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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Prepared by BCIS Building Cost Information Service Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors Parliament Square, London SW1P 3AD W www.bcis.co.uk T +44 (0)20 7695 1500

F +44 (0)20 7695 1501

RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Foreword
The Governments BIM Strategy paper was published in June 2011 and sets out its intention to require collaborative BIM working on projects by 2016. There were a couple of salient statements in the paper aimed at quantity surveyors and project managers: The effective adoption of BIM technologies by cost consultants and planners has been slow to date, and should this situation remain, then cost and programme services will not benefit from the productivity and speed of response that a settled BIM process can offer. This is not to say that the adoption of BIM will not be without its challenges, but that the professions cannot afford to be outside of the BIM loop. Clients should expect QSs and Project Managers to be familiar with BIM and actively develop ways in which processes can be made more cost effective and value adding.

This survey, carried out in April 2011 by BCIS for the RICS BIM Steering Group, could not be more timely. The survey confirms the lack of awareness among members and highlights that many members would value BIM guidance and training. RICS is gearing up to provide this very soon. While the majority of respondents are aware that BIM is a process and not primarily about technology, many respondents cite the need for improved application interfaces to support integrated working. These will require standards and guidance on their intelligent application, and training in the supporting information technology. They also reinforce a need for ongoing consultation and discussions. This report is an excellent starting point for further consultation if you do not agree with its findings, RICS would very much like to know what you think. It establishes a benchmark for the profession as we look to assess the impact and development of a new way of working. RICS is grateful to all those members who responded to the survey. It is now clear that BIM is here to stay and we are determined to play a leading part in its development, so that the services that the profession provides will benefit from the productivity and speed of response that the BIM process can offer. David Bucknall Chairman of Rider Levett Bucknall and the RICS Quantity Surveying & Construction professional group

RICS July 2011

RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Table of contents
Report sections
Executive summary .................................................................................................................................... 6 1. Introduction....................................................................................................................................... 7 2. Respondents characterisation of their firms BIM use...................................................................... 7 3. Frequency of BIM activities .............................................................................................................. 8 3.1 Frequencies of BIM activities reported by Quantity Surveyors ................................................. 8 3.2 Frequency of firms BIM activities reported by Building Surveyors........................................... 9 4. Work on BIM projects ..................................................................................................................... 10 5. BIM use at successive project stages ............................................................................................ 11 6. Percentages of projects undertaken for different client sectors ..................................................... 11 7. Clients asking for BIM use and intending to use BIM data after project handover ........................ 12 8. Use of different forms of contract on BIM projects ......................................................................... 13 9. BIM neutrality of current forms of contract ..................................................................................... 13 10. Barriers to take up of BIM .............................................................................................................. 14 11. Benefiting financially from BIM....................................................................................................... 15 12. Opinions on BIM (responses to statements about BIM) ................................................................ 16 12.1 Quantity Surveyors opinions on BIM .................................................................................... 16 12.2 Building Surveyors opinions on BIM..................................................................................... 19 12.3 Comparisons of Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors opinions on BIM .................. 22 13. Support for RICS actions on BIM ................................................................................................... 23 14. Interest in BIM training ................................................................................................................... 24 15. Willingness to provide a case study ............................................................................................... 25 16. Familiarity with the BSi Investors Report....................................................................................... 25 Appendix A. Analysis of survey sample ................................................................................................... 26 Appendix B. BIM survey questions........................................................................................................... 29

RICS July 2011 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the Copyright owner. While all reasonable care has been taken in the compilation of this document, BCIS, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and the compilers will not be under any legal liability in respect of any misstatement, error or omission contained therein or for the reliance any person may place thereon.

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Tables
1. 2. 3. 4: 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. BIM use as characterised by 71 Quantity Surveyors ....................................................................... 7 BIM use as characterised by 37 Building Surveyors........................................................................ 7 Frequencies of different BIM activities by Quantity Surveyors......................................................... 8 Frequencies of different BIM activities by Building Surveyors ......................................................... 9 Percentages of respondents citing BIM use .................................................................................. 10 Distribution of projects where BIM was used in last 12 months..................................................... 10 Calculated numbers of projects where BIM was used in last 12 months....................................... 10 Use of BIMs at successive project stages...................................................................................... 11 Percentages of BIM projects undertaken for different client sectors ............................................. 11 Clients asking for BIM use and intending to use BIM data ............................................................ 12 Use of different forms of contract on BIM projects ......................................................................... 13 BIM neutrality of current forms of contracts: Current forms of contract are BIM neutral ............... 13 Quantity Surveyors scoring of relative importance of barriers to take up of BIM .......................... 14 Building Surveyors scoring of relative importance of barriers to take up of BIM........................... 14 Quantity Surveyors scoring of relative financial benefit of BIM ..................................................... 15 Building Surveyors scoring of relative financial benefit of BIM ..................................................... 15 Quantity Surveyors agreement with statements about BIM: All & BIM involved........................... 16 Building Surveyors agreement with statements about BIM: All & BIM involved ........................... 19 Comparison of agreement with statements by Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors from firms with recent BIM involvement ......................................................................................... 22 All respondents support for possible RICS BIM actions................................................................ 23 Quantity Surveyors support for possible RICS BIM actions.......................................................... 23 Building Surveyors support for possible RICS BIM actions .......................................................... 23 Interest in training by professional group and for all respondents ................................................. 24 Familiarity with BSi Investors Report............................................................................................. 25 Breakdown of UK responses by primary firm types ....................................................................... 26 Tabulation of primary firm types and secondary activities for UK respondents ............................. 26 Types and sizes of firms ................................................................................................................ 27 UK Respondents positions ............................................................................................................ 28 Response by RICS Professional Group......................................................................................... 28 Cross-tabulation of responses to firm type/activity and professional group questions ................. 28

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Figures
1. 2. Quantity Surveyors BIM use............................................................................................................ 7 Building Surveyors BIM use ............................................................................................................ 7

Agreement with BIM statements by Quantity Surveyors: All & BIM involved ........................................ 17 3. Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle ..................................................................................... 17 4. Clients will drive the adoption of BIM ............................................................................................. 17 5. Adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training.............................................................. 17 6. Projects may involve multiple BIMs like overlapping venn diagrams with data sharing at the overlaps .......................................................................................................................................... 17 7. A BIM that does not contain specification and cost data falls well short of the mark .................... 18 8. A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM.......................................... 18 9. A project extranet is a BIM ............................................................................................................. 18 10. A BIM that does not support ongoing facilities management is not a BIM..................................... 18 Agreement with BIM statements by Building Surveyors: All & BIM involved ......................................... 20 11. Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle ..................................................................................... 20 12. Clients will drive the adoption of BIM ............................................................................................. 20 13. Adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training.............................................................. 20 14. Projects may involve multiple BIMs like overlapping venn diagrams with data sharing at the overlaps ......................................................................................................................................... 20 15. A BIM that does not contain specification and cost data falls well short of the mark .................... 21 16. A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM.......................................... 21 17. A project extranet is a BIM ............................................................................................................. 21 18. A BIM that does not support ongoing facilities management is not a BIM..................................... 21 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Quantity Surveyors interest in BIM training ................................................................................... 24 Building Surveyors interest in BIM training ................................................................................... 24 All respondents interest in BIM training......................................................................................... 24 Breakdown of UK responses by primary firm types ....................................................................... 26 Breakdown by numbers of staff ..................................................................................................... 27 Types and sizes of firms ................................................................................................................ 27 UK Respondents positions ............................................................................................................ 28 Response by RICS Professional Group......................................................................................... 28

