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K.V.

Reddy
President
All India Prison Officers Association
09849904733 / 09440060055
Email:kvreddydsp@yahoo.com
STATE ADMINISTRATIVE REPORT - 2007-08
ANDHRA PRADESH PRISONS DEPARTMENT
MISSION STATEMENT

Andhra Pradesh Prisons and Correctional Services Department


confines, manages and provides a safe, secure and humane environment to
prisoners both undertrial and convicted, by utilizing a trained professional
Prison Force and providing them opportunities for re-integration in society as
responsible and productive citizens and thus serve and protect the society.
VISION

Our vision is to provide a service of which the public can be proud and
which will be regarded as a standard of excellence in the country.
GOALS
Our principal goals are to:

 Keep prisoners in safe custody

 Maintain order, control, discipline and safe prison environment

 Provide decent conditions for prisoners and meet their needs, with
respect to food, clothing, bedding, hygiene, sanitation and health care.

 Provide positive programmes which help prisoners address their


offending behaviour and allow them as full and responsible a life as
possible.

 Help prisoners prepare for their return to the community.

 Keep the prison force disciplined, motivated and professional by


reinforcement with periodical training.

 Deliver prison services using the resources provided by Government


with maximum efficiency.

In meeting these goals, we will co-operate closely with other criminal


justice agencies for development of the criminal justice system as a whole.

ANDHRA PRADESH PRISONS DEPARTMENT

VALUES

In seeking to realize our vision and meet our goals, we will adhere to
the following values.

 Integrity is fundamental to every thing we do. We will meet honesty


and openness, and exercise effective stewardship of public money and
assets.

 Commitment by our staff and to our staff. Staff are the most
important asset empowered to develop and use their skills and abilities
to the full, while being held accountable for their performance.
Teamwork will be encouraged. They will be treated with fairness,
respect and openness. Their safety and well being will be a prime
concern.

 Care for prisoners. Prisoner will be treated with fairness, justice and
respect as individuals. Their punishment is deprivation of liberty and
they are entitled to certain recognized standards while in prison. They
will be given reasons for decisions and, where possible, involved in
discussions about matters effecting them. In working with prisoners,
we will involve their families and others in the community as fully as
possible.

 Equality of Opportunity we are committed to equality of opportunity


and the elimination of discrimination on improper grounds.

 Innovation and Improvement are essential to success of the


service, requiring the acceptance of change and the delivery of
continuing improvements in quality and efficiency.
I. AN OVERVIEW OF THE PRISON DEPARTMENT

Andhra Pradesh Prisons Department came into existence on 1st


November, 1956 after the re-organization of States by amalgamation of the
then Hyderabad Prison Service and the Prison Service of the then Andhra
State. Initially the Prisons Department consisted of only few Central Jails,
District Jails and Sub Jails.

Subsequently during 1976 in pursuance of the policy decision taken by


the Government to transfer the administration of Sub Jails from the control of
the Judiciary to that of Prisons Department, the Prisons Department
expanded into a major Department. Over a period of time, with the
upgradation of some jails into District Jails and Central Jails and due to
construction of new jails, the number of institutions under the control of the
Department has increased. During 1985, in order to improve the operational
efficiency of the institutions and to effectively manage the department, the
administration was decentralized and consequently 3 Regions were formed
namely Telangana Region with 10 Districts, coastal Andhra Region with 07
Districts and Rayalaseema Region with 06 Districts each headed by a Deputy
Inspector General of Prisons. With the implementation of modernization
schemes, the infrastructure of the Prisons Department improved further an
account of construction of new prisons, improvement in the hygiene and
sanitary conditions, medical facilities, construction of quarters for staff and
introduction of new correctional programmes for the prisoners. Presently,
the Department has under its control 07 Central Prisons, 10 District Jails, 02
Open Prisons, 02 State Jails for Women, 01 Borstal School and 121 Sub Jails.

Andhra Pradesh Prisons Department is considered as one of the most


progressive Prisons Departments in the country. It has to its credit a number
of far reaching reforms which were emulated by other states of the country.
Among these achievements are establishment of the first permanent Open
Prison at Moulali in 1954, introducing Panchayat System among prisoners,
introducing
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Stainless Steel Utensils and Gas Cooking System in the Prisons, provision of
septic toilets in place of dry type toilets in 1980, uninterrupted water supply
and introducing innovative vocational training programmes for prisoners,
besides providing of modern medical facilities.

In recent times, Andhra Pradesh Prisons Department has achieved the


unique distinction of introducing the Video Linkage System between Prisons
and Courts for the first time in the Country which enabled speedy justice to
the UT prisoners. The Department also has the distinction of constructing
the best prison in the country at Cherlapalli.

A. ADMINISTRATIVE SETUP

The A.P. Prisons Department is functioning under the control of Home


Department. The Director General and Inspector General of Prisons and
Correctional Services is the Head of the Department. He is assisted by
2 Additional Inspectors General of Prisons at Headquarters and 2 Deputy
Inspectors General of Prisons at Regional Level. The various institutions
under the control of the Prisons Department are classified into Central
Prisons, District Jails, Open Prisons, State Jails for Women, Borstal and Sub
Jails. They are headed by officers of different ranks.
Please refer to Annexure-1 at page No.37

1. DIRECTORATE

The Director General and Inspector General of Prisons & Correctional


Services is the Controlling Officer of the Prisons Department. During the
year 2007-08, the Department was headed by the following Officers.

1] Sri S.K.Jayachandra, I.P.S. -- 01-04-2007 to 31-10-2007

2] Sri P. Gautam Kumar I.P.S. -- 01-11-2007 to 31-03-2008


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To assist the Director General of Prisons at the directorate, there are


2 Additional Inspectors General of Prisons looking after the subjects of
Headquarters and Development & Training respectively. Other officers
working in Headquarters include P.A. to Inspector General of Prisons,
Accounts Officer, Assistant Director (Statistics) and Assistant Director
(Industries).

2. REGIONAL OFFICES

The Department is divided into three regions i.e Telangana headed by


Addl. Inspector General of Prisons, Costal Andhra Region and Rayalaseema
Region each headed by Deputy Inspector General of Prisons. The
headquarters of the three regions are located at Hyderabad, Rajahmundry
and Kadapa respectively.

The Telangana Region consists of 10 districts with largest number of


institutions. About 50% of prison population in the state is confined in the
jails located in this region. The Coastal Andhra Region controls the jails in 07
Districts and Rayalaseema Region has 6 districts as given below:

Sl. Name of the No. of No. of No. of No. of State Jails Borstal No. of
Region District Central Distri Open for School Sub
No.
Jails ct Prisons Women Jails *
Jails
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

1 Telangana 10 3 6 1 1 1 27
Region
2 Coastal Andhra 7 2 2 - 1 - 53
Region
3 Rayalaseema 6 2 2 1 - - 41
Region
Total 23 7 10 2 2 1 121

* - Excluding Not Functioning Sub Jails.


