Type of tissue: A longitudinal section of the larynx. Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin. Special features: 1. Anatomical features of the larynx: • Vestibule. • Vestibular fold. • Ventricle. • Sub-glottis. • Glottis. • Conus elasticus. • Vocal ligament. • Vocalis. • Thyroid cartilage. • Cricoid cartilage.

2. In this slide, the main focus is on the vocal fold and on the vestibular fold. 3. Orientation: • In the lowest magnification, The vestibular fold has glands in the submucousa. • In the lowest magnification the vocal fold does not have glands in the submucousa. 4. The vestibule and vestibular fold are divided into five layers: • Epithelium – pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells: (cilia, basal bodies, basement membrane). • Lamina propria – A C.T layer that contains some lymphocytes. • Submucousa –A loose C.T layer that has mixed salivary glands. The serous acini are dark and the mucous acini are clear. • Dense C.T layer – the quadrangular membrane. • Perichondrium and hyaline cartilage (the thyroid cartilage).
mucousa

• Dense C.T that contains a lot of H2O and it can accumulate more H2O and grow.5. (in case of an anaphylactic shock the accumulation of H2O will cause an obstruction of the air ways). mucousa  There is no submucousa! . • Lamina propria – appears as white spaces. • Perichondrium and hyaline cartilage (the thyroid cartilage).T layer – the upper edge of the conus elasticus and the vocal ligament. This lamina propria is composed of loose C. • Striated muscle (vocalis muscle). The vocal fold is divided into four layers: • Epithelium – stratified squamous non keratinized epithel.

basal bodies. • Muscular layer – vocalis and part of the thyroepiglotic muscle. The sub glottis is divided into five layers: • Epithelium – pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells: (cilia. basement membrane).T • Submucousa –A loose C. The serous acini are dark and the mucous acini are clear. mucousa . • Lamina propria – becomes completely loose C. • Perichondrium and the hyaline cartilage (the thyroid cartilage).6.T layer that has mixed salivary glands.

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nerves and adipocytes that accompany the tissue. • Membranous part – a smooth muscle which connects the two open ends of each cartilage ring.T. The trachea is composed of two parts: • Cartilaginous part – “C” shaped hyaline cartilage rings that are interconnected by C. 2. 3. Special features: 1. Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin.Type of tissue: A cross section of the trachea. Surrounding the trachea are blood vessels. . When we look at the specimen in the lowest magnification we can identify in the postero-lateral part a piece of the trachea that shows both parts.

T.4. (the basement membrane is very thick).  Between the mucousa and submucousa is an elastic membrane barrier but it is not stained in H&E. Adventitia is the outermost connective tissue covering of any organ. • Hyaline cartilage. • Sub-mucousa – loose C. vessel. pericardial and pleural surfaces).T with a high amount of lymphocytes. • Adventitia – loose C.T with mixed salivary glands. This lymphatic tissue is part of BALT (bronchus associated lymphoid tissue).( In contrast to serousal surfaces which cover peritoneal. Classification of the cartilaginous part: (from the lumen) • Epithel: pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells. . • Lamina propria – loose C. (because the organ is located in the mediastinum). (serous are dark and mucous are clear). or other structures.

T. • Smooth muscle layer – regulates the diameter of the bronchial lumen. (the basement membrane is very thick).5.T with mixed salivary glands.T with a high amount of lymphocytes. Classification of the membranous part: (from the lumen) • Epithel: pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells. • Adventitia – loose C. Adventitia is the outermost connective tissue covering of any organ. (serous are dark and mucous are clear). This lymphatic tissue is part of BALT (bronchus associated lymphatic tissue). vessel. (because the organ is located in the mediastinum). • Sub-mucousa – loose C. or other structure  There is no cartilage! . • Lamina propria – loose C.

trachea Cartilaginous part Membranous part esophagus .

Epithel Lamina propria submucousa cartilage .

Epithel Lamina propria submucousa cartilage adventitia .

Pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells ciliae Basal bodies BM .

ciliae Basal bodies Pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells .

Cartilaginous part Membranous part .

Epithel Lamina propria submucousa Smooth muscle .