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Executive summary
In April 2011, BCIS undertook a Building Information Modelling Survey of RICS members in the UK and United States on behalf of the RICS BIM Steering Group and the QS & Construction IT Business Group. The survey was sent to 8500 RICS members asking about their firms engagement with BIM. Responses were received from 298. BCIS also received 21 emails from surveyors who didnt feel they could usefully answer the questions. This report analyses the responses from 156 members of the Quantity Surveying and Construction Professional Group (QSs) and 96 members of the Building Surveying Professional Group (BSs). Ten percent (10%) of QSs and three percent (3%) of BSs said they were using BIM regularly, a further 29% of both QSs and BSs have had some limited engagement with BIM. For QSs that use BIM, the most frequent use is for construction scheduling (14%), followed by extracting quantities and facilities/asset management (both 8%). 15% of BSs using BIM regularly cite linking specification clauses to graphic elements as its most common use, followed by 10% for both construction scheduling and 3D modelling for drawing production. Four percent (4%) of QSs and 1% of BSs invest regularly in BIM training. Ten percent (10%) of QSs and 6% BSs are actively assessing BIM tools with a view to adopting BIM. Just over 20% of respondents said they had worked on projects where BIM was used within the last 12 months. Those who had worked on BIM projects felt using BIM would have been appropriate on 2.5 times as many projects. For the QSs, the majority of BIM use was in the design and construction phases, while BSs were as likely to use BIM in facilities management as construction. On over half of BIM projects, the client requested its use, and a third of the clients intended to use BIM after handover. For QSs, the biggest barriers to the take-up of BIM are lack of client demand, lack of training, lack of application interfaces and lack of standards. The responses for the BSs were similar, but they also identified lack of IT infrastructure and professional indemnity insurance terms as barriers. The respondents felt that most participants benefit financially from BIM, and respondents with BIM experience are more positive about the benefits. Seventy-five percent (75%) of all respondents and 85% of those that have worked on BIM projects agreed with the statement: Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle. Respondents felt the RICS should provide BIM guidance and training. Eleven percent (11%) of respondents were familiar with the BSI Investors Report, and those that read the report were generally positive.

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

1. Introduction
On 8 April 2011, on behalf of the RICS BIM Steering Group and the QS & Construction IT Business Group, BCIS under took a Building Information Modelling Survey of RICS members in the UK and United States. The survey was sent to 8336 UK, and 121 US, Director/Principal level members participating in the RICS Building Surveying, Quantity Surveying & Construction, Project Management and Facilities Management professional groups. By 17 May 2011, replies had been received from 292 UK and 6 US based surveyors - response rates of 3.5% and 6% respectively. The US responses were deemed too few to report. The survey sought to answers questions about surveyors use and views on building information modeling. Surveyors are not a homogenous group: there are different types and they work for different types of firms. After analysing the respondents profiles, BCIS decided to report the results relative to RICS professional group membership and focus on the responses from 156 Quantity Surveying & Construction group members and 96 Building Surveying group members. The responses from these groups account for 86% of the UK responses, are deemed to represent Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors respectively, and are numerous enough to support meaningful numerical analyses.

2. Respondents characterisation of their firms BIM use


Tables 1 & 2 and Figures 1 & 2 show categorisations of Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors responses to the question: How would you characterise your firm's use of BIM? that was appended to survey Question 6. The categories were chosen by BCIS during analysis. The reader should treat the percentages with caution, particularly those for Using, but early days and Using, infrequently or in a limited fashion. However, it seems at most 10% of the Quantity Surveyors and 3% of the responding Building
Surveyors use BIM with any regularity.

Table 1. BIM use as characterised by 71 Quantity Surveyors Use of BIM Not using Not using, because inappropriate Not using, but building awareness/monitoring developments Not using, but aware/have investigated Using, but early days Using, infrequently or in limited fashion Using Other % 39 4 7 7 6 23 10 4
10% 4% 39%

23% 6% 7% 7% 4%

Figure 1. Quantity Surveyors BIM use

Table 2. BIM use as characterised by 37 Building Surveyors Use of BIM Not using Not using, because inappropriate Not using, but building awareness/monitoring developments Not using, but aware/have investigated Using, but early days Using, infrequently or in limited fashion Using Other % 32 14 5 3 5 24 3 14
14% 3% 32%

24%

5%

3%

5%

14%

Figure 2. Building Surveyors BIM use

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

3. Frequency of BIM activities


Survey question 6 asked: Please indicate the frequency at which your firm engages in the following activities? Tables 3 and 4 show the percentages of Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors stating different frequencies of BIM use by their firms for different activities. The All columns contain percentages of the all the Quantity Surveyors or Building Surveyors that ticked each activity/frequency combination in the question matrix. The BIM columns contain only the percentages for respondents from firms that were involved in one or more BIM projects in the last 12 months. Where an All % is greater than a corresponding BIM %, BCIS assumes the answer reflects earlier activity.

3.1 Frequencies of BIM activities reported by Quantity Surveyors


Table 3 shows the percentages of Quantity Surveyors citing different frequencies of BIM use for different activities. The table is sorted on the sums of the Very often and Often BIM percentage columns. The Nr columns show the numbers of responses to which the All and BIM percentages relate. Table 3. Frequencies of different BIM activities by Quantity Surveyors
Frequency Respondents BIM Activity Linking construction schedule data to a BIM Extracting quantities from a BIM Using a BIM for facilities/asset management Linking specification clauses to graphic elements in a BIM Building a 3D BIM model for 2D drawing production purposes BIM Awareness/Training Checking on the development of BIM tools and processes with a view to adopting BIM working Investing in BIM training Very often All BIM % % 1 1 3 Often Sometimes All All BIM BIM % % % % 5 5 4 3 14 8 8 3 15 16 9 9 7 32 36 14 19 8 Rarely All BIM % % 19 22 20 25 12 30 33 35 46 24 Never All BIM % % 61 57 68 63 81 24 22 43 30 68 Response All BIM Nr Nr 152 151 152 152 151 37 36 37 37 37

3 1

5 3

7 3

11 5

17 15

32 32

26 23

41 32

47 58

11 27

152 151

37 37

The sums of the Very often and Often percentages suggest that no more than 6%, and generally 4%, of the all the responding firms make frequent use of BIM for any of the activities. The corresponding figures from respondents with recent involvement in BIM projects are substantially higher.