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3. TRAINING INSTITUTE

The efficiency of an organization is determined by the caliber of


training and motivation of the personnel manning it. This is particularly so in
respect of organization that deals with human beings. Therefore, very
special care and attention should be bestowed in selection and training of
personnel who are to man the prison and Correctional Administration.
Physical fitness and courage, leadership and man management qualities as
well as balanced humane personality are essentially required for prison
personnel.

Andhra Pradesh State is the first State in South India to establish a


State Institute of Correctional Administration (SICA) in 1984 under the charge
of a Principal in the cadre of Superintendent of jails. The State Institute of
Correctional Administration (SICA) is imparting ‘Basic Induction Training’ and
in-service refresher courses to the lower and middle level executive officers
with well-experienced faculty members.

 During the year 2007-08, 2,560 staff members of different cadres have
been trained.
Details are furnished at page No.36 under Other Special Features.

B. PRISON ADMINISTRATION

1. CENTRAL PRISONS

Central Prisons are the maximum security prisons established on


territorial basis with larger capacity. Prisoners sentenced to above 2 years,
Civil prisoners, prisoners sentenced to death and detenues are confined in
Central Prisons. Besides the above categories of prisoners, Under-trial
prisoners and Women prisoners of the district are also confined. The Central
Prison also functions as the District Prison of the District. The Central Prisons
are headed by officers of the rank of Superintendent of Jails.
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The locations of the Central Prisons, their capacity etc., are given
below:

Sl. Name of the Year of Authorized No. of prisoners as on 31-03-2008


No. jails establishmen Capacity
t
Convicts UTs Others Total
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1. Central 1876 1000 87 721 8 816
Prison,
Hyderabad
2. Central 2000 1790 1107 693 6 1806
Prison,
Cherlapalli
3. Central 1886 1203 646 443 6 1095
Prison,
Warangal
4. Central 1864 1136 1394 438 26 1858
Prison,
Rajahmundry
5. Central 1908 820 417 414 3 834
Prison,
Visakhapatna
m
6. Central 1992 950 788 155 8 951
Prison,
Kadapa
7. Central 1901 500 215 122 0 357
Prison,
Nellore
Total 7399 4654 2986 57 7697

Since large number of long term convicted prisoners are confined in


Central Prisons diversified work programmes and vocational training
schemes are implemented. The details of work programmes are given in the
table below:

Sl.No Central Central Central Central Central Central Central


. Prison, Prison, Prison, Prison, Prison, Prison, Prison,
Cherlapa Hyderaba Warang Nellore Kadapa Rajahmund Visakhapatn
lli d al ry
am
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1. Power - Power - - Power Power


looms looms looms looms

2. Soap - Soap - - - -
making making
3. Steel - Steel Steel Steel Steel Steel
furniture furnitur furnitur furnitur furniture furniture
e e e
4. Phenyle - - - Phenyl - -
making e
making
5. Durry - Durry - - - Durry
making making making

6. Tailoring - Tailorin Tailorin Tailorin Tailoring Tailoring


g g g
7. - - Printing - - - -

8. Dyeing - Dyeing - - - -
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Short term prisoners in Central Prisons are imparted training in


vocational programmes to enable them to rehabilitate themselves after
release from prison. The details of vocational programmes are given under:

Sl.No Central Central Central Centra Central Central Central


. Prison, Prison, Prison, l Prison, Prison, Prison,
Cherlapa Hyderaba Warang Prison, Kadapa Rajahmund Visakhapatn
lli d al Nellor ry
am
e
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1. Plumbing - - - - - -

2. - Book - - - Book Book


binding binding binding

3. Electrical - - - - - -
wiring
4. Motor - - - - - -
driving
5. Masonry - - - Masonry - -

6. - - - - - Coir -
making
unit
7. - - - - - DTP -

8. - - - - Carpent - Carpentr
ry y

9. - - - - - Smithy -

2. DISTRICT JAILS

District Jails are located in District headquarters where Central Prisons


are not established. There are 10 District Jails in the State. The District Jails
admit convict prisoners sentenced upto 2 years and undertrail prisoners
belonging to the District including those transferred by the Sub Jails. The
District Jails are headed by the officers of rank of Deputy Superintendent of
Jails. The authorized capacity of District Jail ranges from 200 to 500. District
Jails are characterized by large number of remand prisoners and undertrial
prisoners. Women prisoners of the District are also confined in separate
enclosures which are looked after by women prison staff. Since the number
of convicts is less, no work programmes are implemented. The main work in
District Jails relate to production of prisoners before the courts of the District.
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The location of District Jails, their authorized capacity etc., are given in
the table below:

Sl.No Name of the Year of Authorize No. of prisoners as on


. Jail and establishm d 31-03-2008
location ent capacity
Convicts UTS Total
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1. Sangareddy 1870 95 30 183 213

2. Nalgonda 1916 160 22 152 174

3. Mahaboobnag 1892 147 20 275 295


ar
4. Nizamabad 1964 320 48 375 423

5. Karimnagar 1897 339 36 354 390

6. Adilabad 2007 331 39 169 208

7. Vijayawada 1976 166 30 230 260

8. Guntur 1920 255 40 240 280

9. Anantapur 1998 186 17 195 212

10. Ongole 2008 150 11 172 183

Total 2149 293 2345 2638

3. OPEN PRISONS

Open Prison system is a remarkable innovation in the realm of


Correctional treatment providing an offender with greater freedom with
natural surroundings and lesser tension which culminate in creating an
atmosphere conducive to reform himself and to achieve social, moral and
economic development in the society.

Andhra Pradesh State has the credit of starting the first permanent
Open Prison at Moulali (now Cherlapally) on the outskirts of Hyderabad in the
year 1954. In 1965 another Open Prison was started at Anantapur. Both
these Open Prisons are also called as Prisoners Agricultural Colonies. While
the Open Prison at Moulali now Cherlapalli is located in 128.27 acres, the one
at Anantapur is located in 1,427.57 acres. The authorized capacity of these
prisons is 195 and 235 respectively.

Officers in the rank of Superintendent of Jails are holding the post of


Superintendents of these prisons.

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Prisoners who are not involved in heinous offences and are healthy and
below 60 years and who have good family relations are selected to work in
these prisons.

Besides agricultural activities, training in Horticulture, Poultry form,


Dairy farm and Sheep rearing is also imparted to the prisoners in these
colonies. The income of Cherlapalli and Anantapur Colonies through various
activities during the year 2007-2008 was Rs.22,85,869/- and Rs.6,44,876/-
respectively. Prisoners of open prisons are extended liberal facilities in
parole and extra remission.
Refer table on work programmes in Open Jails at page No.17 for more
details.

4. SEMI OPEN PRISONS

While Open Prisons are fully independent in functioning, Semi Open


Prisons are not independent Institutions but located in prisons where Open
lands are available for agricultural and other activities.