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• Terminal bronchiole. The bronchial tree is composed of: • bronchus. . Special features: 1. • Respiratory bronchiole. • Bronchioles. 2.Type of tissue: A longitudinal section of the lung. The lungs begin at the bifurcation of the trachea which creates the bronchial tree. • Alveoli. Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin.

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3. bronchus: (composition) • Epithel – pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells. • Lamina propria – loose C.T tissue with lymphocytes. Part of BALT. • Smooth muscle – muscularis mucousa. • Submucousa. • Hyaline cartilage. • Adventitia. The deeper we go inside the bronchial tree, The hyaline cartilage becomes less complete and starts to form a disc-like formation. On the other hand the smooth muscle will become more promininant and circular. Three things change from different segments of the bronchial tree:  Epithelium size changes.  The cartilage disappears.  The smooth muscle content increases.

4. bronchiole: (composition) • Epithel – pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells. • Lamina propria – loose C.T tissue with lymphocytes. Part of BALT. • Smooth muscle – muscularis mucousa.
when the cartilage disappears it is the spot where the bronchus becomes a bronchiolus. In this segment there is no submucousa. 5. Terminal bronchiole: (composition): • Epithel – simple columnar epithel. • Lamina propria – loose C.T tissue with lymphocytes. Part of BALT. • Smooth muscle – muscularis mucousa. The change between the bronchiolus and the terminal bronchiole is seen at the level of the epithelium. The epithelium becomes columnar ( a thinner layer of cells aids respiration).

6. Respiratory bronchiole: (composition): • Epithel – simple cuboidal epithel. • Lamina propria – loose C.T tissue with lymphocytes. Part of BALT. • Smooth muscle – muscularis mucousa.
The epithelium of the respiratory bronchioles becomes cuboidal. This is actually the first part of the active respiratory system. The respiratory bronchioles divide into alveolar ducts that have no walls. The alveolar ducts are simply openings in the alveoli where respiration occurs. 7. alveoli: The alveoli are hollow spaces that are enclosed by a wall. The wall of the alveoli is composed of two cell types: • Pneumocyte type 1 – very narrow cells that participate in gas exchange. their cytoplasm is barely seen and the nuclei are narrow.

T is highly vasculated.Pneumocyte type 2 – these cells have a round and large nucleus. intra-alveolar C. This C. The surfactant reduces the alveolar surface tension and keeps the alveoli from adhering to each other and collapsing. they secrete a lipoprotein which is a main component of surfactant.T: This connective tissue is composed of high amounts of elastic fibers that provide the elastic characteristics of the lungs. 8. These cells do not take part in gas exchange(directly). • .

How to identify the different blood vessels? • • • • Pulmonary artery – accompanies the bronchi. Pulmonary vein – isolated. In the connective tissue layer.There are two types of circulation in the lungs: • Pulmonary circulation. These are large eosinophilic cells called dust cells or alveolar macrophage. there is also a special type of macrophage that can even enter the wall of the alveoli. Bronchial artery – accompanies the bronchi. They phagocyte dust and exit the lungs via lymph nodes. besides resident cells that can normally be found. Bronchial vein – accompanies the bronchi. . • Systemic circulation.

• Alveoli are lined with pneumocytes type 1 and type 2 on the alveolar wall. They secrete a protein called CC16 (Clara cell secretory protein 16). Decrease in CC16 levels is a major cause of Asthma and COPD.9. . • Clara cells – these are non ciliated dome-shaped cells located between the cuboidal cells of the respiratory bronchiole. and a surface active agent that prevents luminal adhesion especially during expiration. The gas exchange occurs in capillaries adjacent to the alveoli where a blood air barrier is formed. other: • Visceral pleura – a layer of simple squamous mesothelium the surrounds the lung.

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The whole bronchial tree is part of BALT: the bronchus associated lymphatic tissue.  Endothelium. • . In the C.  Basement membrane of pneumocytes type1.T there are lymphocytes and lymphatic follicles.  Basement membrane of endothelium.• The blood air barrier – composed of four layer:  Pneumocytes type1.

bronchus .

bronchus .

bronchiole .

Pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells .

Respiratory bronchiole .

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alveolus .

Pneumocyte type2 Pneumocyte type1 capillary .

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. The ink will provide a characteristic black color. This slide shows the same structures as the lung in H&E.Type of tissue: A cross section of the lung. The only focus in this slide is on the blood vessels. 2. • Indian ink – this ink is injected IV and eventually reaches the blood vessels of the lungs. Special features: 1. Staining method: • Hematoxylin and Eosin.