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

3.2 Frequencies of firms BIM activities reported by Building Surveyors


Table 4 shows the percentages of Building Surveyors citing different frequencies of BIM use for different activities by their firms. The table is sorted on the sums of the Very often and Often BIM % columns, but if these are equal, the Sometimes column figure decided the relative ranking. The All Nr and BIM Nr columns again show the numbers of respondents responding to an activity question. Table 4. Frequencies of different BIM activities by Building Surveyors
Frequency Respondents BIM Activity Linking specification clauses to graphic elements in a BIM Linking construction schedule data to a BIM Building a 3D BIM model for 2D drawing production purposes Using a BIM for facilities/asset management Extracting quantities from a BIM BIM Awareness/Training Checking on the development of BIM tools and processes with a view to adopting BIM working Investing in BIM training Very often All BIM % % 1 1 1 5 5 Often Sometimes All All BIM BIM % % % % 3 3 1 1 2 10 10 5 5 5 9 14 5 12 5 35 40 15 40 20 Rarely All BIM % % 21 20 19 22 21 30 35 40 40 45 Never All BIM % % 66 63 73 65 70 20 15 35 15 30 Response All BIM Nr Nr 92 94 94 94 94 20 20 20 20 20

3 -

10 -

3 1

5 5

13 14

35 45

24 17

35 30

57 68

15 20

93 93

20 20

The sums of the Very often and Often percentages suggest that no more than 4% and generally less than 3% of all the responding firms make frequent use of BIM for any of the activities. The corresponding figures for BIM activities of firms with recent involvement in BIM projects are substantially higher, ranging from 5% to 15% depending on activity.

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

4. Work on BIM projects


Survey question 7 asked: Over the last 12 months, approximately how many projects has your firm worked on where: BIM was used? Using a BIM might have been appropriate? Table 5 shows the numbers and percentages of respondents from each RICS professional group that said their firms had worked on one or more BIM project projects over the last 12 months. Table 5. Percentages of respondents citing BIM use
RICS Professional Groups surveyed Quantity Surveying & Construction Building Surveying Project Management Facilities Management Nr of respondents Nr where BIM used 156 37 96 11 3 20 4 2 % where BIM used 24 21 36 66

Twenty-four percent (24%) of the Quantity Surveyors and 21% of the Building Surveyors said their firms had worked on projects where BIM was used. The percentages seem quite high, even considering that the question is not necessarily identifying firms that participated directly to building a BIM. Table 6 shows the numbers and percentages of firms that worked on different numbers of projects where BIM was used within the last 12 months. The Nr (number) and % (percentage) figures highlighted for Quantity Surveyors indicate 119 respondents (or 76% of the 156 that answered the question) said their firms were not involved in a project where BIM was used in the last 12 months. The equivalent number and percentage for the Quantity Surveyors is 76 respondents or 79% of the sample. Table 6. Distribution of projects where BIM was used in last 12 months
Numbers of BIM projects undertaken by respondent firms RICS Professional Groups surveyed Quantity Surveying & Construction Building Surveying Project Management Facilities Management 0 1 119 10 76 6 76 3 79 3 1 7 9 64 1 33 2 9 6 5 5 3 5 3 3 3 4 1 1 5 3 2 3 3 6 10 12 15 1 3 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 9 1 1 1 9 20 3 2 2 2 50 1 1 300 1 9 Sum 156 100 96 100 11 100 3 100

Nr % Nr % Nr % Nr %

1 - 33

1 - 33

Table 7 shows the products of multiplying the numbers of respondents in Table 6 by the different numbers of projects where BIM was used in the past 12 months. Together, the BIM using firms account for 669 projects, but a single project management firm accounts for 300 of them. Table 7. Calculated numbers of projects where BIM was used in last 12 months
Primary RICS Professional Group Quantity Surveying & Construction Building Surveying 0 PNr PNr 1 2 3 4 5 6 10 12 15 6 30 - 15 20 60 40 50 50 50 300 Sum 300 300 223 111 323 12 669

10 18 15 3 10 9 1 - 2 14 30 24

4 15

- 15 12 10 12

Project Management PNr Facilities Management PNr Total


Note: PNr = Number of projects

- 10 12 - 10 4 30 18 60 24 15 100

If a similar calculation is applied to the data on the numbers of projects for which the same set of respondents said Using BIM might have been appropriate the number of projects would be 1612, roughly 2.4 times as many. RICS July 2011 10

RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

5. BIM use at successive project stages


Survey question 8 asked: For the above BIM projects, on what percentage of the projects was or will the BIMs be used in the following project stages: Design, Construction, Operation and Maintenance/FM. The question was framed to allow respondents to report on projects that had not yet been handed over, but the wording may have proved confusing. For the Building Surveyors and Quantity Surveyors, BCIS: multiplied the percentages cited by the numbers of BIM projects that the respondents said they had worked on in the last 12 months when responding to survey question 7; summed the products; and then; divided by the total number of BIM projects quoted by each group. Table 8 shows the resulting percentages. Table 8. Use of BIMs at successive project stages
RICS Professional Group members Phase Design % 89 46 68 Construction % 74 53 64 O&M/FM % 36 46 41

Quantity Surveying & Construction Group BIM users Building Surveying Group BIM users Averages

6. Percentages of projects undertaken for different client sectors


Survey question 9 asked: What percentage of the above BIM projects were undertaken for each client of the following sectors/types? Table 9 shows the percentages that were calculated for the responses from Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors. BCIS again multiplied the percentages submitted by the numbers of BIM projects that the respondents said they had worked on in the last 12 months, summed the products and then divided by the total number of BIM projects quoted by each group. Zeros were entered where respondents did not enter values for client types. BCIS also calculated straight averages, un-weighted by the numbers of projects. Table 9 shows the calculated percentages. Table 9. Percentages of BIM projects undertaken for different client sectors
BIM using Quantity Surveyors Client sector Commercial Residential Education Health Retail Infrastructure Petro-Chemical Oil & Gas Other* Weighted Percentages 25 10 12 12 34 4 2 Un-weighted Percentages 28 15 17 16 9 2 3 4 BIM using Building Surveyors Weighted Percentages 50 27 11 7 6 Un-weighted percentages 50 22 16 7 6 -

* Note: Other includes hospitality and sports/leisure

The 34% weighted percentage for Quantity Surveyors undertaking Retail projects using BIM reflects a few firms working on large numbers BIM projects.

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7. Clients asking for BIM use and intending to use BIM data after project handover
Survey question 10 asked: On the projects where a BIM was used, what percentage of the clients: Asked that BIM be used? Intend to use BIM (in-house) after handover? For BIM using Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors, BCIS multiplied the numbers of BIM projects by the percentages entered in response to question 10, summed the products and divided by the total number of projects to arrive at percentages of projects. Table 10 shows the results of the calculations, but only the project numbers and percentages for respondents to each sub-question were used in the calculation, so the sample sizes are small. BCIS found it of interest that 14 of 37 BIM using Quantity Surveyors (38%) and 5 of 20 BIM using Building Surveyors (25%) said they did not know the whether the client was to use the BIM after completion. Table 10. Clients asking for BIM use and intending to use BIM data
RICS members Quantity Surveyors Building Surveyors % of projects where clients asked for BIM 75% (based on 26 responses) 28% (based on 15 responses) % of projects where clients intend to use BIM 44% (based on 22 responses) 16% (based on 13 responses)

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

8. Use of different forms of contract on BIM projects


Survey question 11 asked: Which of the forms of building contracts were used on the above BIM projects? Table 11 tabulates the responses by RICS professional group. The percentages do not sum to 100% because respondents cited multiple contracts. Table 11. Use of different forms of contract on BIM projects
Contract RICS Professional Group Quantity Surveying & Construction Building Surveying Project Management JCT Nr 23 15 4 % 68 83 100 NEC Nr 11 2 2 % 32 11 50 Other Nr 7 3 % 21 17 Yes, see text below Yes, see text below

Others mentioned?