Semi Open Prisons are located in the following places:

Central Prison District Jails Sub Jail

1. Rajahmundry 6. Sangareddy 16. Khammam


2. Advivaram 7. Nalgonda 17. Vizianagaram
3. Nellore 8. Mahaboobnagar 18. Srikakulam
4. Warangal 9. Nizamabad 19. Kurnool
5. Kapada 10. Adilabad
11 Guntur
12 Vijayawada
13. Anantapur
14. Karimnagar
15. Ongole

The criteria of selection of prisoners and the condition of work in Semi


Open Prisons remains same as those of Open Prisons. The difference
however, is that the prisoners working in Semi Open Prisons are engaged in
agricultural

activities only in day time and report back to prison in the evening for
confinement.

5. OPEN CAMP

Open Camps are camps established with the prisoners for a specific
purpose. An Open Camp is functioning in Gachibowli, Hyderabad at the
premises of Indian Immunologicals, a public sector organization which is
engaged in developing vaccine for treatment of foot and mouth disease in
animals. The prisoners who work in this Open Camps are selected from
among the prisoners who are already working in two open prisons located at
Cherlapalli and Anantapur. Prisoners working here are being paid Rs. 50/- as
daily wage. They are extended facilities similar to those of open prisons.

6. STATE JAILS FOR WOMEN

There are two exclusive prisons for confining women at Rajahmundry


and Hyderabad. The State Jail for Women at Rajahmundry was earlier
functioning under the administrative control of Superintendent, Central
Prison, Rajahmundry till 1994, whereas the State Jail for Women at
Hyderabad was originally a separate annexe attached to Central Prison,
Hyderabad. In 1994, they were declared independent institutions under the
control of a Women Superintendent. The particulars regarding their location,
area, authorized accommodation are given under;
Sl. Name of the Jail Year of Area Authorized
No. establishme Accommodatio
nt n

1 2 3 4 5

1. State Jail for Women, 1994 6 Acres 220


Hyderabad
2. State Jail for Women, 1955 4.5 160
Rajahmundry Acres

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Women Prisoners are taken care by the Women Staff in accordance
with model prison manual. All convicted prisoners including life convicted
prisoners and death sentenced prisoners belonging to Telangana Districts
are confined at State Jail for Women, Hyderabad, while convicted Prisoners
from Rayalaseema Districts and Coastal Andhra Districts are confined in
State Jail for Women, Rajahmundry. Besides convicted prisoners, Undertrial
prisoners concerned in the local courts are also confined in these prisons.

Children of Women Prisoners are allowed to stay with their mother till
the age of 06 years. Children between the ages of 03 to 06 years are sent to
local schools for their education with a view to provide healthy environment
for their normal upbringing. Creches are provided in these 2 prisons.
Children after attaining the age of 06 years are either handed over to the
relatives of their parents or admitted in Government hostels.
Women Prisoners are provided with various work programmes as given
below;
Sl.No. Name of the Jail Work programmes

1 2 3

1. State Jail for 1. Coir making unit


Women, 2. Envelop making
Rajahmundry 3. Tailoring
4. amber charka

2. State Jail for 1. Embroidery


Women, 2. Tailoring
Hyderabad 3. Tooth Powder
Making
4. Candle Unit

Full time Lady Medical Officers are working in these jails to attend to
the medical needs of the prisoners.
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7. BORSTAL SCHOOL

There is one Borstal School functioning at Nizamabad which was


established in 1977. It is located in 1.2 ½ Acres with an authorized capacity
of 93. However, as on 31-03-2008 only 11 inmates were confined.

Borstal School is a correctional institution meant for reforming


adolescent offenders who are in the age group of 18 to 21. The primary
objective of the Borstal School is to ensure care, welfare and rehabilitation of
young offenders and to keep them away from contaminating atmosphere of
the prison. Emphasis is given on education, training and moral influence
conducive for reformation and prevention of crime.

Over a period of time, the admissions of inmates into Borstal School


has been steadily coming down. The reasons being lesser committals of
young offenders to Borstal Schools and unwillingness on the part of parents
to allow detention of their children in Borstal Schools, the reason being that
the offenders sent to Borstal School have to be detained for a minimum
period of 02 years and are not eligible for remission of sentence while
remission of sentence is given in Central Jails and District Jails. No inmate
will be detained in Borstal School beyond 23 years of age.

Inmates confined in Borstal School are imparted training in Tailoring,


Plumbing Work, Electrical Wiring and Motor Rewinding.

Officers in the rank of Deputy Superintendent of Jails are holding the


post of Superintendent of Borstal School.

8. DISTRICT SUB-JAILS OFFICES

For maintaining operational efficiency of the Sub-Jails in the State, 20


District Sub jails Offices are established under the control of District Sub-Jails
Officers. These officers are responsible for proper functioning of the Sub-Jails
in
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the Districts. The District Sub-Jails Officer undertakes periodical visits and
inspections. There are 27 Sub-Jails functioning in 07 Districts of Telangana
Region, 53 Sub-Jails in 07 Districts of Coastal Andhra Region and 41 Sub-Jails
in 06 Districts of Rayalaseema Region. Sub-Jail Offices were not established
in the Districts of Hyderabad, Mahaboobnagar and Nizamabad.

Officers in the rank of Deputy Superintendents are functioning as


District Sub-Jails Officers.

9. SUB-JAILS

The Sub-Jails are small units meant for confining Undertrial prisoners
involved in cases before the local magistrates and also the convicted
prisoners sentenced upto one month. Prisoners sentenced to more than one
month are transferred to nearest Central Jail or District Jail. The authorized
capacity of all the 121 number of Sub-Jails in the State is 4,532. As against
this as on 31-03-2008, there were 3,568 Prisoners.

Officers in the rank of Deputy Jailor are holding the post of


Superintendent of Sub-Jails.

C. PRISON STATISTICS

1. POPULATION

The authorized accommodation in A.P. Prisons at the beginning of the


year was 12710. Due to implementation of the scheme of Modernization of
Prison Administration, construction of new jails, repairs and renovation of
jails, the authorized capacity increased to 14983. There were 143 Jails
functioning in the State during the year.
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At the beginning of the year i.e. 1-4-2007, there were 15,741
(Male 14,755 + Female 986) Prisoners confined in various prisons of the
state, which included 5,437 (Male 5,191 + Female 246) Convicted Prisoners,
10,265 (Male 9,526 + Female 739) Remand Prisoners, 18 (Male 17 +
Female 1) Detenus and 21 Civil Prisoners.

During the year 2007-2008 a total number of 1,89,082 (Male


1,63,454 + Female 25,628) prisoners were admitted, which included 16,032
(Male 15,340 + Female 692) Convicted Prisoners, 1,72,682 (Male 1,47,746
+ Female 24,936) Remand Prisoners, 64 Detenus and 304 Civil Prisoners.

Similarly a total number of 1,90,233 (Male 1,64,599 + Female 25,634)


prisoners were discharged from various Prisons. Out of this, 15,610 (Male
14,932 + Female 678) were Convicted Prisoners, 1,74,282 (Male 1,49,327 +
Female 24,955) Remand Prisoners, 53 (Male 52 + Female 1) Detenus and
288 Civil Prisoners.