Blood vessels .

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summary
bronchus epithel Pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells + BALT + + bronchiolus Pseudo stratified columnar ciliated epithel with goblet cells + BALT + Terminal bronchiole Simple columnar epithel + BALT + Respiratory bronchiole Simple cuboidal epithel + Clara cells + BALT + -

Lamina propria Smooth muscle submucousa

cartilage

Hyaline cartilage that degenerates into cartilage islands +

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adventitia

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Type of tissue: A cross section of the esophagus. Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin. Special features: 1. The esophagus and the entire GI tract are composed of the following layers: • Epithel. • Lamina propria. • Muscularis mucousa. • Submucousa. • Muscularis externa – a smooth muscle layer. • Adventitia.
mucousa

2. Each layer more into details: • Epithel – stratified squamous non keratinized epithel. Has three layers: stratum basale, stratum spinosum, stratum plancellulare. The epithelial layer provides a mechanical protection against food irritation. • Lamina propria – loose C.T. this is the only part of the GI tract that is not part of MALT. • Muscularis mucousa – a circular smooth muscle layer. • Submucousa – a loose C.T layer that contains esophageal glands. These glands are composed of mucous secreting cells (lightly stained) that protect the surface of the esophagus. • Muscularis externa – this smooth muscle layer is sub divided into two layers:  Inner layer – circular orientation.  Outer layer – longitudinal orientation.

Located between the submucousa and the muscularis externa. These plexi initiate the peristaltic movement and innervate glands.T layer that also contains nerves and blood vessels. This is a thick plexus that is located between the circular and longitudinal layers of the muscularis externa.  Myenteric plexus – AKA Auerbach’s plexus.• The muscularis externa contains two important nervous plexi that are part of the enteric nervous system:  Submucousal plexus – AKA Meissner’s plexus. It is a C. Adventitia – in this case because there is no serous membrane it is an adventitia layer that is the outer most cover. .

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epithel Lamina propria Muscularis mucousa submucousa Muscularis externa adventitia .

circular .Myenteric plexus Outer .longitudinal Inner .

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Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin. Special features: 1. The stomach is composed of the following layers: • Epithel. • Submucousa. • Sub serousa. • Muscularis mucousa.Type of tissue: A section of the stomach. • serousa mucousa . • Lamina propria. • Muscularis externa – a smooth muscle layer.

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and from digestive enzymes. Each layer more into details: • Epithel – simple columnar mucous secreting epithel. It is very large and very thick. the cells would be autolysed  peptic ulcer.2. • Lamina propria – the lamina propria is a part of MALT.T which is part of MALT. Without it.  Gastric glands. The mucous creates a thick layer to protect cells from the low pH of the gastric juice. These cells are very pail because the mucous is washed during the preparation.  Gastric pits – these are protrusions of the free surface of the stomach into the lamina propria. The gastric glands open into these pits. and can is composed of three main parts:  Lymphoreticular C. . It provides an immunological response against foreign elements that enter the stomach.

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which means that there are a lot of rER in the cytoplasm. They secrete H+ and Cl.  Chief cells: these cells are found in the basal part of the mucousa. The H+ provides the gastric juice its acidic pH (1-2). The cells are round with pale cytoplasm and they secrete mucous.The cellular composition of the gastric glands includes:  Mucous secreting neck cells: found in the apical part of the mucousa.  Parietal cells: found in the middle portion of the mucousa. They also release intrinsic factor which is needed for B12 absorption. It is stored as a zymogen (pre enzyme form). These cells are large with round nuclei and an eosinophilic cytoplasm. They are strongly basophilic because of intensive protein production (pepsinogen). .into intracellular tubules that conduct the ions into the lumen of the stomach. From a low magnification these cells appear as white bands.

T Muscularis externa – a very thick muscular layer that is aimed to protect the peritoneum from the gastric content. These cells appear as dark clusters under silver impregnation.• • • • •  Enteroendocrine cells – these cells belong to the GEP family (gastro-entero-pancreatic cells) and to the APUD family.  Outer – longitudinal orientation. Sub serousa. They secrete hormones into the blood or into the lamina propria that will regulate the motility and secretory activity of the GI system. Serousa.loose C. Submucousa.  Middle – circular orientation. . Muscularis mucousa – a circular smooth muscle layer. Therefore it consist of three layers:  Inner – oblique orientation.

