You are on page 1of 64

An official publication of the Canadian Welding Association | Summer 2010

Publication officielle de l’Association canadienne de soudage | l’été 2010
www.cwa-acs.org
SUMMER | L’ÉTÉ 2010 $7.95 / 7,95 $
INSIDE:
CWA CONFERENCE 2010
SEPTEMBER 26-28, 2010
BLUE MOUNTAIN, CO
À L’INTÉRIEUR :
CONFÉRENCE L’ACS 2010
26-28 SEPTEMBRE 2010
BLUE MOUNTAIN, CO
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
To learn why Air Liquide cylinders are safer please contact us at
1-800-817-7697 www.airliquide.ca
SMARTOP

TM
now joins the TOP family.
another smart choice!
Safety Simplicity Savings
Air Liquide brings
safety to the TOP!
426497_air_liquide.indd 1 4/13/09 7:39:45 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
OneWord Defines
Select-Arc’s NewElectrode Line
and Reputation for Quality...
OneWord Defines
Select-Arc’s NewElectrode Line
and Reputation for Quality...
600 Enterprise Drive
P.O. Box 259
Fort Loramie, OH 45845-0259
Phone: (937) 295-5215
Fax: (888) 511-5217
www.select-arc.com
Select-Arc, Inc. has earned
an outstanding reputation
in the industry as a manu-
facturer of premium quality
tubular welding electrodes
for carbon and low alloy
steel welding.
Now Select-Arc has
expanded its range of
exceptional products
with the introduction
of a complete line of
austenitic, martensit-
ic and ferritic stainless
steel electrodes. Both
the new SelectAlloy
and Select stainless
steel wires deliver the
superior feedabili-
ty, superb welding
electrodes’ higher deposi-
tion rates improve produc-
tivity and reduce welding
costs.
SelectAlloy’s smooth bead
contour, easy peeling slag,
minimal spatter, closely
controlled weld de-
posit compositions and
metal soundness deliver
additional savings.
The Select 400 Series
metal cored electrodes
offer the same advan-
tages as SelectAlloy
and are ideally suited
for difficult-to-weld
applications, such as
auto exhaust systems.
characteristics, consistent
deposit chemistry and excel-
lent overall performance you
have come to expect from
Select-Arc.
The chart bel ow shows
that SelectAlloy flux cored
Discover for yourself the
many benefits of specifying
Select-Arc’s new premium
stainless steel electrodes. Call
us today at 1-800-341-5215
or you can visit our website
at www.select-arc.com for
more information.
Stainless.
407832_Select.indd 1 11/17/08 11:48:00 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
4 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Published for: / Publié pour :
Canadian Welding Association /
L’Association canadienne de soudage
7250 West Credit Ave.
Mississauga, ON L5N 5N1
Tel: 800-844-6790 ext. 256
Fax: 905-542-1318
Email: admin@cwa-acs.org
Website: www.cwa-acs.org
Published by: / Publié par :

Naylor (Canada), Inc.
100 Sutherland Ave.
Winnipeg, MB R2W 3C7
800-665-2456
www.naylor.com
Publisher: / Éditeur :
Robert Phillips
Project Manager: / Gestionnaire de projet :
Alana Place
CWA Editor: / Éditeur de l’ACS:
Dan Tadic
CWA Journal Committee: /
Comité du Journal de l’ACS :
Robert Shaw, Chairman / président
Shane Haskins
Karsten Madsen
Andy McCartney
Mick J. Pates
Kristy Waalderbos
Marketing Associate: / Adjoint au marketing :
Heather Zimmerman
Account Executives: / Chargés de compte :
Mark Hawkins (bookleader), Robert Bartmanovich,
Bill Biber, Brenda Ezinicki, Ralph Herzberg,
Wayne Jury, Cheryll Oland, Darryl Sawchuk
Naylor Editor: / Éditeur de Naylor :
Michael Senecal
Layout & Design: /
Mise en page et illustration :
??
Advertising Art: / Art publicitaire :
??
Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:
Naylor (Canada), Inc., Distribution Dept.,
100 Sutherland Ave., Winnipeg, MB R2W 3C7.
Renvoyer toute correspondance ne pouvant être livrée
au Canada à : Naylor (Canada), Inc., Service de la
distribution,
100 Sutherland Ave., Winnipeg, MB R2W 3C7.
CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS
MAIL AGREEMENT #40064978
CONVENTION DE LA POSTE –
PUBLICATIONS NUMÉRO 40064978
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 2010/CWA-Q0110/9708
PUBLIÉ EN FÉVRIER 2010/CWA-Q0110/9708
©2010 Naylor (Canada), Inc. All rights reserved.
The contents of this publication may not be reproduced
by any means, in whole or in part, without the prior
written consent of the publisher.
©2010 Naylor (Canada), Inc. Tous droits réservés.
Le contenu de cette publication ne peut être reproduit,
en tout ou en partie, de quelque manière que ce soit,
sans la permission écrite de l’éditeur.
Contents
Table des matières
Messages / Messages
Chairman’s Message/Director’s Message
Message du président/Message du directeur
9
SUMMER / L’ÉTÉ 2010
Buyers’ Guide
Guide de l’acheteur
60
Close Up
Gros plan
62
www.cwa-acs.org
Welded Connections and the Versatility of Fillet Welds
Assemblages soudés et polyvalence des soudures d’angle 11
Influences on fatigue properties of welded structures
and methods of assessment
Influences sur les propriétés de fatigue des
constructions soudées et méthodes d’évaluation
17
Field Hardness Testing of Welds
Essais de dureté des soudures sur le terrain
24
General Requirements for Built-Up Members
Exigences générales relatives aux éléments composés
31
The Next Step in Plasma Beveling: When Straight
Cutting Is Not Enough
La prochaine étape du chanfreinage plasma :
quand les coupes droites ne suffisent pas
34
Design and Use of Cored Stainless Steel Electrodes
Conception et utilisation des électrodes fourrées en acier inoxydable
42
How to Make Economical 6 mm
Semiautomatic Horizontal Fillet Welds
Comment réaliser semi-automatiquement
des soudures d’angle de 6 mm à l’horizontale
54
Features / Articles
Published for: / Publié pour :
Canadian Welding Association /
L’Association canadienne de soudage
8260 Parkhill Drive
Milton, ON L9T 5V7
Tel: 800-844-6790
Fax: 905-542-1318
Email: admin@cwa-acs.org
Website: www.cwa-acs.org
Published by: / Publié par :

Naylor (Canada), Inc.
100 Sutherland Ave.
Winnipeg, MB R2W 3C7
800-665-2456
www.naylor.com
Publisher: / Éditeur :
Robert Phillips
Project Manager: / Gestionnaire de projet :
Alana Place
CWA Editor: / Éditeur de l’ACS:
Dan Tadic
CWA Journal Committee: /
Comité du Journal de l’ACS :
Robert Shaw (Chairman / président),
Shane Haskins
Karsten Madsen
Andy McCartney
Mick J. Pates
Kristy Waalderbos
Marketing Associate: / Adjoint au marketing :
Heather Zimmerman
Account Executives: / Chargés de compte :
Ralph Herzberg (bookleader), Bill Biber, John Byrne,
Anook Commandeur, Brenda Ezinicki, Wayne Jury,
Cheryll Oland, Darryl Sawchuk
Naylor Editor: / Éditeur de Naylor :
Michael Senecal
Layout & Design: /
Mise en page et illustration :
Bill Kitson
Advertising Art: / Art publicitaire :
Elaine Connell
Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:
Naylor (Canada), Inc., Distribution Dept.,
100 Sutherland Ave., Winnipeg, MB R2W 3C7.
Renvoyer toute correspondance ne pouvant être livrée
au Canada à : Naylor (Canada), Inc., Service de la
distribution, 100 Sutherland Ave.,
Winnipeg, MB R2W 3C7.
CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS
MAIL AGREEMENT #40064978
CONVENTION DE LA POSTE –
PUBLICATIONS NUMÉRO 40064978
PUBLISHED AUGUST 2010/CWA-Q0310/4325
PUBLIÉ EN AOUT 2010/CWA-Q0310/4325
©2010 Naylor (Canada), Inc. All rights reserved.
The contents of this publication may not be reproduced
by any means, in whole or in part, without the prior
written consent of the publisher.
©2010 Naylor (Canada), Inc. Tous droits réservés.
Le contenu de cette publication ne peut être reproduit,
en tout ou en partie, de quelque manière que ce soit,
sans la permission écrite de l’éditeur.
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
ESAB Coreweld
®
C-6 –
the best in metal core-wired performance.
Welding with metal-cored wire can reduce weld cycle times,
yield higher deposition rates than solid wire, and increase
travel speeds, significantly improving your welding process.
Ideal for applications in the automotive, railcar, agricultural,
heavy equipment, and food and chemical industries.
With local warehousing and distribution across Canada,
ESAB ensures you have your product when you need it.
Find out why Coreweld C-6 could be right for you.
To register for a free
trial and consultation,
visit www.esab.ca/C6
or email us at
CanadaMktg@esab.com.
esab.ca + 1.877.935.3226
Perfect
performance.
INTEGRITY
+
EXPERIENCE
+
INNOVATION
+
PARTNERSHIP
479757_ESAB.indd 1 5/18/10 2:28:55 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
The CWA organizing committee is planning a fun flled, information packed Annual Conference at the Blue
Mountain Resort in Collingwood, ON. Come out and learn how your company can beneft from improved
process technologies and production effciencies while driving our welding industry toward global
competitiveness. You have the opportunity to become familiar with new technological developments in: welding
research, applied research, productivity improvement methodologies, robotic intelligence, recent laser
advancements, welding gas applications, spatter free welding, maintenance and repair analysis, recent welding
power source evolution, pipe automation implementation for the oil sands industry, process automation, lean
manufacturing applications, and cost analysis, etc. Blue Mountain is the perfect setting for our frst annual CWA
Conference with the fresh water lakes, scenic caves, golf, hiking, and outstanding fall colours. There are also
many small shops and boutiques where you can fnd art, pottery, gifts and the renowned, unique Scandinavian
Spa. As always, there will be a great deal of networking and knowledge sharing within the welding industry.
Please plan on attending this very exciting Conference and supporting the Canadian Welding Association.
Conference Fees (Registration includes all meals, business meetings and social programs.)

Early Bird Registration (Before August 31st, 2010)
Members • $375 + tax
Non-Members • $500 + tax
Students • $300 + tax
Spousal Fee* • $125 + tax
Standard Registration (After August 31st, 2010)
Members • $500 + tax
Non-Members • $625 + tax
Students • $350 + tax
Spousal Fee* • $125 + tax
Spousal Program
Scandinave Spa • $65 + tax
Canoeing or Kayaking • $138 + tax
Artisan Tour • $120 + tax
* spousal fee includes reception and awards dinner
CWA Annual Conference: Agenda
Productivity
• Lean Welding Methodology (Max-Weld Diagnostic) – Jean Claude, Brisson National Research Council
• Automating Robotic Welding - Nick McDonald, ABB Robotics
• Power factor – Dominique Dodd, Thermonic Electric Company
• Energy Effciency and Costs in Arc Welding – Jim Galloway, Conestoga College
• Pipe Welding in the Wild West – James Gilbank, AECON Lockerbie
• The Benefts of Real Time Data Acquisition to Manufacturers – Chris Brodnick, Lincoln Electric
• Energy Applications for Advanced Joining Processes – Ed Hansen, ESAB
Process
• CMT Technology- Martin Willinger, Fronius Canada
• Fiber Laser Processing at Extreme Speed Extreme Power - Charles Caristan, Air Liquide Industrial US LP
• Diffusion Brazing of Nickel Based Super Alloys - Jesse Brenneman, University of Waterloo
• Wire Welding of Pt-10% Ir to 316-LVM Stainless Steel – Y.D. Huang, G.S. Zou & Y. Zhou, University of Waterloo
• Weldability of AA-5182 Sheets Seam Welded – N. Joshi and D.C. Weckman, University of Waterloo
• The Effects of Aluminum Coating Layer on Steel During Laser Brazing of Steel-AZ31B Mg Alloy – Ali Nasiri, Y. Zhou, & D.
Weckman, University of Waterloo
• The Effect of Variable Changes in Alternating Current Output in Submerged Arc Welding – Dale Malcolm, Lincoln Electric
• Is Spatterless Welding Possible with GMAW Process? – Brian Doyle Panasonic Factory Solutions
• The Magnetic Pulse Impact Welding of Magnesium Sheets – Alex Berlin University of Waterloo
Applications
• Welding Productivity: Challenges and Opportunities for Canada’s Fabrication and Construction Industry - Matthew Yarmuch,
Alberta Research Council
• Effect of Welding Parameters on Tungsten Carbide: Metal Matrix Composites (WC-MMC) Produces by GMAW - Matt Yar-
much, Alberta Research Council/University of Alberta
• The Canadian Centre for Welding and Joining – Patricio Mendez, University of Alberta
• Theoretical Analysis of Penetration Depth of Keyhole Laser Welding Process – Ali Nasiri, Y. Zhou, & D. Weckman,
University of Waterloo
• Fabrication Challenges in the Construction of Four 630M3 Autoclave Vessels – Victor Taylor Hatch, Auto Clave
Technology Group
• Hybrid Automated Welding System (HAWS) – A New Way to Robotically Weld Pipe Fabrications – Carl Heinrich Roboweld
Inc & Mathew Yarmuch, Alberta Innovates –Technology Futures
• 20/20 Vision (Back to the future with intelligent robotic welding sensors) – Jeffrey Noruk, Servo-Robot Corp.

Consumables and Safety
• Improvements in Tubular Welding Wire Consumables – Joseph C. Bundy, Hobart Brothers
• Automation Trends Support Continued Growth of Metal Cored Wire – Garth Stapon, National Standard
• Reducing the Hazard – Jay Smith, Nederman Canada
• Shielding Gases for Challenging Joining Applications – Kevin A Lyttle, Praxair Technical Center
• Improved economics in MIG-welding of automotive Al-structures by using O2 doped argon-helium welding gas mixtures -
Christoph Matz Linde Canada.
CONTACT US NOW TO REGISTER
Phone: 1-800-844-6790 | Fax: 905-542-1318 | Web: www.cwa-acs.org | Email: info@cwa-acs.org
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
The CWA organizing committee is planning a fun flled, information packed Annual Conference at the Blue
Mountain Resort in Collingwood, ON. Come out and learn how your company can beneft from improved
process technologies and production effciencies while driving our welding industry toward global
competitiveness. You have the opportunity to become familiar with new technological developments in: welding
research, applied research, productivity improvement methodologies, robotic intelligence, recent laser
advancements, welding gas applications, spatter free welding, maintenance and repair analysis, recent welding
power source evolution, pipe automation implementation for the oil sands industry, process automation, lean
manufacturing applications, and cost analysis, etc. Blue Mountain is the perfect setting for our frst annual CWA
Conference with the fresh water lakes, scenic caves, golf, hiking, and outstanding fall colours. There are also
many small shops and boutiques where you can fnd art, pottery, gifts and the renowned, unique Scandinavian
Spa. As always, there will be a great deal of networking and knowledge sharing within the welding industry.
Please plan on attending this very exciting Conference and supporting the Canadian Welding Association.
Conference Fees (Registration includes all meals, business meetings and social programs.)

Early Bird Registration (Before August 31st, 2010)
Members • $375 + tax
Non-Members • $500 + tax
Students • $300 + tax
Spousal Fee* • $125 + tax
Standard Registration (After August 31st, 2010)
Members • $500 + tax
Non-Members • $625 + tax
Students • $350 + tax
Spousal Fee* • $125 + tax
Spousal Program
Scandinave Spa • $65 + tax
Canoeing or Kayaking • $138 + tax
Artisan Tour • $120 + tax
* spousal fee includes reception and awards dinner
CWA Annual Conference: Agenda
Productivity
• Lean Welding Methodology (Max-Weld Diagnostic) – Jean Claude, Brisson National Research Council
• Automating Robotic Welding - Nick McDonald, ABB Robotics
• Power factor – Dominique Dodd, Thermonic Electric Company
• Energy Effciency and Costs in Arc Welding – Jim Galloway, Conestoga College
• Pipe Welding in the Wild West – James Gilbank, AECON Lockerbie
• The Benefts of Real Time Data Acquisition to Manufacturers – Chris Brodnick, Lincoln Electric
• Energy Applications for Advanced Joining Processes – Ed Hansen, ESAB
Process
• CMT Technology- Martin Willinger, Fronius Canada
• Fiber Laser Processing at Extreme Speed Extreme Power - Charles Caristan, Air Liquide Industrial US LP
• Diffusion Brazing of Nickel Based Super Alloys - Jesse Brenneman, University of Waterloo
• Wire Welding of Pt-10% Ir to 316-LVM Stainless Steel – Y.D. Huang, G.S. Zou & Y. Zhou, University of Waterloo
• Weldability of AA-5182 Sheets Seam Welded – N. Joshi and D.C. Weckman, University of Waterloo
• The Effects of Aluminum Coating Layer on Steel During Laser Brazing of Steel-AZ31B Mg Alloy – Ali Nasiri, Y. Zhou, & D.
Weckman, University of Waterloo
• The Effect of Variable Changes in Alternating Current Output in Submerged Arc Welding – Dale Malcolm, Lincoln Electric
• Is Spatterless Welding Possible with GMAW Process? – Brian Doyle Panasonic Factory Solutions
• The Magnetic Pulse Impact Welding of Magnesium Sheets – Alex Berlin University of Waterloo
Applications
• Welding Productivity: Challenges and Opportunities for Canada’s Fabrication and Construction Industry - Matthew Yarmuch,
Alberta Research Council
• Effect of Welding Parameters on Tungsten Carbide: Metal Matrix Composites (WC-MMC) Produces by GMAW - Matt Yar-
much, Alberta Research Council/University of Alberta
• The Canadian Centre for Welding and Joining – Patricio Mendez, University of Alberta
• Theoretical Analysis of Penetration Depth of Keyhole Laser Welding Process – Ali Nasiri, Y. Zhou, & D. Weckman,
University of Waterloo
• Fabrication Challenges in the Construction of Four 630M3 Autoclave Vessels – Victor Taylor Hatch, Auto Clave
Technology Group
• Hybrid Automated Welding System (HAWS) – A New Way to Robotically Weld Pipe Fabrications – Carl Heinrich Roboweld
Inc & Mathew Yarmuch, Alberta Innovates –Technology Futures
• 20/20 Vision (Back to the future with intelligent robotic welding sensors) – Jeffrey Noruk, Servo-Robot Corp.