At the end of the year i.e. on 31-3-2008, a total of number of


14,590 (Male 13,610 + Female 980) Prisoners were confined in various
Prisons in the State, out of which there were 5,859 (Male 5,599 + Female
260) Convicted Prisoners, 8,665 (Male 7,945 + Female 720) Remand
Prisoners, 29 Detenus and 37 Civil Prisoners.

Please refer Annexures II, III & IV at page Nos. from 38 to 40 for details.

2. ESCAPES

During the year 2007-2008, 79 prisoners escaped from the custody,


out of which 68 prisoners escaped from police custody during transit, 03
escaped while working in extra mural gangs of the prison and 08 from
prisons. Of the 79 escapes, 29 prisoners were recaptured.
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3. DEATHS

During the year 2007-08, 123 prisoners died due to various causes.
While 120 prisoners died in Government hospitals outside the jail while
undergoing treatment, 03 prisoners died on account of suicide. The details
of prisoners along with their cause of death is given in Annexure-V at page
No.41.

4. PAROLE

In order to enable a prisoner to maintain social relations with his family


and community and to save evils of prisonisation, a system of releasing
prisoners periodically in the form of parole, emergency parole, escort parole
and furlough is implemented in A.P. Prisons.

Parole is a conditional suspension of sentence to enable a prisoner to


attend to domestic problems for a initial period of 15 days. This facility is
granted to all convicted prisoners after undergoing certain period of
sentence. Prisoners undergoing life imprisonment become eligible after
undergoing 03 years of imprisonment, while others become eligible after one
year. Reports from police and Probation Officers are called for before
releasing the prisoner on parole. The period spent by prisoner on parole will
have to be undergone by the prisoner and therefore it is added to the
remaining sentence. Government is the authority to sanction parole.

5. EMERGENCY PAROLE

Emergency Parole is a release of a prisoner for 24 hours to enable him


to attend to emergencies like death ceremonies of his close relatives. The
Superintendents are authorized to sanction Emergency Parole to convicts.
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6. ESCORT PAROLE

In certain cases where a prison who has not become eligible for
furlough and is required to attend to an emergency at home, escort parole is
sanctioned by the Government, generally at the cost of the prisoner

7. FURLOUGH

Furlough is the another form of temporary release for 14 days which is


granted as an incentive for good conduct. Prisoners showing good conduct
are granted furlough once in 02 years. Prisoners who are working in Open
Prisons, however, are granted furlough every year. Since furlough is granted
as an incentive, the period spent by a prisoner is treated as remission of
sentence. The Director General of Prisons is the authority for sanctioning
furlough.

The details of releases on parole, furlough, emergency parole and


escort parole are given below:

Sl.No. Type of release Number of prisoners released

1 2 3

1. Parole 495

2. Furlough 613

3. Emergency Parole 83

4. Escort Parole 104


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II. LEGISLATION WITH WHICH THE DEPARTMENT IS

CONCERNED

The Department is administered under the following Acts:

 The Prisons Act, 1894 (General Act of 1894)

 The Prisoners Act, 1900 (Central Act of III of 1900)

 Transfer of Prisoners Act 1950

 Borstal School Act & Rules, 1925

 Andhra Pradesh Prison Rules, 1925

 Probation of Offenders Act, 1958

 Identification of Prisoners Act, 1920

III. WORK PROGRAMMES

Work programmes and vocational training are the most important


components of prison programmes. In fact, all other institutional activities
have to be planned around them. Work programmes and vocational training
have specified objectives. The principal objective is that an inmate should
be imparted such skills and attitudes as can facilitate his resettlement in
society after his release.

A. CENTRAL PRISONS

The Department provides training to prisoners in various trades in all


Central Prisons. These centers are intended as training cum production
centres. The production and sales of various products during 2007-08 is
given below;

1. Total production Rs. 2,77,76,515/-


2. Total receipts towards sale of products Rs. 2,34,62,798/-
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Prison-wise, production-wise and sales-wise particulars during the year
2007-08 are given in Annexure VI and VII at page Nos. 42 & 43.

B. OPEN JAILS

Unlike Central Prisons, work in Open Prison is diversified to suit socio-


economic back ground of different types of prisoners. Since almost all
prisoners hail from rural background, they are given training in agricultural
activities.

Since these Open Prisons are also Agricultural Colonies, more


importance is given on growing vegetables, fruits, fodder, besides training in
maintaining dairy farm, poultry farm and sheep rearing units.

The details of income of two institutions are furnished below:

(In Rs.)
Sl.N Name of the Jail Product Income
o.
1 2 3 4

1. Prisoners Agricultural Vegetables 4,28,562


Colony,
Cherlapally
Fruits 14,885

Vermicompost 18,438

Dairy 6,33,469

Poultry 6,88,355

Sheep 2,70,000

Green Fodder 2,32,160

Total 22,85,869

2. Prisoners Agricultural Vegetables 4,90,377


Colony,
Anantapur
Dairy 1,54,499

Total 6,44,876

Grand Total 29,30,745


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IV. BUDGET AND EXPENDITURE

A. BUDGET PROVIDED DURING THE YEAR AND ITS EXPENDITURE ON


ESTABLLISHMENT AS WELL AS ON DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
(in. Rs.)
(A) BUDGET :

(i) Under Plan 21,26,00,000

(ii) Non-Plan 96,01,56,000

Total Budget 117,27,56,000


(B) RELEASES

(i) Under Plan ---

(ii) Non-Plan 87,52,54,000

Total Releases 87,52,54,000


(C) EXPENDITURE

(i) Plan --

(ii) Non-Plan
(1) Development Expenditure 23,11,60,000

(2) Non-Development Expenditure 51,96,90,000


(Establishment Charges including Salaries)
Total Expenditure (i& ii) 75,08,50,000
Expenditure on Inmates
(1) Food 13,78,96,000
(2) Medical 65,48,000
(3) Clothing 90,60,000
(4) Vocational/Educational 4,06,89,000
(5) Welfare Activities
4,09,000
(6) Others
11,93,57,000
Total Expenditure on Inmates
31,39,59,000

The Daily Expenditure on maintenance of each


Prisoner including establishment charges = Total Expenditure on
Prisoners
No of days x Average
Lockup
= 73,29,92,000
366 X 15179
= Rs.131.94
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B. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
1. PERSPECTIVE PLAN ON PRISON REFORMS

Under the scheme of Perspective Plan on Prison Reforms, recognizing


the need to improve the conditions of the Prison staff and prisoners, the
Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India in consultation with the
Bureau of Police Research & Development (BPR&D) has made analysis of the
available infrastructure and assessment of the requirements of the State
governments to bring the Prisons upto certain minimum standards and
formulated a plan called Perspective Plan on Prison Reforms. This Plan
has the following components:-

a) Construction of new Prisons to reduce over crowding


b) Repairs and renovation of existing Jails
c) Improvement in sanitation and water supply and
d) Living accommodation for Prison staff