Responses* Nr 34 18 4

* The number of responses refers only to those that mentioned a contract of some type.

Quantity Surveyors 24 Quantity Surveyors mentioned use of JCT forms on at least 124 projects. NEC forms were used by 10 firms: 5 of these used NEC forms on a total of 11 projects. Other contracts forms cited included: two mentions of FIDIC, one mention of using a Bespoke Client Contract on 50 projects, one mention of using a PPP/PPC 2000 contract on 15 projects, and one mention of a single use of a Bespoke EPCM Oil & Gas contract prepared by the Client. Building Surveyors 15 Building Surveyors mentioned the use of JCT forms on at least 71 projects. NEC forms were used by two firms on a total of 14 projects (2+12). Other contracts forms used on BIM projects included FIDIC and GC Works. Where building information modelling is concerned, the form of construction contract used does not appear to be a major issue, but choice of procurement method (e.g. design and build) may be significant.

9. BIM neutrality of current forms of contract


Table 12 tabulates as percentages the responses received from members of different RICS professional groups to survey question 12. To what extent do you agree that: Current forms of contract are BIM neutral? The All percentages again refer to all members of a group; the BIM percentages refer to subsets of only those respondents whose firms had been involved in a BIM project within the last 12 months. Table 12. BIM neutrality of current forms of contracts: Current forms of contract are BIM neutral
Response options Agree strongly or Agree All % 28 26 45 BIM % 29 22 75 Neither Agree nor Disagree All % 58 54 36 67 BIM % 57 67 25 100 Disagree strongly or Disagree All % 14 19 18 33 BIM % 14 11 -

Balances All % 14 7 27 -33 BIM % 14 11 75 -

Responses All Nr 136 72 11 3 BIM Nr 35 18 4 2

RICS Professional Groups Quantity Surveying & Construction Building Surveying Project Management Facilities Management

The figures for facilities managers should be ignored on the basis that there are too few responses and the majority neither agree nor disagree. BCIS found it of interest that the balance for project managers is so positive. In general, the figures indicate a high level of uncertainty, but the balance of opinion is that current forms of contract are BIM neutral.

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

10. Barriers to take up of BIM


Tables 13 and 14 tabulate the responses received from Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors to survey question 13: How important are the following as barriers to the wider take up of BIM? The tables are both sorted on the BIM % balances, but the All % balances probably give a better indication of prevailing sentiment. Table 13. Quantity Surveyors scoring of relative importance of barriers to take up of BIM
Response options Potential barriers Lack of client demand Lack of application interfaces between BIM systems and 3rd party applications of choice Lack of training/education Lack of standards Uncertainties over ownership of data and responsibilities Current conditions of engagement Lack of government lead/direction Lack of IT infrastructure Current professional indemnity insurance terms Lack of new and/or amended forms of construction contracts Very important or important All BIM % % 74 57 70 53 50 50 43 48 27 24 68 61 59 58 51 39 41 32 17 16 Relevant All % 24 35 25 34 34 32 35 34 41 36 BIM % 32 33 35 22 35 36 30 43 47 27 Little or no importance All % 2 8 5 14 16 18 22 18 32 41 BIM % 6 5 19 14 25 30 24 36 57 Balances All % 72 49 65 39 34 32 21 30 (-5) (-17) BIM % 68 55 54 39 37 14 11 8 (-19) (-41) Response All Nr 140 134 139 133 135 137 137 138 135 135 BIM Nr 37 36 37 36 37 36 37 37 36 37

Table 14. Building Surveyors scoring of relative importance of barriers to take up of BIM
Response options Potential barriers Lack of application interfaces between BIM systems and 3rd party applications of choice Lack of IT infrastructure Lack of standards Lack of client demand Current professional indemnity insurance terms Lack of government lead/direction Current conditions of engagement Lack of new and/or amended forms of construction contracts Uncertainties over ownership of data and responsibilities Lack of training/education Very important or important All BIM % % 65 45 41 63 50 46 38 42 42 29 63 47 53 38 37 42 47 32 32 32 Relevant All % 29 42 37 35 37 26 32 45 41 44 BIM % 21 47 37 62 42 32 42 47 47 47 Little or no importance All % 4 9 15 1 9 20 21 9 12 18 BIM % 16 5 11 21 26 11 21 21 21 Balances All % 61 36 26 62 41 26 17 33 30 11 BIM % 47 42 42 38 16 16 16 11 11 11 Response All Nr 69 71 70 71 70 70 71 69 69 68 BIM Nr 18 20 20 13 19 19 20 20 19 19

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

11. Benefiting financially from BIM


Tables 15 and 16 show the scoring by Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors of the levels of financial benefit in response to survey question 14: How much will the following benefit financially from BIM? The BIM columns again show only the scoring from surveyors whose firms were involved in one or more BIM projects in the last 12 months. The tables are sorted on the BIM % balances. Table 15. Quantity Surveyors scoring of relative financial benefit of BIM
Benefit level 1 Greatly or 2 (More than average) All BIM % % 62 75 72 80 67 52 42 50 38 25 72 58 61 58 53 36 3 Average All % 25 19 18 26 36 25 35 37 BIM % 22 9 14 28 19 22 25 36 4 (Little) or 5 Not at all All % 13 9 15 22 22 25 27 37 BIM % 3 11 14 14 19 19 22 28 Balances All % 49 63 52 30 20 25 11 -12 BIM % 72 69 58 44 42 39 31 8 Responses All 135 134 134 133 132 134 132 131 BIM 36 35 36 36 36 36 36 36

Group Respondents Clients Facilities Managers Software Vendors Consultants Tier 1 Contractors Building Users/Occupants Specialist Contractors Suppliers

Table 16. Building Surveyors scoring of relative financial benefit of BIM


Benefit level 1 Greatly or 2 (More than average) All BIM % % 64 89 55 69 49 45 36 24 32 71 79 79 58 50 50 44 3 Average All % 5 29 11 11 37 44 33 39 BIM % 5 29 11 11 37 44 33 39 4 (Little) or 5 Not at all All % 5 11 11 5 6 17 17 BIM % 5 11 11 5 6 17 17 Balances All % 59 55 59 38 40 30 8 16 BIM % 84 71 68 68 53 44 33 28 Responses All 69 64 68 68 69 67 66 65 BIM 19 17 19 19 19 18 18 18

Group Respondents Facilities Managers Specialist Contractors Software Vendors Suppliers Clients Consultants Tier 1 Contractors Building Users/Occupants

The average scoring of benefit levels by firms that participated in BIM projects in the last year are consistently higher than the scoring based on all the responding Quantity and Building Surveyors. QS BIM users score the financial benefits obtained by clients higher than those for software vendors. More respondents scored facilities managers as benefiting 1 Greatly or 2 (More than average) than any other type of firm. This view was shared by the entire survey sample.