Consumables and Safety
• Improvements in Tubular Welding Wire Consumables – Joseph C. Bundy, Hobart Brothers
• Automation Trends Support Continued Growth of Metal Cored Wire – Garth Stapon, National Standard
• Reducing the Hazard – Jay Smith, Nederman Canada
• Shielding Gases for Challenging Joining Applications – Kevin A Lyttle, Praxair Technical Center
• Improved economics in MIG-welding of automotive Al-structures by using O2 doped argon-helium welding gas mixtures -
Christoph Matz Linde Canada.
CONTACT US NOW TO REGISTER
Phone: 1-800-844-6790 | Fax: 905-542-1318 | Web: www.cwa-acs.org | Email: info@cwa-acs.org
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Hodgson Custom Rolling Inc.
services a wide variety of industries in the ENERGY
SECTORS of hydro, petro chemical, atomic, gas, oil,
wind, etc. in addition to those in heavy manufacturing,
steel, pulp & paper, mining, marine, forestry, etc.
Hodgson’s commitment to providing customers
superior products and personalized professional
service has earned itself a reputation for excellence,
making the name HODGSON synonymous with
“paramount quality and workmanship”.
Hodgson Custom Rolling Inc. is one of North
America’s largest plate rolling, forming, section
rolling and fabricating companies.
PLATE ROLLING & FLATTENING
Hodgson Custom Rolling specializes in the rolling and flattening of heavy
plate up to 10” thick and up to 12 feet wide. Cylinders and segments can be
rolled to diameters ranging from 10” to over 20 feet. Products made include
ASME pressure vessel sections. Crane Hoist Drums, thick walled pipe, etc.
PRESS BRAKE FORMING & HOT FORMING
Hodgson Custom Rolling’s brake department processes all types of steel sections
and plate up to 18” thick. Developed shapes such as cones, trapezoids, parabolas,
reducers (round to round, square to round) etc.
STRUCTURAL SECTION ROLLING
Hodgson Custom Rolling has the expertise to roll curved structural sections into
a wide range of shapes and sizes (angle, wide flange beam, I-beam, channel, bar,
tee section, pipe, tubing, rail, etc.). We specialize in Spiral Staircase Stringers,
flanges, support beams, gear blanks, etc.
HEAVY PLATE FABRICATING & SAW CUTTING
Hodgson Custom Rolling combines expertise in rolling, forming, assembly and
welding to produce various fabrications including kiln sections, rope drums, heavy
weldments, ladles, pressure vessel parts, multiple Components for Heavy Equipment
applications etc., with saw cutting of heavy plate capacity of 80” x 80”.
5580 Kalar Road Telephone: (905) 356-8132 U.S. Address:
Niagara Falls Toll-Free: (800) 263-2547 M.P.O Box 1526
Ontario, Canada Fax: (905) 356-6025 Niagara Falls, N.Y.
L2H 3L1 E-mail: hodgson@hodgson.on.ca 14302 - 1526
Website: www.hodgsoncustomrolling.com
HODGSON CAN HELP SOLVE YOUR PROBLEMS
HODGSON CAN HELP SOLVE YOUR PROBLEMS
44” ID
6” Thick
96” Long
108” ID
4” Thick wall
VH - 72”
192” ID
ASME ISO9001:2008
478266_HodgsonCustom.indd 1 5/13/10 1:25:35 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 9
Director’s Message/Message du directeur
CWA National Advisory Council Chairman’s Message
Message du président du conseil consultatif national de l’ACS
Don Gemmell
CWA National Advisory Council Chairman
Président du conseil consultatif national de l’ACS
Dan Tadic
Director, Canadian Welding Association
Directeur, Association canadienne de soudage
We have exper i enced a ver y
strong membership growth and are
over 10,000 at this moment. Our plan
is to be at 50,000 members by early
2014. Our chapter expansion program
is well under way with most recent
additions i n Kelowna, Saskatoon,
Montreal, Moncton, Fort McMurray,
St. John’s and student chapter at Universities of Alberta
and Waterloo. By the end of this year, we will have new
chapters added in Windsor, Scarborough, Sudbury and
Barrie. Starting with this Journal issue we will be profil-
ing various chapter activities, events and individuals. We
hope that you will get involved with a chapter activity in
your community.
I’m sure everyone is reflecting on the
past year both personally and profes-
sionally and planning or looking for-
ward to some summer vacation to enjoy
some special times with family and/or
friends. While the summer season is
upon us, along with the great weather
that is usually associated with it as well,
we are all too familiar with how quickly Labour Day will
arrive. Now is the time to review the first annual fall
agenda and conference information which is scheduled
for September 26-28, 2010, in Collingwood, ON. Visit the
CWA website at www.cwa-acs.org and take advantage of
the early registration discount to be part of the seminars,
social activities and awards presentations amongst some
of the most highly respected experts in the welding com-
munity. When you consider that there are twenty eight
various topics to choose from, the seminars alone are a
tremendous value. Wishing you all a safe and relaxing
summer and hoping to see you at the conference.
Don Gemmell
Dan Tadic
Je suis sûr que tout le monde pense à l’année qui vient de se terminer,
tant du point de vue personnel que professionnel, et que vous planifiez
tous vos vacances d’été afin de profiter pleinement de moments spéciaux
en famille et avec les amis. Bien que la saison estivale soit déjà arrivée,
avec le beau temps qui y est normalement associé, nous savons tous que
la fête du Travail arrivera bien assez vite. C’est le moment de passer en
revue le premier calendrier annuel d’automne et l’information sur la
conférence qui aura lieu du 26 au 28 septembre 2010 à Collingwood, en
Ontario. Visitez le site Web de l’ACS au www.cwa-acs.org et profitez des
rabais offerts à ceux qui s’inscrivent à l’avance et qui veulent participer
aux colloques, aux activités sociales et à la remise des prix et se joindre
à quelques-uns des spécialistes les plus respectés de la communauté du
soudage. En pensant que vous pouvez choisir parmi vingt-huit sujets
différents, vous constaterez que les colloques offrent une grande valeur
à eux seuls. Nous vous souhaitons à tous un été relaxant en toute sécu-
rité et nous espérons vous voir à la conférence.
Nous avons connu une croissance très forte au niveau des ins-
criptions, de sorte que nous comptons actuellement plus de 10 000
membres. Notre plan est d’augmenter ce chiffre à 50 000 membres d’ici
le début de l’année 2014. Le programme d’expansion de notre section
locale est en cours et nous avons ajouté tout récemment des sections à
Kelowna, à Saskatoon, à Montréal, à Moncton, à Fort McMurray et à
St. John’s ainsi qu’une section étudiante aux Universités d’Alberta et de
Waterloo. D’ici la fin de l’année, nous aurons ajouté des nouvelles sec-
tions à Windsor, à Scarborough, à Sudbury et à Barrie. Avec le présent
numéro du Journal, nous commencerons à établir le profil de plusieurs
activités et événements organisés par les différentes sections ainsi que
de certains de leurs membres. Nous espérons que vous participerez aux
activités de la section dans votre communauté.
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
When YOU’RE Welding
Nederman is by YOUR Side!
Nederman extraction arms safeguard EmpIoyees and the
Environment and make your job more Productive.
-Flexible and easy to position for increased productivity
-Extract dangerous welding fumes at source without wasting energy
-Extraction at source with Nederman fan speed control and damper saves
even more energy
-Hood lamp available for increased visibility and convenience
-Arms for ALL applications including explosive and hygienic environments
-Nederman provides complete systems including flters, piping, control and
installation
YOU’LL FIND A NEDERMAN SOLUTION
THAT’S A PERFECT FIT FOR YOU
HD MD CR Original Telescopic D/DX
See us at Canadian Manufacturing Week 2010
Oct 5-7, 2010
Toronto Congress Centre
fume and dust extraction and ltration - hose and cable reels - industrial vacuum systems - machining mist ltration - vehicle exhaust extraction
CWA Corporate Member
MAKE YOUR OPERATIONS A HEALTHIER ONE
VISIT WWW. NEDERMAN.COM/WELDING
Ask the Pollution Control Experts who are committed to keeping
you healthy!
Control of exposure to welding
fumes can usually be achieved
with the help of extraction and
ltration. The choice of tech-
nique depends on the circum-
stances. The aim is to capture
the fumes as close to the source
as possible. This protects not
only the welder but also other
workers. Nederman systems
are designed to extract welding
fumes from a great number of
applications and are also used
for cleaning of workspaces. Our
product range includes mobile
and stationary units for welding
fume and dust extraction as well
as hose reels for gas, com-
pressed air and more.
For a complete range visit
www.nederman.ca
Nederman CAPTURE AT SOURCE FUME
EXTRACTION METHODS:
onger reach
each
lters
nual welding
ng
ding and sanding
GREEN ontrols
ding & Grinding
Call Our Sales Team Today!
1-866-332-2611
482304_Nederman.indd 1 6/22/10 11:27:05 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 11
Welded Connections and the
Versatility of Fillet Welds
Assemblages soudés et
polyvalence des soudures d’angle
Neil A. Paolini
The five basic joint types (Butt, Tee, Corner, Lap, Edge) can be
welded with fillet welds, groove welds, plug/slot welds or bead
welds. The latter is used for weld overlay, sealing welds and edge
welds; these are not generally considered as being calculated
strength welds. Partial penetration groove welds (PJP), full
penetration groove welds (CJP), and fillet welds are designed
to transfer calculated stresses across (or along) a joint. When
the full strength of a joint is needed, structural designers will
often specify CJP welds. They should, in reality, specify “full-
strength welds” since full strength on Tee joints, in particular,
can be achieved using fillet welds. Fillet welds are more eco-
nomical than PJP or CJP groove welds, since edge preparation
Les cinq types d’assemblages fondamentaux (bout à bout, en T, en
L, à recouvrement et sur chant) peuvent être soudés au moyen de soudures
d’angle, de soudures sur préparation, de soudures en bouchon ou en entaille
ou de cordons de soudure. Les cordons sont utilisés pour réaliser des sou-
dures de rechargement, d’étanchéité et sur chant, qui ne sont généralement
pas considérés comme des soudures de résistance calculée. Les soudures sur
préparation à pénétration partielle et complète ainsi que les soudures d’an-
gle sont conçues pour transférer les contraintes calculées à travers un joint
ou le long de celui-ci. Lorsque la soudure doit être complètement saine, les
concepteurs de structures prescriront souvent les soudures à pénétration
complète. En fait, ils devraient plutôt préconiser les « soudures complète-
ment saines » puisqu’il est possible d’obtenir une résistance maximale sur
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
12 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Fillet Weld Design Resistances
Weld resistance Vrw cannot exceed Base Metal resistance Vrm
NOTE: S16.1-2001 has increased the Xu values from 480 MPa to 490 MPa
Am = Aw when AW = fillet leg area
Vrw = .67 x x Aw x XU (1 + .5sin 0 )
Angle
degrees
0
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
49
50
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
90
SIN0
0
0.259
0.342
0.423
0.5
0.574
0.643
0.707
0.755
0.766
0.819
0.866
0.906
0.940
0.966
0.935
1
SIN0
0
0.132
0.200
0.275
0.354
0.434
0.515
0.595
0.656
0.670
0.741
0.806
0.863
0.911
0.949
0.977
1
Vrw (leg)
kN/mm/mm
0.156
0.166
0.172
0.177
0.184
0.190
0.196
0.202
0.207
0.208
0.214
0.219
(Vrw=0.18 max for A36)
300W/300WT/350W max
350WT only
350WT only
350 WT max.
Vrw Cannot exceed
0.214
0 = angle between line of action of
force and axis of the weld
For 300W, 2350WT & 350W material, Vr = .202 kN/mm/mm for angles greater than 49 degrees
For 350WT material, use Vr = .214 kN/mm/mm for angles 60 degrees and greater
Total resistance Vr = Vrw x Fillet Leg Size (mm) x Weld Length (mm)
Fu = 450 MPa
(300W/350W300WT)
Fu = 480 MPa (350WT)
ow
1.5
Vrw = .67 x x Aw x XU (1 + .5sin 0 ) ow
1.5
/2^.5
Vrw = .67 x x Aw x Fu = 0.202 Aw kN/mm/mm max for
Vrw = .67 x x Aw x Fu = 0.215 Aw kN/mm/mm max for
ow
ow
Xu = 490 MPa
= 0.220 (1 + .5 sin 0 ) Aw (E.T area)
= 0.156 (1 + .5 sin 0 ) Aw (fillet leg area)
1.5
1.5
Percent Waste When Size #1 Fillets are Specified
and Size #2 Fillets are made
Size #2 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 1/2 9/16 5/8 11/16 3/4
0.25 0.313 0.4 0.438 0.5 0.5625 0.63 0.688 0.75
Size #1 PERCENT WASTE
1/4
5/16
3/8
Figure 2
For example, if a 5/16” fillet is sepcified and the welder makes a 7/16” fillet,
96% of the weld is wasted. Even going from a 1/4” fillet to 5/16” will
waste 56%
0 56 125 206 300 406 525 656 800
0 44 96 156 224 300 384 476
0 36 78 125 178 236 300
is not required and joint geometry is simpler (because there is
no root gap to maintain). In addition, fillet welds require less
welder skill than required for making groove welds.
The use of fillet welds is far greater than all other types of
welds. More care should be taken by draftsmen and design-
ers to take advantage of available economies at the design or
detailing stage.
Weld Design Criteria
Allowable stresses and Imperial units were prevalent in the
1950s, ’60s and ’70s. Electrodes were classifed in accordance
with their minimum tensile strength. E60XX electrodes had a
UTS of 60 kips/sq. in.; E70XX UTS had 70 ksi, etc. Fillet welds
were designed using 1% of the UTS in lbs/in of length/sixteenth
inch of leg size. For example, using E70XX electrodes, the
design value of a fllet was 700lbs/in of weld / 1/16˝ of leg length.
A 1/4˝ fllet had a resistance of 4 x 700 = 2,800 lbs/in of weld.
Testing soon proved these values were unacceptably low.
The CSA W59.1-70 code increased the allowable shear on
a weld’s effective throat to 3% of the UTS. This resulted in an
allowable throat shear stress of 21,000 psi for E70XX welds.
The 450 component shear on the leg of a fillet became 14,850
psi or 925 #/in/sixteenth, a 32% increase from the 700 # value.
un assemblage en T, en particulier, en utilisant des soudures
d’angle. Ces dernières sont plus économiques que les soudures
sur préparation à pénétration partielle ou complète puisque
la préparation du bord n’est pas requise et que la géométrie du
joint est plus simple (parce qu’il n’y a aucun écartement à la
racine à maintenir). De plus, le soudeur n’est pas tenu d’être
aussi qualifié pour exécuter une soudure d’angle que pour une
soudure sur préparation.
Les soudures d’angle sont celles qui sont les plus couram-
ment utilisées par rapport aux autres types de soudures. Les
dessinateurs et les concepteurs doivent s’assurer de tirer profit
des économies qui s’offrent à eux lors de la phase de conception
ou de finition.
Critères de conception des soudures
Les contraintes admissibles et les unités impériales étaient courantes lors
des années 50, 60 et 70. Les électrodes étaient classées selon leur résistance à
la traction minimale et celle des électrodes E60XX et E70XX, par exemple,
était de 60 kips/po2 et de 70 ksi respectivement. Les soudures d’angle étaient
conçues en utilisant 1 % de la résistance à la traction en lb/po par longueur/
seizième de pouce de dimension des côtés. Par exemple, dans le cas de l’élec-
trode E70XX, la valeur de calcul d’une soudure d’angle était de 700 lb/po de
soudure par 1/16 po de longueur de côté. Donc, une soudure d’angle de ¼ po
avait une résistance de 4 x 700 = 2 800 lb/po de soudure. Les essais ont vite
démontré que ces valeurs étaient trop basses et donc inadmissibles.
Selon la norme CSA W59.1-70, le cisaillement admissible sur la gorge
eff icace d’une soudure devait être augmenté à 3 % de la résistance à la
traction, permettant ainsi une contrainte de cisaillement de 21 000 lb/po
2

pour les soudures réalisées au moyen d’une électrode E70XX. Le cisaille-
ment d’un composant 450 sur le côté d’une soudure d’angle devenait donc
14 850 lb/po
2
ou 925 no/po/un seizième, soit une augmentation de 32 % par
rapport à la valeur du numéro 700.
Avec la venue de la conversion métrique et de la méthode de calcul
aux états limites, la résistance est devenue encore plus élevée. Les charges
étaient prises en considération et les coefficients de résistance ont été élabo-
rés de manière à tenir compte des charges pondérées. Les soudures étaient
soumises à un coeff icient de résistance réduit de 0,67. La résistance au
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 13
With the advent of metric conversion and Limit States
Design, the bar was raised even higher. Loads were fac-
tored and resistance factors developed to accommodate
the factored loads. Welds were subject to a reducing weld
resistance factor of 0.67. The shear resistance of a weld for a
factored load became V
rw
= 0.67 x ω
w
x effective throat area
x weld UTS. The metric UTS (X
u
) was set at 480MPa (i.e.,
V
rw
= 0.67ω
w
A
w
X
u
). The weld resistance factor vw is also set
at 0.67.
Further research indicated that the UTS (X
u
) should be
increased from 480MPa to 490MPa. Fillet weld resistances
also increased when the angle between the line of force and
weld axis increased from zero to 900. The increase was also
dependent on the base material strength. The formula now
becomes V
rw
= 0.67ω
w
A
w
X
u
(1 + 0.5sinη
1.5
).
Figure 1 simplifies these equations for all angles of force
and X
uu
= 490MPa applied to 300W and 350W base materi-
als. The note at the bottom of figure 1 illustrates how easily
fillet welds can be designed. A conservative approach, if the
angle is not known, is to assume it is zero and use the factor
V
rw
= 0.156.
Points to Consider
• Groove weld strength is limited to the plate thickness.
Groove welds cannot be overwelded.
• Fillet weld strength (size) is not limited to plate thickness.
Fillet welds sizes are not limited.
• Overwelding a fllet increases the amount of weld metal by
the square of the increase (fgure 2). (Doubling the size of
a fllet results in four times the amount of weld metal—a
300% increase).
• Fillet sizes should be kept to a minimum (in accordance
with code and heat input criteria).
• A 5 mm fllet 100 mm long has the same strength as a 10
mm fllet 50 mm long with half the weld metal.
• A smaller, longer fllet is more economical than a larger
shorter fllet of equal resistance.
• Size the fllet weld to suit the load. Continuous fllets are
not always required.
• Standardize, if practical, on either a 6 mm or 8 mm single-
pass fllet for any given assembly.
• If feasible, replace PJP and CJP Tee joint groove welds with
equal strength fllet welds.
Converting a Large Tee Joint Fillet to a More Economical
Equal Strength Combination Bevel/Fillet Weld (Figure 3)
When the calculated fllet size equals, or exceeds, 16 mm, a
combination of fllet and single bevel groove welds should be
considered. A fllet half the size of the large calculated fllet size
combined with a partial penetration 450 single bevel chamfer
equal to the half fllet leg plus 3 mm will result in resistance
equal to the large calculated fllet size. This combination uses
half the weld of the calculated large fllet, thereby reducing
heat input, distortion, weld metal and welding time. The only
additional cost would be the bevel preparation on the Tee
stem. For example, a 20 mm fllet would be replaced by a 13
mm (10 + 3) single 45° bevel chamfer weld overlaid with a 10
cisaillement d’une soudure pour une charge pondérée devenait donc V
rw
=
0,67 x ω
w
x la section de la gorge efficace x la résistance à la traction de la
soudure. Celle-ci en unités métriques (Xu) a été réglée à 480 MPa (c.-à-d.,
V
rw
= 0,67ω
w
A
x
X
u
). Le coefficient de résistance de la soudure ω
w
est aussi
réglé à 0,67.
Des recherches plus avancées ont indiqué que la résistance à la traction
(X
u
) devrait être augmentée de 480 MPa à 490 MPa. La résistance des
soudures d’angle a aussi augmenté lorsque l’angle entre la ligne de force et
l’axe de la soudure est monté de zéro à 900. Cette augmentation dépendait
aussi de la résistance du matériau de base. La formule devient donc V
rw
=
0,67ω
w
A
x
X
u
(1 + 0,5sinη
1.5
).
La figure 1 simplifie ces équations pour tous les angles de force et X
uu

= 490 MPa est appliqué aux matériaux de base 300 W et 350 W. La note à
la fin de la figure 1 illustre à quel point il est facile de concevoir des soudu-
res d’angle. Une approche conservatrice, lorsque l’angle n’est pas connu, est
d’assumer que celui-ci est zéro et d’utiliser le coefficient V
rw
= 0,156.
Points à considérer
• La résistance des soudures sur préparation se limite à l’épaisseur de la
plaque. Ces soudures ne peuvent pas faire l’objet d’un soudage excessif.
• La résistance des soudures d’angle (dimension) ne se limite pas à l’épais-
seur de la plaque. Il n’y a aucune limite quant aux dimensions des soudures
d’angle.
• Une quantité excessive de métal déposé dans une soudure d’angle aug-
mente la quantité de métal fondu par le carré de l’augmentation (fgure 2).
(Doubler la dimension d’une soudure d’angle résulte en quatre fois la
quantité de métal déposé—soit une augmentation de 300 %).
• Les dimensions des soudures d’angle devraient demeurer minimales
(conformément aux codes et aux critères d’apport thermique).
• Une soudure d’angle de 5 mm ayant une longueur de 100 mm a la même
résistance qu’une soudure d’angle de 10 mm ayant une longueur de 50 mm,
avec la moitié de la quantité de métal déposé.
• Une soudure d’angle moins large et plus longue est plus économique qu’une
soudure d’angle plus courte et plus large ayant la même résistance.
• La dimension de la soudure d’angle doit convenir à la charge. Les soudu-
res d’angle continues ne sont pas toujours requises.
• Il faut standardiser, lorsque cela est pratique, sur une soudure d’angle de
6 mm ou de 8 mm réalisée en une seule passe pour un assemblage donné.
• Dans la mesure du possible, remplacer les soudures sur préparation à
pénétration partielle ou complète réalisées sur les assemblages en T par
des soudures d’angle ayant la même résistance.
Conversion d’une large soudure d’angle réalisée sur un
assemblage en T à une soudure sur préparation en demi-V/
soudure d’angle combinée plus économique ayant la même
résistance (figure 3)
Lorsque la dimension d’une soudure d’angle calculée est égale ou supérieure
à 16 mm, la combinaison d’une soudure d’angle et d’une soudure sur prépara-
tion en demi-V devrait être considérée. Une soudure d’angle dont la dimension
est la moitié de celle d’une soudure d’angle calculée plus large combinée à un
chanfrein simple de type 450 à pénétration partielle égal à la moitié du côté
de la soudure d’angle plus 3 mm donnera une résistance égale à la dimension
de la large soudure d’angle calculée. Cette combinaison utilise la moitié de la
large soudure d’angle calculée, réduisant ainsi l’énergie linéaire, la distor-
sion, la quantité de métal fondu et la durée du soudage. Le seul coût addition-
nel serait la préparation du chanfrein sur l’assemblage en T. Par exemple, une
soudure d’angle de 20 mm serait remplacée par un chanfrein simple de 45 º et
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
14 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
mm fllet. The 3 mm is required to compensate for an effective
throat code reduction for a 45° bevel (fgure 3b).
This combination is applicable for a Tee joint where the
Tee stem is in longitudinal shear (i.e., the line of force is along
the axis of the weld). Conservatively, this could be applied to
lines of force at angles to 900 with the weld axis. However,
when the stem is in tension (i.e., the angle η = 900), applying
CSA S16-01, Clause 13.13.3.3, the tensile resistance of a par-
tial joint penetration groove weld combined with a fillet weld
would be more economical (figure 3a).
The evolution of structural joint design has progressed
from forging to riveting, to bolting, to high-tensile bolting, to
combinations of bolting/welding, and to welding only. Today,
welding is a mature science that has resulted in stronger,
lighter more economical structures, and has also expanded
the imagination, scope and creativity of engineers and archi-
tects. Elegant structures are now routinely designed that are
only possible through the use of welded joints. The artistic
canopy shown at the beginning of this article is an example of
artistic imagination that relies on welded joints.

Neil A. Paolini, P. Eng., works at ProWeld Engineering.
de 13 mm (10 + 3) chevauchée par une soudure d’angle de 10 mm. Le 3 mm est
requis pour compenser la réduction de la gorge effcace pour une préparation
de 45 º exigée par le code (fgure 3b).
Cette combinaison s’applique aux assemblages en T lorsque celui-ci subit
un cisaillement longitudinal (c.-à-d., la ligne de force se trouve le long de
l’axe de la soudure). En demeurant conservateur, cela pourrait s’appliquer
aux lignes de force à des angles allant jusqu’à 900 par rapport à l’axe de
la soudure. Cependant, lorsque l’assemblage en T est sous tension (c.-à-d.,
que l’angle η= 900), selon l’article 13.13.3.3 de la norme CSA S16-01, la
résistance à la traction d’une soudure sur préparation à pénétration partielle
combinée à une soudure d’angle serait plus économique (figure 3a).
La conception des joints de structure a évolué du forage au rivetage, au
boulonnage, au boulonnage à haute traction, au boulonnage et soudage
combiné et finalement, au soudage seulement. Aujourd’hui, le soudage est
une science avancée qui a produit des structures plus fortes, plus légères
et plus économiques et élargi l’imagination, le champ d’application et la
créativité des ingénieurs et des architectes. Les structures élégantes mainte-
nant conçues de façon régulière ne sont possibles que grâce aux assemblages
soudés. La structure illustrée au début de cet article est un exemple d’imagi-
nation artistique qui repose sur des assemblages soudés.

Neil A. Paolini, ing., travaille chez ProWeld Engineering.
Partial Joint Penetration Groove Weld combined with Fillet Weld (Matching Electrodes)
EXAMPLE
Clause 13.13.3.3
L = 100mm
D = 10mm
C = 10mm
An = nominal area of fusion face normal to Tr = C x L =
Aw = Area of effective throat = D/2^.5 x L =
Tr
3mm
Fusion Face
C
D
D/2^0.5
Figure 3b
1000 mm^2
707 mm^2
S16.1 Tr = o x ((An x Fu)^2 + (Aw x Xu) ^2)^.5
Depth of chamfer = C + 3 Length = L mm
Fu = 450 MPa
Xu = 490 MPa
0.45
0.49
300W; 350W; 300WT
Tr = 381 kN
NOTE: Depth of chamfer is C + 3 due to 3mm LOP on 45 degree bevel
Replacing Large Fillet with Equal Resistance Combination Fillet and Chamfer
Chamfer = 50% large fillet leg size (+ 3 mm for LOP in root)
Combination Fillet = 50% large fillet size
Tr = 0.67 x Aw x Xu
Single Large Fillet
Effective Throat ET1 = 2D/2^.5=1.414 D
Combination Chamfer + Fillet
Chamfer =2D/2 +3 = Effective D
Effective Throat ET2 = Chamfer face = D X 2^.5 = 1.414D
ET1 = ET2
Combination weld has same resistance as large fillet, with 50% of the weld metal.
Figure 3a
Tr
D+-3
D
45
o
ET
D+3
D
2D
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
This is the promise Titan Contracting has given its
customers for more than 30 years.
With a superior tank and vessel operation, as well as highly
reputable mechanical and power divisions, Titan credits its
continued success to providing its skilled craftsmen with
only the best tools and products available. That’s why Titan
uses Stoody Nickel Flux Cored Wires.
“Since we’ve replaced solid MIG wires such as Alloys
625 and C276 with Stoody’s Nickel Flux Cored Wires,
productivity and quality improvements have been
significant. They advance our ability to automate,
eliminating the chance of human error,” says Tank
Division Manager, Darrell Jones. “It replaces any
conventional welding wire because of its ‘all position’
capabilities.”
As one of the leading fabricators and erectors of
FGD Scrubber Systems in the nation, Titan has used Stoody
Nickel Flux Cored Wires to tackle tough welds on absorbers
and wet electrostatic precipitators (WESPs). “We rely on
Stoody for speed, productivity and quality,” says Jones, “and
Stoody’s customer support is far superior to any of the other
specialty alloy wire companies we have tried in the past.”
DARRELL JONES
Tank Division Manager
Titan Contracting & Leasing, Inc.
Owensboro, KY
titancontracting.com
Titan Contracting carries the torch – will you?
THERMADYNE, a global cutting and welding leader, joins
the American Welding Society in encouraging individuals to
practice the art, craftsmanship and professions of welding,
metalworking and fabrication. Victor, Thermal Dynamics,
Thermal Arc, Arcair, Tweco, Stoody, Cigweld and TurboTorch
are among the Thermadyne family of brands that you can
count on for safety, reliability and quality.
A JOB DONE RIGHT.
www.thermadyne.com
2070 Wyecroft Road, Oakville, Ontario L6L 5V6 | Customer Care Tel: 905-827-4515 | Customer Care Fax: 1-800-588-1714 | e-mail: canadacs@thermadyne.com
471947_Thermadyne.indd 1 3/19/10 9:46:11 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Now there’s a smarter choice to capture thermally-generated dust and
fume. Introducing Donaldson
®
Torit
®
PowerCore
®
TG—a new style of
dust collector that is packaged with powerful new technology. With
a significantly smaller footprint than most cartridge collectors and
smarter, longer lasting PowerCore Filter Packs™, Torit PowerCore TG
delivers the best combination of footprint, appearance and performance.
• Completely packaged, fully assembled collectors up to 10,000 CFM
• Strong, sleek all-welded housing
• Energy saver package, quiet motor & smart controls
• Proven PowerCore & Ultra-Web
®
technology
• Backed by over 300 patents
• Fewer, faster filter changes
• Cleaner air for welding, laser cutting, thermal spray and plasma cutting
Nothing Outsmarts Torit PowerCore TG.
Learn more.
Donaldson.com/toritpowercore
800.365.1331
Donaldson Torit
Minneapolis, MN
55440-1299
donaldsontorit.com
Smaller. Smarter Colleotors.