In order to address the deficiencies in the aforesaid areas of Prison


Administration, the Government of India introduced the above new Plan
Scheme to be implemented over a period of five years with an outlay of
Rs.1,800 Crores for the entire Country on cost sharing basis by Central
Government and State Government in the ratio of 75:25 for implementation
during the period from 2002-03 to 2006-07.
20

The State of Andhra Pradesh was allotted Rs.106.31 Crores for five
years from 2002-03 to 2006-07 under the above four components.
Accordingly, the action plan was prepared and submitted to the Government.
(Rs.in Crores)
Sl.No Name of the component Amount
. allotted

1 2 3

1. Construction of new prisons at Nizamabad, 35.81


Khammam, Nellore and Sangareddy
2. Repairs and renovations to District Jails, 24.13
Ongole, Srikakulam, Guntur, Anantapur, State
Jail for Women, Hyderabad, Central Prisons,
Hyderabad, Kadapa, Warangal, Rajahmundry
Cherlapalli, Sub Jails at Mahaboobabad,
Miryalaguda, Adilabad
3. Construction of quarters in all the Central 40.46
Prisons, District Jails, Prisoners Agricultural
Colonies and Sub Jails wherever the lands are
available.
4. Improving sanitation and water supply 5.91
arrangements in Central Prisons, District Jails
and Sub Jails.
Total 106.31

The construction of new prisons at Nizamabad and Khammam are


completed and the construction of new prisons at Sanga Reddy and Nellore
are under progress.

Allocation and Expenditure particulars of funds under Perspective Plan for


construction of new jails from 2002-03 to 2006-07

(Rs. In Crores)
Sl.No Name of the Jail Allocation Expenditure Balance
.
1 2 3 4 5

1. Nizamabad 9.00 9.00 0.00

2. Khammam 9.00 9.00 0.00


3. Nellore 9.00 1.92 7.08

4. Sanga Reddy 9.00 0.00 9.00

Total 36.00 19.92 16.08


21

The Repairs and renovations are taken up in 14 Jails. Except at Central


Prison, Rajahmundry and Hyderabad, at all the remaining places the
renovation works are completed.

Allocation and Expenditure particulars of funds under Perspective Plan for


Repairs and Renovations from 2002-03 to 2006-07
(Rs. In Lakhs)
Sl.No. Name of the Jail Allocation Expenditu Balance

re
1 2 3 4 5

1. Central Prison, Kadapa 310.37 259.65 50.72

2. Central Prison, Hyderabad 690.80 8.20 682.60

3. Central Prison, 675.00 261.67 413.33


Rajahmundry
4. Central Prison, Cherlapalli 100.00 0.00 100.00

5. Central Prison, Warangal 214.47 197.42 17.05

6. District Jail, Guntur 70.85 70.85 0.00

7. District Jail, Srikakulam 500.00 500.00 0.00

8. State Jail for Women, 18.00 18.00 0.00


Hyderabad
9. District Jail, Anantapur 49.53 49.53 0.00

10. DJ/Sub Jail, Adilabad 406.85 327.78 79.07

11. Sub Jail, Mahaboobabad 194.00 194.00 0.00

12. Sub Jail, Ongole 100.84 100.84 0.00

13. Open Air Jail, Nellore 16.33 16.33 0.00

14. Sub Jail, Miryalaguda 2.53 2.53 0.00

Total 3349.57 2006.80 1342.77


22

As against the (605) quarters proposed in various Jails, (603) quarters


were already completed and the remaining (2) quarters at Central Prison,
Hyderabad are to be constructed.

Allocation and Expenditure particulars of funds under Perspective Plan for


Staff quarters from 2002-03 to 2006-07
(Rs. In Lakhs)
Sl.No Name of the Jail Allocation Expenditu Balance

. re
1 2 3 4 5

1. Central Prison, Rajahmundry 288.69 288.69 0.00

2. Central Prison, Warangal 305.00 305.00 0.00

3. % Addl. IG of Prisons 16.85 16.85 0.00


(DT&TR)
4. CP, Hyd & SJW, Hyderabad 665.00 551.13 113.87

5. Central Prison, Kadapa 272.60 272.60 0.00

6. District Jail, Karimnagar 77.95 73.18 4.77

7. District Jail, Nalgonda 101.38 97.00 4.38

8. District Jail, Mahboobnagar 75.70 75.70 0.00

9. Prisoners Agricultural 199.00 148.70 50.30


Colony, Cherlapalli
10. District Jail, Adilabad 146.90 146.90 0.00

11. District Jail, Nizamabad 146.90 146.90 0.00

12. (29) Sub Jails 1106.09 1103.65 2.44

Total 3402.06 3226.30 175.76


23

Allocation and Expenditure particulars of funds under Perspective Plan for


sanitation & water supply from 2002-03 to 2006-07

(Rs. in Lakhs)
Sl.No Name of the Jail Allocation Expenditu Balance

. re
1 2 3 4 5

1. Central Prison, 44.91 44.91 0.00


Visakhapatnam
2. Central Prison, 5.52 5.52 0.00
Rajahmundry
3. Central Prison, Warangal 31.62 31.62 0.00

4. State Jail for Women, 8.58 8.58 0.00


Rajahmundry
5. Prisoners Agricultural 2.97 2.97 0.00
Colony, Cherlapalli
6. District Jail, 7.70 7.70 0.00
Mahboobnagar
7. District Jail, Nalgonda 4.30 4.30 0.00

8. District Jail, Karimnagar 3.50 3.50 0.00

9. (56) Sub Jails 170.27 170.27 0.00

Total 279.37 279.37 0.00


24

2. ANNUAL ACTION PLAN 2006-07

During the year 2006-07 an amount of Rs.2,126.00 Lakhs has been


allocated to take up the following works.
(Rs. In Lakhs)
Proposed allocations
Sl.No Name of the component
.
Central State Total
Share Share
1 2 3 4 5

I. Construction of New Jails

1. District Jail, Sangareddy 675.00 225.00 900.00

II. Repairs and Renovations

1. Central Prison, 506.25 168.75 675.00


Rajahmundry
2. Central Prison, 91.37 30.46 121.83
Hyderabad
3. Central Prison, Kadapa 6.64 2.21 8.85

4. Central Prison, Warangal 160.10 53.37 213.47

5. Central Prison, 75.00 25.00 100.00


Cherlapalli
6. Sub Jail, Adilabad (short 80.14 26.71 106.85
fall)
Total 920.25 306.75 1227.00

Grand Total (I+II) 1594.50 531.50 2126.00

Due to non receipt of Central Share amount of Rs.1,594.50 Lakhs in the


year 2006-07 and 2007-08, the above said works are being taken up in the
year 2008-09 as the Central Share amount of Rs.1,594.50 Lakhs was
received by the APSPHC Limited in the month of June, 2008.
25

V. INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

1. QUARTERLY REVIEW OF CASES OF UNDERTRIAL PRISONERS

Cases of all Undertrials who are in the jail for more than (3) months are
being reviewed by Undertrial Review Committee consisting of District and
Sessions Judge, Superintendent of Police and Superintendent of Jails every
quarter.

