You are on page 1of 36

Research Topic: 

 
Determining recommendations to the creation of a fares 
strategy to support improved public transport in South East 
Queensland. 

Submitted to Paul Donohue 

David Bremner n5777038 
June 2009 
DBP415 Research Project 
Master of Urban and Regional Planning 

Criteria 

– Quality of written and graphic communication 
– Clarity of research question, objectives, explanation of background 
– Rigour and appropriateness of the collection and analysis of information 
– Connections between analysis and conclusions and question and research 
objectives 

   
 
   
1  Abstract ...............................................................................................................1 
2  Introduction .........................................................................................................1 
3  Method overview.................................................................................................2 
3.1  Research topic ..............................................................................................................................................2 
3.2  Research aims/objectives........................................................................................................................2 
3.3  Approach.........................................................................................................................................................2 
3.4  Method .............................................................................................................................................................3 
3.5  Analytical and consultative techniques .............................................................................................3 
4  Situational Review ...............................................................................................4 
4.1  Implementation of Translink and integrated ticketing ..............................................................4 
4.2  PT fares elsewhere .....................................................................................................................................5 
4.2.1  London, UK..................................................................................................................................................5 
4.2.2  Perth, Australia .........................................................................................................................................6 
4.2.3  Melbourne (still to be implemented) ...............................................................................................7 
4.3  Urban and regional planning and transport planning policy context ..................................7 
4.3.1  Integrated Regional Transport Plan ...............................................................................................8 
4.3.2  South East Queensland Regional Plan ............................................................................................8 
4.3.3  Translink Network Plan ........................................................................................................................9 
4.3.4  Transport Plan for Brisbane ............................................................................................................10 
4.3.5  A Community Service Obligation Framework for Public Transport in SEQ ................11 
4.4  Summary...................................................................................................................................................... 12 
5  Consultation.......................................................................................................12 
5.1  Online survey ............................................................................................................................................. 12 
5.1.1  Section 1 ­ Use of public transport and payment method ...................................................13 
5.1.2  Section 2 ­ Fare Policy Principles ...................................................................................................14 
5.1.3  Section 3 ­ Fare Policy Aims..............................................................................................................17 
5.1.4  Section 4 ­ Actions for Implementation .......................................................................................18 
5.1.5  Section 5 ­ Additional Open Text Question Responses...........................................................18 
5.1.6  Survey Summary....................................................................................................................................19 
5.2  Key stakeholder interviews ................................................................................................................. 20 
6  Summary Analysis ..............................................................................................21 
6.1  Key values of importance for PT........................................................................................................21 
6.2  Decision Approach...................................................................................................................................21 
7  Recommendations .............................................................................................23 
7.1  Community engagement ....................................................................................................................... 24 
7.2  Housing and transportation affordability research ..................................................................24 
7.3  Creation of new products ..................................................................................................................... 24 
7.4  Opportunities for immediate changes to pricing .......................................................................25 
7.4.1  Fare increases.........................................................................................................................................25 
7.4.2  Indexing.....................................................................................................................................................25 
7.4.3  Zone based monthly travelcard on Go card...............................................................................25 
7.4.4  Off­peak ticketing on Go card ..........................................................................................................26 
7.4.5  Cancel frequent user scheme............................................................................................................26 
7.4.6  Improve penalty fares approach ....................................................................................................26 
7.4.7  Comparison of 2009 Suggested Adult Fares with 2004 and 2008 Prices.....................28 
7.4.8  Summary...................................................................................................................................................29 
8  Conclusion .........................................................................................................29 
9  References .........................................................................................................30 
10  Appendix One – Summary of Interviews.............................................................31 
 

   
Page i 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

1 Abstract 
This research seeks to establish a values approach to public transport fares in South East 
Queensland. It is hoped that the recommendations of this research will inform fare pricing 
and the drafting of a formal public transport fares strategy by Translink.  This is seen to be 
relevant and timely research given changes afoot to fares in South East Queensland and 
the ongoing claim that public transport services are central to compact, livable, socially 
just and environmentally sensitive urban form. 

2 Introduction 
South East Queensland has been experiencing rapid and sustained growth for the last 
several decades. This growth in population when tied to changes in travel behaviour in 
favour of the car has resulted in significant implications for urban form and transport 
planning. 