© 2009 Donaldson Company, Inc. Minneapolis, MN
Torit
®
PowerCore
®
TG has
up to a 65% smaller footprint
than most cartridge collectors.
Packaged with
POWER
replaces up to
THREE
cartridge filters
O
N
E

P
ow
erC
ore
Filter P
ack
467427_Donaldson.indd 1 3/4/10 11:27:16 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 17
Influences on fatigue
properties of welded structures
and methods of assessment
Influences sur les propriétés de
fatigue des constructions soudées
et méthodes d’évaluation
Adolf F. Hobbacher
Welded structures can terminate their usage life by various
reasons, including wear, corrosion, brittle fracture, overload,
buckling, creep or—most important—fatigue. Besides wear
and corrosion, about 80% of all failures of welded struc-
tures subjected to repeated loads are due to fatigue. The
fatigue properties and life of a welded component or joint
are dependent on several parameters. First, on the loading
side, there is the effect of load fluctuations, which can be
described according to the magnitude of stress, the stress
La durée de vie des constructions soudées peut être réduite pour
diverses raisons, y compris l’usure, la corrosion, la rupture fragile, les
surcharges, le f lambage, le f luage ou—le plus important—la fatigue.
Outre l’usure et la corrosion, environ 80 % de toutes les défaillances de
constructions soudées soumises à des charges répétées sont causées par la
fatigue. Les propriétés de fatigue et la durée de vie d’un assemblage soudé
ou d’un joint dépendent de plusieurs paramètres. Premièrement, du côté
charge, il y a l’effet des f luctuations de charge, qui peuvent être décrites
selon l’ampleur et la gamme des contraintes et le nombre de cycles. Du côté
T
e
r
r
i

M
e
y
e
r

B
o
a
k
e
,

U
n
i
v
e
r
s
i
t
y

o
f

W
a
t
e
r
l
o
o
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
18 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
range, and the number of cycles. On the fatigue resistance
side, there are the effects of material type, the surface of the
welded joint, the temperature that may modify the material
properties, and the shape as the main governing parameter.
This implies that, in most failure cases, design and fabrica-
tion (i.e., weld quality and severity of notch) are primary, and
material selection and properties are secondary.
When designing welded components of structures that
are subjected to repeated loads, fatigue considerations are
essential. Methods for calculating fatigue (1) the nominal
stress method (e.g., ASME, CSA S16, S6 and W59); (2) the
structural hot spot stress method and its variations (e.g.,
Eurocodes and offshore structures); (3) the effective notch
stress method; and (4) fracture mechanics. The best but
most expensive method is (5) direct component testing. It is
applied in areas with a high commercial or human risk, such
as automotive and aircraft engineering. Another point is that
there is considerable variation as to the effects of fatigue, and
a design standard must cover worst-case conditions. In test-
ing, the real fatigue property of the specific component can
be used (see figure 1).
Many areas of technology refer to officially introduced
or agreed design code or standard. Here, the problem is that
a code or standard is always a reduction of a complex set of
possibilities, and is valid only for the limited set of circum-
stances for which it was established. An application in a
slightly different area might cause problems. It is important
for the designer to have adequate knowledge of the basics
of fatigue in addition to the background of an applied code
Figure 1. Example of data collection of a structural detail and code. Figure 1. Exemple de collecte de
données d’un détail de conception et d’un code.
de résistance à la fatigue, il y a les effets du type de matériau, de la surface
de l’assemblage soudé, de la température qui peut modifier les propriétés
du matériau et de la forme, qui constitue le principal paramètre. Cela
signif ie que dans la plupart des cas de défaillance, la conception et la
fabrication (c.-à-d., la qualité de la soudure et la gravité de l’entaille) sont
d’une importance primordiale, alors que la sélection des matériaux et les
propriétés sont des facteurs secondaires.
Lors de la conception des assemblages soudés sur des structures sou-
mises à des charges répétées, il est essentiel de tenir compte de la fatigue.
Il existe cinq méthodes pour calculer la fatigue, soit (1) la méthode de
contraintes nominales (p. ex., ASME, CSA S16, S6 et W59); (2) la méthode
de contraintes dans la zone chaude structurale et ses variations (p. ex., les
Eurocodes et les constructions en mer); (3) la méthode de contraintes d’en-
taille efficace; et (4) la mécanique de la rupture. La meilleure méthode et
la plus dispendieuse est la méthode (5), soit la méthode d’essais directs des
composants. Cette méthode s’applique dans des endroits où un risque com-
mercial et humain élevé est présent, comme dans les industries de l’auto-
mobile et du génie technique des aéronefs. Un autre point est la variation
considérable quant aux effets de la fatigue et une norme de conception doit
couvrir les pires éventualités. Lors des essais, la propriété de fatigue réelle
du composant précis peut être utilisée (voir la figure 1).
Dans plusieurs domaines technologiques, des références sont faites
au code ou à la norme de conception officielle ou adoptée. Le problème
ici est qu’un code ou une norme est toujours une réduction d’un ensemble
complexe de possibilités et n’est valide que dans le cadre de circonstances
limitées pour lesquelles il ou elle a été établi(e). Une utilisation dans un
endroit légèrement différent pourrait causer des problèmes. Il est impor-
tant que le concepteur connaisse suff isamment les notions élémentaires
de la fatigue en plus de l’historique d’un code ou d’une norme appliqué(e).
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 19
or standard. This enables him or her to offer a true critical
engineering assessment for the designed structure.
Parameters of Fatigue
Fatigue failures are as old as the use of technology by humans.
It was once thought that fatigue was induced by simple over-
load, and the way to eliminate fatigue was to eliminate overload.
Around the year 1790, however, experiments showed that over-
load was not the cause of fatigue; rather, it is caused by the fre-
quency of load repetitions—or the number of load cycles, to use
modern terms.
Today, the determination of load history is the most crucial
factor in fatigue assessment. In many cases it is not possible to
make long-term measurements, and in those situations, assump-
tions based on applicable codes or standards may fill the gap.
The problem is reflected by the partial safety factors in various
building codes. On the loads it is about a factor of 1.5, whereas
on the resistance side it is only 1.1 in Eurocodes and 0.9 in CSA
standards.
Stresses are usually not evenly distributed over the sectional
area of a weld. With fillet welds, there are stress concentrations
at the weld toe and at the root. These notch effects are an import-
ant parameter and dominate the design. Weld imperfections
(e.g., inclusions, porosity, cracks, lack of fusion and penetration,
and others) are also sources of fatigue. It is not the metallurgy, it
is the stress rising effect that reduces the fatigue properties.
The process of fatigue is orderly. Crack initiation is fol-
lowed by crack propagation and then the final rupture of
Cela lui permet d’offrir une véritable évaluation technique essentielle pour
la structure qu’il a conçue.
Paramètres de fatigue
Les ruptures par fatigue sont aussi anciennes que l’utilisation de la tech-
nologie par les humains. On pensait autrefois que la fatigue était induite
par une simple surcharge et que la façon de l’éliminer était d’éliminer la
surcharge. Autour de l’année 1790, cependant, des essais ont démontré que
la surcharge ne causait pas la fatigue, mais qu’elle était plutôt occasionnée
par la fréquence des répétitions de charge ou par le nombre de mises en
charge cycliques, pour utiliser des termes modernes.
Aujourd’hui, la détermination des antécédents de charge est le facteur
le plus essentiel de l’évaluation de la fatigue. Dans bien des cas, il est
impossible d’effectuer des mesures à long terme et, dans de telles situa-
tions, des hypothèses fondées sur les codes ou sur les normes pertinent(e)s
peuvent combler le vide. Le problème est ref lété par les facteurs de sécurité
partiels précisés dans les divers codes du bâtiment. Sur les charges, il s’agit
d’un facteur d’environ 1,5, alors que du côté résistance, il n’est que de 1,1
dans les Eurocodes et de 0,9 dans les normes CSA.
Normalement, les contraintes ne sont pas distribuées uniformément
sur la section transversale de la soudure. Dans les cas des soudures d’angle,
des concentrations de contraintes sont présentes au raccordement à l’en-
droit et à la racine. Ces effets d’entaille constituent un paramètre impor-
tant et dominent la conception. Les imperfections des soudures (p. ex., les
inclusions, la porosité, les fissures, le manque de fusion et le manque de
pénétration) sont aussi des sources de fatigue. Ce n’est pas la métallurgie,
mais plutôt l’effet de la concentration des contraintes qui réduit les pro-
priétés de fatigue.
rental lease service used equipment
call 1-866-733-3272 or click reddarc.com Global Welder Rental Specialists
446510_Red.indd 1 9/11/09 12:43:34 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
20 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
the remaining sectional area. In welded joints, the period of
crack initiation is brief in comparison to the period of crack
propagation. The relevant parameter for crack propagation
is the modulus of elasticity, which makes the fatigue proper-
ties independent within a type of material. The reduction of
fatigue properties at higher temperature is primarily due to
the reduction of the modulus of elasticity.
Methods of Analysis
To assess the fatigue properties of welded joints, anticipated
load history is compared with fatigue resistance and is repre-
sented by a log-log plot of stress range versus life cycles—the
so-called Woehler SN curve. There are different possibilities
for the selection of the reference stress range. The nominal
stress method specifes the fatigue life of a welded joint accord-
ing to the characteristic global geometry of the joint and the
history of nominal stresses at specifed locations. In design
codes, this simple method requires a catalogue of all struc-
tural details, each of them associated with a special Woehler
SN curve. Modern codes and standards may have more than
80 structural details associated with six to ten SN curves.
The structural hot-spot stress method is measured by sum-
marizing all stress rising effects except the notch effects of
the weld. In codes, only one or two Woehler SN curves are
needed.
In mechanical engineering it is usual to take the stress
within a notch as a reference stress. This procedure is not
directly applicable to the irregular notches of weld toes.
Le processus de fatigue est ordonné. L’amorce de fissures est suivie par
la propagation de celles-ci, puis par la rupture finale de la section restante.
Dans les joints soudés, la période d’amorçage des fissures est brève compa-
rée à celle de la propagation des fissures. Le paramètre pertinent pour la
propagation des fissures est le module d’élasticité, qui rend les propriétés
de fatigue indépendantes à l’intérieur d’un type de matériau. La réduction
des propriétés de fatigue à des températures plus élevées est principalement
causée par la réduction du module d’élasticité.
Méthodes d’analyse
Pour évaluer les propriétés de fatigue des joints soudés, l’historique des charges
anticipées est comparé à la résistance à la fatigue et représenté dans un graphe
bilogarithmique de la gamme de contraintes par rapport aux cycles de vie—la
soi-disant courbe SN de Woehler. Il existe différentes possibilités quant à la
sélection de la gamme de contraintes de référence. La méthode de contraintes
nominales précise la durée de vie en fatigue d’un joint soudé selon la géométrie
globale caractéristique du joint et l’historique des contraintes nominales à des
endroits stipulés. Dans les codes de conception, cette simple méthode exige un
catalogue de tous les détails de conception, chacun étant associé à une courbe
SN de Woehler spéciale. Les codes et les normes modernes peuvent stipuler plus
de 80 détails de conception associés à entre six et dix courbes SN.
La méthode de contraintes dans la zone chaude structurale est mesurée en
résumant tous les effets de la concentration des contraintes, à l’exception des
effets des entailles de la soudure. Dans les codes, seulement un ou deux cour-
bes SN de Woehler sont requises.
En génie mécanique, la contrainte dans l’entaille est normalement
utilisée à titre de contrainte de référence. Cette procédure ne s’applique pas
directement aux entailles irrégulières des raccordements à l’endroit. On a
478927_Pearl.indd 1 5/18/10 12:00:19 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 21
The problem was overcome by the replacement of the actual
notch by a fictitious effective notch, which gives consistent
results. It requires a fine finite element meshing. In codes
only, one SN curve is needed.
An entirely different approach is the use of fracture mech-
anics. Here it is assumed that there was an initial crack or
crack-like imperfection on the surface, followed by the onset
of crack propagation on the fluctuating service loads until a
final rupture occurs. This method can be applied universally
and will become more important in the near future. The
drawback is that is requires a highly skilled and experienced
analyst and some computational power. The advantage is in
the ability to rationally make a determination of remaining
fatigue life.
Fabrication Quality
In fabrication, irregularities and imperfections can never be
completely avoided. Many quality assurance systems were
based on ISO 5817. This code was established as a means of
understanding the difference between fabricators and inspect-
ors. Fatigue properties were not a point of consideration. As a
consequence, the quality levels B, C and D are not consistent
in terms of fatigue. Different industry standards try to over-
come that problem. Currently, a joint working group between
ISO and IIW has been established with the task of bringing
the different approaches in line.
There are post-weld treatments available that improve
the fatigue properties of welded joints. Two basic effects are
réglé le problème en remplaçant l’entaille réelle par une entaille efficace fic-
tive, ce qui donne des résultats consistants. Cela exige le maillage d’éléments
finis. Dans les codes seulement, une seule courbe SN est requise.
Une approche entièrement différente est l’utilisation de la mécanique
de rupture. Ici, en théorie, la surface comporte une fissure initiale ou une
imperfection qui ressemble à une fissure, suivie par le début de la propa-
gation de fissures sur les charges de service f luctuantes jusqu’à ce qu’une
rupture finale se produise. Cette méthode peut être mise en œuvre universel-
lement et deviendra plus importante dans un proche avenir. L’inconvénient
est qu’elle exige un analyste hautement compétent et expérimenté et une
certaine puissance de calcul. L’avantage est dans la capacité de déterminer
rationnellement la durée de vie en fatigue restante.
Qualité de la fabrication
Lors de la fabrication, il est impossible d’éviter complètement les irrégulari-
tés et les imperfections. Plusieurs systèmes d’assurance de la qualité étaient
fondés sur le code ISO 5817. Ce dernier a été adopté en vue d’établir la diffé-
rence entre un fabricant et un inspecteur. Les propriétés de fatigue n’étaient
pas un point à analyser. Par conséquent, les niveaux de qualité B, C et D ne
sont pas conformes en matière de fatigue. Différentes normes de l’industrie
essaient de contrer ce problème. Actuellement, un groupe de travail mixte
formé de l’ISO et l’IIS a été mis sur pied avec la tâche d’harmoniser les diffé-
rentes approches.
Deux traitements après soudage sont disponibles en vue d’améliorer les
propriétés de fatigue des assemblages soudés, avec deux effets fondamentaux.
Dans le premier cas, la forme de l’assemblage est améliorée en meulant ou en
fraisant le raccordement au moyen d’une broyeuse ou en le refondant avec
un enrobage TIG. Dans le deuxième cas, des contraintes de compression
800.345.7248
www.UnitedAbrasives.com
AGOS
GonoraI Purposo
A4GN
AIumInum
Z-Toch
TM
HIgh Portormanco
SaIcoch
TM
Long LIto
MetaI
AIuminum
StainIess
MetaI
StainIess
MetaI
481404_United.indd 1 6/3/10 7:25:08 AM
Let LABCAN Handle All
Your Non Destructive
Examination Needs
Whether It’s For:
• Quality assurance
• Third party inspection
• Level III services
• Visual inspection
• Periodic inspection
• In service inspection
• Electromagnetic inspection
of steel wire rope
• API 653 inspection
• X and gamma ray inspection
• Ultrasonic (standard and
phased array) inspection
• Surface inspection (penetrant and
magnetic particles)
• Ferrite content
• Hardness testing
• Remote visual inspection
• Leak testing
TROIS~RIVIÈRES
225, Dessureault Street, (Quebec) G8T 2L7
Phone: (819) 378-8612 Fax: (819) 378-9449
frodier@labcan.com • www.labcan.com
481260_Labcan.indd 1 6/7/10 1:31:54 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
22 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
available. The first improves the shape by grinding, milling
the toe with a burr grinder, or re-melting with TIG dressing.
The second involves the introduction of benign residual com-
pressive stresses with a hammer, a needle, shot or ultrasonic
peening.
Human Resources
Fatigue properties are frst of all dependent on design. But
a design is always accomplished by a designer. It has been
shown that most failure cases are due to poor design and not
to poor fabrication in shop. What was wrong was not scientifc
question per se, but rather a lack of knowledge of the state of
the art. So designer education is crucial and has a huge infu-
ence on the fatigue properties of welded joints. In a normal
university engineering education, fatigue is not taught at an
adequate level, and so dedicated company-based or other pro-
fessional-level training is needed.
Conclusion
Knowledge of appropriate fatigue design for welded compon-
ents is not a mere academic exercise, it is essential for economic
and safety reasons. Most failures could have been avoided just
by applying the existing state of the art.

Adolf F. Hobbacher is a research consultant and former director of the Institute
for Materials and Production Technology at the University of Applied Sciences
in Mannheim, Germany.
résiduelles bénignes sont introduites dans l’assemblage au moyen d’un mar-
teau, d’une aiguille, d’un grenaillage de précontrainte ou d’un martelage
par ultrasons.
Ressources humaines
Les propriétés de fatigue dépendent d’abord de la conception, mais une
conception est toujours accomplie par un concepteur. Il a été démontré que
dans la plupart des cas, les défaillances sont causées par une mauvaise concep-
tion et non pas par une mauvaise fabrication à l’atelier. Ce qui n’allait pas
n’était pas une question scientifque pour ainsi dire, mais plutôt un manque
de connaissance de la technique d’avant-garde. Il est donc essentiel de bien
former le concepteur puisqu’il a une énorme infuence sur les propriétés de
fatigue des assemblages soudés. Dans un programme d’ingénierie offert nor-
malement au niveau universitaire, la notion de fatigue n’est pas abordée adé-
quatement, de sorte qu’une formation spécialisée offerte à l’interne par les
entreprises ou une formation professionnelle est requise.
Conclusion
La connaissance d’une conception de fatigue appropriée pour les assembla-
ges soudés n’est tout simplement pas un exercice académique, mais est plu-
tôt essentielle pour des raisons économiques et de sécurité. La plupart des
défaillances auraient pu être évitées en utilisant tout simplement les techni-
ques avant-gardistes actuelles.

Adolf F. Hobbacher est conseiller en recherche et ancien directeur de l’Institute
for Materials and Production Technology à l’University of Applied Sciences à
Mannheim, en Allemagne.
483163_Eutectic.indd 1 6/22/10 11:35:27 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
HobbacherComp.indd 1 7/2/10 12:37:51 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
24 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Non-destructive examination is essential in verifying weld
soundness, but it tells us little about the metallurgical properties
of a weldment. Hardness testing is unique among mechanical
test methods in that it can be performed in a manner that is
essentially nondestructive. While “in situ” hardness testing has
been employed for a long time, its prominence is growing due to
several factors:
• The increasing use of metallurgically more complex struc-
tural steels and other alloys.
• The extreme demands placed on materials by ever-increasing
operating pressures and temperatures (e.g., in the many new
steam and power generation plants).
• The growth of ftness-for-purpose and risk-based inspection
programs, concurrent with aging plant infrastructure.
• Availability of improved portable testing equipment
This apparently simple test method is frequently called for in
technical specifications and some construction codes. Hardness
limits are given not just as a general precaution, but also to
avoid specific failure modes that may affect welds in their oper-
ating environments. This article provides a brief overview of the
applications and methods of field hardness testing of welds and
describes basic elements of a successful technique.
Why Is Weld Hardness Testing Important?
Welders, supervisors and engineers are familiar with the possible
consequences of welding carbon and low alloy steels: hydrogen-
assisted cracking, high hardness in the heat-affected zone (HAZ),
L’examen non destructif est essentiel
pour vérifier la qualité d’une soudure. Par
contre, cet examen ne nous dit pas grand
chose sur les propriétés métallurgiques d’un
assemblage soudé. L’essai de dureté est uni-
que parmi les méthodes d’essai mécaniques parce qu’il peut être effectué
d’une manière essentiellement non destructive. Alors que des essais de dureté
« in situ » ont été longtemps utilisés, ceux-ci deviennent plus importants en
raison de plusieurs facteurs :
• L’utilisation croissante d’aciers de construction et d’alliages plus comple-
xes du point vue de la métallurgie.
• Les exigences extrêmes placées sur les matériaux par les pressions et les
températures d’utilisation qui augmentent constamment (p. ex., dans
les nombreuses nouvelles usines de génération de vapeur ou d’énergie
électrique).
• L’augmentation des programmes d’inspection fondés sur les risques et
d’aptitude à l’usage, en même temps que le vieillissement des infrastructu-
res d’usines.
• La disponibilité d’appareils d’essai portatifs améliorés.
Cette méthode d’essai manifestement simple est souvent exigée dans
les spécifications techniques et dans certains codes de la construction. Les
limites de dureté sont fournies non seulement à titre de précaution générale,
mais aussi pour éviter les modes de défaillance spécifiques qui peuvent avoir
une incidence sur les soudures dans leurs environnements opérationnels.
Cet article donne un bref aperçu des applications et des méthodes d’essais de
dureté sur le terrain des soudures et décrit les éléments fondamentaux d’une
technique réussie.
Field Hardness
Testing of Welds
Essais de dureté des
soudures sur le terrain
Gordon Snieder
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 25
and reduced low-temperature fracture toughness. But hardness
is also restricted for other reasons, including resistance to cor-
rosion. For example, NACE MR0175 (Materials for Use in H2S-
containing Environments in Oil and Gas Production) and CSA
Z662 (Oil and Gas Pipeline Systems) both address high hard-
ness as a risk factor in sulphide stress corrosion cracking (SSC).
Another example is the Cr-Mo steels (in particular, grade P-91,
which has been growing in popularity), where hardness testing is
crucial in checking the effectiveness of stress relief after forming
or welding. Of the zones in a steel weldment, the HAZ is of most
concern, and is also the most diffcult to test. This narrow region
bordering the weld metal is where the base metal is heated above
the transformation temperature before cooling. The resulting
structure and hardness of the HAZ is dependent on a variety
of factors, primarily composition, but also thickness, preheat
temperature, and heat input. Hardness testing is the only way to
evaluate the HAZ condition.
A welding procedure specifications (WPS) developed for
critical applications such as high-energy piping will include
supplementary testing such as Charpy impact and hardness
testing. The applicable code and/or construction specification
should provide guidance as to the test methods and locations.
Pourquoi les essais de dureté des soudures sont-ils si
importants?
Les soudeurs, les superviseurs et les ingénieurs connaissent bien les
conséquences éventuelles du soudage des aciers au carbone et faiblement
alliés : la fissuration par l’hydrogène, une dureté élevée dans la zone ther-
miquement affectée (ZTA) et une ténacité réduite à base température. Mais
la dureté est aussi limitée pour d’autres raisons, y compris la résistance à la
corrosion. Par exemple, la norme MR0175 de NACE et la norme CSA Z662
traitent toutes les deux de la dureté élevée à titre de facteur de risque dans la
fissuration par corrosion sous contrainte du sulfure. Un autre exemple porte
sur les aciers Cr-Mo (en particulier de classe P-91, qui devient de plus en plus
populaire) où les essais de dureté sont essentiels afin de vérifier l’efficacité
de la relaxation des contraintes après le formage ou le soudage. Parmi les
zones dans un assemblage soudé en acier, la ZTA est la plus préoccupante
et la plus difficile à tester. Cette région étroite en bordure du métal déposé
est l’endroit où le métal de base est chauffé au-dessus de la température de
transformation avant le refroidissement. La structure résultante et la dureté
de la ZTA dépendent de plusieurs facteurs différents, surtout la composition,
mais aussi l’épaisseur, la température de préchauffage et l’apport de chaleur.
L’essai de dureté est le seul moyen d’évaluer l’état de la ZTA.
Une spécif ication de mode opératoire de soudage (SMOS) mise au
point pour des applications critiques telles que la tuyauterie haute énergie
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
26 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
These requirements can usually be met
comfortably under the controlled con-
ditions of qualification welding by the
constructor’s top welder, but what about
the construction site, where conditions
are often less than ideal?
Guidelines for Testing
The frst step is choosing the appropri-
ate test method. It must suit the shape
and size of the work piece, and take into
account possible access restrictions. The
applicable ASTM standard describes
not only the method and technique, but
also the requirements for a valid test that
must be taken into account by the techni-
cian. These include minimum thickness,
corrections for convexity and concavity
of the work surface, and surface fnish.
Unfortunately in practice much of the
portable hardness testing is ineffective
or even misleading, a situation that can
be dangerous. An effective feld hardness
testing procedure will include the follow-
ing steps:
1. Remove the weld reinforcement by
coarse grinding, fush with the sur-
rounding base metal profle.
2. Improve the surface fnish using pro-
gressively fner abrasive grits—320 grit
is usually suffcient.
3. Etch the surface to locate the various
weld zones—base metal (BM), heat-
affected zone (HAZ), and weld metal
(WM).
4. Calibrate on an appropriate test block.
5. After each test, subsequent exam-
ination with a low power eyepiece is
helpful to visually confrm correct
indentation location within the coarse-
grained HAZ, which can be less than 1
mm wide.
6. Recognize the scatter inherent with
each method, and report an average of
several readings within each zone.
Where possible, test the HAZ on both
sides of the joint—the base metals may
be different, and the bead sequence may
result in quite different results.
Types of Portable Hardness Testers
Hardness may be defned as the resist-
ance to indentation by an indenter under
an applied load. In the metallurgical lab-
oratory, this is performed on fnished sec-
tions using heavy, fxed instruments such
as a Rockwell tester. The test piece is pre-
pared and brought to the testing equip-
ment: the conditions are controlled and
the results reproducible.
Conversely, in construction the test
equipment must be brought to the work
piece, on which we can only test the sur-
face. Apart from the massive nature of
laboratory testers, there are difficulties
in reproducing laboratory methods in the
field, the most significant of which are
measuring the applied load and measur-
ing the indentation dimensions.
Portable Brinell and Rockwell testers.
The Brinell method has been used in
the field for many years in the form of
the pin Brinell and Telebrineller testers.
While portable and easy to use, Brinell
is completely unsuited for HAZ testing
due to the large indentation diameter.
(Beware of contractors reporting HAZ
hardness in Brinell—amazingly this still
happens.) Positional capability may be
limited, and a second person may be
required to achieve an effective strike
with the hammer.
Several adaptations of the Rockwell
method have been devised for field
work, but they are not all that portable.
©
2
0
1
0
T
h
e
r
m
o

F
i
s
h
e
r
S
c
i
e
n
t
i
f
i
c

I
n
c
.