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

12. Opinions on BIM (responses to statements about BIM)


Survey question 5 asked: To what extent do you Agree or Disagree with the following statements about BIM? (Agree strongly, Agree, Neither Agree nor Disagree, Disagree, Disagree strongly) Any comments? The answers are reported in Tables 17 and 18.

12.1 Quantity Surveyors opinions on BIM


Table 17 shows the responses from all Quantity Surveyors, together with the corresponding subsets of answers from firms that were involved in a BIM project within the last 12 months, highlighted in blue. Table 17. Quantity Surveyors agreement with statements about BIM: All & BIM involved
Agree Neither strongly or Agree nor Agree Disagree Statement Respondents All % 73 40 61 39 BIM % 84 49 62 43 All % 13 34 21 32 BIM % 11 32 22 38 Disagree or Disagree strongly All % 3 17 5 8 BIM % 5 19 16 14 Do not know All % 12 9 12 21 BIM % 5 Balance All % 70 23 56 30 BIM % 78 30 46 30 Response All Nr 154 154 155 155 BIM Nr 37 37 37 37

Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle. Clients will drive the adoption of BIM Adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training Projects may involve multiple BIMs like overlapping venn diagrams with data sharing at the overlaps A BIM that does not contain specification and cost data falls well short of the mark A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM A project extranet is a BIM A BIM that does not support ongoing facilities management is not a BIM

76 49 12 56

81 65 16 62

10 23 22 18

8 11 16 19

3 8 46 12

11 16 65 16

11 20 20 15

8 3 3

73 41 -34 44

69 49 -49 46

154 155 155 154

36 37 37 37

RICS July 2011

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Agreement with BIM statements by Quantity Surveyors: All & BIM involved Figures 3 through 10 illustrate Table 17 and contrast the responses received from all Quantity Surveyors to statements about BIM with those from firms involved in one or more BIM projects in the last 12 months. The figures are keyed as follows:
Agree strongly or Agree Neither Agree nor Disagree Disagree or Disagree strongly Do not know

All Quantity Surveyors


3 13 12 73

Only Quantity Surveyors with BIM involvement


11
5

84

Figure 3a All QSs

Figure 3b BIM QSs

Figure 3. Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle The responses where firms were involved in a BIM project exhibit 11% greater agreement; there is predictably more certainty in that the Do not knows have disappeared, but also 2% less neither agree nor disagree with the statement derived from the BSi Investors Report. Arguably the statement is bland, but does refer to building modelling as a process over a buildings lifecycle.
9 17 40
19 49

34

32

Figure 4a All QSs Figure 4b BIM QSs Figure 4. Clients will drive the adoption of BIM The respondents from firms with BIM involvement are again more certain when compared to all the Quantity Surveying respondents, but the percentages that Neither agree nor disagree are about the same and only 9% more BIM users agree with the statement.
5 12
16 0

21

61

22

62

Figure 5a All QSs Figure 5b BIM QSs Figure 5. Adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training With the respondents from firms with BIM involvement the percentage disagreeing that BIM involves a substantial training investment increases by 11%, but the majority in agreement is almost the same.
21 8 32 39

14

43

38

Figure 6a All QSs Figure 6b BIM QSs Figure 6. Projects may involve multiple BIMs like overlapping venn diagrams with data sharing at the overlaps A marginally higher percentage of respondents from firms with recent BIM project involvement agree with the statement, but the percentage that neither agree nor disagree is also higher, and the percentage that disagree is substantially higher. RICS July 2011 17

RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Agreement with statements by Quantity Surveyors: All & BIM involved (contd)
Agree strongly or Agree Neither Agree nor Disagree Disagree or Disagree strongly Do not know

All Quantity Surveyors


3 10 11

Only Quantity Surveyors with BIM involvement


8 11

76

81

Figure 7a All QSs

Figure 7b BIM QSs

Figure 7. A BIM that does not contain specification and cost data falls well short of the mark There is general agreement that a BIM should include specification and cost data amongst both the sample as a whole and BIM involved only respondents. The levels of agreement are higher than those of Building Surveyors. The percentage disagreeing is higher amongst respondents from firms with experience of BIM projects.
20 8
11 65

49

8 16

23

Figure 8a All QSs

Figure 8b BIM QSs

Figure 8. A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM Sixteen percent more Quantity Surveyors from firms with recent BIM project involvement firms agree with the statement, but the percentage that disagrees is also higher, while the percentage of respondents that neither agree nor disagree with the statement is 12% less.
20 12 22

3 65

16 16

46

Figure 9a All QSs Figure 9b BIM QSs Figure 9. A project extranet is a BIM QS views With the respondents from firms with recent BIM project experience Do not know is largely replaced by disagreement with the statement, which increases by 19%.
15 12 56
16 3 62 19

18

Figure 10a All QSs Figure BIM QSs Figure 10. A BIM that does not support ongoing facilities management is not a BIM QS views With the respondents from firms with recent BIM project experience the Do not know percentage is 12% lower, agreement increases by 6%, but disagreement increases by 4%.

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12.2 Building Surveyors opinions on BIM


Table 18 shows the responses from all Building Surveyors together with the corresponding shaded subsets of answers from firms that were involved in a BIM project within the last 12 months. Table 18. Building Surveyors agreement with statements about BIM: All & BIM involved
Agree strongly or Agree Respondents Statement Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle. Clients will drive the adoption of BIM Adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training Projects may involve multiple BIMs like overlapping venn diagrams with data sharing at the overlaps A BIM that does not contain specification and cost data falls well short of the mark A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM A project extranet is a BIM A BIM that does not support ongoing facilities management is not a BIM All % BIM % Neither Agree nor Disagree All BIM % % Disagree or Disagree strongly All BIM % % Do not know All % BIM % Balance All % BIM % Response All Nr BIM Nr

75

85

10

15

71

85

94

20

33 55

40 85

29 26

40 10

20 4

20 5

15 11

14 51

20 80

93 93

20 20

30

50

30

35

15

15

22

16

35

93

20

65

70

15

15

15

11

57

55

94

20

43 10 49

60 20 60

21 39 20

20 30 35

10 23 7

15 45 0

22 25 21

5 5 5

32

45

92 93 93

20 20 20

-13 -25 42 60

RICS July 2011

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Agreement with BIM statements by Building Surveyors: All & BIM involved Figures 11 through 18 illustrate Table 18 and contrast the responses received from all Building Surveyors to statements about BIM with those from firms involved in one or more BIM projects in the last 12 months. The figures are keyed as follows:
Agree strongly or Agree Neither Agree nor Disagree Disagree or Disagree strongly Do not know