Indeed, private road based travel has been one of, if not the, major shaping factor to our 
cities since World War II.  Recent shifts in perception about climate change, coupled with 
significant increases in the price of petrol and increasing urban congestion have lead to an 
increasing focus back on public transport. Public transport is seen as integral in dealing 
with these challenges.  It is also seen as a major community service that helps address 
broad desires for social equity and access to employment and training. 

It is within this context that shifts towards more integrated service planning, provision 
and charging have occurred in public transport in South East Queensland. 

Indeed since the initial formation of Translink in 2004 many local advancements have 
been made to public transport in support of both transport, and urban and regional 
planning policy.  Many of these advancements have been due to enhanced regulation, 
integration of fares across private public transport operators and progressively more 
centralised transport planning. 

For over a decade transport policy has been spruiking the need to integrate both fares and 
planning in order to improve service delivery of public transport, an often‐cited objective 
of urban and regional planning policy.  However it is only within the last 18 months that 
integrated electronic ticketing (via smart card) has become a reality for South East 
Queenslanders. 

The smart card payment system provided by Cubic under agreement with Translink is 
operational (and predominantly stable) across three local modes (rail, bus and ferry) and 
eighteen operators. However despite this there are still significant barriers related to fares 
and charges that are preventing more widespread adoption of smart card ticketing by 
public transport users and non‐users alike. 

In July 2008, changes to state legislation further empowered Translink to accomplish long 
stated objectives regarding integrated ticketing and public transport planning and 
provision.  Translink must now produce and submit to the Transport Minister a fare 
strategy at least every 5 years. 

Translink’s recent actions and statements would seem to indicate that the authority is 
producing this strategy without engaging with the community.  Given the significant 
impacts such a strategy would have on social equity outcomes and peoples’ day‐to‐day 
lives, this research seeks to contribute to the unmet need for community engagement.  It is 
hoped that Translink’s own work may be informed by this research. 

   
Page 1 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

In doing this, the research will briefly review existing policy aims of transport and urban 
planning documents.  The research will also engage with members of the community and 
key stakeholders to determine a suitable approach to the formation of an equitable public 
transportation fares policy respectful of the community’s values. 

Given the relationship between funding and service outcome would seem closely related, 
and urban and regional planning policy heavily relies on reliable and high quality public 
transport service provision, this research is relevant to this course. 

Further, given that several important policy documents are currently under review (such 
as the South East Queensland Regional Plan and the Integrated Regional Transport Plan) 
and recent changes to legislation require Translink to determine a public transport fares 
policy, the research is also highly timely. 

3 Method overview 
3.1 Research topic 
As described in the introduction, this research seeks to address the topic: 

“Determining recommendations to the creation of a fares strategy to support 
improved public transport in South East Queensland”. 

3.2 Research aims/objectives 
This research seeks to: 

1.  Research the existing situation in regards to public transport fares in South East 
Queensland and the desired outcomes of relevant urban and regional planning 
policy 

2.  Determine community perspectives on fares and synthesise these with urban and 
transport planning perspectives to develop an objectives/value based framework 
or approach  

3.  Synthesise local objectives, opportunities and constraints to produce 
recommendations to direct and inform the authoring by Translink of a public 
transport fares strategy both in terms of approach and content (ie new fare 
products). 

3.3 Approach 
Objective  Method  Output  Analysis 
– Research existing  – Situation analysis  – Background  – Understanding 
situation in  – Policy review  research on fares  of opportunities 
regards to: public  since integration  and constraints 
transport fares in  under Translink in  in regards to 
SEQ and relevant  2004  public transport, 
urban planning  – Review of relevant  specifically via 
theory  literature/policy  the recently 
such as SEQ  introduced 
Regional Plan,  smart card 
Integrated  technology 
Regional Transport 
Plan 