A
l
l

t
r
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
s

a
r
e
t
h
e

p
r
o
p
e
r
t
y

o
f
T
h
e
r
m
o

F
i
s
h
e
r
S
c
i
e
n
t
i
f
i
c

I
n
c
.

a
n
d

i
t
s

s
u
b
s
i
d
i
a
r
i
e
s

.

A
l
l

r
i
g
h
t
s

r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
Now you don’t have to risk your business and its reputation
on the accuracy of your suppliers’ material. Introducing the
Thermo Scientific Niton XL2 alloy analyzer: the new value
leader offering unsurpassed accuracy and price/performance,
plus:
East of use: built-in alloy grade library sorts alloys with
greater speed and accuracy
Rugged construction: dust- and waterproof for dependable
performance in any shop environment
Global service and support: backed by the industry leader in
handheld XRF, for worry-free operation
More than 25,000 Thermo Scientific Niton XRF analyzers are in
use daily worldwide. For more information on our analyzers,
please visit www.thermoscientific.com/niton.
In Canada, please contact Elemental Controls at 866-544-9974
or visit www.elementalcontrols.com.
The all-new Thermo Scientific
Niton XL2 joins the Niton XL3
and our family of handheld
XRF analyzers. Speed,
accuracy, value – the
advantage is yours.
Moving science forward
Eliminate the guesswork.
Verify or recover material traceability in seconds.
481015_Elemental.indd 1 6/4/10 11:05:01 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 27
comprendra des essais supplémentaires tels que
l’essai de résilience Charpy et l’essai de dureté. Le
code ou le devis de construction devrait fournir
des lignes directrices quant aux méthodes d’essai
et aux emplacements. Ces exigences peuvent nor-
malement être satisfaites sans aucun problème
dans les conditions contrôlées associées au sou-
dage de qualification réalisé par le soudeur le
plus qualifié du constructeur. Mais qu’advient-il
du site de construction où les conditions laissent
souvent à désirer?
Lignes directrices sur la mise à l’essai
La première étape est de choisir la méthode d’es-
sai appropriée. Celle-ci doit convenir à la forme et à
la dimension de la pièce à souder et tenir compte des
restrictions d’accès éventuelles. La norme ASTM
pertinente décrit non seulement la méthode et la
technique, mais aussi les exigences pour un essai
valide dont le technicien doit tenir compte. Celles-ci
incluent l’épaisseur minimale, les corrections pour
la convexité et la concavité de la surface de travail
et le fini de surface. Malheureusement, en pratique,
la majorité des appareils d’essai de dureté portatifs
sont inefficaces et les résultats sont même faussés,
une situation qui pourrait se révéler dangereuse.
Une méthode d’essai de dureté sur le terrain efficace
comprendra les étapes suivantes :
1. Enlever la surépaisseur par broyage gros-
sier, de niveau avec le profl de métal de base
environnant.
2. Améliorer le fni de surface en utilisant des par-
ticules abrasives progressivement plus fnes—les
particules 320 sont généralement suffsantes.
3. Graver la surface afn de localiser les diverses
zones de soudage—le métal de base, la zone
thermiquement affectée et le métal déposé.
4. Étalonner sur un bloc d’essai approprié.
5. Après chaque essai, il est utile de procéder
à d’autres examens avec un oculaire à faible
puissance afn de confrmer à l’œil nu que les
empreintes sont correctes dans la ZTA à grains
grossiers, qui peuvent être de moins de 1 mm de
largeur.
6. Reconnaître la diffusion inhérente à chaque
méthode et consigner une moyenne de plusieurs
lectures à l’intérieur de chaque zone.
Dans la mesure du possible, tester la ZTA des
deux côtés de l’assemblage—les métaux de base
pourraient être différents et la séquence des cordons
pourrait donner des résultats très différents.
Types d’appareils d’essai de dureté
portatifs
La dureté pourrait être définie comme la résis-
tance aux empreintes réalisées par un pénétrateur
sous une charge appliquée. Dans le laboratoire
métallurgique, ces empreintes sont réalisées sur
des sections finies au moyen d’instruments fixes
lourds tels que la machine Rockwell. L’éprouvette
est préparée et emportée jusqu’à l’appareil d’es-
sai : les conditions sont contrôlées et les résultats
sont reproductibles. Réciproquement, dans la
construction, l’appareil d’essai doit être apporté
jusqu’à la pièce à souder, sur laquelle seule la sur-
face peut être testée. Non seulement les appareils
d’essai utilisés en laboratoire sont-ils massifs, mais
il est aussi difficile de reproduire les méthodes de
laboratoire sur le terrain, la plus importante étant
la mesure de la charge appliquée et des dimensions
des empreintes.
Machines Brinell et Rockwell
portatives
La méthode Brinell a été utilisée sur le terrain
pendant plusieurs années sous forme des machines
Brinell à goupille et Telebrineller. Bien que la
machine Brinell soit portative et facile à utili-
ser, celle-ci ne convient absolument pas pour les
essais de la ZTA en raison du diamètre des larges
empreintes. (Prenez garde aux entrepreneurs qui
indiquent une dureté de la ZTA avec une machine
Brinell—étonnamment, cela arrive encore.) La
capacité positionnelle pourrait être limitée et une
deuxième personne pourrait être requise pour
assurer une frappe efficace avec le marteau.
483308_Liburdi.indd 1 6/14/10 4:48:59 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
28 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Furthermore, the indenter size is still
fairly large and is less than ideal for
HAZ testing.
One advantage of these methods is
that they are more tolerant of surface
roughness.
Portable hardness testers. Over the
past several decades, two basic types
of portable hardness testers have been
developed that offer better position
capability and ease of use.
Dynamic hardness testers (rebound
type) are based on the principle that
the loss of velocity of a hardened ball
projected at a metal surface is an indi-
cation of the material’s hardness. The
results are then converted to recognized
hardness scales.
Dynamic testers are fast, lightweight,
easy to use in all positions, and leave a
very small indentation. It is best suited
to relatively thick, massive sections such
as castings and forgings.
Disadvantages for weld testing: dif-
ficulty in isolating the HAZ, operator
variability, minimum work piece mass
(to avoid an inertia effect), scatter in
results, and surface effects.
The ultrasonic contact impedance
(UCI) method uses a Vickers dia-
mond indenter at the end of a metal
rod. Piezoelectric transducers excite
the rod to a longitudinal oscillation fre-
quency of 70 kHz. When the diamond
penetrates the work piece, there is a
frequency shift that is proportional to
the depth of indentation. Softer materi-
als have deeper indentations and yield
greater frequency shifts, and vice versa.
The i nstrument converts the result
into one of the conventional hardness
scales.
The UCI method is very portable,
easy to use in all positions, and leaves
a small indentation. It has the advan-
tage of being able to isolate the HAZ.
Testing can be done on a variety of
alloys, although calibration must be
done on a test block having a similar
modulus of elasticity as that of the work
piece.
Disadvantages for weld testi ng:
operator variability, minimum work
piece mass and thickness, scatter in
results; and surface effects.
New developments. The through-
diamond technique (TDT) is a recent
innovation that overcomes the limita-
tions of other methods. It observes and
measures the indentation made by a
Vickers diamond indenter while under
load. While the two portable methods
described above measure hardness
indirectly, TDT solves both problems
of measurement while under a known
load and of indentation measurement.
Moreover, it overcomes work piece
thickness and mass issues, opening up
possibilities for mobile testing of a wide
variety of products and shapes.
Summary
Supported by a testing procedure pre-
pared specifcally for the task, hard-
ness testing is a cost-effective and useful
method for evaluating the condition of
welds in the feld. The demand for hard-
ness testing will only grow in future.
New technologies can overcome the
drawbacks of previous testers and offer
greater fexibility in application and
reliability of results.

Gordon Snieder, P.Eng., is a consultant based in
Sarnia, ON.
WELDING PRODUCTS
Product Forms
• MIG WIRE
• TIG WIRE
• SUB-ARC WIRE
• ELECTRODES
Packages
• SPOOLS
• WIRE BASKETS
• COILS
• TECH-PAK's
• DRUMS
• REELS
Ph. 1-613-264-5550
TF. 1-866-224-5224
Fx. 613-264-5551
Contact
James Smith
jsmith@centraIwire.com
Trevor BIair
tbIair@centraIwire.com
www.techaIIoy.com
479708_TECHALLOY.indd 1 6/15/10 2:29:51 PM
Practical Hands on Training with
Experienced Trades Professionals!
Full sized CNC HASS Mill on Site
www.learntoweld.ca
www.learncncmachining.ca
Job
Placement
Assistance
Over 88%
of graduates
find full time
jobs within
6 months
Earn more
$$$
Kick start
your career
Institute of Technical Trades
Train for a Rewarding Career in...
EI, Second Career, Ontario Works, WSIB, ODSP Eligible.
Financial Assistance May be Available to Qualified Applicants
749 Warden Ave., Scarborough
(3 Stops north of Warden Subway, Free Parking)
416-750-1950 - 1-800-461-4981
Weekend &
Evenings Classes
Available!!
Welding
• CWB or TSSA (pipe)
• Electric Arc
• MIG
• TIG
• Flux-Core
CNC
• MasterCAM X4
• AutoCAD 2010
• Solid Works 2010
• Inventor
• CNC Mill & Lathe
470098_Institute.indd 1 3/11/10 4:13:15 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 29
Plusieurs adapt ations de l a méthode
Rockwell ont été conçues pour le travail sur le
terrain, mais elles ne sont pas très portables. De
plus, la dimension du pénétrateur est toujours
assez large et pas très recommandée pour les
essais de la ZTA.
Un avantage de ces méthodes est qu’elles
sont plus tolérantes en matière de rugosité de
la surface.
Appareils d’essai de dureté portatifs. Au
cours des dernières décennies, deux types fonda-
mentaux d’appareils d’essai de dureté portatifs
ont été mis au point, offrant une meilleure capa-
cité positionnelle et une meilleure convivialité.
Les appareils de dureté dynamiques (de type à
rebond) sont fondés sur le principe que la perte
de vitesse d’une balle durcie projetée sur une
surface en métal est une indication de la dureté
du matériau. Les résultats sont ensuite convertis
à des échelles de dureté reconnues.
Les apparei l s d’essai dynamiques sont
rapides, légers, faciles à utiliser dans toutes
les positions et ne laissent qu’une très petite
empreinte. Ils sont mieux adaptés aux sections
épaisses massives telles que les pièces coulées
et forgées. Parmi les inconvénients des essais
de soudures, on retrouve la diff iculté à isoler
la ZTA, la variabilité de l’opérateur, une masse
minimale de la pièce à souder (afin d’éviter un
effet d’inertie), des résultats diffusés et des effets
de surface.
La méthode d’impédance par contact ultra-
sonique utilise un pénétrateur au diamant
Vickers à l’extrémité d’une tige en métal. Les
transducteurs piézoélectriques excitent la tige
à une fréquence d’oscillation longitudinale de
70 kHz. Lorsque le diamant pénètre dans la
pièce à souder, le déplacement de fréquence est
proportionnel à la profondeur de l’empreinte.
Les empreintes des matériaux plus doux sont
plus profondes et le déplacement des fréquen-
ces est plus grand, et vice versa. L’instrument
convertit le résultat dans l’une des échelles de
dureté conventionnelles.
La méthode d’impédance par contact ultra-
sonique est très portable, facile à utiliser dans
toutes les positions et laisse une petite empreinte.
Elle a l’avantage de pouvoir isoler la ZTA. Les
essais peuvent être effectués sur une variété d’al-
liages même si l’étalonnage doit être réalisé sur
un bloc d’essai dont le module d’élasticité est le
même que celui de la pièce à souder.
Parmi les inconvénients des essais de sou-
dures, on retrouve la variabilité de l’opérateur,
une masse et une épaisseur minimales de la pièce
à souder, des résultats diffusés et des effets de
surface.
Nouveaux développements. La méthode
TDT est une récente innovation qui répond aux
problèmes de limitations des autres méthodes.
Elle permet d’observer et de mesurer l’empreinte
faite par un pénétrateur au diamant Vickers en
étant sous charge. Alors que les deux méthodes
portables décrites ci-dessus mesurent la dureté
indirectement, la méthode TDT règle non seu-
lement les deux problèmes reliés à la mesure à
prendre en étant sous une charge connue et à
la mesure de l’empreinte, mais aussi l’épaisseur
de la pièce à souder et les questions de masse,
offrant ainsi la possibilité d’un essai mobile sur
une grande variété de produits et de formes.
Résumé
Appuyé par une méthode d’essai préparée
spécifiquement pour la tâche, l’essai de dureté
est une méthode économique et utile pour
évaluer l’état des soudures sur le terrain. La
demande d’essais de dureté ne fera que croître
à l’avenir. Les nouvelles technologies peuvent
contrer les inconvénients des appareils d’essai
antérieurs et of frir une meilleure f lexibilité
dans la mise en application et la f iabilité des
résultats.

Gordon Snieder, ing., est un conseiller basé à
Sarnia, en Ontario.
For more info: www.slimlineupclamps.com
To place an order call 301-707-1860
• ROI in one week
• Any fitting, any position,
perfect alignment in seconds
• One person can easily fabricate
spools by themselves, quickly
and SAFELY
• The only clamp that offers
fitting to fitting alignment
• Excellent in the field or fab shop
ly
shop
479945_SlimLine.indd 1 5/27/10 12:00:16 PM
kI -Industr|o| kod|ogrophy
bI -b|troson|c Inspect|on
MI -Mognet|c Fort|c|e
FI -L|qu|d Fenetront
VI -V|suo| Inspect|on
We|d|ng Iro|n|ng & Cert|||cot|on
Meto||urg|co| Loborotory lSJ ¹¯·25
IkIS {lnIernc| FcIcry ln:pecIicn Sy:Iem)
Fhosed Arroy
Ionk Inspect|on AFI ó53
F|oor Scon
NACE Inspector
We|d|ng Eng|neer|ng
Heot Ireotment
Mequaltech is a laboratory and consulting firm Mequaltech is a laboratory and consulting firm
specializing in applied testing and analysis of specializing in applied testing and analysis of
metal and welding technologies. metal and welding technologies.
Contact us: 1800-627-5755, marketing@mequaltech.com
www. mequal t ech. com
8740, boulevard Pie-IX, Montréal (Québec) H1Z 3V1
www.mequaltech.com
478540_Laboratory.indd 1 6/5/10 11:36:01 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
30 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Tru-Remote
WI RELESS WELDI NG REMOTE
Output control at up to
400 ft without a cord!
www. TruRemote. com • (604) 868-4640
ORDER
ONLINE
Increase your quality,
productivity and safety.
Start & Stop • Increase/Decrease
Glow Plug • High/Low idle
100% accurate
Tru-Remote is compatible with Lincoln, Miller, Multi-Quip and Red-D-Arc.
471401_Tru.indd 1 5/14/10 9:31:40 AM
Brand new Edmonton shop complete with
nineteen welding bays now open for
testing and training
CLAC also offers other safety and specialty training, such as
CSTS, Standard and Emergency First Aid, and H2S Alive.
Please call CLAC Alberta Training at 1–888–863–5154 or
e-mail edmtraining@clac.ca for more information.
www.clac.ca
Ofering:
1. ABSA performance qualifcation testing
2. Practice times for ABSA welder recertifcation
3. Initial B pressure courses
4. GTAW training courses
5. CWB training and testing
6. Pipeline welding / training and testing
7. CSA level one welding inspector courses (coming
in the spring/summer of 2010)
For more information, pricing, or to book an
appointment, please contact Alida Uitvlugt, training
coordinator or Curtis Dahl, welding coordinator/
examiner, at 780–454–6181 or e-mail welding@clac.ca.
466339_Christian.indd 1 2/6/10 11:45:45 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 31
General Requirements for
Built-Up Members
Exigences générales relatives
aux éléments composés
CAN/CSA S16.1, Clause 19, stipulates that built-up members
shall satisfy Figure 1, the details for tension members of
built-up sections, and Figure 2, for compression members
of built-up sections. These details satisfy most basic design
requirements, but for practical engineering projects, fur-
ther checks must be made to ensure that they satisfy stress
transfer.
Design engineers who do not deal with steel structures
regularly may think these figures are rarely used. For educa-
tion purposes, it will change your mind if you ever have an
Figure 2. Details
for compression
members of built-up
sections. Figure 2.
Détails des éléments en
compression des sections
composées.
Selon le chapitre 19 de la norme CAN/CSA S16.1, les éléments compo-
sés doivent satisfaire aux exigences de la figure 1 sur les détails relatifs aux
éléments en tension des sections composées et de la figure 2 sur les détails
des éléments en compression des sections composées. Ces détails répondent
à la plupart des exigences de calcul fondamentales, mais pour mettre en
œuvre les projets d’ingénierie, des vérifications additionnelles doivent être
effectuées afin d’assurer que les éléments satisfont aux exigences de transfert
de contraintes.
Figure 1. Details for
tension members
of built-up
sections. Figure 1.
Détails relatifs aux
éléments en tension des
sections composées.
Albert E. Ting
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
32 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
opportunity to make a visit to the General Motors plant in
Oshawa, ON.
During the latter part of the 1980s, the plant’s steel build-
ing structures were reinforced in just about every column and
every truss, and some of the joist members also, to accommo-
date the loadings for automation.
The job involved reinforcing existing all-welded truss
members, chords and webs, with plates, angles or channels,
to form built-up members—thousands and thousands of
them. The existing or original members are already loaded.
After the new section is added, initially it is not stressed
because it does not share the existing load. The new plate
or angle will only be stressed after the additional load is
applied, and the additional load is shared both by the existing
and the new section. Therefore, the existing member weld
must be checked for the combination of existing and the new
shared loads. The new section resists only the shared portion
of additional load.
The design part of the project was highly tedious, and the
scope of field work was huge. During the peak of the project,
there were 65 full-time welders working two shifts while the
shop, one of the largest fabricators then in Canada, employed
only 50 full-time welders.
The conclusion is that these two figures, or tables, deserve
thorough study and must be fully understood. You, as design
engineers, will save millions for the owners and fabricators
and in the meantime, provide safer and sound structures.
That’s what good engineering is all about.

Les ingénieurs-concepteurs qui n’œuvrent pas dans le domaine des struc-
tures en acier peuvent souvent penser que ces figures sont rarement utilisées.
Or, si jamais vous avez l’occasion de visiter l’usine de General Motors à
Oshawa, en Ontario, vous changerez sûrement d’idée et voici pourquoi.
Vers la f in des années 80, presque toutes les colonnes et fermes des
structures en acier et même certains éléments de poutrelles de l’usine ont été
renforcés afin de permettre les chargements aux fins de l’automatisation.
Les travaux consistaient à renforcer les éléments de fermes, les mem-
brures et les âmes entièrement soudés déjà en place avec des plaques, des
cornières ou des profilés pour former des milliers et des milliers d’éléments
composés. Les éléments existants ou originaux sont déjà mis en charge. Toute
nouvelle section qui vient d’être ajoutée ne subit aucune contrainte initiale-
ment puisqu’elle ne partage pas la charge existante. La nouvelle plaque ou
cornière ne sera donc soumise à une contrainte qu’après l’application d’une
charge additionnelle et cette charge est partagée par la section existante et
par la nouvelle section. Il faut donc vérifier la combinaison des charges exis-
tantes et nouvellement partagées de l’élément existant, la nouvelle section ne
pouvant résister qu’à la portion partagée de la charge additionnelle.
La partie du projet qui traitait du calcul s’est avérée particulièrement
pénible et l’étendue des travaux sur le terrain était énorme. Lors de la
période la plus achalandée du projet, 65 soudeurs à temps plein travaillaient
deux quarts alors que l’atelier—un des plus importants fabricants au
Canada à l’époque—employait seulement 50 soudeurs à plein temps.
En guise de conclusion, ces deux figures ou tableaux méritent d’être étu-
diés à fond et doivent être très bien compris. Vous, à titre d’ingénieur-con-
cepteur, économiserez des millions pour les propriétaires et les fabricants.
En attendant, construisez des structures plus sécuritaires et saines. Voilà ce
que représente un bon travail d’ingénierie.