All Building Surveyors


10 4 8 75

Only Building Surveyors with BIM involvement


15

85

Figure 11a All BSs Figure 11b BIM BSs Figure 11. Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle The respondents where firms were involved in a BIM project exhibit 10% greater agreement; there is more certainty in that the Do not knows have disappeared, but also 5% more neither agree nor disagree with the statement derived from the BSi Investors Report.
15 33

20 40 40

20 29

Figure 12a All BSs Figure 12b BIM BSs Figure 12. Clients will drive the adoption of BIM The respondents from firms with BIM involvement are more certain when compared to all the Building Surveying respondents, but 11% more Neither agree nor disagree and only 7% more agree with the statement perhaps reflecting sentiment that clients in general may not be driving the adoption of BIM.
4 11
10 5 85

26

55

Figure 13a All BSs

Figure 13b BIM BSs

Figure 13. Adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training The respondents from firms with BIM involvement clearly feel that BIM does involve a substantial investment in training 30% more agree with the statement.
22 30

15 15 70

15 30

Figure 14a All BSs Figure 14b BIM BSs Figure 14. Projects may involve multiple BIMs like overlapping venn diagrams with data sharing at the overlaps The respondents from firms with BIM involvement seemingly understood the statement better, there are no Do not knows, and 40% more agreed that projects may involve multiple BIMs. However, 15% of both sample groups disagree which may reflect the sentiment that a building information model should be held in a single integrated repository.

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Agreement with statements by Building Surveyors: All & BIM involved (contd)
Agree strongly or Agree Neither Agree nor Disagree Disagree or Disagree strongly Do not know

All Building Surveyors


7 11

Only Building Surveyors with BIM involvement


15 15

15

65

70

Figure 15a All BSs Figure 15b BIM BSs Figure 15. A BIM that does not contain specification and cost data falls well short of the mark BS views There is general agreement that a BIM should include specification and cost data amongst both the sample as a whole and BIM involved only respondents, but the balance in agreement falls from 58% (657) to 55% (70-15), with a higher percentage of respondents from firms with BIM involvement disagreeing with the statement
22 43
15 5

10 21

60 20

Figure 16a All BSs Figure 16b BIM BSs Figure 16. A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM BS views A substantial majority of Building Surveyors from BIM involved firms agree with the statement, but the percentage that disagrees is also higher, while the percentages of respondents that neither agreed nor disagreed with the statement is roughly the same in both groups. There may be uncertainty about what constitutes a repository for shared data.
25 10
5 20

39 23

45 30

Figure 17a All BSs Figure 17b BIM BSs Figure 17. A project extranet is a BIM - BS views BCIS expected most respondents to disagree, and the percentages of respondents in agreement are the smallest for any of the statements offered. However, the high percentages for Neither agree nor disagree or Do not know (64% of the full sample of Building Surveyors and 35% of those from firms with recent BIM project involvement) suggest that many respondents are not familiar with BIM or extranets.
21 7 49

5 35 60

20

Figure 18a All BSs Figure 18b BIM BSs Figure 18. A BIM that does not support ongoing facilities management is not a BIM BS views One could argue that respondents should agree with the statement if they agree with the previous statement: Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle. However, 10% less of the total sample, and 25% less of respondents from firms with recent BIM project involvement agreed. The responses may indicate knowledge of building information models that are commonly used only during design and construction.

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12.3 Comparisons of Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors opinions on BIM


Table 19 offers direct comparison of the sentiments of the Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors that responded from firms with recent involvement in BIM projects. The balances shown provide measures of how strongly opinions are held. The greatest difference in opinion relates to whether adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training; the smallest difference relates to the statement: A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM. Table 19. Comparison of agreement with statements by Quantity Surveyors and Building Surveyors from firms with recent BIM involvement
Neither Agree strongly or agree nor Agree disagree Statement QS Respondents BIM % 84 BS BIM % 85 QS BIM % 11 BS BIM % 15 Disagree or Disagree strongly QS BIM % 5 BS BIM % -

Do not know QS BIM % BS BIM % 12

Balance QS BIM % 78 BS BIM % 85

Response QS Nr BS Nr

Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle Clients will drive the adoption of BIM Adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training Projects may involve multiple BIMs like overlapping venn diagrams with data sharing at the overlaps A BIM that does not contain specification and cost data falls well short of the mark A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM A project extranet is a BIM A BIM that does not support ongoing facilities management is not a BIM

37

20

49 62 43

40 85 50

32 22 38

40 10 35

19 16 14

20 5 15

9 12 21

30 46 30

20 80 35

37 37 37

20 20 20

81 65 16 62

70 60 20 60

8 11 16 19

15 20 30 35

11 16 65 16

15 15 45 -

8 3 3

11 20 20 15

69 49 -49 46

55 45 -25 60

36 37 37 37

20 20 20 20

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13. Support for RICS actions on BIM


Survey question 16 asked: What should the RICS do to support BIM working? (The response options were Yes or No.) Tables 20, 21 and 22 report the percentages of respondents that answered Yes for all respondents, Quantity Surveyors, and then Building Surveyors. The shaded columns again report the percentages for the corresponding answers from only those respondents that work for firms that have been involved in BIM projects in the last 12 months. The figures in brackets following column headings are the numbers of respondents that answered the question from the group. Irrespective of the possible action, respondents from firms with recent BIM project experience tend to answer Yes more often. Providing guidance on the use BIM and providing training score highly. Table 20. All respondents support for possible RICS BIM actions
All with recent project BIM Experience (65) 85 48 55 52 49 45

Possible RICS actions Provide guidance on the use of BIM Provide training Support data exchange standards development Influence BIM input/output requirements Define levels of BIM working for reference in professional services agreements Influence/lead on new forms of contract

All Respondents (291) 67 46 37 36 36 34

Table 21. Quantity Surveyors support for possible RICS BIM actions
All QS & Construction Group Members (155) 75 49 45 41 37 32 QS & Construction with recent BIM project experience (36) 83 42 56 56 39 31

Possible RICS actions Provide guidance on the use of BIM Provide training Support data exchange standards development Influence BIM input/output requirements Define levels of BIM working for reference in professional services agreements Influence/lead on new forms of contract

Table 22. Building Surveyors support for possible RICS BIM actions
All Building Surveying PG member respondents (96) 59 42 36 33 31 26 Building Surveying with recent BIM project experience (20) 90 55 60 60 50 50

Possible RICS actions Provide guidance on the use of BIM Provide training Define levels of BIM working for reference in professional services agreements Influence/lead on new forms of contract Influence BIM input/output requirements Support data exchange standards development

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

14. Interest in BIM training


Table 23 shows a breakdown of responses by professional group to survey question 17: Would your organisation be interested in BIM training? Irrespective of professional group, at least 46% and generally more than 50% of respondents said their firms would be interested in BIM training. In most cases, respondents from firms that were involved in BIM projects within the last 12 months were substantially more interested in BIM training. Table 23. Interest in training by professional group and for all respondents
RICS Professional Group Quantity Surveying & Construction Building Surveying Project Management Facilities Management Other All respondents (of any group) All Yes Nr % 79 54 36 46 7 64 2 5 129 67 28 50 All No Nr % 67 46 42 54 4 36 1 13 127 33 72 50 BIM Yes Nr % 18 50 15 79 3 75 1 37 50 61 BIM No Nr % 18 50 4 21 1 25 1 9 24 50 100 39 Responses All BIM 146 36 78 19 11 4 3 18 256 2 9 61

