websites are made available through the library’s website for you to access both on and off campus. Services include training sessions, one-on-one consultations and free loans from other libraries. www.uoit.ca/library

LEARNING COMMONS CENTRE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
The Centre for Students with Disabilities makes sure reasonable accommodations are available with every program, providing you with the opportunity to succeed in your chosen field. The centre works with students who are blind, have low vision, are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a physical, medical, psychiatric or learning disability. www.uoit.ca/csd UOIT’s state-of-the-art Learning Commons houses 200 computers and other workstations. Additional amenities include private tutoring rooms, laptop stations, plasma information displays, CD/DVD burners, scanners, high-speed printing and access to the Internet via wired and wireless technologies. The Client Services and IT Support Desk is also conveniently located here to help you with any IT-related issues that may arise.

LEARNER SUPPORT CENTRE CAMPUS SECURITY
Your safety and security on campus are a priority. The Office of Campus Safety, Public Safety and Security has implemented numerous strategies for your safety, including uniformed security personnel who routinely patrol the campus, a 24-hour security presence at the Gordon Willey building’s main desk, Code Blue stations in all parking lots that provide direct contact to the security desk, and closed-circuit television cameras throughout campus. The office also facilitates the Campus Walk program, which provides escorts to and from your car on campus. Security can be contacted at anytime via internal telephones, cellphones and campus pay phones, which are programmed for free calls to security by dialing 905.721.8668 ext. 2400. Classrooms telephones are also equipped with a pre-programmed emergency button. www.uoit.ca/campussafety
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If you are looking for additional academic help, our Learner Support Centre provides learning skills support and online tutorials, as well as peer writing tutors and writing and academic language specialists who work with you if your first language is not English. Study and writing skills workshops are scheduled throughout the year and include a variety of topics, including time management, test taking skills, referencing and research strategies. www.uoit.ca/lsc

Faculty of Criminology, Justice and Policy Studies
U N I V E R S I T Y O F O N TA R I O I N S T I T U T E O F T E C H N O L O G Y 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON Canada L1H 7K4
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905.721.3234

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905.721.3372 www.criminologyandjustice.uoit.ca

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