482148_TheLinde.indd 1 6/12/10 10:20:52 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Since 1799, PFERD has offered high-quality solutions to
industry’s most demanding applications.
PFERD is pleased to offer their newest innovations to our
customers. For more information about the broad range
of PFERD ADVANCE products, please contact our Customer
Service department at 866-245-1555.
PFR
PFERD’s new POLIFAN® CURVE SG-PLUS flap disc has
an innovative radial shape to optimize fillet-
weld operations on steel and INOX
workpieces.
POLIFAN® CURVE
SG-PLUS flap discs are
specially designed to
provide fast, aggressive
grinding with a very high rate of material
removal.
POLIFAN
®
CURVE
The Ultimate Tool for Fillet Weld Grinding
C PPOLIFA FAN AN
®
POLIFA AAN
®
PFERD’s new
POLIFAN
®
STRONG
SG-PLUS flap disc
removes more material in
less time than any grinding wheel or
competitive flap disc on the market.
The POLIFAN
®
STRONG flap discs feature a high-performance Zirconia
Alumina abrasive grain, and is available in 4-1/2“ or 5“ disc
diameters.
Designed to be used on Steel workpieces,
POLIFAN
®
STRONG flap discs are recommended
for weld dressing (36 grit), edge grinding,
chamfering and deburring applications (50 grit).
POLIFAN
®
STRONG
Significantly Reduce Your Grinding Time!
See us at Weld Expo,
Booth #10013
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
34 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
The Next Step in
Plasma Bevelling:
When Straight Cutting
Is Not Enough
La prochaine étape du
chanfreinage plasma :
quand les coupes droites
ne suffisent pas
Christopher Phillip
Plasma cutting has taken center stage when it comes to cut-
ting mild, aluminum, and stainless steel from gauge to two
inches thick. With fast cut times and low operating costs,
the straight, accurate, and dross-free cuts have pleased
bottom lines everywhere. Yet, until the early 1980s and the
advent of high-definition plasma, those characteristics were
unachievable. More recently, high-performance plasma
has pushed the envelope by further increasing both quality
and speed while lowering operator costs. Thicker piercing,
less dross, better holes, straighter edges, higher speeds,
and lower costs have driven the desire and the development
for automated plasma beveling. With current software,
plasma technology and new bevel units, plasma beveling
has achieved the tolerances of straight plasma cutting,
improving weld fit-up and decreasing the time invested in a
weld shop, secondary processing, or out in the field.
Rotary-Style Bevel Head
One of the traditional beveling heada has been a rotary
plasma beveling unit. This older technology is a sight to
Le coupage au plasma est devenu le centre d’intérêt lorsqu’il s’agit de
couper des tôles en acier doux, en aluminium et en acier inoxydable allant
jusqu’à 5,08 cm (2 po) d’épaisseur. Grâce aux durées de coupe plus rapides
et aux coûts d’exploitation moins élevés, les coupes droites, précises et
libres d’impuretés ont plu aux entreprises partout en raison des résultats
nets qu’ils ont connu. Et dire pourtant que jusqu’au début des années 80
et avec la venue du plasma haute définition, ces caractéristiques étaient
irréalisables. Plus récemment, le plasma haute définition est allé encore
plus loin en améliorant davantage la qualité et la vitesse en baissant les
coûts d’exploitation. Un perçage plus épais, moins d’impuretés, des trous
mieux définis, des bords plus droits, des vitesses plus élevées et des coûts
plus bas ont entraîné le désir de développer le système de chanfreinage
plasma automatisé. Avec les logiciels actuels, la technologie du plasma et
les nouvelles unités de chanfreinage, le chanfreinage plasma a atteint les
mêmes tolérances que le coupage plasma droit, ce qui améliore l’ajustage
des assemblages soudés et réduit le temps investi dans l’atelier de soudage
ou sur le terrain et celui requis pour le traitement secondaire.
Tête de chanfreinage de type rotatif
L’une des têtes de chanfreinage traditionnelles a toujours été une unité de
chanfreinage plasma rotative. Cette technologie plus ancienne est quelque
chose à voir. Les têtes rotatives, qui sont normalement installées sur un
pont de style portique et glissent en un mouvement de va-et-vient, tour-
nent automatiquement le chalumeau. Ces têtes ont été offertes pendant plus
d’une décennie. Et pourtant, les têtes rotatives ont un gros désavantage :
leur dimension et leur poids. Les énormes poutres portiques sont les seules
à pouvoir les soutenir, ce qui augmente les dépenses en capital et exige un
grand espace de plancher pour les faire fonctionner. De plus, contrairement
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 35
behold. Rotary heads typ-
ically sit on a gantry style
bridge, sliding back and
forth, revolving the torch
automatically. These heads
have been offered for over
a decade. Yet, rotary heads
have a huge downfall: their
size and weight. Only substan-
tial gantry beams can hold them
up. Capital investment is there-
fore high, the foor space needed to
run them is large, and, unlike smaller
unitized precision tables, motion performace can be a prob-
lem. Also, most rotary-style contour beveling heads suffer
from torch lead wind-up; which occurs during the rotation of
contour beveling. The rotation of the head causes the leads
to wind up, resulting in at least an increase in the complexity
of programing and a possible safety hazard.
aux plus petites tables de précision unitisées, la performance des mouve-
ments peut être problématique et la plupart des têtes de chanfreinage
rotatives de contour entraînent la torsion du câble de chalumeau. Ceci se
produit lors de la rotation associée au chanfreinage de contour. La rotation
de la tête entraîne la torsion des câbles, ce qui augmente à tout le moins la
complexité de la programmation et éventuellement un risque d’accident.
Nouvelle catégorie de têtes de chanfreinage
La venue de la robotique moderne a amené une réponse à ces problèmes sous
forme de têtes de chanfreinage plasma robotiques. Maintenant que la robo-
tique a été intégrée dans l’ingénierie des unités de chanfreinage plasma,
les nouvelles unités pèsent 23 kilogrammes et s’élèvent à environ un demi-
mètre de hauteur. Parce qu’elles sont moins lourdes, on peut les placer sur
des plus petites tables de précision unitisées, permettant ainsi d’effectuer
le chanfreinage de contour avec précision. Le problème relié au poids a été
réglé par une conception de joint double unique. Cette conception a aussi
répondu à la question touchant la façon de solutionner la torsion du câble
de la torche. Grâce à ce changement, il n’est plus nécessaire de dérouler le
câble de la torche entre les faces coupées et après le chanfreinage de contour.
Aussi, contrairement aux têtes rotatives, toute la mécanique est renfermée
dans l’unité. La mécanique interne étant maintenant protégée, la fréquence
des dommages est réduite.
Modifications essentielles de la conception
La conception des têtes de chanfreinage plasma robotiques a été modifée
plusieurs fois, la principale modifcation étant l’ajout de deux jointures
robotiques encapsulées. Les ingénieurs devaient relever le déf de trouver
un moyen de surmonter les principaux inconvénients des têtes rotatives,
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
36 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
479245_Techno.indd 1 6/3/10 8:14:22 PM
Euro/Fronius Compatible
www.mkproducts.com
sales@mkproducts.com
800-787-9707
Sidewinder
®
Prince
®
SG
Prince
®
XL
CobraTig
®
Python
®
LX Series
DiamondBack

CopperHeads
®
Aircrafter

T-25
Aircrafter

T-200
shown with optional 10” turntable
Lincoln Compatible
MK/Cobra
®
Connections
Miller Compatible
Cobramatic
®
Pro Series
More Than Just Push-Pull
481095_MKProducts.indd 1 6/4/10 9:32:09 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 37
New Category of Bevel Head
The advent of modern robotics brought an answer to these
problems in the form of robotic plasma beveling heads. Now
that robotics have been incorporated in the engineering of
plasma beveling units, the new units weigh 23 kilograms
and stand at around half a meter tall. Due to the decreased
weight, these beveling heads can be placed on smaller uni-
tized precision tables, now providing the ability of preci-
sion contour beveling. The weight issue was overcome by a
unique dual joint design. This design also answered the ques-
tion of how to overcome torch lead wind-up. This change
overcomes the need for the torch to unwind between cut
faces and after contour bevels. Also, unlike the rotary heads,
all of the mechanics are encapsulated within the unit. With
internal mechanics now protected, the frequency of damage
is reduced.
Core Design Changes
Robotic plasma beveling heads have several core design chan-
ges. The primary change is the addition of two encapsulated
robotic knuckles. Engineers were challenged to develop a
way to overcome rotary heads’ principal disadvantage: their
weight and size. More accurately, the disadvantage stemmed
from a need for high reduction, high rigidity, and low size/
weight gearing. Research and development led to the use of
planeocentric gearing for a robotic wrist joint. Planeocentric
gearing was chosen because they incorporated factures
that include, high gear reduction, extreme rigidity and low
weight. These features result in much more compact and
more rigid gearboxes. By changing the general layout of the
head another key element changed: calibration. While rotary
head calibration is based off the Z-axis of the center line of
the torch, giving a known point of the torch tip, a robotic
plasma beveling head calibrates of the rotational axes of the
planeocentric gearboxes. No longer is the point of rotation
the torch tip. On a robotic beveling head the point of rota-
tion is the intersection of the two rotational axes. This point
lies upon any point of the torch center line.
The effects of this change are profound. Only the center
line of the torch is a known point; the distance between
the intersection of the rotational axes and the torch tip is
still unknown. Calibration can only be finished when this
distance is known by the CNC. Yet, through simple usage
of trigonometry and ohmic sensing in the form of auto-
calibration software, the distance can be determined auto-
matically. The compounding effects of all these changes
result in lighter weight and higher rigidity, greater accuracy,
and quicker calibration of robotic beveling heads.
Weld Fit-Up
Ulti mately, the effects of core design changes previ-
ously mentioned result in a tighter weld fit-up. The higher
level of control, coupled with a compact design that has
an increased rotational accuracy, allows even automatic
welders to have little trouble in filling the gap. The rota-
tion of the robotic unit is so precise; it can be increased and
decreased by thousandths of a degree.
AKS Robo-Kut cutting one inch carbon steel at 45°. Coupage d’un
acier au carbone d’un pouce d’épaisseur à 45 º avec le robo-Kut d’AKS.
soit leur poids et leur dimension. Plus précisément, ces désavantages décou-
laient d’un besoin d’un engrenage à forte réduction, à rigidité élevée, à fai-
ble dimension et à faible poids. Après des recherches et des développements,
il a été décidé d’utiliser une commande par engrenage planocentrique pour
une articulation de poignet robotique. La commande par engrenage plano-
centrique a été choisie parce qu’elle intégre une démultiplication élevée, une
rigidité extrême et un faible poids, rendant les boîtes de vitesse plus com-
pactes et plus puissantes. En changeant la disposition générale de la tête, un
autre élément clé a changé aussi : l’étalonnage. Alors que l’étalonnage de la
tête rotative est situé près de l’axe Z de la ligne centrale du chalumeau, don-
nant un point connu de l’embout du chalumeau, une tête de chanfreinage
plasma robotique étalonne les axes rotatifs des boîtes de vitesse planocen-
triques. Le point de rotation n’est donc plus l’embout du chalumeau. Sur
une tête de chanfreinage robotique, le point de rotation est l’intersection
des deux axes rotatifs. Ce point repose sur n’importe quel point de la ligne
centrale du chalumeau.
Les effets de ce changement sont énormes. Le seul point connu est la
ligne centrale du chalumeau; la distance entre l’intersection des axes rota-
tifs et l’embout du chalumeau est toujours inconnue. L’étalonnage ne peut
se terminer que lorsque la commande numérique par ordinateur reconnaît
cette distance. Or, par une simple utilisation de trigonométrie et de détec-
tion ohmique sous forme de logiciel d’auto-étalonnage, il est possible de
déterminer automatiquement la distance. Les effets cumulatifs de tous ces
changements entraînent un poids plus léger, une rigidité plus élevée, une
meilleure précision et un étalonnage plus rapide des têtes de chanfreinage
robotiques.
Ajustage de l’assemblage soudé
À la limite, les effets de la modification essentielle de la conception
mentionnée ci-dessus produisent un meilleur ajustage de l’assemblage
soudé. Le plus haut niveau de contrôle associé à la conception compacte
rehausse la précision rotative et permet même aux machines utilisées pour
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
38 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Types of Cuts
Plasma beveling not only can perform angular bevels
of +/- 45°, but also other cuts as well. Some of the standard
cuts include:
• V-Cuts: A positive bevel or a top cut. This cut is used to
improve weld ft-up and is a simple cut to accomplish.
This cut has sharp edges.
Mild steel cut with the AKS Robo-Kut. Coupage d’un acier doux avec
le robo-Kut d’AKS.
le soudage automatique de remplir le petit vide sans aucun problème. La
rotation de l’unité robotique est tellement précise qu’elle peut être aug-
mentée et réduite dans l’ordre de milliers de degrés.
Types de coupes
Le chanfreinage plasma peut non seulement produire des chanfreins
angulaires de +/-45°, mais aussi d’autres types de coupes. Parmi les coupes
normalisées, on retrouve :
• les coupes en V : un chanfrein positif ou une coupe supérieure. Cette
coupe facile à réaliser est utilisée pour améliorer l’ajustage de l’assem-
blage soudé et produit des bords coupants;
• les coupes en A : une coupe négative ou une coupe inférieure. Cette
coupe facile à réaliser est utilisée pour améliorer l’ajustage des assem-
blages soudés et produit des surfaces lisses;
• les coupes en X : une combinaison des coupes en A et en V qui produit
des faces symétriques et un bord coupant au centre;
• les coupes en Y supérieures et les coupes en Y inférieures : puisqu’il
s’agit d’une image-miroir, choisir laquelle utiliser ne peut être déter-
miné que par des essais et les exigences d’application;
• les coupes en K : la plus diffcile des coupes, elle résulte de la combinai-
son des coupes en Y inférieures et des coupes en Y supérieures. Cette
coupe est utilisée pour améliorer l’ajustage des assemblages soudés
entre des surfaces différentes.
En déterminant quelle forme de coupe utiliser, il est important en fait
de mettre les pièces à l’essai avant d’élaborer les plans. Des facteurs tels
que les épaisseurs, les matériaux et les intensités de courant différents de
l’unité jouent tous un rôle dans la forme finale obtenue.
NDE EQUIPMENT
SUPPLIES AND SERVICES
Ultrasonic
Eddy Current
Magnetic Particle
Liquid Penetrant
Hardness Testers
Borescopes, Fiberscopes
Video Inspection Scopes
Ultraviolet Lamps
X-Ray Systems
CustomNDE Systems
Service & Calibration
Rental & Leasing
CANADIAN NDE TECHNOLOGY LTD.
124 SKYWAY AVE.,
TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA M9W 4Y9
PHONE (416) 213-8000 FAX (416) 213-8004
QUEBEC: Phone (450) 373-8580 Fax (450) 373-6297
WEB: www.candet.ca E-MAIL: candet@candet.ca
ISO 9001:2000 Certified
NDE
319183_Candet.indd 1 2/15/07 1:12:28 PM 466305_JPNissen.indd 1 3/11/10 11:13:23 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 39
• A-Cut: A negative cut or bottom cut. This cut is used to
improve weld ft-up and is simple to accomplish. This
cut has smooth surfaces.
• X-Cut: This is a combination of both
A & V cuts resulting in symmet-
rical faces with a sharp edge in the
middle.
• Y top and Y bottom Cuts: Being a
mirror image of each other, choos-
ing which one to use can only be
determined by testing and applica-
tion requirements.
• K-Cut: The most diffcult of the cuts.
Results from combining both Y-Bottom
and Y-Top cuts. Used to improve weld ft-
up between two different surfaces.
In determining which cut shape to use, it is import-
ant to actually test parts before signing off on the blue
print. Different thickness, material, amperage of unit, and
other factors will all play in the outcome of each shape.
Improving Technologies
As the plasma cutting industry grows, technological improve-
ments in plasma grow with it. This modern technology has
been under development since the 1940s. As a result, the
industry knows a lot more about plasma cutting then most
realize. With gas shielding, double-arc avoidance, and,
Accu-Kut Unitized Mechanized
Plasma Table. Table plasma
mécanisée unitisée Accu-Kut.
Types de coupes
Plus l’industrie du coupage plasma croît, plus la technologie du
plasma s’améliore. Cette technologie moderne est en phase de conception
depuis les années 40 et, par conséquent, l’industrie connaît beaucoup plus
le coupage plasma que la plupart d’entre nous le réalise. Avec les gaz de
protection, l’évitement de l’arc double et, ultérieurement, les buses vortex,
la liste de jalons est impressionnante. Les têtes de chanfreinage robotiques
WONDER GEL
Stainless Steel Pickling Gel
Achieve maximum corrosion resistance to stainless steel.
Surface contamination may drastically reduce the life of
stainless steel. Wonder Gel removes (pickles) stubborn impurities,
cleans the toughest slag, scale and heat discoloration
and restores (passivates) the protective oxide layer.
BRADFORD DERUSTIT CORP.
21660 Waterford Drive
Yorba Linda, CA 92887
International ph: 714.695.0899
International fax: 714.695.0840
e-mail sales@derustit.com
www.derustit.com
WELD AFTER WELD BEFORE
468184_Bradford.indd 1 2/22/10 11:25:37 PM
MAINTAIN YOUR EXCELLENCE
IN WELDING
HI-LO® WELDING GAGE
· Measures Internal Misalignment
(before and after tacking)
· Wall Thickness of Pipe
· Crown Height of Buttwelds, etc.
BRIDGE CAM GAGE
& NEW POCKET BRIDGE CAM
· Measures Leg & Throat
· Angle of Preparation
· Undercut and more!
P.O. BOX 218 · STEVENSVILLE, MICHIGAN 49127
PHONE: 269-465-5750 · FAX: 269-465-6385
Email: info@galgage.com • Website: www.galgage.com • Visa & Mastercard Accepted
469468_GAL.indd 1 3/5/10 11:47:30 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
40 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
eventually, vortex nozzles, the list of milestones is impressive.
Robotic beveling heads were designed with the attributes of
older technology in mind and with newer technology incor-
porated. As a result, near machine-tool-quality cutting is
now the standard for plasma beveling. All shops have ways to
improve, and if you plasma cut gauge to two-inch aluminum,
mild, or stainless, regardless of the unit, robotic or rotary,
plasma beveling can be an improved technology for you.

Christopher Phillip is marketing manager for AKS Cutting Systems, Inc.
ont été conçues avec les attributs d’une technologie plus ancienne, en y
incorporant une nouvelle technologie. Par conséquent, la qualité du cou-
page a presque atteint celle de l’usinage des machines-outils qui constitue
maintenant la norme pour le chanfreinage plasma. Chaque atelier a des
moyens de s’améliorer et si vous coupez au plasma des tôles d’aluminium,
d’acier doux ou d’acier inoxydable atteignant jusqu’à deux pouces d’épais-
seur, peu importe avec quelle unité, robotique ou rotative, le chanfreinage
plasma peut devenir une meilleur technologie pour vous.)

Christopher Phillip est directeur du marketing chez AKS Cutting Systems, Inc.
Auto-Calibration
AKS Cutting System’s robo-kut uses patent-pend-
ing auto-calibration system software on the market
and developed in-house. Calibrating some bevel
systems can take as long as several hours. Through
simple trigonometry and ohmic sensing, the AKS
auto-calibration software system can calibrate in
minutes. All of this is achieved by touching a tool-
ing ball attached to the electrode of the torch to the
plate, through use of ohmic sensing, and recording
the servo steps taken. The calibration software now
knows the distance traversed. Following that, the
software compares several distances taken the same
way to reach points across the plate. Once com-
puted, the exact 3D location of the torch tip becomes
a known variable in relation with the actual location
of the plate surface.
Auto-étalonnage
Le système de coupage robo-kut d’AKS utilise un logiciel de
système d’auto-étalonnage qui a été développé à l’interne et
dont le brevet est en instance. Alors que la majorité des systè-
mes d’étalonnage peuvent prendre jusqu’à quatre heures, par
simple trigonométrie et détection ohmique, le système AKS
peut étalonner dans moins de 10 minutes. En mettant une balle
d’outillage f ixée à l’électrode du chalumeau en contact avec la
plaque et en enregistrant les servo-étapes qui sont prises, le
logiciel enregistre la distance maintenant connue. Ensuite, il
compare cinq distances prises de la même manière pour attein-
dre des points à travers la plaque à des angles statiques. Une
fois calculé, l’emplacement 3D exact de la buse du chalumeau
devient une variable connue en relation avec l’emplacement
actuel de la surface de la plaque.
AKS Cutting Systems
Machine-Tool Quality
Mechanized Plasma Tables
Inventor, designer, and manufacturer of the robo-
kut robotic beveling unit, AKS Cutting Systems
developed the robotic beveling unit through its many
years of combines metal cutting experience. All of
the factors listed in this article as recommended
for the highest-quality cuts have been standard on
AKS plasma tables since the company’s inception.
Simply put, many other tables are not up to the per-
formance standards needed to run a robotic plasma
beveling unit like the AKS robo-kut. For more
information, visit www.akscutting.com.
Tables plasma mécanisées de
qualité machine-outil égale à celle
des systèmes de coupage AKS
L’inventeur, le concepteur et le fabricant de l’unité de chanfrei-
nage robotique robo-kut, soit AKS Cutting Systems, a mis au
point cette unité de chanfreinage robotique autour du coupage
du métal d’apprêt utilisé sur nos machines les plus en demande
dans l’industrie. Tous les facteurs énumérés dans cet article
tels qu’ils sont recommandés pour les coupes de la plus haute
qualité sont standard sur les tables plasma d’AKS et ce, depuis
la fondation de l’entreprise. Nous éprouvons de la diffculté à
installer rétroactivement la tête de chanfreinage robo-kut sur
des tables plasma vendues sur le marché autres que les nôtres.
Autrement dit, les autres tables ne répondent pas aux normes de
tolérance requises en matière d’empilage pour faire fonctionner
le robo-kut d’AKS. Pour obtenir plus d’information, visitez
www.akscutting.com.
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
474345_GEDIK.indd 1 4/6/10 7:50:32 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
42 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Design and Use of Cored
Stainless Steel Electrodes
Conception et utilisation des
électrodes fourrées en acier
inoxydable
Today, the use of cored wires in industry is widespread.
Fabricators who compete on a global scale recognize the
advantages of tubular wires not only in increased productiv-
ity, but also improved operability (ease of use) as compared
to other consumable types, such as stick electrodes and solid
wires. These features far overcome the higher cost per pound
as compared to stick electrodes or solid wires. The same
advantages, and others, also extend to cored stainless steel
wires.
The key to these advantages lie in the design of the wire.
During the manufacture of stainless cored wires a continuous
ribbon of flat, stainless steel strip is sent through a series of
rolls that form it into a U-shape. This U-shape is then filled
with powder and another set of rolls closes the U to form an
O-shape. This O-shaped tube is then drawn through a series
of dies to final size. The resultant product has a compacted
powder center surrounded by a thin stainless steel sheath. The
powder fill is either metallic (metal cored) or a mixture of met-
als and flux ingredients (flux cored).
Higher Deposition Rates and Lower Heat Inputs
All or nearly all of the welding current is conducted by the thin
sheath of stainless steel. Because the cross-sectional area carry-
ing the current is small the wire heats up rapidly and melts at a
faster rate than a solid wire of the same diameter (see fgure 2).
The result is that for a given current level a cored wire will
deposit more pounds of weld metal per hour (see figure 3).
Conversely, when depositing the same amount of wire
(equivalent wire feed speed settings) the cored wire needs less
current to melt the wire, which lowers the heat input level.
This can have particular advantages in stainless steel welding.
All types of stainless steel are susceptible to cracking.
The lower heat inputs used with cored wires reduces residual
stresses and weldment distortion, lowering the tendency to
crack.
De nos jours, les fils fourrés sont couramment utilisés dans l’indus-
trie. Les fabricants qui soutiennent la concurrence à l’échelle mondiale
reconnaissent les avantages des fils tubulaires, non seulement parce qu’ils
rehaussent la productivité, mais aussi parce qu’ils améliorent l’aptitude
au fonctionnement (la facilité d’utilisation) par rapport aux autres types
de produits d’apport tels que les électrodes enrobées et les fils pleins. Ces
caractéristiques sont beaucoup plus avantageuses malgré le coût plus élevé
par livre de ces électrodes par rapport à celui des électrodes enrobées ou des
fils pleins. Les fils fourrés en acier inoxydable offrent les mêmes avantages,
sinon plus.
La clé de ces avantages repose sur la conception du fil. Lors de la fabri-
cation des fils fourrés en acier inoxydable, un ruban continu de bande d’acier
inoxydable droite est envoyé à travers une série de rouleaux qui lui donnent
une forme en U. Cette forme en U est ensuite remplie de poudre et une autre
série de rouleaux ferme le U pour former un O. Ce tube en O est ensuite passé
à travers une série de matrices jusqu’à ce qu’il prenne sa dimension finale. Le
produit résultant consiste en une poudre compactée au centre entourée d’une
mince gaine en acier inoxydable. Le remplissage de poudre est en métal (fil
composite) ou un mélange de métaux et de composants de f lux (fil fourré).
Taux de dépôt supérieur et énergie linéaire inférieure
Tout le courant de soudage, ou presque tout le courant de soudage, est
transporté par une mince gaine en acier inoxydable. La section transversale
qui transporte le courant étant mince, le fil se réchauffe vite et fond plus
rapidement qu’un fil plein ayant le même diamètre (voir la figure 2).
Par conséquent, pour un courant donné, un fil fourré déposera plus de
métal en livres par heure (voir la figure 3).
Inversement, lorsque la même quantité de métal est déposée (à la même
vitesse de dévidage), le fil fourré a besoin de moins de courant pour faire
fondre le fil, réduisant ainsi l’apport thermique. Ceci peut être particulière-
ment avantageux lors du soudage de l’acier inoxydable.
Tous les types d’aciers inoxydables sont susceptibles à la fissuration.
L’énergie linéaire inférieure requise pour les fils fourrés réduit les contrain-
tes résiduelles et la distorsion des assemblages soudés et limite ainsi la ten-
dance à la fissuration.
Les aciers inoxydables ferritiques sont prédisposés au grossissement des
grains et à la perte de ductilité qui s’ensuit. Cette tendance peut être mini-
misée en utilisant moins d’énergie linéaire.
Tom Van Loon and/et Ron Smith,
Select-Arc, Inc.
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 43
Figure 1. Cored wire manufacturing
process. Figure 1. Processus de
fabrication d’un fil fourré.
Figure 2. Current paths in cored and
solid wires Figure 2. Trajet du courant
dans les fils fourrés et les fils pleins.
Ferritic stainless steels are prone to grain growth and
resultant loss of ductility. Lower heat inputs help reduce this
tendency.
Austenitic and ferritic stainless steels are susceptible to
sensitization (chromium depletion at the grain boundaries
that can result in subsequent intergranular corrosion). Lower
heat inputs increase the cooling rates through the critical
temperature ranges where sensitization occurs, thus lowering
susceptibility.
Increased Flexibility in Chemistry and Performance
Characteristics
The metal powders added to the core of these wires can be
adjusted to meet a wide variety of different chemistries. These
adjustments can be made quickly and in small quantities to
meet special requirements, such as non-standard chemistries
or targeted ferrite numbers.
The flux ingredients in the core define the performance
characteristics. They melt to form a slag that helps protect the
Les aciers inoxydables austénitiques et ferritiques sont susceptibles à la
sensibilisation (diminution du chrome au joint des grains pouvant entraîner
une corrosion intergranulaire). Une énergie linéaire inférieure augmente la
vitesse de refroidissement à l’intérieur des plages de température critiques
où la sensibilisation est occasionnée, réduisant ainsi cette susceptibilité.
Flexibilité accrue en chimie et caractéristiques de
performance
Les poudres métalliques qui sont ajoutées à l’âme de ces fils peuvent
être ajustées afin de répondre aux exigences d’une vaste gamme de produits
chimiques différents. Ces ajustements peuvent se faire rapidement et en peti-
tes quantités afin de satisfaire à certaines exigences particulières telles que
celles des compositions chimiques non standard ou du nombre de ferrites
ciblés.
Les composants de f lux dans l’âme définissent les caractéristiques de
performance. Ces composants fondent et forment du laitier, ce qui aide
à protéger le métal déposé contre l’atmosphère, tout en supportant et en
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
44 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Manufacturing
FIux Cored
WeIding Wire
COBALT