   
Page 2 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

– Determine  – Review of existing  – Survey data  – Synthesis of 


community  consultation  – Notes from  opportunities 
perspectives on  outcomes  interviews  and constraints 
fares  – Online survey for  – Creation of fare  with user/non 
– Determine  users and non‐ objectives  user/ key 
desired urban  users, other key  – Tables, graphs,  stakeholder and 
planning  stakeholders  text  planner 
outcomes  – Semi‐structured  perspectives 
– Determine  interviews with  – Objectives 
desired transport  urban planners  framework 
planning  – Semi‐structured 
outcomes  interviews with 
transport 
planners 
– Determine  – Use the  – Recommendations  – Testing of 
recommendations  objectives  in approach to be  proposals 
including further  framework to  taken to  against the 
research to be  produce  implement  objectives 
undertaken  recommendations  improved fares  framework 
– Propose  – Suggest topics 
innovative fare  for further 
products  research 
 

3.4 Method 
This research has utilised three main research approaches including: a regional policy 
review; community and stakeholder consultation, and; a brief investigation into applicable 
national and international case studies. 

Each of these three methods of inquiry have contributed to the analysis and synthesis 
within the research and have informed the production of recommendations. 

Although this approach is predominantly based in qualitative approaches to data and 
social research it produces recommendations to the need for further specifically focussed 
quantitative research. 

It is hoped that this current qualitative approach may provide a suitable contextual basis 
for a more rigorous quantitative research project. It is noted however that such an 
approach, given the time, budget and relative value to be gained, was not either suitable or 
relevant to this component of the research. 

3.5 Analytical and consultative techniques 
This research utilised an online survey and semi‐structured interviews as methods to 
research into the values and aspirations of users, non users and planners. The use of these 
techniques is extremely widespread in both practice and theory. As community 
consultation is seen as central to the development of the fares strategy this approach is 
perceived to be highly relevant and appropriate. 

The semi‐structured face‐to‐face interviews were undertaken with urban and transport 
planners and compared and contrasted with the outputs from the online survey. The 
online survey predominantly included public transport users and supporters as well as 
some non‐users and key stakeholders (such as operational involvement). 

   
Page 3 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

4 Situational Review 
4.1 Implementation of Translink and integrated ticketing 
On 1 July 2004 Translink, then an agency of Queensland Transport, commenced operation 
with the pricing and zonal integration of public transport fares in South East Queensland.  
This was a significant step forward with all private transport operators selling tickets 
valid for travel across all modes and operators at the same cost to the travelling public.  
This was the first stage in offering fully integrated fares via a smart card payment facility. 

   
Translink Zone Map  Translink Service Coverage 
Maps accessed from http://www.translink.com.au/qt/translin.nsf/index/maps 
 

Since 2004 the demand for public transport has continued to rise and significantly more 
journeys are now taken since Translink and integrated ticketing was first introduced.  
Integrated fares and significant increases in both the cost of fuel and population are seen 
to be major drivers. 

Therefore, after four years of operation, on 1 July 2008, Translink became a statutory 
authority under the Transport Operations (Translink Transit Authority) Act 2008.  This Act 
has significant implications for the operation and funding of public transport in South East 
Queensland.  The Act implemented governance changes (for example the establishment of 
a board to direct the Authority and increased ability to acquire property) as well changes 
in outputs and actions required of the Authority by the Minister. 

   
Page 4 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

Under Sections 42 and 43 of the Act, the Translink Transit Authority (TTA or simply 
Translink) must now prepare and approve a Translink network plan at least every four 
years outlining funded improvements in mass transit services and infrastructure. 
Translink must now also produce written fare strategies every five years. 

In February 2008 Translink launched smart card ticketing via the Go card payment 
system.  At launch the Go card fares were equal to paper ticket fares. However due to the 
Go card technology only being capable of charging single tickets, may customers (such as 
those using 10 trip savers, daily, weekly or monthly tickets) were disadvantaged.  As the 
old ticketing equipment was failing there was a need to remove the 10 trip savers from 
sale, yet Go card only offered these customers a significant and not acknowledged fare 
rise. 

In order to address community concerns that Go card was more expensive than paper 
ticketing Translink implemented a change to public transport fares on 4 August 2008.  At 
this time, fares were indexed against CPI to address then spiralling fuel costs and the Go 
card ‘frequent user scheme’ was amended. In effect the same level of discount that paper 
10 trip, weekly and monthly tickets offered was applied to the cost of single tickets (the 
only product type) on Go Card.  This change was policy on the run and was not (at least 
publicly) supported by a fares strategy.  It did however partially address the inequity 
between paper and Go card fares that was highly disincentive to Go card use. 