46

54

50

50

Figure 19a All QS (146) Figure 19b BIM QS (36) Figure 19. Quantity Surveyors interest in BIM training Seventy-nine (54%) of 146 members of the responding Quantity Surveying & Construction professional group members said their firms would be interested in BIM training. The percentage falls slightly (to 50%) when only the answers from 36 firms that were involved in BIM projects within the last 12 months are considered.
21
54 46

79

Figure 20a All BSs (78) Figure 20b BIM BSs (19) Figure 20. Building Surveyors interest in BIM training Forty-six (46%) of 78 members of the responding Building Surveying professional group members said their firms would be interested in BIM training. The percentage rises markedly (to 79%) when only the answers from 19 firms that were involved in BIM projects within the last 12 months are considered.

50

50

39

61

Figure 21a All respondents (256)

Figure 21b All BIM respondents (61)

Figure 21. All respondents interest in BIM training One hundred and twenty-nine (50%) of all 256 surveyors that answered the question said their firms would be interested in BIM training. The percentage rises (to 61%) when only the answers from 61 firms that were involved in BIM projects within the last 12 months are considered.

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15. Willingness to provide a case study


Eighteen respondents (6% of the total survey sample) answered: Yes in response to survey question 18: If you have had experience of using BIM, would you be interested in providing a case study?

16. Familiarity with the BSi Investors Report


There were 261 responses to survey question 20: Are you familiar with the BSi Investors Report? Table 25 shows the response from All respondents, Quantity Surveyors, Building Surveyors and Project Managers. Table 24. Familiarity with BSi Investors Report
Yes, Familiar Yes All respondents Quantity Surveyors Building Surveyors Project Managers Nr. 28 18 6 2 % 11 12 7 18 No, Not Familiar Nr. 233 128 76 9 % 89 88 92 82 Answers Nr 261 146 82 11

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Appendix A. Analysis of survey sample


Breakdown of the UK response by firm types
Table 25 and Figure 22 show the breakdown of the 290 UK responses to Question 1: What type of firm do you represent? Two respondents did specify their firm type. Question 1 also requested respondents to: Select one primary and as many other secondary activities that apply. Forty-four respondents selected multiple primary activities. In tabulating the results, BCIS classified these responses as being from Multidisciplinary surveying firms. Table 25 & Figure 22. Breakdown of UK responses by primary firm types
Primary Activity Public Client Private Client Building Surveyor Quantity Surveyor Project Management Multi-disciplinary Surveying Tier 1 Contractor Specialist Contractor Other* Total Nr 3 14 58 101 13 82 2 2 15 290 % 1 5 20 35 4 28 1 1 5 100

1% 5% 1% 1% 5% 28% 20%

4%

35%

Figure 22. Breakdown of UK responses by primary firm types

* The 14 Other primary activities cited by firms (followed by the number of firms citing them in parentheses) included: Approved Inspector (1), Architects (1), Architecture (1), Engineering & Project Management (1), Capital Allowance Claims (1), Consultancy/ Corporate Finance/Audit/Tax (1), Consulting Engineering, particularly energy sector based (Oil and Gas) (1), Geomatics (2), Loss Adjusting (1), Multi-disciplinary Design (1), DEA & CEA (1), Party Wall Specialists (1), CDM Coordinators and Project Managers (1), Software Development (1) and Training Courses Provider (1)

Table 26 tabulates the UK responses by primary firm type and secondary activities. Again, the response is for 290 firms as two respondents did not give firm types. The number of surveying firms acting as public clients is notable. Table 26. Tabulation of primary firm types and secondary activities for UK respondents
Quantity Surveyor Building Surveyor Civil Engineering/ Infrastructure Tier 1 Contractor Multi-disciplinary Surveying

Private Client

Project Management

Specialist Contractor Nr 1 1 2 1 5

Secondary Activities

Facilities Management

Public Client

Primary Activities Public Client Private Client Building Surveyor Quantity Surveyor Project Management Multi-disciplinary Surveying Tier 1 Contractor Specialist Contractor Other Totals

Nr 3 14 58 101 13 82 2 2 15 290

Nr 2 22 24

Nr 7 3 1 47 58

Nr 7 11 4 51 1 2 76

Nr 3 8 7 43 1 6 68

Nr 3 15 61 56 3 138

Nr 4 4 8 16 1 33

Nr 1 2 1 7 1 2 14

Nr 2 5 4 1 2 14

Nr 1 3 4

Nr 1 2 9 1 5 18

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Breakdown of UK responses by numbers of staff employed


Figure 23 shows the percentage breakdown of the 292 UK respondents answers to survey Question 2: How many staff does your firm employ? Sixty percent of the firms employ 10 staff members or less. This percentage is lower than BCIS would anticipate and suggests the survey sample is skewed toward larger firms. The Construction Industry Council Survey of UK Construction Professionals 2005/2006 found 89% of surveying firms employing 10 staff or less.

7% 4% 11% 9%

9%

60%

1-10 101-250

11-50 251-1000

51-100 1000+

Figure 23. Breakdown by numbers of staff

Cross tabulation of UK responses by types and sizes


Table 27 cross tabulates the responses to survey Questions 1 and 2 and shows the numbers and percentages of firms of different sizes and primary types. Figure 24 presents the same data as a bar chart. Table 27. Types and sizes of firms
Staff number ranges Primary Firm Activity Public Client Private Client Building Surveyor Quantity Surveyor Project Management Multi-disciplinary Surveying Tier 1 Contractor Specialist Contractor Other Not stated Totals 1-10 Nr 5 46 62 7 43 1 1 7 2 174 % 2 16 21 2 15 2 1 60 11-50 Nr % 3 4 9 2 6 2 26 1 1 3 1 2 1 9 51-100 Nr % 2 4 11 3 10 1 1 32 1 1 4 1 3 11 101-250 Nr % 1 6 5 1 13 2 2 5 251-1000 Nr % 2 4 4 7 1 3 21 1 1 1 2 1 7 1000+ Nr % 1 3 9 1 11 1 26 <1 1 3 4 9

120 100 80 60 40 20 0
Cl ie Pr nt iva te Cl Bu ie ild nt in g Su Q rv ua ey nt or ity Pr Su oj rv ec ey M t or ul M tian di ag sc em ip lin en ar t y Su rv Ti ey er in 1 g Co Sp n t ra ec ct ia or lis tC on tra ct or th er st at e O d

1000+ 251-1000 101-250 51-100 11-50 1-10

Pu bl ic

Figure 24. Types and sizes of firms

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Positions of respondents
Survey Question 3 asked: What is your position? Table 28 and Figure 25 show the breakdown of respondents by position for all 292 UK respondents. The great majority of respondents are Partners/Directors/Principals as they were selected when compiling the survey mailing list.