2. DEDICATED ESCORT FORCE IN TWIN CITIES

First time in the country (3) platoons are detailed exclusively for
transporting prisoners from city jails to local courts for regular trials.

3. HIGH LEVEL COMMITTEE

Provision of police escorts to prisoners is reviewed every month by the


Addl. Director General of Police, Commandants and other officers. This led to
increase in provision of escorts percentage of production during the year is
85%.

4. SECURITY COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Quarterly meetings are being held at mandal level and District level to
review the security arrangements in Jails. Half yearly meeting held at state
level.

5. COORDINATION WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS

 Building repairs and maintenance as well as construction is entrusted

to Police Housing Corporation.

 Education Department, Horticulture Department, Veterinary

Department, Industries Department, Revenue Department, Judicial


Department, Police Department, Women and Child Welfare

Department are rendering their services regularly.

26

 NGOs are undertaking medical camps and organizing legal aid and

help towards welfare of prisoners.

 RICA a Joint Venture of 4 Southern States which came into force in

1979 is imparting regular training to middle level and senior level

officers.

VI. REFORMS PENDING AT GOVERNMENT LEVEL

1. ANDHRA PRADESH RELEASE OF OFFENDERS ON COMMUNITY SERVICE

ACT

The Act proposes a new punishment in the form of community


service for offenders found guilty of non serious offences. This is an
alternative to imprisonment where offender is required to work for
community benefit in his spare time without any remuneration.

2. WORK RELEASE PROGRAMME

This is yet another innovative alternative where prisoners come out


of prison in the day time and work. They will report back to prison in the
evening. Such measures are already in vogue in Lucknow Model Jail,
Central Prison, Ahmedabad.

3. PROVIDING TELEPHONE FACILITY TO PRISONERS

Andhra Pradesh is seriously considering allowing prisoners to use


telephone facility to enable them to talk to their family members.
Telephone facility is already provided in Karnataka jails and it is reported
that it is successful. Andhra Pradesh has introduced it on experimental
basis in open jails and it was found to be highly successful.
27

4. RELEASE OF CONVICTS ON PROBATION ACT

This Act proposes regular review of cases of convicted prisoners


including life convicts after certain period of imprisonment and to release
them on probation under supervision.
5. PRISON WARD AT GANDHI HOSPITAL

A new prison ward at Gandhi Hospital, Hyderabad is proposed for


providing better treatment to prisoners. The matter relating to providing
infrastructural facilities like beds, medical equipment and sanctioning
medical staff is under consideration of Government.

VII. IMPLEMENTATION OF SCHEMES

1. MORAL UPLIFT OF PRISONERS

After the morning ablutions, prisoners practice meditation for 30


minutes everyday in their respective barracks. Besides meditation, yoga is
also practiced in all prisons. Important festivals are celebrated and moral
lectures are regularly given.
2. RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

Facilities like Television, Radio, News papers and indoor games are
provided in all the prisons of the State. In addition to the above, library
facilities are also available in larger prisoners. On national holidays like
Republic Day, Independence Day and Mahatma Gandhi Jayanthi, Sports and
Games competitions, Literary competitions, Cultural activities etc. are
organized.
28

3. VOCATIONAL TRAINING

Towards the object of making the life of prisoners more meaningful


and useful while in custody and afterwards, various skills are imparted to the
prisoners to help them reintegrated into society after their release. While
long term prisoners are provided with opportunities in acquiring skills in
various activities, short term prisoners are imparted training in programmes
like masonry, plumbing, electric wiring, house wiring etc. The National
Academy of Construction (NAC) a Government of India undertaking is
imparting skills to prisoners in these trades. Besides, Motor Driving is also
imparting to Short term prisoners at Central Prison, Cherlapalli.
4. COMPLAINT REDRESSAL MECHANISM
The institutions are being administered in a manner which is fair and
just. The grievances and complaints are being promptly looked into by the
Prison Officers at every level. Prisoners are given full liberty to ventilate
their grievances to the Institutional Officers, Inspecting Officers and visiting
Judicial Officers. Complaint boxes have been installed in all prisons which
are opened once in a month by the Secretary, State Legal Aid Services. The
keys of these complaint box are with the Secretary. Besides, prisoners are
free to send representations to State Human Rights Commission and
National Human Rights Commission and other Courts. Senior Officers during
their visit invariably give a patient hearing to the grievances of the prisoners.
Visiting Committees are constituted in many prisons redress the various
institutional problems.

5. TRANSPARENCY
Board of Visitors are constituted with official members and Non Official
members in most of the Prisons. These visitors have free access to the
Prison and regularly interact with prisoners. The grievances of prisoners, if
any, are brought to the notice of the Superintendent. Non-governmental
Organizations are being encouraged to undertake various activities like
conducting of medical camps,
29

counseling, celebrating Prisoners Welfare Day, AIDS awareness programmes,


educating prisoners’ children and imparting moral education. Media is also
encouraged to visit the prisons.

6. EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES
The Central Prisons pay special attention for providing general
education from 1 Standard to V Standard to the inmates. They are also
taught 3 Rs and arrangements are made for conducting examinations
leading to award of Certificates and Degrees.

Prisoners are pursuing higher education through correspondence


courses also. Universities are arranging contact classes and the examination
fee is waived. Special remission is awarded to those prisoners who are
successful in examinations. Apart from formal class room teachings by the
paid teachers, the inmates are also provided with books and writing
materials etc., at Government cost. The details of exams and prisoners who
appeared in various examinations during the year 2007-08 is given below:

Sl.No Name of the examination No. of inmates No. of inmates


. appeared passed

1 2 3 4

1. B.A. 1st year 127 56

2. B.A. 2nd year 95 44

3. B.A. final year 83 46

4. M.A. 1st year 21 9

5. M.A. 2nd year 18 6

Total 344 161


30
7. FAMILY TIES

To enable a convict prisoner to maintain social relations with his family


and the community and to save himself from the evils of prisonisation, a
system of releasing convicted prisoners periodically for temporary periods is
being implemented by way of granting parole and furlough.

Similarly to enable prisoners to attend emergencies like death, funeral


of near relative or marriage of near relative, prisoners are being sanctioned
emergency leave. Welfare Officers are posted in Prisons to help the
prisoners in maintaining contacts with their families and assist them in
securing release on parole and furlough. Welfare officers also help the
prisoners in securing loans for their rehabilitation and in solving domestic
problems.

8. CONTACT WITH OUTSIDE WORLD

There is no restriction on writing letters and receiving letters by the


prisoners. Convicted prisoners and remand prisoners are provided with one
post card at Government cost, once in a fortnight and once in a week
respectively.