Since the launch of the electronic Go Card in early 2008 and the August change to fares 
ongoing community pushes have lead to the further public announcement that Translink 
will have a fares strategy to the Minister for approval by mid 2009.  This strategy is said to 
contain recommendations about off‐peak ticketing and fare reductions (Cheaper fares 
proposal by mid­year: Translink, Brisbane Times, 21 April 2009). 

To my knowledge Translink has not engaged the community in forming this fare strategy 
except via minimal market research conducted by ACNielsen, the results of which are not 
publicly available and which only examined people’s preferences for different products, 
rather than the underlying values they held. 

Given that Translink is not simply providing a commercial service and instead plays an 
important role in social equity outcomes of Government, I strongly believe this approach 
to be insufficient. 

It is within this context that this paper seeks to clarify some of the community’s values and 
suggest innovative approaches to fares.  This is seen as highly preferable over a 
continuation of Translink’s current approach and recent actions (hidden unconsulted fare 
increases and misleading advertising) and as such is very relevant and extremely timely. 

4.2 PT fares elsewhere 
In order to determine some of the tried and proven technical possibilities of integrated 
ticketing, it is worthwhile quickly examining a few alternative implementations of the 
technology.  As such a short overview of London, UK and Perth and Melbourne, Australia 
are included below. 

4.2.1 London, UK 
Over the last several years under the Greater London Authority’s Transport Strategy (and 
the previous Lord Mayor Ken Livingstone’s supervision), many improvements have been 
made to public transport in London. 

Many of these improvements are based upon the implementation of Oyster card, an 
electronic payment system based on very similar technology as South East Queensland’s 
Go card. 

   
Page 5 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

In London, Transport for London (TfL) bus services, tube services and some overland rail 
services can all be paid for using Oyster card. 

Using Oyster, passengers have the option of pay‐as‐you‐go or travel cards (that is, 
daily/monthly tickets) or a combination (that is, monthly with additional ‘cash’ to pay for 
travel outside each customer’s chosen zones of travel). 

The Tube is a closed system with supervised fare gates at every station. Travel by Tube is 
paid for by zones travelled and requires touching the Oyster card at entry and exit.  
However TfL bus services across Greater London are flat fee and only require touching on 
with Oyster.  This fee is extremely low and when combined with the congestion‐reducing 
and fund‐raising effects of congestion charging has proved remarkably successful at 
improving bus service levels. 

TfL guarantees that travel by Oyster will be cheaper than any other alternative. For 
instance, if a passenger is using pay‐as‐you‐go, the most they will be charged in one day on 
public transport is the cost of the cash day travel card for that number of zones with a 
50pence discount.  Travel that would normally cost more within those zones on that day is 
free under the Oyster daily cap.  Passengers that incur less than the daily travel card cost, 
only pay for what they use. 

Bus passengers using Oyster pay a maximum daily fee of 3pound, no matter long the 
journey is (service area is only Greater London) or how many journeys are made.  A single 
bus journey with Oyster is 1pound, a significant discount on the cash pre‐purchased fare 
of 2pound per journey. 

Oyster card payment offers significant savings compared to cash. For example a passenger 
who travels within zone one on the tube would pay only 1.50pound with Oyster but 
4pound by cash. This significant difference in cost is a large incentive for passengers to use 
Oyster and allows more efficient operation of tube stations, payment facilities etc. 

On top of these benefits and in order to promote an accessible city to youth, under 11s 
travel entirely free with their Photocard. 

4.2.2 Perth, Australia 
Perth was the first system in Australia to implement smart card ticketing successfully.  
‘Smartrider’ allows for travel on buses, trains and ferries in Perth across nine zones.  The 
card also allows passengers to access a central free travel zone.  All passengers who board 
and alight within the Central Business District, that is who travel within the free travel 
zone (‘FTZ’) do not pay a fare.  This aspect of the Perth system is most notable for this 
research. 