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epithel Lamina propria Muscularis mucousa submucousa Muscularis externa .

epithel Lamina propria Muscularis mucousa submucousa Gastric pit .

Simple columnar mucous secreting epithel Mucous secreting neck cells .

Mucous secreting neck cells Parietal cells Chief cells .

Mucous secreting neck cells .

Parietal cells Chief cells .

Inner oblique Middle circular Outer longitudinal .

Sub serousa serousa .

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In this specimen all mucous secreting cells will be stained in purple. Special features: 1. This is a specific staining that shows carbohydrates in purple. Staining method: PAS – periodic acid schiff. . • Mucous secreting neck cells.Type of tissue: A section of the stomach. The focus of this slide will be on the mucous secreting cells: • Surface epithelium.

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Special features: 1. Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin. • Duodenal portion. The pylorus has two parts and the aim is to investigate the differences between them: • Stomach portion.Type of tissue: A section of the gastro-duodenal junction (pylorus). In this slide the focus is on the pylorus. .

 Enteroendocrine cells – part of the APUD and GEP families They secrete hormones into the blood or into the lamina propria that will secrete peptides: VIP.T. • Submucousa – loose C.2.T mucousa . The lamina propria also contains glands (pyloric glands) that are composed of two cell types:  Mucous secreting cells. • Lamina propria – has a high amount of C. The stomach portion of the pylorus: (division into layers): • Epithelium – simple columnar epithel (mucous secreting). which is part of MALT. Bombesin that regulate the motility and secretory activity of the GI system.  No parietal and chief cells! • Muscularis mucousa – a smooth muscle layer.

• • • Muscularis externa – composed of three layers:  Inner oblique.  Middle circular. Sub serousa. . Serousa.  Outer longitudinal.

(enterocytes). These smooth muscle bundles provide motility to the villus. • Lamina propria – composed of lymphoreticular C. It forms intestinal villi which are finger-like protrusions into the lumen of the small intestine (covered by epithelium). Within the villus are smooth muscle cells (red bands) that are detached from the muscularis mucousa. The duodenal part of the pylorus: (division into layers): • Epithelium – simple columnar epithel with brush border and goblet cells. These are intestinal glands known as the crypts of Leiberkun. . Within the real/well defined lamina propria there are some structures with lumens.3.T (MALT).

 Enteroendocrine cells. .  Pannet cells – these cells maintain the mucousal innate immunity by secreting antimicrobial substances.The crypts of Leiberkuhn are composed of three types of cells:  Goblet cells. lysozyme… and an eosinophilic granulated apical part the contains transport vesicles. are found in the basal most part and they have a basophilic basal portion which contains zymogens: alpha-defensins.

T that contains a very high amount of mucous secreting glands called Brunner glands. Submucousa – loose C. in between the glands there will be smooth muscle remnants (eosinophilic). Brunner glands are characteristic only for the duodenum. As a result. The Brunnner glands secrete an alkaline mucous secretion to buffer the acidic chyme that reaches the proximal part of the small intestine. These glands grow so much that they pierce into the muscularis mucousa and enter the lamina propria. . Muscularis mucousa – a smooth muscle layer.• • Within the lamina propria there are also few Brunner glands. This higher pH is also optimal to activate digestive enzymes that reach the duodenum.

2.  Outer longitudinal. . the pyloric glands do not contain chief cells and parietal cells. Muscularis externa – composed of two layers:  Inner circular. 3. The best way to know which part of the pylorus is shown is by looking at the epithelium. The pylorus has a very muscular external layer which is the sphincter itself. In the stomach part of the pylorus. Serousa.• • • Tips: 1. Sub serousa.

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duodenum stomach .

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Staining method: PAS + Hematoxylin.Type of tissue: A section of the gastro-duodenal junction. the mucous secreting cells are easier to detect. Special features: 1. . With PAS. In this slide it is much easier to make the difference between the gastric portion and the duodenal portion of the pylorus.