9. INTERVIEWS

In order to enable inmates to have contacts with family members,


friends, advocates, interviews are permitted liberally. All under-trial
prisoners are being given interviews twice a week and also special interviews
while convicts are given two interviews fortnight and also special interviews.
Advocates of the prisoners are allowed regular access.

10. MEDICAL CARE

All Central Prisons are provided with full fledged hospitals with full time
Medical Officers and supporting staff. Except the District Jails at Nizamabad
and Mahaboobnagar all other District Jails were also provided with full time
Medical Officers.
31

Please refer Annexure-VIII at page No.44 for details.

At the time of admission all prisoners are subjected to medical


screening and prisoners requiring specialized treatment are referred to
outside hospitals. Prisoners suffering from infectious diseases are
segregated appropriately. Except 3 Central Prisons, Deputy Civil Surgeons
are posted in all Central Prisons. Pathology labs with pathologists and Lab-
technicians are functioning in all Central Prisons except one. Special care is
being taken in giving treatment to mentally ill prisoners as suggested by
Mental Health Hospitals.

There is no restriction on purchase of medicines or on treatment of


prisoners. Needy prisoners are referred to District Headquarters hospitals
and specialized hospitals.

An amount of Rs.18.24 Lakhs has been provided during the year 2007-
08 under normal state plan for continuation of Medical staff at 5 District Jails
stationed at Nizamabad, Karimnagar, Sangareddy, Guntur & Vijayawada to
provide timely medical treatment to the sick prisoners.

11. DIET
Prisoners are being provided with nutritious diet. Prisoners are
provided with breakfast, 2 times tea, launch and dinner. Every Sunday non-
vegetarian is served. Prisoners are given either Chicken or mutton. Sick
prisoners are provided with medical diet and special diet is provided to all
prisoners on important festivals. Children of women prisoners are being
provided with special diet consisting of milk, egg and banana everyday.
32

12. SANITATION AND HYGIENE


All prisons in Andhra Pradesh are provided with bore wells with over
head tanks. For drinking purpose, potable water is being supplied. As per
norms, septic toilets for day and night use in the ratio of 1:6 are provided in
all the prisons. Bathrooms are also provided at a ratio of 1:10. Prisoners are
also supplied with toilet soaps, washing soaps and coconut oil regularly.
Facilities for hair cutting are also provided. All living accommodation is
provided with fans, tube lights and adequate ventilation. At Central Prison,
Cherlapalli and Visakhapatnam sewerage treatment plants are constructed.

VIII. OTHER SPECIAL FEATURES

1. CONSTITUTION OF PRISON DEVELOPMENT BOARD

The Government have constituted a Prison Development Board under


the Chairmanship of the Hon’ble Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh to over-
see the development of the department. The A.P. Legislative Assembly has
enacted the Board on 13th March, 2001. The Act came into force on 13 th
April, 2001. The Draft Rules are under the approval of the Government.

2. CONSTITUTION OF HIGH LEVEL COMMITTEE

Non-production of under-trial prisoners regularly before the courts has


been a major problem for the department. The main reason for non-
production is non-availability of escort force. In order to overcome this
problem Government have constituted a Committee with Addl. Director
General of Police (Law & Order) as Chairman, Inspector General of Prisons,
Addl. Inspector General of Prisons, Deputy Commissioner of Police (CAR),
Hyderabad and Commandant, SAR CPL, Hyderabad as members.
33

The Committee reviews the production of remand prisoners in Courts


every month and ensures that the officers concerned to improve the
percentage of production. Thus, the problem of non-production of under-trial
prisoners in Courts is solved to a great extent.

3. VIDEO - LINKAGE

The Production of remand prisoners before the respective courts has


remained a major problem due non-availability of regular escort force
resulting in unrest among the under trial Prisoners.

With a view to ensure the regular production of remand prisoners


before the courts and reduce to burden on the Police department, Video
Linkage facility was established for the first time in 2001 between Central
Prison, Hyderabad and Criminal Courts Complex, Hyderabad on a pilot basis
utilizing the electronic technology. On account of this facility the remand
prisoners need not be produced physically before the Court for extension of
remand. This system has been working satisfactorily since it’s launch in
January, 2001.

The Government of Andhra Pradesh have extended the facility to 14


more Prisons and 15 Courts at a cost of Rs.2.50 crores. The system is
successfully working at all places. Conducting of trials through Video Linkage
is also being given a very serious thought and the possibilities are being
explored.

 This is also first of its kind in the entire Country.

4. DISTRICT LEVEL SECURITY COMMITTEE MEETING

Government in G.O.Ms.No.106/Home (Prisons.B2) Department,


dated 8-5-2001 read with G.O.Ms.No.176, Home (Prisons.B2) Department,
dated 17-6-2002 have constituted State, District & Mandal level Prison
Security Review Committees to review the security of the prisons.
34

State level committee meets once in 6 months while the District &
Mandal level committee meets once in a quarter in the premises of prison/jail
and review the security arrangements and make recommendations
wherever necessary.

5. PRISONERS PANCHAYAT SYSTEM

With a view to create a sense of responsibility and self-reliance among


the prisoners, Prisoners Panchayat Boards are constituted in all Central
Prisons (CPs), District Jails (DJs), Prisoners Agricultural Colonies (PACs) and
State Jails for Women (SJsW). In Central Prisons and Prisoners Agricultural
Colonies the Board consists of elected convicted prisoners only, while in
District Jails and State Jails for Women it consists of under trail prisoners also.

Convicts who have more than six months sentence to serve are eligible
for election to the Board. Prisoners convicted of offences involving moral
turpitude like rape, dacoity, robbery etc. are debarred from contesting the
election.

The Board is headed by the Superintendent and regularly reviews


matters relating to welfare of prisoners i.e. ration, sanitation, recreation etc.

6. UNDERTRIAL REVIEW COMMITTEE

For speedy disposal of long pending cases, the Government have


constituted an Undertrail Review Committee headed by the respective
District and Sessions Judge in each district. The Superintendent of Police and
Superintendent of the concerned prison are the members. This committee
meets every quarter and reviews the long pending cases of under trial
prisoners and takes remedial measures for disposal of the cases.
35
7. CITIZENS’ CHARTER

The main objective is to provide quality services to the Citizens, though


the department does not have much public interface directly. The
department does not lag behind in providing better services to the Citizens in
areas where public interface exists.

The Department is providing the following services:

 Within one hour from the time of receipt of application by


Superintendents, interviews will be allowed with relatives and friends
etc.

 Prisoners will be released on bail by 4.00 P.M. after receipt of orders


upto 2.00 P.M. Releases will be made on that day itself after receipt of
the orders between 2–6 P.M.

 Complaints will be solved within one week at Superintendents’ level,


within 15 days at Deputy Inspector General of Prison level and within
(1) month at Head of the Department level.