   
Page 6 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

 
4.2.3 Melbourne (still to be implemented) 
The Victorian Transport Ticketing Authority established in 2003 is procuring a smart card 
payment technology. This card is called Myki and is currently being implemented across 
regional bus operators in Victoria.  The payment system will eventually be rolled out 
across Victoria and Melbourne and be used on all trains and trams. 

Myki has suffered serious delays, criticisms and budgetary issues during implementation. 
Metlink covers Melbourne and surrounds under two different zones. This appears much 
more simple than SEQ’s 23 zone system, however in reality the fares regulated by the TTA 
are much more complicated than in SEQ.  Fares in Melbourne are calculated for either the 
inner or outer zone or both, whereas in Queensland you pay for the number of zones you 
travel across.  Metlink also includes regional systems whereas in Queensland these are 
covered under Qconnect services with their own ticketing approaches. One interesting 
aspect of the Myki smart card implementation is the fact that from the beginning, Myki will 
not charge more than the daily cost for multiple trips (unlike Go card in SEQ that currently 
charges as many single journeys as are taken). 

4.3 Urban and regional planning and transport planning policy context 
State and local governments in SEQ have a broad range of existing policy in regards to 
transport and public transport. This policy often reflects tensions in the broader 
community’s desires to drive (perhaps the misinterpreted value of access) versus the 
obviously more efficient cost effective (and in many cases more socially equitable) 
delivery of public transport infrastructure and services. 

This research has included a review of existing government policy in an attempt to 
determine where consensus exists in relation to the value of public transport services and 
the influences that such services can have on urban and regional form. 

Relevant policy includes: 

– Integrated Regional Transport Plan (currently being reviewed) 
– South East Queensland Regional Plan and Infrastructure Plan and Program 
(currently being reviewed) 
– Translink Network Plan (currently or shortly to be under review) 
– Transport Plan for Brisbane (recently reviewed) 

   
Page 7 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

4.3.1 Integrated Regional Transport Plan 
The Integrated Regional Transport Plan (South East Queensland) 1997 is a twenty five year 
plan to “develop and manage the transport system in a way that supports the agreed plans 
for accommodating the region’s expected major population and employment growth” 
(Queensland Transport, 1997:vi). 

The Integrated Regional Transport Plan (IRTP) includes objectives and proposals and 
describes an approach to land use and transport, social justice and environmental 
sustainability. 

The objectives of the IRTP include (amongst others): 

– Developing a more sustainable transport system – by increasing the proportion of 
trips made by public transport, walking and cycling, and in shared rides and 
reducing growth in peak commuter car travel 
– Restraining the growth of peak period car travel demands – by reducing the 
predominance of single occupant vehicle travel, increasing ride‐sharing, improving 
public transport, eliminating unnecessary trips and better sharing of the traffic 
load around the network to make the most of the existing transport system 
– Coordinating transport and land use planning – by supporting more compact, 
better designed urban development which supports public transport and allows 
people to walk and cycle more 
– Ensuring social justice – by a more inclusive transport system which shares the 
costs and benefits of transport equitably across the region 
– Maintaining environmental quality – by cleaner vehicles and better approaches to 
providing transport infrastructure 
The proposals include (amongst others): 

– Change the planning approach so the projects considered are more closely aligned 
with the sort of transport system the community wants 
– Ensure there is a ‘seamless’ public transport system which combines all available 
public transport operations and provides a range of alternatives to car travel 
– Upgrade the traditional line haul public transport (rail and bus) systems to cope 
with massive peak period increases 
– Make public transport safer, more frequent, convenient, accessible, secure, 
affordable, reliable and faster 
– Give priority, congestion‐free running to road based public transport vehicles in 
major urban areas 
A key action to support these objectives and overarching proposals includes: 

– Integrated fares, ticketing, passenger information and marketing to ensure 
convenient affordable travel 
Although the IRTP talks about targets for public transport use that are ‘realistic and 
achievable’ it sets very low targets. By default this is making the transport task harder as 
lack of public transport or active alternatives is forcing passengers to use their car more, 
despite growing congestion. The document therefore undermines its own objectives as it 
sets a target that effectively reinforces status quo. 

4.3.2 South East Queensland Regional Plan 
The South East Queensland Regional Plan states that its purpose is to help manage 
population growth and its associated change sustainably and to protect and enhance the 
quality of life in the region. 