Special features: 2. The basement membrane will be stained purple because it contains reticular fibers that have a high amount of carbohydrates.secrete mucous. • Goblet cells within the epithelium will be stained in a dark blue/purple color (PAS positive). • Goblet cells within the crypts of Leiberkuhn will be stained in a dark blue/purple color (PAS positive). • Brunner glands in the submucousa and in the basal part of the lamina propria are also stained in purple. . 3. The stomach portion of the pylorus: • The surface epithelium is PAS positive – it secretes mucous. 4. Duodenal part of pylorus: • The surface epithel is not stained with PAS because it does not secrete mucous. • The pyloric glands are also PAS positive and they are located in the lamina propria.

Stomach part Duodenal part .

Stomach part Duodenal part .

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• Sub serousa. • Submucousa. The jejunum is composed of: • Epithel. • Muscularis externa. • Serousa.Type of tissue: A cross section of the jejunum. Special features: 1. • Muscularis mucousa. • Lamina propria. . Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin.

The lamina propria is designed as finger-like protrusions that are called intestinal villi.2. More into details: • Epithel. • Submucousa – the submucousa consist of protrusions that go into the lamina propria.T as part of the MALT family and some lymphatic follicles can often be seen. These are called valves of Kerckeing.composed of simple columnar epithelium with brush border and Goblet cells (enterocytes). Within the villi. these villi also have smooth muscles that control motility. • Lamina propria – composed of lymphoreticular C. In the basal part of the lamina propria the crypts of Leiberkuhn are present. plasma cells secrete immunoglobulins (IgA). (the Brunner glands are not present! They are strictly found in the duodenum) . they increase the surface area of the small intestine and assist absorption.

3.cells (microfolds) : these cells are found above lymphatic rich areas and they are antigen transporting cells 4. • Intestinal villi. Between these two layers of smooth muscle are two nerve plexi of the enteric nervous system:  Myenteric plexus.  Outer – longitudinal. • Goblet cells. • M. Cellular population on the surface of the jejunum: • Epithelial cells. Structures that increase the absorption surface area: • Brush border.  Submucousal plexus.circular. • Valve of Kerckring. • .Muscularis externa – is composed of two layers:  Inner .

. In the center of the intestinal villi are found lacteals.5. These are lymph vessels (capillaries) that collect absorbed chylomicrones.

mucousa

Valve of Kerckeing

Muscularis externa

Valve of Kerckeing

Crypts of Leiberkuhn

Valve of Kerckeing

Muscularis mucousa

Inner circular

Outer longitudinal

Lamina propria Goblet cell enterocytes .

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. • Sub serousa. • Muscularis mucousa. The jejunum and ileum are composed of: • Epithel.Type of tissue: A cross section of the jejunum and ileum. • Lamina propria. Staining method: Goldner’s trichrome. Special features: 1. • Muscularis externa. • Serousa. • Submucousa.

3. . Nuclei are stained in dark blue. 4. All mucous secreting cells in the slide will be stained in light green.2. The basal part of the cells is dark basophilic and the apical portion contains eosinophilic granules that contain zymogens. The bottom line: this slide comes to show us the Panneth cells in the crypts of Leiberkuhn.

Pannet cell .

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• Muscularis externa.Type of tissue: A longitudinal section of the colon. • Submucousa. • Sub serousa. • Lamina propria. . Special features: 1. • Serousa. Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin. • Muscularis mucousa. The colon is composed of: • Epithel.

The cell population in these crypts is: goblet cells and entero endocrine cells. Also consist of some M-cells. Also in the lamina propria some lymphatic follicles can be seen. . There are no intestinal villi. • Lamina propria – part of GALT. More into details: • Epithel: simple columnar epithel small amounts of micro villi and goblet cells (enterocytes). In that case it is taken between tiniae coli (3 elongated bundles). (there are no pannet cells. • Muscularis externa – mostly composed of 2 layers but in some cases it can be seen that the outer longitudinal layer is missing. Contains a lymphoreticular connective tissue.). the elongated coulmnar structures are actually glands (elongated tubular glands) which are elongated crypts of Leiberkuhn.2.

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Type of tissue: A cross section of the vermiform appendix. • Muscularis mucousa. The appendix is composed of: • Epithel. Special features: 1. . • Muscularis externa. • Serousa. • Lamina propria. Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin. • Submucousa. • Sub serousa.