8. RETREAT
The Retreat, ‘a programme for review and introspection and to identify
new methodologies for better administration’ is being organized since 2001
in the Department. On the request of the Department, the Government is
giving administrative sanction to utilize an amount of Rs.5.00 Lakhs funds
available under the Head of Account “2056 Jails – MH-001 Direction and
Administration, SH (01) Headquarters Office – 200 Other Administrative
Expenditure (Non-Plan) every year. During the financial year under review,
the Retreat was conducted from 23rd November, 2007 to 26th November,
2007 at Regional Level, and on 6th, 7th, 10th and 11th December, 2007 at State
Level. The meetings have brought out recommendations on various aspects
for better administration. These recommendations are being implemented
after the approval of the Government.

36

9. TRAINING OF OFFICERS AND STAFF

The State Institute of Correctional Administration, Hyderabad which


was established in 1984 has conducted in-service training for 2,560
personnel. In addition, 37 Officers have undergone training at Regional
Institute of Correctional Administration (RICA), Vellore, 42 Officers & others
at Dr. MCR Human Resources Development (MCRHRD), Hyderabad & 01
Officer at Sardar Vallabhai Patel National Police Academy, Hyderabad.

10. CHILDREN SENT TO OUTSIDE SCHOOL

Andhra Pradesh has started a very novel and innovative measure with
regard to the children of the female prisoners. With a view to see that
children of the prisoners have a normal up-bringing in healthy atmosphere
and are not punished for their parent misdeeds, the Department has taken
up an innovative step of sending these children to school outside the prison.
This is also first of its kind in the country. Everyday children in the age group
of 3-6 years are sent to a school outside the prison.

11. STALL AT INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION

Every year, Prison Department runs a stall at All India Industrial


Exhibition held at Hyderabad to exhibit and sell jail made articles like Bed
sheets, Towels, Napkins, Steel and Wooden furniture, Carpets, Durries,
Phenyle, Soaps etc.. The total sale of products in the exhibition during the
year 2007-08 was Rs.7,54,804/-

12. GENERAL FUNCTIONING OF THE DEPARTMENT

During the year the relationship between Officers and Staff was cordial
and the general administration in the Department was very peaceful, smooth
and effective.
---000---

INDEX
Sl.No Item Page
. Nos

1 2 3

I. An Overview of the Prison Department 1-15

(A) Administrative Set-Up 2-4

(1) Directorate 2-3


(2) Regional Offices 3

(3) Training Institute 4

(B) Prison Administration 4-12

(1) Central Prisons 4-6

(2) District Jails 6-7

(3) Open Prisons 7-8

(4) Semi Open Prisons 8-9

(5) Open Camp 9

(6) State Jails for Women 9-10

(7) Borstal School 11

(8) District Sub Jails Offices 11-


12

(9) Sub Jails 12

(C) Prison Statistics 12-


15

(1) Population 12-


13

(2) Escapes 13

(3) Deaths 14
(4) Parole 14

(5) Emergency Parole 14

(6) Escort Parole 15

(7) Furlough 15

II. Legislation with which the Department is 16


concerned.
III. Work Programmes 16-
17

(A) Central Prisons 16-


17

(B) Open Jails 17

IV. Budget and Expenditure 18-


24

(A) The Budget Provided during the financial 18


year and its expenditure on Establishment
as well as on Developmental Activities.
(B) Developmental Activities 19-
24

(1) Perspective Plan on Prison Reforms 19-


23

(2) Annual Action Plan 2006-07 24

V. Integrated Approach to Criminal Justice 25-


System 26

(1) Quarterly Review of cases of Under-trial prisons 25

(2) Dedicated Escort Force in Twin Cities 25

(3) High Level Committee 25

(4) Security Committee meetings 25

(5) Coordination with other department 25-


26

Sl.No Item Page


. Nos

1 2 3

VI. Reforms pending at Government level 26-


27

(1) Andhra Pradesh Release of Offenders on 26


Community Service Act
(2) Work Release Programmes 26

(3) Providing Telephone facility to prisoners 26

(4) Release of convicts on Probation Act 27

(5) Prison Ward at Gandhi Hospital 27

VII. Implementation of Schemes 27-


32

(1) Moral Uplift of Prisoners 27

(2) Recreational Facilities 28

(3) Vocational Training 28

(4) Complaint Redressal Mechanism 28

(5) Transparency 28-


29

(6) Educational Facilities 29

(7) Family Ties 30

(8) Contact with outside world 30

(9) Interviews 30

(10) Medical Care 30-


31

(11) Diet 31

(12) Sanitation and Hygiene 32

VIII. Other Special Features 32-


36

(1) Constitution of Prison Development Board 32

(2) Constitution of High Level Committee 32-


33

(3) Video Linkage 33

(4) District Level Security Committee Meeting 33-


34

(5) Prisoners Panchayat System 34

(6) Under-trial Review Committee 34

(7) Citizens’ Charter 35

(8) Retreat 35

(9) Training of Officers and Staff 36

(10) Children sent to outside School 36

(11) Stall at Industrial Exhibition 36

(12) General Functioning of the Department 36


Annexure – I 37

Annexure – II 38

Annexure – III 39

Annexure - IV 40

Annexure – V 41

Annexure – VI 42

Annexure – VII 43

Annexure – VIII 44

(ii)
PREFACE

I am happy to release the administrative report of the Andhra Pradesh


Prisons Department for the year 2007-08. During the year significant
progress and achievements were made. Among the achievements are
constructions of new prisons at Khammam and Mahaboobabad. Towards the
objective of reintegration of prisoners into mainstream of society, new
training programmes were introduced at Central Prison, Cherlapalli in the
form of Computer Learning Centre and Motor Driving Course.

Andhra Pradesh Prisons Department is considered as most progressive


of the Prisons Departments in the country. Perhaps Andhra Pradesh is the
only State where the entire prison cadre is professionally trained. During the
year 2007-08, the Department has continued the momentum in its progress
towards improving living conditions of prisoners and orienting the staff to be
more professional. There were no untoward incidents in the prison
administration and the administration was smooth through out.

I congratulate all the officers and staff of the Planning Research and
Development Cell for working hard to bring out this report.

I hope that this report would be useful for administrators, research


scholars, academic personnel and others.

LOKENDRA SHARMA, I.P.S.


Director General and
Hyderabad, Inspector General of Prisons and
Dated: 11-11-2008 Correctional Services
41

ANNEXURE - V

Number of diseases and deaths during the


financial year 2007-08
Sl.No Name of the Number
. disease of deaths

1 2 3

1. Heart disease 56

2. Lung disease 08

3. Tuberculosis 12

4. HIV 07

5. Disease related to 04

brain
6. Multi Organ Failure 08

7. Kidney disease 02

8. Liver disease 01

9. Injuries 01

10. GIT 01

11. Septicamia 02

12. Suicide 03

13. Natural Death 03

14. Others 12

15. Awaiting PM Report 03

TOTAL 123
OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR GENERAL & INSPECTOR
GENERAL OF PRISONS & CORRECTIONAL SERVICES
GOVERNMENT OF ANDHRA PRADESH
HYDERABAD – 500 024