NICKEL


HARDFACE


STAINLESS

ALLOY STEEL


TOOL STEEL

MAINTENANCE


FORGE ALLOYS


CUSTOM ALLOY

COR-MET, INC.
12500 Grand River Rd.
Brighton, MI 48116
PH: 810-227-3251
FAX: 810-227-9266
www.cor-met.com
sales@cor-met.com
481528_CorMet.indd 1 6/2/10 3:25:35 PM
Oxylance Inc
Thermic Torches (Burning Bars)
We manufacture Complete Thermic
Cutting Systems for large and small
jobs. From cutting heavy castings to
piercing starter holes in plate and
removing frozen pins. Quality products
manufactured in the USA.
Surecut Exothermic System
Oxygen Vaporizers
Burning Bars
Burning Bar Holders
Oxygen Hose
Oxygen Regulator
Safety Clothing
For Information Call (205) 322-9906
www.oxylance.com info@oxylance.com
466901_Oxylance.indd 1 3/3/10 10:08:11 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 45
weld metal from the atmosphere and also supports and shapes
the weld bead. Gas shielded, flux cored electrodes designed
for out of position use form a quick freezing shelf of slag that
can support a relatively large amount of molten weld metal
(see figure 4).This property gives the flux cored wire its great-
est advantage, the ability to deposit large amounts of weld
metal out of position using conventional power supplies.
Although the flat and horizontal beads produced by the
all position electrodes are generally acceptable, some stainless
steel customers prefer the superior bead appearance of the flat
and horizontal electrodes. Different slag systems are used for
the gas shielded, flat and horizontal, flux cored electrodes.
They are more fluid and the weld metal flows out to a very
pleasing, shiny, even and finely rippled bead (see figure 5).
The fluid slag system makes these types difficult to use in out
of position welding.
Improved Bead Profiles
Another advantage of the tubular structure of these electrodes
is the superior bead profle vs. solid wires. Because the current
is only carried on the outer edge of the wire there is more spread
to the arc force. Cored wire bead profles are wider and slightly
less penetrated than solid wire. This allows them to weld at
higher travel speeds and to be less likely to burn through in
areas of poor ft-up.
Figure 3 - Typical deposition rates for various stainless steel electrodes. Note that at any given current level the kgs of weld metal
deposited by the cored electrode is higher. For example at 150 amps the covered electrode deposits 0.7 Kg/hr (1.5 lbs/hr),
The solid wire 2.0 Kg/hr (4.4 lbs/hr)and the cored wire 2.4 Kg/hr (5.3 lbs/hr). The differences become larger at higher
current levels. Ìn this example the deposition rates of the metal cored and flux cored wires are virtually the same.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350
D
e
p
.

R
a
t
e

(
K
g
s
/
h
r
)
Current (amps)
Typical Deposition Rates for Stainless Steel Electrodes
1.2 mm Cored Wire
1.2 mm Solid Wire
4.0 mm Covered Electrode
Figure 3. Typical deposition rates for various stainless steel electrodes. Note that at any given current level the Kgs of weld metal
deposited by the cored electrode is higher. For example at 150 amps the covered electrode deposits 0.7 Kg/hr (1.5 lbs/hr), the solid wire
2.0 Kg/hr (4.4 lbs/hr), and the cored wire 2.4 Kg/hr (5.3 lbs/hr). The differences become larger at higher current levels. In this example the
deposition rates of the metal cored and flux cored wires are virtually the same. Figure 3. Taux de dépôts types pour diverses électrodes en acier
inoxydable. Notez qu’à un courant donné, le Kgs du métal déposé par le fil fourré est plus élevé. Par exemple, à 150 ampères, l’électrode enrobée dépose 0,7 Kg/h (1,5 lb/h),
le fil plein 2,0 Kg/h (4,4 lb/h) et le fil fourré 2,4 Kg/h (5,3lb/h). Les différences deviennent plus grandes à des courants plus élevés. Dans cet exemple, les taux de dépôt des
fils composites et des fils fourrés sont presque les mêmes.
formant le cordon de soudure. Les fils-électrodes fourrés avec gaz de protec-
tion conçus pour une utilisation hors position forment une couche de laitier
à congélation rapide qui peut supporter une quantité relativement petite de
métal fondu (voir la figure 4). Cette propriété confère au fil fourré son plus
grand avantage, soit la capacité de déposer des grandes quantités de métal
hors position en utilisant une source de courant conventionnelle.
Bien que les cordons plats et horizontaux réalisés par des électrodes
toutes positions soient généralement acceptés, certains clients qui achètent
l’acier inoxydable préfèrent l’apparence supérieure de ces cordons. Différents
systèmes de laitier sont utilisés pour les fils fourrés avec protection gazeuse
utilisés en position à plat ou horizontale. Ceux-ci sont plus f luides et le
métal qui s’écoule de l’électrode forme un cordon brillant finement strié
plus attrayant et uniforme (voir la figure 5). Ce système de laitier plus f luide
rend plus difficile l’utilisation de ces types d’électrodes lors du soudage hors
position.
Profils de cordons améliorés
Un autre avantage de la structure tubulaire de ces électrodes est le profil
de cordon supérieur qu’elle produit par rapport aux fils pleins. Parce que le
courant n’est transporté que sur le bord extérieur du fil, la force de l’arc est
plus étendue. Les profils de cordon réalisés au moyen d’un fil fourré sont
plus larges et leur pénétration est légèrement inférieure à ceux exécutés par
un fil plein. La soudure peut donc être exécutée à une vitesse plus élevée et la
possibilité d’effondrement dans les zones où il y a un mauvais ajustage en est
réduite.
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
46 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Use of Cored Stainless Steel Electrodes
Welding of ferritic stainless steel. The ferritic grades of stain-
less steel contain 10-20% chromium, have a low carbon content
and little or no nickel. They have good scaling resistance at ele-
vated temperatures and are very resistant to corrosive attack
in chloride environments. A large amount of the ferritic stain-
less steels are used in the manufacture of automotive exhaust
systems where they are exposed to elevated temperatures and
Figure 4. Vertical bead made with all position 308L flux cored
electrode at a deposition rate of 4.5 Kg/hr (9.9 lbs/hr). Figure 4.
Cordon vertical réalisé au moyen d’une électrode fourrée 308L toutes positions à un
taux de dépôt de 4,5 Kg/h (9,9 lb/h).
Utilisation des électrodes fourrées en acier inoxydable
Soudage de l’acier inoxydable ferritique. Les aciers inoxydables ferriti-
ques contiennent de 10 à 20 % de chrome, ont une faible teneur en carbone
et ne comportent aucun nickel ou presque. Ils résistent bien à la formation
de calamine à des températures élevées et sont très résistants aux attaques
de corrosion dans les environnements de chlorure. Une grande quantité
d’acier inoxydable ferritique est utilisée dans la fabrication des systèmes
d’échappement d’automobiles lorsque ceux-ci sont exposés à des hautes
températures et au sel de voirie. Ces composants sont faits en acier inoxy-
dable de faible épaisseur ayant une teneur en chrome de 12 % (type 409)
ou de 18 % (types 439, 18CrCb). Les soudures sont exécutées à des vitesses
d’avancement élevées afn de rehausser la productivité et d’éviter l’effondre-
ment, ce qui constitue une utilisation idéale pour les fls composites (voir
la fgure 6). Ces derniers peuvent être soudés à des vitesses plus élevées que
les fls pleins et donner de bons résultats dans les zones où l’ajustage peut
parfois être inacceptable. Du titane et/ou du niobium peut être ajouté à ces
électrodes afn de « stabiliser » la microstructure en liant chimiquement
le carbone et en empêchant la formation d’une phase martensitique plus
fragile. L’ajout de titane favorise également la stabilité de l’arc et réduit
la quantité de projections. Ces électrodes sont couramment utilisées en
Amérique du Nord avec le gaz de protection Ar-2 % O
2
, alors que l’argon,
qui contient jusqu’à 20 % de CO
2
, est moins souvent utilisé. Le diamètre
des fls varie généralement entre 1,0 et 1,6 mm (0,040 à 1/16 po) et l’ap-
port thermique est très faible, étant généralement inférieur à 0,4 kJ/mm
(10,2 kJ/po).
À notre connaissance, il n’existe aucune électrode fourrée en acier
inoxydable ferritique. En raison des problèmes reliés au grossissement
des grains et de la perte de ductilité, ces aciers doivent être soudés à des
www.ati-ia.com/weld/
919.772.0115
With patented advances in the locking mechanism and
failsafe, and new flexible module mounting and integrated
robot mounting patterns, we’ve created the most reliable,
easy-to-use Welding Gun Changers. Ever.
The QC-210 Welding Gun Changer.
The new standard from ATI.
Come visit us at the
Weld Expo 2010 Show
Booth #11013
ROBOTIC END EFFECTORS
The most reliable,
easy-to-use
Gun Changer.
Ever.
A more reliable
locking mechanism.
A more reliable fail-safe.
A more flexible utility
mounting solution.
481942_ati.indd 1 6/3/10 12:05:45 PM 439361_Cambridge.indd 1 7/28/09 8:50:40 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 47
Figure 5. Horizontal fillet made with flat and horizontal 308L flux
cored electrode. Note the smooth, even, finely rippled bead.
Figure 5. Soudure d’angle horizontale réalisée au moyen d’une électrode fourrée
208L à plat et à l’horizontale. Remarquez le cordon lisse, uniforme et finement strié.
road salt. These components are made of thin gauge stainless
steel, with chromium levels at 12 % (type 409) or 18% (types 439,
18CrCb). Welds are made at high travel speeds to increase pro-
ductivity and to avoid burn through. This is an ideal applica-
tion for metal cored wires (see fgure 6). They can run at faster
travel speeds than solid wires and will handle the occasional
poor ft-up. Additions of titanium and/or niobium are added
to these electrodes to «stabilize» the microstructure by tying
up carbon and preventing the formation of a more brittle, mar-
tensitic phase. Titanium additions also promote arc stability
and reduce spatter levels. In North America these electrodes
are commonly used with Ar-2%O
2
shielding gas. Argon with
up to 20% CO
2
is less commonly used. Typical wire diameters
range from 1.0-1.6 mm (0.040˝-1/16˝). Heat inputs are very low,
usually less than 0.4 kJ/mm (10.2kJ/in).
To our knowledge there are no flux cored, ferritic, stainless
steel electrodes. Because of problems with grain growth and
loss of ductility these steels must be welded at low heat inputs,
so they are unable to take advantage of the higher deposition
rates offered by the flux cored electrodes.
Welding of martensitic stainless steel. There is a full range of
cored electrodes for welding the martensitic stainless grades.
All-position and flat and horizontal flux cored wires types, as
well as metal cored electrodes are available. 410NiMo tubular
wire grades are commonly used in the hydro-electric power
industry (see figure 7). Because of their makeup they lend
themselves well to applications which require high strength
and corrosion resistance. Alloys of this type may also be
apports de chaleur inférieurs et ne peuvent donc pas prendre avantage des
taux de dépôt plus élevés offerts par les fils fourrés.
Soudage de l’acier inoxydable martensitique. Il existe une vaste gamme
d’électrodes fourrés pour souder les aciers inoxydables martensitiques, y
compris les fils fourrés toutes positions, à plat et à l’horizontale et les fils
composites. Les fils tubulaires 410NiMo sont souvent utilisés dans l’indus-
trie de l’énergie hydroélectrique (voir la figure 7). Grâce à leur composition,
ils se prêtent bien aux applications qui exigent une haute résilience et une
468662_HAI.indd 1 3/13/10 11:23:36 AM
In your business, the welds
need to be perfect. Partner
with the industry leader in
field portable weld prep, cut
and bevel machine tools.
Since 1883, E.H. Wachs
®
has
manufactured the tools that
make the job easier. Perfect
welds begin with perfect
weld preps.
Partner with E.H.Wachs
®
for Perfect
Weld Preps
888.785.2000 | ehwachs.com
The New and More
Powerful MB Plus
The New Versatile
Small Diameter Split Frame (SDSF)
466675_EH.indd 1 2/26/10 11:48:48 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
48 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
heat-treated to meet specific design criteria. Larger diameter
metal cored electrodes, 420 types, are used to resurface steel
mill rolls using the submerged arc process. Smaller diam-
eter steel rolls can be efficiently resurfaced with flux-cored
consumables. Some precautions are necessary when welding
these steels because they are susceptible to hydrogen induced
cracking. Protection of the welding consumables to prevent
Figure 6. Weld on an exhaust system manifold welded with 439
metal cored wire. The weld was made in the vertical down position
using an Ar-CO
2
shielding gas mix. Figure 6. Soudure sur le collecteur
d’un système d’échappement réalisée au moyen d’un fil composite 439. La soudure
a été exécutée dans la position verticale vers le bas au moyen d’un mélange de gaz
de protection Ar-CO
2
.
résistance à la corrosion. Les alliages de ce type peuvent aussi être soumis
à un traitement thermique afin de répondre à des critères de conception
particuliers. Les fils composites de type 420 ont un plus grand diamètre
et sont utilisés pour le rechargement curatif des bobines brutes en acier au
moyen du procédé SAW. Les bobines d’acier de plus petit diamètre peuvent
être rechargées efficacement à l’aide d’un fil fourré. Il faut prendre certaines
précautions en soudant ces aciers parce qu’ils sont susceptibles à la fissura-
tion par l’hydrogène. Il est donc essentiel de protéger les produits d’apport
contre l’humidité absorbée et d’utiliser des températures entre passes et de
préchauffage appropriées. Les électrodes fourrées utilisées pour souder les
aciers inoxydables martensitiques sont protégées par le gaz CO
2
ou Ar-25 %
CO
2
. Il y a certains avantages à utiliser le CO
2
puisque cela réduira la teneur
en hydrogène dans le métal fondu.
Soudage des aciers inoxydables austénitiques et duplex. Une gamme
complète de fils fourrés est offerte pour souder les aciers inoxydables austé-
nitiques et certaines classes d’aciers duplex standards. Les plages de tempé-
rature dans lesquelles ces alliages peuvent être utilisés sont très étendues, de
températures cyrogéniques à une température de près de 1 090 ºC (2 000 ºF),
et ils peuvent être exposés à une grande variété de matières corrosives.
Chaque utilisation particulière comprend des exigences précises et le métal
déposé doit avoir les mêmes caractéristiques de performance que le matériau
de base. Les fils fourrés conviennent parfaitement puisqu’il est relativement
facile d’ajuster la composition du fil pour des utilisations précises.
Les versions fourrées de ces électrodes peuvent utiliser comme gaz
de protection soit le CO
2
ou le mélange Ar-25 % CO
2
. Le CO
2
offre une
meilleure pénétration et permet le mouillage du cordon, alors qu’avec le
mélange de gaz Ar-25 % CO
2
, l’arc est plus silencieux et il y a moins de
projections et de fumée. Les gaz plus riches que l’argon ou les mélanges de
479655_Gullco.indd 1 6/16/10 9:41:32 AM
905-575-8311 • 1-800-794-7840
www.advancedwelding.ca
email: advweld@advweldtech.com
IN-PLANT TRAINING • CONSULTING • CUSTOM PROGRAMS
Accredited C.W.B. and T.S.S.A. Test Centre
“Training For Success”
ADVANCED WELDING
TECHNIQUES INC.
WELDER TRAINING FACILITY
483038_Advanced.indd 1 6/16/10 11:56:57 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 49
moisture pickup and the use of proper preheat and interpass
temperatures is essential. Flux cored electrodes used to weld
martensitic stainless are shielded with CO
2
or Ar-25% CO
2