2. • Submucousa – can be divided into two parts: the upper portion is occupied by secondary lymphatic follicles and a Lower part that is composed of loose C. Also contains HEVs. There are no tiniae coli (except for the opening from the colon).T. Consist of secondary lymphatic follicles. Also consist of some M-cells. Contains a lymphoreticular connective tissue. • Muscularis externa – mostly composed of 2 layers. • Lamina propria – part of GALT. More into details: • Epithel: simple columnar epithel small amounts of micro villi and goblet cells (enterocytes). .

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Special features: 1. In this slide we will find both the rectum and the anal canal.Type of tissue: A cross section of the ano-rectal junction Staining method: Hematoxylin and Eosin. We will see the histological changes that the tissues undergo. .

The intestinal part of the anorectal junction (the distal part of the rectum): This layer is composed of: • Epithel – simple columnar epithel with goblet cells.composed of 2 layers (no tiniae coli). • Adventitia.2. • Sub mucousa – loose C.T • Muscularis externa.the rectum is located infra-peritoneally. • Muscularis mucousa.  This part is identical to the colon histologically. • Lamina propria – GALT. .

2. • Lamina propria – GALT is connected to the submucousa (no muscularis mucousa. Columnar zone: • The epithelium partially changes: it is simple columnar epithel which has some stratified squamous non keratinized islands. • Hemorrhoidal zone. it breaks into bundles and disappears). . • Cutaneous zone. The anal part of the anorectal junction: • The architecture in this part changes three times and divides the anal part into three sub parts: • Columnar zone.

Hemorrhoidal zone: • The epithelium is stratified squamous non keratinized. • Muscularis externa – the inner circular portion is becoming very thick and will eventually end forming the internal anal sphincter which can not be voluntarily controlled. . • Lamina propria – is composed of loose C. The outer longitudinal layer will break down into fascicles.T. Now that this plexus is located so close to the epithel it is the main source of hemorrhoids. it contains an internal hemorrhoidal plexus that was present in the sub mucousa. it is also fused with the submucousa thus it is called the subjacent mucousal layer. This layer is highly vascular.

Cutaneous zone: • This layer will become skin. • Hypodermis. • Associated structures with skin! • The bundles of the outer longitudinal muscularis external layer will continue distally and merge with a skeletal muscle which is the external anal sphincter. It is found in the adventitia. • Epithel – stratified squamous keratinized epithel. • Dermis.) . (another muscle that can be seen is the levator ani muscle.

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Columnar part .

Hemorrhoidal part .

Hemorrhoidal part .

Hemorrhoidal – cutaneous part .

Hemorrhoidal – cutaneous part

Cutaneous part

Cutaneous part

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Columnar part .

Columnar – hemorrhoidal junction .

Hemorrhoidal part .

Hemorrhoidal part .

Cutaneous part .

Cutaneous part .

Goblet. Pannet cells. Goblet cells Simple columnar+ brush border + goblet MALT: Intestinal villi. Enteroendocrine Simple columnar Mucous secreting MALT: Enteroendocrine. HEV Lamina propria Loose C.Organ category epithel esophagus stomach GDJ (S) GDJ (D) jejunum colon appendix SSNKE Simple columnar Mucous secreting MALT: Parietal.T Muscularis mucousa Sub-mucousa Smooth circular Loose CT Esophageal glands Submucous al plexus 2 layer Myenteric plexus Smooth circular Loose CT Submucousal plexus Smooth circular Loose CT Submucous al plexus Smooth circular Brunner glands Submucousal plexus Smooth circular Valves of kerckring Submucousal plexus 2 layers Myenteric plexus Smooth circular Loose CT Submucou sal plexus Smooth circular Loose CT Submuco usal plexus 2 layers Myenteri c plexus Tiniae colli Muscularis externa 3 layers Myenteric plexus 3 layers Myenteric plexus 2 layers Myenteric plexus 2 layers Myenteric plexus Tiniae colli . Crypt of Leiberkuhn. Mucous cell Simple columnar+ brush border + goblet MALT: Intestinal villi. chief. Crypt of Leiberkuhn Simple columnar + micro villi GALT: Crypts of leiberkuhn . Enteroendocrine Simple columnar + micro villi GALT: Lymphati c follicles. Enteroendocrine. mucous neck .

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