Table 28. UK Respondents positions


Position
Partner/Director/Principal Senior/Managing Surveyor Surveyor Other*

9%

2% 1%

Nr
256 25 7 4

%
87 9 2 1
88%

* The four others were: Consultants (2),, a Project Controls Specialist and a Technical Specialist

Figure 25. UK Respondents positions

Breakdown of UK responses by primary RICS Professional Group


Table 29 and Figure 26 show the breakdown of the UK based respondents by the RICS Professional Group membership declared by 292 respondents in response to Question 4. The largest group at 53% is Quantity Surveying & Construction followed by Building Surveying at 33%.

Table 29. Response by RICS Professional Group


Professional Group Quantity Surveying & Construction Building Surveying Project Management Facilities Management Other

4% 1%

9%

Nr
156 96 11 3 26 292

%
53 33 4 1 9 100

33%

53%

Figure 26. Response by RICS Professional Group

* The 26 Other professional groups cited by firms (followed by the number of firms citing them in parentheses) include: Agency and management surveyor (1), Building Control (3), Dispute Resolution (1), Energy Assessment (1), General Practice (5), General Practice (Rural) or Rural (2), Geomatics (2), Minerals surveyor (1), Planning & Development (1), Property Management (1), Residential, or Residential Survey and/or Valuation (4), Valuation (3) and Not stated (1).

Cross tabulation of UK responses by RICS Professional Group and firm types


Table 30 presents a cross tabulation of the responses by primary firm type and secondary activities entered in response to Question 1: What type of firm do you represent?, and Professional Group membership from Question 4: As a RICS member, what is your primary RICS Professional Group?

Table 30. Cross-tabulation of responses to firm type/activity and professional group questions
RICS Professional Group Building Facilities Project Quantity Surveying Sums Surveying Management Management & Construction PFT SA PFT SA PFT SA PFT SA PFT SA Nr Nr Nr Nr Nr Nr Nr Nr 1 2 54 3 32 1 3 13 28 35 13 38 11 5 5 3 2 4 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 1 1 3 5 2 4 4 7 2 2 1 1 2 3 3 100 7 36 1 1 5 10 20 28 48 90 16 5 7 1 2 11 2 7 57 101 13 75 1 2 8 23 51 69 66 137 32 12 13 4 5 17

Primary Firm Type Public Client Private Client Building Surveying Quantity Surveying Project Management Facilities Management Civil Engineering/Infrastructure Multi-disciplinary Surveying Tier 1 Contractor Specialist Contractor Other

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

Appendix B. BIM survey questions


The Web survey form asked for confirmation of the respondents details and posed the questions below with the response options offered following in parentheses, and sub-questions proceeded by hyphens (). 1. What type of firm do you represent? Please select one primary and as many other secondary activities that apply) (Yes, No) - Public Client - Private Client - Building Surveying - Quantity Surveying - Project Management - Facilities Management - Civil Engineering/Infrastructure - Multi-disciplinary Surveying - Tier 1 Contractor - Specialist Contractor - Other: please specify How many staff does your firm employ? (1-10, 11-50, 51-100, 101-250, 251-1000, 1000+) What is your position? - Partner/Director - Senior/Managing Surveyor - Surveyor - Other: please specify As a RICS member, what is your primary RICS Professional Group? (Yes, No) - Building Surveying - Facilities Management - Project Management - Quantity Surveying & Construction - Other: please specify To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about BIM? (Agree strongly, Agree, Neither agree nor disagree, Disagree, Disagree strongly) - A BIM that does not include a repository for shared data is not a BIM. - A BIM that does not contain specification and cost data falls well short of the mark. - A project extranet is a BIM. - Building Information Modelling is the process of generating and managing information about a building during its entire life cycle. - Clients will drive the adoption of BIM. - Adopting BIM entails a substantial investment in training. - Projects may involve multiple BIMs like overlapping venn diagrams with data sharing at the overlaps. - A BIM that does not support ongoing facilities management is not a BIM. Please indicate the frequency at which your firm engages in the following activities? (Very often, Often, Sometime, Rarely, Never) - Checking on the development of BIM tools and processes with a view to adopting BIM working? - Using a BIM for facilities/asset management? - Linking construction schedule data to a BIM? - Building a 3D BIM model for 2D drawing production purposes? - Extracting quantities from a BIM? - Investing in BIM training? - Linking specification clauses to graphic elements in a BIM? How would you characterise your firms use of BIM?

2. 3.

4.

5.

6.

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RICS 2011 Building Information Modelling Survey Report

7.

Over the last 12 months, approximately how many projects has your firm worked on where: - BIM was used? - Using a BIM might have been appropriate? For the above BIM projects, on what percentage of the projects was or will the BIMs be used in the following project stages: - Design - Construction - Operation and Maintenance/FM What percentage of the above BIM projects were undertaken for each client of the following sectors/types: - Commercial - Residential - Education - Health - Retail - Infrastructure - Petro-Chemical - Oil & Gas - Other: (please enter Sector, then %)

8.

9.

10. On the projects where a BIM was used, what percentage of the clients: - Asked that BIM be used - Intend to use BIM (inhouse) after handover (If you don't know, please type X in box right) 11. Which of the following forms of building contract were used on the above BIM projects? - JCT - NEC - Not Applicable - Other: please specify 12. To what extent do you agree that: 'Current forms of contract are BIM neutral? (Agree strongly, Agree, Neither agree or disagree, Disagree, Disagree strongly) 13. How important are the following as barriers to the wider take up of BIM? (Very important, Important, Relevant, Little importance, Not important) - Current conditions of engagement - Lack of client demand - Lack of application interfaces between BIM systems and 3rd party applications of choice - Lack of IT infrastructure - Lack of new and/or amended forms of construction contracts - Uncertainties over ownership of data and responsibilities - Lack of government lead/direction - Lack of training/education - Current professional indemnity insurance terms - Lack of Standards - Other?

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14. How much will the following benefit financially from BIM? (Please score) (1 Greatly, 2, 3, 4, 5 Not at all) - Clients - Facilities Managers - Consultants - Tier 1 Contractors - Specialist Contractors - Suppliers - Software Vendors - Building Users/Occupants 15. What do you see as the main benefits of BIM use to your own organisation? (Yes. No) - Higher fees - Increased efficiencies/reduction in cost base - Opportunities for expanded services(s) - I see no benefits for me/my organisation - Other: please specify below 16. What should the RICS do support your BIM working? (Yes, No) - Provide guidance on the use of BIM - Provide training? Influence/lead on new forms of contract - Influence BIM input/output requirements - Define levels of BIM working for reference in professional services agreements - Support data exchange standards development - Other: please specify below 17. Would your organisation be interested in BIM training? (Yes, No) 18. If you have had experience of using BIM, would you be interested in providing a case study? (Yes, No) 19. Would you like to be notified when the report of this survey is published? (Yes, No) (If so, please confirm your email address.) 20. Are you familiar with the BSi Investors Report? (http://www.bsigroup.com/upload/Standards%20&%20Publications/Building/InvestorsReportBIM.pdf)

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