   
Page 8 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

To address this aim the current draft document (2009‐2031) refers to a number of 
strategic directions of relevance including: 

– Sustainability and climate change 
– Strong communities  
– Smart growth 
– Economic development 
– Infrastructure, and 
– Integrated transport. 
These strategic directions and their desired regional outcomes are overviewed in the 
following chart.  It is argued that those in orange are highly pertinent (while those in blue 
are relevant) to this research. 
Sustainability 
and climate  Strong  Economic  Integrated 
communities  Smart growth  development  Infrastructure  transport  
change 

Strategic 
Sustainability  Containing  Diversifying the  Supporting  transport 
principles  Social planning  growth  economy  regional growth  
planning  

Infrastructure  Sustainable 
Reducing  Industry and  planning,  travel and 
greenhouse gas  Addressing  Compact  business 
disadvantag  development  coordination  improved 
emissions  development  and funding   accessibility 

Effective 
Climate change  Healthy and safe  Urban character  Innovation and  Managing  transport 
adaptation  communitie  and design  technology  demand  
investment  

Protecting key  Transport 
Climate change  Building strong  Housing choice  Enterprise  sites and  system 
management   communities  and affordability  opportunities 
corridors   efjiciency 

Cultural 
heritage, arts  Activity centres 
Responding to  and transit  Social  Efjicient freight 
rising oil prices  and cultural  infrastructure   services 
developmen  corridors  

Centres that 
support 
business 

Mixed use 
centres 

Integrated land 
use and 
transport 
plannin 
 
 

4.3.3 Translink Network Plan 
The TransLink Network Plan (TNP) is designed to guide the delivery of better public 
transport services and infrastructure across South East Queensland. 

The TNP is a 10 year plan  (2004 to 2014) for developing the public transport network 
that includes a rolling 4 year program of public transport service and infrastructure 
improvements (2004–05 to 2007–08).  

The TNP describes TransLink’s purpose to be “to lead and deliver an integrated public 
transport system that is used and valued by the people of South East Queensland” and the 
vision to be:  

– the best public transport system in Australia  
– an operationally excellent organisation  
– a trusted organisation  
– a place people want to be 
According to this document, TransLink is delivering:  

   
Page 9 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

– one ticket – by delivering integrated ticketing and standardised fares, zones and 
concessions  
– one network – by centrally planning and coordinating all major public transport 
routes, services, connections and infrastructure  
– one system – by marketing the system through consistent branding and passenger 
information. 
Key service improvements over the initial 4 years of the program include: 

– Better‐coordinated services and timetables 
– More cross‐town services 
– Restructuring services to improve efficiency 
– A network of high‐frequency services 
– Additional peak period bus and rail services 
The above vision, purpose and improvements relate to the following key strategic 
directions (as can be seen each of the sub‐policies is highly relevant to this research): 

Making services  Making it easy, 
Making services 
fast, frequent  Filling the gaps   comfortable and 
connect   and reliable   safe  

Meet minimum 
Make services fast and  standards for service  Make it easy to use and 
Integrate the network   frequent   understand  
coverage, frequency 
and operating hours  

Make services run on  Extend the network 
Coordinate timetables  time   into developing areas   Make it easy to access  

Invest in the rail  Deliver innovative  Provide quality stations 


network   service options   and stops  

Create a network of  Ensure services are  Provide quality buses, 


priority bus corridors  well patronised  trains and ferries  

Enhance safety and 
security 

 
4.3.4 Transport Plan for Brisbane 
The Transport Plan for Brisbane 2008­2026 sets out a plan for Brisbane that claims to 
achieve the following outcomes: 

– Public transport is the preferred mode of travel to the city’s major centres. It 
provides a high level of access to all facilities and services in Brisbane, reducing the 
need to use a car 
– A sustainable level of travel demand where the growth in traffic is less than the 
growth in population 
– Transport and land uses are managed to create a preferred urban form that 
increases accessibility and connectivity and supports sustainable travel behaviour 
– People and goods can move safely on the road network by the most efficient 
modes and routes, and the impact of traffic on neighbourhoods and the 
environment is minimised  
– Freight moves efficiently and safely within Brisbane while the livability of 
residential areas is protected  