gas. There is some benefit to using CO
2
as this will result in
lower weld metal hydrogen levels.
Welding of austenitic and duplex stainless steel. A full
range of cored wires are available to weld the austenitic stain-
less steel grades as well as some of the standard duplex grades.
The range of use of these alloys is very broad, from cryogenic
temperatures to near 1090°C (2000°F), with exposure to a
wide variety of corrosive media. Each particular application
has specific requirements and the weld metal must perform in
a similar manner to the base material. Cored wires are a good
fit because it is relatively easy to make adjustments to wire
chemistry for specific applications.
The flux cored versions of these electrodes can use either
CO
2
or Ar-25% CO
2
shielding gas. CO
2
gives better penetra-
tion and bead wetting. The use of Ar-25% CO
2
shielding gas
results in a smoother arc with slightly less spatter, and lower
fume levels. Gases richer in argon or specialty gas mixes are
not generally recommended when using stainless steel flux-
cored electrodes unless the product has been designed to run
with those specific shielding gas blends.
Metal cored electrodes commonly use Ar-2%O
2
and Ar/
CO
2
shielding gas blends containing up to a maximum of 3%
CO
2
.The use of Ar/2% CO
2
shielding gas with metal-cored
stainless steel electrodes will permit all modes of metal trans-
fer; short circuit, globular, spray and pulsed. Welds produced
Figure 7. Directional flaps used in hydro-electric power generation
to direct water flow to turbines. Welding was done with 410NiMo
flux cored wire Figure 7. Volets directionnels utilisés pour la génération
d’énergie hydroélectrique en vue de diriger le débit d’eau vers les turbines. Le
soudage a été réalisé au moyen d’un fil fourré 410NiMo.
gaz spéciaux ne sont pas généralement recommandés lorsqu’on utilise des
électrodes fourrées en acier inoxydable, à moins que le produit ait été conçu
pour être utilisé avec ces mélanges de gaz de protection particuliers.
Les f ils composites utilisent généralement des mélanges de gaz de
protection composés de 2 % d’oxygène (O
2
) et un mélange d’argon (Ar) et
de dioxyde de carbone (Co
2
) qui contiennent 3 % de CO
2
au maximum.
L’utilisation d’un gaz de protection composé d’argon et de 2 % CO
2
avec des
électrodes en acier inoxydable à âme métallique permettra l’utilisation de
472226_Holland.indd 1 3/24/10 6:00:46 PM 478876_Tommys.indd 1 5/20/10 3:18:47 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
50 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
with these shielding gas blends have minimal spatter levels,
adequate penetration and cleaner weld surfaces (reduced
oxides) as compared to Ar/O
2
blends. Shielding gas manufac-
turers in North America offer a variety of «specialty» shield-
ing gas blends that are designed for welding austenitic and
duplex stainless steels with metal-cored electrodes. Some of
the common «specialty» blends may contain controlled addi-
tions of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen or nitric-oxide that accen-
tuate the performance characteristics of metal-cored stainless
steel electrodes. Improved color match, penetration, bead
profile, fume reduction, stability of weld metal microstructure
(duplex) and increased productivity are such features. It is
important however when selecting «specialty» shielding gas
blends to consult not only the shielding gas supplier but also
the weld consumable manufacturer to determine the feas-
ibility for a specific application. Consideration should also
be given to weld procedures; as in most cases a separate weld
procedure specification (WPS) and procedure qualification
report (PQR) must be performed.
There are also some austenitic, self-shielded flux cored
electrodes designed for flat and horizontal use. These self-
shielded electrodes also find themselves readily used in appli-
cations that historically would have used stick electrodes.
They are often used for surfacing applications, such as for
mining equipment.
The chemical, petroleum and power generation indus-
tries are large consumers of austenitic stainless steels. Flux
cored wires, both the all-position types and the f lat and
tous les modes de transfert, soit par courts-circuits, globulaire, en pluie et
par pulsation. Les soudures réalisées avec ces mélanges réduisent les pro-
jections au maximum et procurent une pénétration adéquate et une surface
plus propre (moins d’oxydes) par rapport aux mélanges d’argon et d’oxygène.
Les fabricants de gaz de protection en Amérique du Nord offrent une variété
de mélanges conçus « spécialement » pour le soudage des aciers inoxyda-
bles austénitiques et duplex avec fils composites. Des quantités contrôlées
d’hydrogène, d’hélium, d’azote ou d’oxyde nitrique peuvent être ajoutées à
certains de ces mélanges communs afin de rehausser les caractéristiques de
performance des électrodes en acier inoxydable à âme métallique, y compris
une meilleure pénétration et harmonie de couleurs, un profil de cordon
amélioré, moins de fumée ainsi qu’une meilleure stabilité de la microstruc-
ture (duplex) du métal déposé et une meilleure productivité. Par contre, il
est important lors de la sélection d’un tel mélange de consulter non seule-
ment le fournisseur du gaz de protection, mais aussi le fabricant du produit
d’apport afin de déterminer la possibilité d’utiliser ces mélanges pour une
utilisation particulière. Les modes opératoires de soudage doivent aussi être
pris en compte et, dans bien des cas, une spécification de mode opératoire
de soudage et un registre de qualification du mode opératoire de soudage
doivent être élaborés.
Des électrodes fourrées austénitiques à protection intrinsèque sont aussi
offertes pour le soudage à plat et horizontal. Celles-ci sont aussi souvent uti-
lisées dans des applications qui, généralement auraient utilisé des électrodes
enrobées. Elles sont aussi souvent employées pour le rechargement, comme
dans le cas du matériel d’exploitation des mines.
Les industries chimique, pétrolière et de production d’énergie électri-
que sont des grands consommateurs d’aciers inoxydables austénitiques et
utilisent des fils fourrés toutes positions à plat et à l’horizontale dans des
With over 20 drill models and hundreds of cutters, you can rely on
Hougen to supply the right drills and cutters to get the job done.
Whether it’s small holes in tight places, extremely accurate holes or
high volume production, Hougen solves your toughest holemaking
problems. And with over 4,000 distributors and 47 service centers
we’ll get you what you need, when you need it, fast.
THE DRILLS & CUTTERS
YOU CAN RELY ON...
...FROM THE COMPANY YOU CAN TRUST.
¡ ê ê · 1 l ¡ · I ¡ ! ¡ º W W W. K ê K K | 1 . | ê M
¡ | K ï | | | º | 1 ! | K K | ! ï º K | | | ! K | | | ! ï
458179_Hougen.indd 1 12/2/09 10:07:09 PM
SERIOUS AIR FOR
SERIOUS PLACES
MAN/EQUIPMENTCOOLING
CURING AND DRYING
FUMEEXHAUST
DUST REMOVAL
CONFINEDSPACE
AIR VENTILATORS
8”, 12”, &20” MODELS
PORTABLE
LIGHTWEIGHT
848-800CFM
110/220V
12VDC
PNEUMATIC
Americ Corporation
785 Bonni e Lane El k Gr ove Vi l l age, I L 60007
800- 364- 4642 Fax 847- 3 64- 4695
www.americ.com
422946_americ.indd 1 3/16/09 1:06:16 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 51
horizontal types, are utilized. Applications include the con-
struction of chemical vessels and storage tanks (all-position
electrodes) and the fabrication of rolled pipe (flat and horizon-
tal electrodes). The base metal used and the corrosive media
involved will dictate the classification of welding electrode to
be selected.
High temperatures are often used in oil or chemical pro-
cessing plants, as well as in power generation equipment. At
temperatures above 540°C (1004°F) creep becomes a problem.
Specially formulated f lux cored wires with higher carbon
levels (H grades) will give improved creep resistance. A word
of caution is due here: some stainless steel flux cored wires
contain bismuth additions to improve slag peeling. Bismuth
is known to reduce creep life and also to play a role in reheat
cracking. When choosing a stainless flux cored electrode for
high temperature use or for applications where a post weld
heat treatment will be performed, it is necessary to confirm
with the electrode manufacturer that no bismuth is present in
the electrode.
Austenitic flux cored electrodes are also available for use
at cryogenic temperatures. Cryogenic pressure vessels for
storage of liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen are fabricated with
flux cored electrodes. Impact toughness is important here
and electrodes designed for cryogenic service environments
produce weld metal with low ferrite numbers and low carbon
contents.
Metal-cored, austenitic electrodes have been used to weld
the roof and side panels of light rail cars, for welding the hatch
applications telles que la construction de récipients et de réservoirs de stoc-
kage de produits chimiques (électrodes toutes positions) et la fabrication de
tuyaux laminés (électrodes utilisées à plat et à l’horizontale). Le métal de
base utilisé et la matière corrosive concernée détermineront le type d’élec-
trode de soudage qui sera sélectionné.
Les températures élevées sont souvent utilisées dans les usines de trai-
tement du pétrole et de produits chimiques ainsi que pour le matériel de
production d’énergie électrique. À des températures supérieures à 540 ºC
(1 004 ºF), le f luage devient problématique. Les fils fourrés spécialement
formulés ayant une haute teneur en carbone (classe H) amélioreront la
résistance contre le f luage, mais une mise en garde est de mise : du bismuth
est ajouté à certains fils fourrés en acier inoxydable afin de faciliter l’enlè-
vement du laitier. Le bismuth est reconnu pour réduire la durée de vie du
f luage et joue un rôle dans la fissuration causée par le réchauffage. Lors de
la sélection d’une électrode fourrée en acier inoxydable pour une utilisation
dans des températures élevées ou pour des applications où un traitement
thermique après soudage sera effectué, il est nécessaire de confirmer auprès
du fabricant de l’électrode que l’électrode ne contient aucun bismuth.
Les électrodes fourrées austénitiques sont aussi vendues en vue d’être
utilisées à des températures cryogéniques. Les appareils à pression cyrogéni-
ques servant au stockage de l’azote liquide ou de l’oxygène liquide sont fabri-
qués avec des électrodes fourrées. La résistance aux chocs est importante ici
et les électrodes conçues pour les environnements de service cyrogénique
produisent un métal déposé à faible quantité de ferrite et à faible teneur en
carbone.
Les électrodes austénitiques à âme métallique ont été utilisées pour sou-
der les panneaux de toit et latéraux des wagons porte-rail légers, les anneaux
des trappes de chargement des wagons-trémies, les châssis d’autobus et les
454826_Diamond.indd 1 11/13/09 1:18:22 PM
25 Tons of HydrauIic Power
onIy $3,350.00!
Notch Pipe Notch Square
Tube
Notch on an
Angle
Form Pickets
VogeI TooI & Die
for over 75 years,
proudIy made in USA
www.VogeITooI. com
TeIephone: 800-272-8946
Fax: 630-562-1500
Remove
TurntabIe to
InstaII VogeI
Picket Former
· 110V, pIug it in - no hardwiring required
· SmaII enough for bench-top use
· Foot switch for hands-free operation
· Accepts many types of VogeI tooIs
TurntabIe
Accepts Three
Pipe Notchers
with No
Changeover!
478199_Vogel.indd 1 5/11/10 1:13:10 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
52 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
ring on hopper cars, bus frames and side panels, storage tanks
in the food/wine industry and for some rolled pipe fabrication.
Duplex stainless steels have successfully been used in pulp
and paper, offshore and petrochemical industries. These types
of stainless steels derive their name from a microstructure
which is roughly half austenite and half ferrite. The duplex
nature of these alloys offer significant advantages as com-
pared to Austenitic grades. Higher strength and improved
corrosion resistance in seawater and other environments
allow design engineers to reduce component weight while
maintaining and in some cases improving the overall service
life. Welding duplex stainless steels requires special care and
attention! Alloying of duplex stainless steels varies greatly and
proper consumable selection is critical. The weld procedure
specification (WPS) needs to detail controlled heat input,
interpass temperatures and cooling rates as these are very
important elements. Process variables and welding procedure
must be strictly monitored in order to maintain an optimum
microstructure and avoid undesirable metallurgical phases.
When using flux-cored consumables, such as 2209 and 2253,
Ar-25% CO
2
shielding gas is recommended. Duplex metal-
cored consumables commonly use a shielding gas blend of
Ar-2% O
2
. As previously mentioned there are a number of
«specialty» shielding gas blends available on the market that
may improve performance characteristics and aid in the ease
of welding duplex stainless steel grades. Remember to consult
with your shielding gas supplier and the consumable manufac-
turer to ensure feasibility.
panneaux latéraux, ainsi que les réservoirs de stockage utilisés dans l’indus-
trie des aliments et du vin et pour fabriquer certains tuyaux laminés.
Les aciers inoxydables duplex ont été utilisés avec succès dans les indus-
tries des pâtes et papiers, côtière et pétrochimique. Ces types d’aciers inoxy-
dables empruntent leur nom de la microstructure, qui est plus ou moins
mi-austénitique et mi-ferritique. La nature duplex de ces alliages offre
d’importants avantages comparés aux alliages austénitiques. Grâce à sa plus
haute résilience et à sa meilleure résistance à la corrosion dans l’eau de mer
et dans d’autres types d’environnements, les ingénieurs-concepteurs sont en
mesure de réduire le poids des composants et de maintenir et même amélio-
rer en même temps la durée de vie globale de l’alliage. Le soudage des aciers
inoxydables duplex exige des soins spéciaux et beaucoup d’attention! Puisque
les alliages qui sont ajoutés dans les aciers inoxydables duplex varient beau-
coup, il est essentiel de choisir le bon produit d’apport dès le départ. La
spécification de mode opératoire de soudage doit décrire en détail l’énergie
linéaire contrôlée, la température entre passes et la vitesse de refroidisse-
ment puisque ces éléments sont très importants. Les variables de procédés et
les modes opératoires de soudage doivent être rigoureusement surveillés afin
de maintenir une microstructure optimale et d’éviter des phases métallurgi-
ques indésirables. Il est recommandé d’utiliser un gaz de protection Ar-25 %
Co
2
lorsque des fils fourrés tels que 2209 et 2253 sont utilisés. Les produits
d’apport à âme métallique duplex utilisent normalement un mélange de gaz
composé d’argon et de 2 % d’oxygène. Comme nous l’avons déjà mentionné,
certains mélanges spéciaux sont offerts sur le marché pour améliorer les
caractéristiques de performance et faciliter le soudage des aciers inoxydables
duplex. N’oubliez pas de consulter votre fournisseur de gaz de protection
ainsi que le fabricant du produit d’apport afin de déterminer la possibilité
d’utiliser ces mélanges.
Use Global Shop Solutions ERP software. Before you know it, you’re
saving thousands of dollars. Year after year. Just like our many
successful fabrication manufacturing customers.
For a FREE copy of our Scheduling White Paper visit
www.GlobalShopSolutions.com/erp-software-downloads.cfm
or call 1-800-364-5958.
“Global Shop has made us a much more
efficient operation and has allowed us
to produce more parts and maintain
our on-time delivery at a high rate.”
Eric Miller, Miller Welding and Machine
Fact.
Successful Fabrication Manufacturers Rely on Global Shop ERP.
Designed to Streamline

©2010, Global Shop Solutions, Inc.
483455_Global.indd 1 6/24/10 11:24:33 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 53
-Safety yellow color enhances visibility
-Rugged construction and powder coat
withstands feld abuse
-Wire-Wrapped heating element provides
uniform heat within oven chamber
-Optional calibrated digital thermometer
-One year product warranty
-Union made in the U.S.A.
Let Phoenix protect your electrodes
for a high quality weld.
Phoenix DryRod®II ovens. Don’t risk weld cracking,
porosity, spatter and costly rework.
Phoenix International, Inc.
Milwaukee, WI 53224 USA
www.dryrod.com
433991_Phoenix.indd 1 6/13/09 1:37:04 PM
STOP THE INSANITY OF ARC GOUGING!
SEAM PREP BY MILLING PROCESS
The seam milling process is replacing arc gouging with a cleaner,
faster and safer milling technology specially adapted to circular
and longitudinal seams on medium and heavy
wall welded cans, vessels and pipes.
Technologies Ltd.
See our full product line at www.graebtec.com or
contact us at sales@graebtec.com for personal assistance.
(416) 591-7033
We also offer a complete
line of plate edge milling
machines for standard and
custom chamfers.
473863_GGT.indd 1 5/3/10 2:36:25 PM
437843_kristian.indd 1 7/17/09 12:22:52 PM
2801 1st Ave No
Fargo, ND 58102
(888) 356-0871
4329 Centurion Drive
Bismarck, ND 58504
(701) 751-4256
WHERE SKILLS
ARE LEARNED
& CAREERS BEGIN
• Mig-Tig-Stick-Pipe Welding
• 40 Hr. – 12 Week Courses
• New Classes Starting Monthly
• Over 550 Students Since 2004
• Nationally & Internationally Recognized
• Maximum of 10 Students Per Class
• We Offer Customized Training for Companies
www.learntoweld.com
467451_Lynnes.indd 1 3/8/10 10:02:55 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
54 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
How to Make Economical
6 mm Semiautomatic
Horizontal Fillet Welds
Comment réaliser semi-
automatiquement des soudures
d’angle de 6 mm à l’horizontale

Stig Skarborn
The purpose of a welding procedure should be to achieve the
required quality at minimum cost. While the first criterion
is usually met, it is our observation that the second is often
not. This article reviews processes for flux cored arc welding
(FCAW) and metal cored arc welding (MCAW) and makes
recommendations on how to achieve economical welds.
Fillet welds are the most common weld type used to join
structural members and are extensively used in mechanical
applications, shipbuilding, and many other situations. They
are used in corner, tee, and lap joints. Usually they are used
for members intersecting at 90°, but a range of 60° to 135° is
not unusual. Often very large loads are transferred, as is the
case for common structural connections using double and
single angles, end plates and shear tabs. Typical sizes for
structural connections and many ship building applications
are 5, 6 and 8 mm single pass fillet welds. This paper has
singled out the 6 mm fillet weld for review, since it is a repre-
sentative size.
Flux-Cored Arc Welding
When gas-shielded FCAW frst became popular 30 to 35 years
ago, the most usual wire was 2.4 mm (3/32 in) in diameter and
welded with 100% carbon dioxide. It was used for fat groove
welds and for fat and horizontal fllet welds. For structural
applications, a current range of 375 to 425 Amperes was typical
for structural work, resulting in a deposition rate of approxi-
mately 6.0 kg/hr (fgure 1).
Satisfactory 6 mm fillet welds were achieved by welders
with normal skills, and welders usually had no problem pass-
ing the CSA W47.1, flat position, performance test since pene-
tration and fusion were adequate.
Le but d’un mode opératoire de soudage devrait être d’obtenir la qualité
requise à un coût minimal. Alors que le premier critère est habituellement
satisfait, nous avons observé que le deuxième ne l’est souvent pas. Cet article
étudie les procédés de soudage FCAW et MCAW et offre des recommanda-
tions sur la façon de réaliser des soudures économiques.
Les soudures d’angle sont les soudures les plus couramment utilisées
pour joindre les éléments de charpente. Elles servent également à réaliser
des assemblages en L, en T et à recouvrement et sont aussi très répandues
dans plusieurs industries telles que la mécanique et la construction navale.
Bien que ces soudures soient généralement utilisées pour des éléments qui se
croisent à 90 ⁰, il n’est pas rare qu’on les utilise à des angles allant de 60 ⁰
à 135 ⁰. Souvent, de très grosses charges sont transférées, comme c’est le cas
avec les assemblages de charpente ordinaires qui utilisent des angles dou-
bles ou simples, des plaques bout-à-bout et des plaquettes de cisaillement.
Typiquement, les soudures d’angles utilisées pour les assemblages de char-
pente et plusieurs applications reliées à la construction navale consistent
en des soudures d’angle de5, 6 et 8 mm réalisées en une seule passe. Dans cet
article, nous étudierons les soudures d’angle de 6 mm puisqu’il s’agit d’une
dimension représentative.
Soudage à l’arc avec fil fourré (procédé FCAW)
Lorsque le procédé FCAW avec gaz de protection est devenu populaire pour
la première fois il y a 30 à 35 ans, le fl le plus couramment utilisé mesurait
2,4 mm (3/32 po) de diamètre et utilisait un gaz composé de 100 % dioxyde
de carbone. Ce procédé servait à réaliser des soudures sur préparation à plat
et des soudures d’angle à plat et à l’horizontale. Dans le cas des charpentes,
l’intensité du courant variait généralement entre 375 et 425 ampères pour
les travaux d’ossature, ce qui entraînait un taux de dépôt d’environ 6,0 kg/h
(fgure 1).
Les soudeurs ayant des compétences normales pouvaient réaliser des sou-
dures d’angle de 6 mm saines et les soudeurs n’avaient normalement aucun
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 55
When reviewing the figures, it should be noted that for
the same current, deposition rate is higher, the smaller the
diameter of the wire. Additionally, the data on the figures has
been discontinued beyond approximately 450 Amperes for the
larger diameter wires, since very few welders will work effect-
ively beyond this value due to the discomfort created by the
intense heat generated by the arc.
Eventually smaller diameter, all position, consumables
became available; first 1.6 mm (1/16 in) and then 1.1 mm (0.045
in). Typical current ranges decreased to 275 to 325 Amperes
for the former and 225 to 275 Amperes for the latter diameter,
with a reduction of deposition rate to 3.8 to 4.8 kg/hr and 3.8
to 5.0 kg/hr respectively (figure 2).
Another development that occurred in this time period
was a transition from carbon dioxide to argon/carbon diox-
ide shielding gases. The result of these two developments
was a decrease in productivity, and a decrease in penetration
due to the lower current and switch to argon based shielding
gases. It is my understanding that more welders than before
were then failing their performance tests, than used to be the
case.
The change to smaller diameter wires and argon based
shielding gases had the following cost implications:
• Additional labour hours
• More expensive consumables
• More expensive gases
The perceived main benefits of the smaller diameter wires
and argon based gas were:
• Greater welder appeal
• Less clean-up
• All-position capability
problème à réussir l’essai de performance en position à plat selon la norme
CSA W47.1 puisque la pénétration et la fusion étaient adéquates.
En examinant les figures, vous noterez sans doute que pour le même
courant, plus le diamètre du fil est petit, plus le taux de dépôt est élevé.
De plus, les données fournies dans les figures ont été abandonnées au-delà
d’environ 450 ampères pour les fils de plus grand diamètre puisque très peu
de soudeurs travailleront efficacement au-delà de ces valeurs, ceux-ci étant
indisposés par la chaleur intense générée par l’arc.
Par la suite, des produits d’apport toutes positions de plus petit dia-
mètre ont été mis sur le marché : d’abord de 1,6 mm (1/16 po) et puis de 1,1
mm (0,045 po). Les gammes de réglage du courant ont baissé de 275 à 325
ampères dans le premier cas, et de 225 à 275 ampères dans le deuxième cas,
avec une réduction du taux de dépôt de 3,8 à 4,8 kg/h et de 3,8 à 5,0 kg/h
respectivement (voir la figure 2).
Un autre déroulement durant cette période a été la transition du dioxyde
de carbone au mélange d’argon et de dioxyde de carbone pour les gaz de pro-
tection. Le résultat de ces deux événements a été une baisse de productivité
et moins de pénétration en raison du plus faible courant et de l’utilisation
de gaz de protection à base d’argon. Par conséquent, selon ce que j’ai pu
constater, un plus grand nombre de soudeurs échouaient leurs épreuves de
performance qu’auparavant.
L’utilisation de fils de plus petit diamètre et de gaz de protection à base
d’argon a entraîné les conséquences financières suivantes :
• un temps de main-d’œuvre plus élevé
• des produits d’apport plus dispendieux
• des gaz plus dispendieux
Ce qui était perçu comme de grands avantages quant aux fils de plus
petit diamètre et aux gaz de protection à base d’argon est :
• un meilleur intérêt de la part des soudeurs
• moins de nettoyage
• la capacité de souder en toutes positions
Figure 1. Typical deposition rates for E492T-9-CH consumables.
Figure 1. Taux de dépôt typiques pour des produits d’apport E492T-9-CH.
Figure 2. Typical deposition rates for E491T-9-CH consumables.
Figure 2. Taux de dépôt typiques pour des produits d’apport E491T-9-CH.
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
56 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
The perceived benefits do not outweigh the substantial
increase in labour cost associated with the lower current
and thus lower deposition rate for projects where most of the
welding is either horizontal fillet welds or flat groove welds.
In addition, some consumable manufacturers make 100%
CO2 shielded wires that produce limited spatter, smoke, and
fume. There is therefore little reason for using small diameter
low current wires for the majority of work in most fabrication
shops. Fabricators that do so are not as competitive as they
should be, and reduce their profit level from what it could be.
Metal-Cored Arc Welding
Typical deposition rates for both fat and all-position FCAW
were given in fgures 1 and 2. A realistic alternative to FCAW
is the MCAW process which began to be commonly used in
the early 1990’s, and for which deposition rates are shown in
fgure 3.
If the objective is to deposit 6 kg/hr, the required currents
for a selection of wire types and sizes are given in table 1. It
can be seen that using E491T-9-CH and E492C-6-CH type
consumables require very similar currents for the same diam-
eter consumable. However, the metal-cored wire has several
advantages over the FCAW for flat and horizontal position
fillet welding, which translate into cost savings:
• No need to remove slag between passes resulting in high
duty cycles
• Little or no spatter to remove after welding
• Low fume generation resulting in a healthier environment
Les avantages ainsi perçus ne l’emportent pas sur l’augmentation impor-
tante des coûts de main-d’œuvre associés aux plus faibles courants et donc
au plus bas taux de dépôt pour les projets où la plupart du soudage consiste
en des soudures d’angle réalisées à l’horizontale ou en des soudures sur pré-
paration réalisées à plat. De plus, certains fabricants de produits d’apport
fabriquent des f ils-électrodes avec protection gazeuse à 100 % CO2 qui
entraînent peu de projections et de fumée. Il y a donc peu de raisons d’uti-
liser des fils de petit diamètre à faible courant pour la majorité des travaux
effectués dans les ateliers de fabrication. Les fabricants qui le font ne sont
pas aussi concurrentiels qu’ils devraient l’être, réduisant ainsi leur niveau de
bénéfice par rapport à ce qu’il pourrait être.
Soudage à l’arc sous gaz avec fil composite (procédé MCAW)
Les taux de dépôt types pour le procédé de soudage FCAW en position à
plat et en toutes positions sont fournis aux figures 1 et 2. Le procédé MCAW,
qui constitue un autre choix réaliste par rapport au procédé FCAW, a com-
mencé à être utilisé couramment au début des années 1990 (voir la figure 3
pour les taux de dépôt correspondants).
Si l’objectif est de déposer 6 kg/h, les courants requis pour la sélection
de fils-électrodes et de dimensions sont fournis au tableau 1. Comme vous
pouvez le constater, l’utilisation de produits d’apport de types E491T-9-CH
et E492C-6-CH exige des courants très semblables pour un produit d’apport
de même diamètre. Cependant, le fil composite offre plusieurs avantages par
rapport au fil fourré pour le soudage de soudures d’angle à plat et à l’hori-
zontale, ce qui se traduit par des économies de coûts :
• aucun besoin d’enlever le laitier entre chaque passe, ce qui entraîne des
facteurs de marche élevés
• peu ou pas de projections à enlever après le soudage
• une faible génération de fumées résultant en un environnement plus sain
• l’utilisation du soudage en poussant au lieu du soudage en tirant, amélio-
rant ainsi la visibilité pour le soudeur
Évidemment, le potentiel existe pour augmenter le taux de dépôt au-des-
sus de 6 kg/h, ce qui est utilisé aux fins d’une comparaison dans le tableau
1. Une revue des recommandations en matière de soudage provenant de
plusieurs sources donne des gammes de réglage du courant entre 350 et 450
ampères pour le soudage de soudures d’angle de 6 à 8 mm sur des matériaux
d’au moins 6 mm d’épaisseur.
Le but de cet article n’est pas de comparer le coût total du
soudage pour les deux procédés, mais plutôt de reconnaître
que les produits d’apport MCAW sont normalement plus
Figure 3. Typical deposition rates for E492C-6-CH consumables.
Figure 3. Taux de dépôt typiques pour des produits d’apport E492C-6-CH.
CUSTOM TURNING ROLLS 3 - 120 ton
All Turning Rolls Now Equipped with 1/2”
steel gear boxes with aluminum bronze gears
Contact Joe Fuller
Ph. 979-277-8343
email: joe@joefuller.com
www.joefuller.com
452684_JoeFuller.indd 1 11/5/09 8:59:18 PM
Tr ai ni ng & Test i ng Si nce 1983
9712 - 54 Ave. Edmonton, AB T6E 0A9
Phone: 780-436-7342 Fax: 780-436-7344
www. grbwel di ng. com www. grbwel di ng. com
CWB Trai ni ng & Test Cent re
B Pressure Upgradi ng & Renewal s
Hourl y Pract i ce on Pl at e or Pi pe
Pre- Empl oyment Wel di ng Courses
SMAW, GMAW, FCAW, GTAW
293284_GRB.indd 1 7/24/06 5:36:20 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 57
• Forehand instead of backhand travel angle results in better
visibility for welder
Obviously the potential exists for increasing the deposition
rate above the 6 kg/hr used for comparison purposes in table
1. A review of welding recommendations from a number of
sources gives currents in the range of 350 to 450 Amperes for
welding 6 to 8 mm fillet welds on material thicknesses of 6
mm and above.
It is not the purpose of this article to compare total weld-
ing costs between the processes, but it is recognized that
MCAW consumables typically cost more than those used
for FCAW. In addition, argon rich gases are always used for
MCAW, while for FCAW, 100% carbon dioxide may be a valid
alternative for some FCAW consumables. However, with the
substantial increase in duty cycle for MCAW, the labour cost
savings more than offset the additional consumable costs.
Recommendations
The welding procedure parameters in table 2 should be ser-
iously considered for making economical fllet welds in the fat
and horizontal positions (and for most fat groove welds). An
issue that should be readily apparent is that the welding speeds
are, in all probability, considerably higher than what welders
are used to, which may cause the welders to reject the process
dispendieux que les produits FCAW. De plus, les gaz riches en
argon sont toujours utilisés pour le procédé MCAW, alors que
pour le procédé FCAW, un gaz composé de 100 % dioxyde de
carbone pourrait constituer une option valide pour certains
produits d’apport FCAW. Or, avec l’augmentation importante
du facteur de marche pour le procédé MCAW, les économies
de coût associées à la main-d’œuvre compensent grandement
les coûts additionnels reliés aux produits d’apport.
Recommandations
Vous devriez sérieusement tenir compte des paramètres du mode opératoire
de soudage précisés au tableau 2 lorsque vous réalisez des soudures d’angle
économiques dans les positions à plat et à l’horizontale (et pour la plupart des
soudures sur préparation réalisées à plat). Une question qui devrait être évi-
dente d’emblée est que la vitesse d’avance est, selon toute probabilité, considé-
rablement plus élevée par rapport à celle à laquelle les soudeurs sont habitués,
de sorte que ces derniers pourraient rejeter le procédé et les paramètres sug-
gérés. Afn de surmonter les objections et d’assurer une technique de soudage
appropriée et surtout d’éliminer les caniveaux en présence de courants élevés
et d’un manque de fusion, il est suggéré que les fabricants offrent des cours
de formation à l’interne et assurent une supervision adéquate ou encore la
présence d’un soudeur principal qui est en mesure d’offrir des conseils. Une
telle formation devrait aussi être offerte dans les collèges communautaires où
souvent la méthodologie semi-automatique à productivité élevée est ignorée.
Consumable/Produit d’apport
E492T-9-CH E491T-9-CH E492C-6-CH
Diameter/
Diamètre
Amperes/
Ampères
Diameter/
Diamètre
Amperes/
Ampères
Diameter/
Diamètre
Amperes/
Ampères
1.6 mm 350 1.1 mm 300 1.1 mm 310
2.0 mm 380 1.3 mm 335 1.3 mm 350
2.4 mm 400 1.6 mm 370 1.6 mm 375
Table 1. Current required to deposit 6 kg/hr. • Tableau 1. Courant requis pour déposer 6 kg/h.
Welding and Metal Fabrication training
at Seneca College, your first step to
becoming an accomplished welder.
Courses offered in:

Basic Welding

Advanced Welding Processes

CWB All Positions Structural Welding

CWB Welder Testing
Contact: Mike/Borean@senecac.on.ca
416.491.5050 x5023
www.senecac.on.ca/ce
476583_Seneca.indd 1 4/21/10 11:56:07 AM
777 Walkers Line, Burlington, Ontario, Canada L7N 2G1
Tel.: (905) 333-3881 Fax: (905) 333-5880
Website: www.sectortechnology.ca Email: info@sectortechnology.ca
Oxyfuel, Plasma,
Water Jet Machines & Service
443524_Sector.indd 1 9/24/09 9:46:38 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
58 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
and the suggested parameters. In order to overcome objections
and assure proper welding technique, especially to eliminate
undercut at high currents and lack of fusion, it is suggested
that fabricators implement in-house training, and assure that
competent supervision or a lead welder be available to provide
guidance. Such training should also occur at community col-
leges, where too often high productivity semi-automatic meth-
odology is ignored. In these very aggressive times with global
competition on many projects, sound technology and econom-
ics must dictate shop foor practice.
Stig Skarborn is a civil/welding consulting engineer and principal of Skarborn
Engineering Ltd. in Fredericton, NB. Additional information is available at
www.skarborneng.com.
Durant les périodes très dynamiques comme celle que nous connaissons
actuellement, avec plusieurs concurrents qui veulent travailler sur le même
projet à l’échelle mondiale, c’est la technologie saine et l’économie qui dictent
ce qui se passe dans les ateliers.
Stig Skarborn est un ingénieur-conseil en soudage et en génie civil et le
directeur de Skarborn Engineering Ltd. à Fredericton, au Nouveau-Brunswick.
Pour plus d’information, consultez le site www.skarborneng.com.
Figure 4. Desirable fillet weld geometry.
Figure 4. Géométrie d’une soudure d’angle voulue.
Table 2. Proposed welding data for MCAW. • Tableau 2. Données de soudage proposées pour le procédé MCAW
Electrode wire classification/
Classification du fil-électrode
E491C-6M-H4 or/ou –H8 or/ou E492C-6M-H4 or/ou –H8
Shielding gas/Gaz de protection 90% argon, 10% CO
2
Electrical stickout/Longueur terminale 20-25 mm
Current and polarity/Courant et polarité DCRP/CCEP
Electrode sizes/Diamètres des électrodes 1.1 mm Alternative 1.3 mm
Wire feed speed (m/min)
Vitesse de dévidage (m/min)
10.2-15.2 7.6-10.2
Amperes/Ampères 265-335 300-360
Arc volts/Tension d’arc (volts) 25-28 25-27
Welding speed for 6 mm horizontal fillet weld (mm/min or in/min)/
Vitesse d’avance pour une soudure d’angle de 6 mm réalisée à l’horizontale (mm/
min ou po/min)
480-745
(19-29)
500-675
(20-26)
Where there’s pipe, there’s Mathey
ISSUES WITH HIGH TENSILE
STRENGTH PIPE?
MATHEY DEARMAN, INC.
4344 S. Maybelle Avenue
Tulsa, Ok USA 74107
Ph: 918 447-1288
Fax: 918 447-0188
Toll Free: 1 800 725-7311
sales@mathey.com - www.mathey.com
The Mathey Dearman
MEGA RIM CLAMP
designed for
TOUGH REFORMING JOBS such
as the alignment and reforming
of ultra-high tensile strength pipe,
including X65, X70, and X80.
MEGA RIM CLAMP:
the clamp with muscle
483291_Mathey.indd 1 6/30/10 4:51:22 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
CMW 2010:
SO MANY ACTIVITIES IN
JUST ONE WEEK!
- Comprehensive education
program, opening keynote,
interactive town hall, technical
programs, networking
reception, Canada’s best welder
competition, one-on-one
matchmaking and much more!
CMW 2010:
LOCATION! LOCATION!
LOCATION!
- Free parking and new layout
with easier navigation! Located
minutes from major highways,
Pearson airport and
THOUSANDS of fabricating and
manufacturing facilities!
CMW 2010:
THE RIGHT PARTNERS!
- Only SME and CWA bring
together the most influential
manufacturing communities
to create your welding
industry event!
Strategic event partners:
Official media partners:
Your Industry Event...
6031 Weld_for cmw show.qxp 7/7/2010 4:25 PM Page 1
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
60 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
ABRASIVES
Pearl Abrasive Company ................................................. 20
Pferd Canada .................................................................. 33
United Abrasives Canada ................................................ 21
AIR FILTRATION/DOWNRAFT TABLES/FUME
EXTRACTORS
Donaldson Company, Inc. ................................................16
ALIGNMENT TOOLS
Slim Line-Up Clamps Inc. ................................................ 29
ALUMINUM WELDING
MK Products, Inc. ............................................................ 36
AUTOMATION – WELDING
Gullco International Limited ............................................ 48
BRAZING ALLOYS
Eutectic Canada, Inc. ...................................................... 22
COMMERCIAL DIVING
Holland College ............................................................... 49
CONSULTING
Global Shop Solutions, Inc. ....................................... 52, 60
CUSTOM ROLLING
Hodgson Custom Rolling, Inc. ........................................... 8
CUTTING PRODUCTS
Oxylance Inc. .................................................................. 44
EDUCATION/TRAINING SERVICES
Global Shop Solutions, Inc. ....................................... 52, 60
ERP SOFTWARE
Global Shop Solutions, Inc. ....................................... 52, 60
FABRICATING EQUIPMENT
Vogel Tool & Die Corp. ..................................................... 51
FUME EXTRACTORS
Nederman Canada ...........................................................10
GANTRY CUTTING MACHINES
Sector Technology, Inc. ................................................... 57
GASES & CONSUMABLES
Air Liquide Inc. ........................................Inside Front Cover
The Linde Group .............................................................. 32
GRINDERS – ELECTRIC
Diamond Ground Products .............................................. 51
HEAT TREATING & INSPECTION
Laboratory Mequaltech ................................................... 29
INDUSTRIAL MARKERS
J.P. Nissen Co. ................................................................ 38
INSURANCE
HKMB Hub International .................................................. 60
METAL ANALYZERS
Elemental Controls ......................................................... 26
NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING
G.A.L. Gage Company ..................................................... 39
Labcan ............................................................................ 21
Laboratory Mequaltech ................................................... 29
ON-SITE MACHINE TOOLS
Hougen Canada ............................................................... 50
ORBITAL WELDING SYSTEMS
Liburdi Engineering Limited ............................................ 27
MK Products, Inc. ............................................................ 36
PIPE-CUTTING & BEVELING EQUIPMENT
E. H. Wachs Canada Ltd. ................................................. 47
PIPE PREPARATION EQUIPMENT
E. H. Wachs Canada Ltd. ................................................. 47
QUALITY ASSURANCE
Global Shop Solutions, Inc. ....................................... 52, 60
RESISTANCE WELDING EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES
Techno Control Cybernetic Inc. ....................................... 36
RIM CLAMPS
Mathey Dearman, Inc. ..................................................... 58
Buyers’ Guide
Guide de l’acheteur
• Preferred Rates on
Home/Auto Insurance
• Business Insurance
• Comprehensive
Pensions & Benefits
Programs
• WSIB Claims
Management Services
• Mergers & Acquisitions
Insurance
• Trade Credit Insurance
HUB INTERNATIONAL
EXCLUSIVE INSURANCE BROKER
FOR THE CANADIAN WELDING
ASSOCIATION
Contact: Denise Spafford
1-877-643-WELD (9353)
denise.spafford@hubinternational.com
www.hkmb.com • www.hubinternational.com
CWA members can rely on HUBʼs insurance experts
to deliver the very best advice and value.
Contact us for:
483854_HKMB.indd 1 6/21/10 5:41:16 PM
Power and performance
to satisfy all of
your welding needs.
ITW Welding North America
888.489.9353
www.itwwelding.com
483336_Canadian.indd 1 6/17/10 2:06:25 PM
Global Shop Solutions, the leader
in manufacturing ERP software value
and ROI, streamlines operations and
positions your company for growth. Our
many successful customers experience:
• Cost reductions
• Improved on-time delivery
• Impeccable quality
• Increased sales
• Labor savings
• Accurate pricing
• And much more!
For more information, call
800.364.5958
or visit us at
GlobalShopSolutions.com
483454_Global.indd 1 6/24/10 11:15:01 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
Journal de l’Association canadienne de soudage • L’Été 2010 61
Holland College ............................................................... 49
Institute of Technical Trades ........................................... 28
Lynnes Welding Training ................................................. 53
WELDERS – RENTALS
Red-D-Arc Welderentals ..................................................19
WELDING – EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES
D/F Machine Specialties, Inc........................................... 44
Lincoln Electric Company ......................Outside Back Cover
Tru-Remote Industrial Welding Equipment Ltd. ............... 30
WELDING & CUTTING TECHNOLOGY
ESAB Welding & Cutting.................................................... 5
WELDING CONSUMABLES
Arcos Industries, LLC .............................. Inside Back Cover
Select-Arc, Inc. ................................................................. 3
WELDING EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES
ESAB Welding & Cutting.................................................... 5
Thermadyne Industries ....................................................15
ROBOTICS & AUTOMATION
ATI Industrial Automation ............................................... 46
KUKA Robotics Canada, Ltd. ........................................... 61
ROD OVENS
Phoenix International ...................................................... 53
SEAM PREP & EDGE PREP
Graebener Group Technologies ....................................... 53
STICK ELECTRODES
GEDIK WELDING ............................................................. 41
TESTING – WELDER PERFORMANCE
& QUALIFICATIONS
Cambridge Materials Testing Ltd. ................................... 46
TESTING – WELDER PROCEDURE
Candet (Canadian NDE Technology Ltd.) ......................... 38
TURN TABLES
Joe Fuller LLC ................................................................. 56
UNIONS
Christian Labourers Association of Canada (CLAC) ........ 30
VENTILATORS
Americ Corp .................................................................... 50
WATERJET CUTTING SERVICES
HAI Precision Waterjets, Inc. ........................................... 47
WELD BACKING
Imperial Weld Ring Corp.................................................. 61
WELD CLEANERS
Bradford Derustit Corp. ................................................... 39
WELD CONSUMABLE INSERTS
Imperial Weld Ring Corp.................................................. 61
WELDER TEST CENTRES
GRB College of Welding .................................................. 56
SENECA College Of Applied Arts & Technology ............... 57
WELDER TRAINING CENTRE
Advanced Welding Techniques ........................................ 48
GRB College of Welding .................................................. 56
WELDING EQUIPMENT REPAIR
Kristian Electric Ltd. ........................................................ 53
WELDING INSPECTION
Laboratory Mequaltech ................................................... 29
WELDING MACHINES
GEDIK WELDING ............................................................. 41
WELDING PREPARATION TOOLS
E. H. Wachs Canada Ltd. ................................................. 47
WELDING PROCEDURES
Laboratory Mequaltech ................................................... 29
WELDING SERVICES
Tommys Welding ............................................................ 49
WELDING WIRES
Canadian Welding Products Group .................................. 60
Cor-Met, Inc. ................................................................... 44
GEDIK Welding ................................................................ 41
Techalloy Welding Products ............................................ 28
482826_Imperial.indd 1 6/22/10 11:16:25 AM
The NEW KR 16 arc HW rounds out KUKA
Robotcs Canada’s extensive line of robots
designed for use in the Arc Welding
industry. The KR 16 arc HW features a
hollow-wrist design, with a 50 mm opening
that allows the integraton of commonly-
used welding packages, and achieves a
repeatability of less than +/- 0.05 mm.
With a protecton classicaton of 1P54,
it is suitable for operaton in the harshest
welding environment conditons. The 16
kg payload and 1636 mm reach make the
KR 16 arc HW best suited for larger work
pieces and thick plate applicatons and long
reach applicatons.
NEW!
KR 16 ARC HW
CONTACT: 416-KUKA-123
www.kukarobotics.com
478458_KUKA.indd 1 6/22/10 11:29:55 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
62 Canadian Welding Association Journal • Summer 2010
Close Up
Don Gemmell
CWA National Advisory Council Chairman
Co-ordinator, Mechanical and Welding
Skills Programs, Niagara College
Don Gemmell began his interest in weld-
ing as a career at an early age. “During
my formative high school years, I focused
on the metal fabrication trades, which led
to summer employment in a local boiler
repair shop,” he recalls. Upon graduation,
Don was hired on as a maintenance welder
apprentice with Stelco Steel in Hamilton,
On. “The welding apprenticeship program
at Stelco was second to none. I had the lux-
ury of working with over 200 qualified weld-
ers; being mentored for over four years and
constantly learning in the shop completing
repairs, fabrication and field installation
on various metals, alloys and procedures.
During a typical week, we could be con-
ducting waste heat boiler repairs, boiler
tube replacement and chrome carbide overlay utilizing oxy-fuel
spray welding, crane rail replacement forty feet above a steel-
making vessel with the SMAW process, slag pot repair weld-
ing with FCAW, pressure piping fabrication with GTAW and
SMAW all to maintain steelmaking production and efficiency.
This was all conducted during a 24 hour, 365 days a year oper-
ation with the Christmas period some of the busiest mainten-
ance being done due to production shut downs.”
Don progressed through many positions, i ncludi ng
Maintenance Welder, Mechanical Shift Supervisor, Training
Instructor, Engineering Quality Control Manager and
Mechanical Trades Training Manager. During this time, Don
began to teach various welding and steel fitting courses part-
time for the continuing education departments at Mohawk and
Niagara colleges. “The most rewarding aspect of teaching, for
me personally, is being able to provide students with the know-
ledge and techniques they need to be successful,” he said. After
30 years in the steel industry and 18 years teaching part-time,
Don decided it was time to retire and pursue a full-time teach-
ing career. In January 2008, he joined Niagara College.
In 2007, Don was also presented with the Robert J. Jacobson
award from the Canadian Welding Association while serving
as Chairman for the Hamilton Chapter for his ongoing support
and contribution to the CWA and the high school welding pro-
grams in Hamilton and the Niagara region.
Currently, Don sits on the Governing Board of the
Canadian Authorized National Body (CWB Group) of the
International Institute of Welding. Since 1994, Don has also
served as a Skills Canada—Ontario judge at the Ontario
Technological Skills Competition (OTSC). In his spare time,
Don enjoys woodworking and his 25-year passion for martial
arts. He is currently working on his fourth degree black belt
(Yodan) in Wado Kai Karate, within the Shintani Karate
Organization.
Gros plan
Don Gemmell
Président du Conseil consultatif national de l’ACS
Coordonnateur, Programmes sur la mécanique et
les compétences en soudage, Collège Niagara
Don Gemmell a commencé à s’intéresser à la
carrière de soudeur à un très jeune âge. « Lors de mes
années de formation à l’école secondaire, je me suis
concentré sur les métiers en fabrication du métal,
ce qui m’a amené à travailler durant l’été dans un
atelier de réparation de chaudières de la localité, »,
explique-t-il. Dès qu’il a été diplômé, Don a été
embauché à titre d’apprenti-soudeur à l’entretien
par Acier Stelco à Hamilton, en Ontario. « Le pro-
gramme d’apprentissage en soudage chez Stelco était
hors pair. J’ai eu le privilège de travailler avec plus
de 200 soudeurs qualif iés, d’être encadré pendant
plus de quatre ans et, directement dans l’atelier, d’ap-
prendre constamment à réparer et à fabriquer; j’ai
même appris à installer sur le terrain divers métaux
et alliages tout en mettant en œuvre les modes opéra-
toires associés. Généralement, durant une semaine,
nous pouvions réparer des chaudières de récupération de chaleur, rem-
placer des tubes de chaudières et réaliser des cordons de rechargement en
carbure de chrome au moyen du soudage oxygaz par projection. Nous pou-
vions tout aussi bien remplacer des rails de grue à 12,2 m (40 pi) au-dessus
d’un vaisseau d’aciérie en utilisant le procédé SMAW, souder une poche à
scories afin de la réparer au moyen du procédé FCAW ou fabriquer de la
tuyauterie sous pression au moyen des procédés GTAW et SMAW, le tout
en vue d’assurer la production et l’efficacité de l’acierie. »
Don a occupé plusieurs postes, notamment ceux de soudeur à l’en-
tretien, de surveillant des équipes de mécaniciens, de formateur, de
responsable du contrôle de la qualité en ingénierie et de responsable de la
formation en métiers mécaniques. Durant cette période, Don a commencé
à donner, à temps partiel, divers cours aux soudeurs et aux charpentiers
en fer dans les services de l’éducation permanente aux collèges Mohawk et
Niagara. « L’aspect le plus enrichissant de l’enseignement, pour moi per-
sonnellement, est de pouvoir transmettre aux étudiants les connaissances
et les techniques dont ils ont besoin pour réussir, » aff irme-t-il. Après
30 ans dans l’industrie de l’acier et 18 ans dans le domaine de l’enseigne-
ment à temps partiel, Don a décidé qu’il était temps de prendre sa retraite
et de poursuivre une carrière dans l’enseignement à plein temps. En jan-
vier 2008, il s’est donc joint au Collège Niagara.
En 2007, Don a aussi reçu le prix Robert J. Jacobson de l’Association
canadienne de soudage lorsqu’il était président de la section locale de
Hamilton pour son appui soutenu et sa contribution à l’ACS et aux pro-
grammes en matière de soudage offerts dans les écoles secondaires situées
dans les régions de Hamilton et de Niagara.
Actuellement, Don est président de l’Association canadienne de sou-
dage et fait partie du Authorized National Board pour l’Institut interna-
tional de la soudure (IIS). Depuis 1994, Don a aussi été juge au concours
des métiers au Canada lors des Olympiades ontariennes des compétences
technologiques. Durant ses moments de loisirs, Don aime travailler le bois
et s’adonner à sa passion des 25 dernières années, soit les arts martiaux. Il
vise actuellement à obtenir la ceinture noire de quatrième degré (Yodan)
en karate Wado Kai avec l’organisation Shintani Karate.
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
When critical welding conditions necessitate
performance without compromise, you can depend
on Arcos to provide you with a comprehensive line
of premium quality high alloy, stainless and nickel
electrodes to conform to your stringent requirements.
You can be assured of our commitment to superior
welding products because Arcos quality meets or
exceeds demanding military and nuclear application
specifications. Arcos’ dedication to excellence has
earned these prestigious certifications:
- ASME Nuclear Certificate # QSC448
- ISO 9001: 2000 Certificate # GQC230
- Mil-I 45208A Inspection
- Navy QPL
We Can Meet Yours, Too!
To learn more about the many reasons you should
insist on Arcos high alloy, stainless and nickel
electrodes for your essential welding applications,
call us today at 800-233-8460 or visit our website
at www.arcos.us.
Arcos Industries, LLC
Onc Arcos lrivc - \t C+rmcl, lA 17S¯1
lnonc (¯70) 339-¯200 - l+x (¯70) 339-¯20o
Arcos Electrodes
Meet Exacting Military
and Nuclear Standards.
455656_Arcos.indd 1 11/12/09 9:37:40 PM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L
477558_Lincoln.indd 1 5/4/10 8:26:47 AM
S
A
M
P
L
E

J
O
U
R
N
A
L