   
Page 10 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

– Clean and green personal transport is safe and attractive and provides a genuine 
alternative to driving  
These outcomes are supported by the following policies: 

– Quality public transport 
o Enhancing priority 
o Improving service integration 
o Providing demand responsive transport 
– Managing travel demand 
– Coordinated transport and land use 
– A safe and efficient road network 
– Delivering the goods on time to the right place 
– Clean and green personal transport 
4.3.5 A Community Service Obligation Framework for Public Transport in SEQ 
A Community Service Obligation Framework for Public Transport in South East Queensland 
(CSO for PT in SEQ) is a framework that was produced in 2001 in response to the need for 
a Community Service Obligation under National Competition Policy for services where the 
government seeks to have commercial businesses deliver non‐commercial products and 
services to the community. 

The framework examines how best to support public transport through pricing and 
regulation and examines international approaches in order to achieve the following policy 
objectives: 

– By consideration of all the costs of transport (including external impacts), the 
benefits of provision of transport infrastructure, and the relative attractiveness of 
the various modes to users, determine the most appropriate means (ie mode and 
type of support provided) to deliver the specified level of public transport services 
within relevant budgetary constraints 
– Effectively achieve the outputs required of Queensland Transport at minimum cost 
to the Government, the community and the environment 
– Accept the style and quality of life identified in the IRTP public consultation 
process as being the preferred lifestyle for South East Queensland 
– Accept the level of public transport services which has been determined within the 
IRTP as commensurate with the preferred lifestyle 
– Recognise current constraints and objectives contained within the Transport 
Operations (Passenger Transport) Act and other relevant legislation, and to strive 
to meet the objectives of the legislation 
In order to achieve these policy objectives the framework makes the following 
recommendations 

– Promote public transport by appropriate regulation rather than (increased) 
subsidies 
– Generally maintain real current fare levels for public transport 
– Focus on the delivery of both rail and bus services, rather than reduced fares to 
increase patronage 
– Expand the service delivery networks of public transport as part of the strategy for 
improved service levels and increased patronage 
– Encourage additional private sector involvement in service delivery based on 
effective regulation rather than direct subsidies (this encouragement should apply 
to all public transport modes equally) 

   
Page 11 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

– Consider innovative public transport solutions to better compete against the car 
– Adopt travel demand management measures (such as incentives, disincentives and 
education to influence travel behaviour, busways and high‐occupancy vehicle 
lanes, etc) where appropriate, and should these prove inadequate, consider and 
adopt harder measures (including parking supply adjustments, road user charging, 
etc) 

4.4 Summary 
Reviewing these documents reveals that agreement does exist on the need for improved 
public transport services.  This need is defined in terms of addressing growth of jobs and 
population and different documents set different targets in relation to public transport 
use. 

Many of the documents describe the benefits to be achieved through integrated ticketing 
such as improved inter‐modality and ease of use. However perhaps the most applicable 
and interesting document to review was the Customer Service Obligation Framework for 
Public Transport in South East Queensland.  This policy raises many important tradeoffs 
and although it was only published in 2001 is in need of review as much has changed in 
SEQ since then. 

This research has considered the objectives from these policy frameworks. It is the role of 
the research however to synthesis these objectives with outcomes from other sources of 
information such as the online community survey and the key expert/stakeholder face‐to‐
face interviews and produce recommendations.  

5 Consultation 
5.1 Online survey 
In order to achieve greater use of public transport, less car use and the associated desired 
outcomes of urban and regional planning documents, the Government needs the full 
support of the community and public transport users (and non users) in changing their 
habits. 

Beyond the basic premise that we live in a democracy, given the above, it is entirely 
relevant that the community is involved in the decision making process over public 
transport fares. As such this research involved online consultation with members of the 
public. 

The survey was conducted via the internet using Questionpro.com, an online survey tool. 
The survey was viewed 158 times, started 128 times and completed by 101 respondents 
in May 2008.  Although this research has suffered numerous delays, the research 
undertaken is still extremely relevant and qualitatively useful due to ongoing changes in 
fares.  

The aim of the survey was firstly to educate respondents about the potential benefits of 
the Go card and secondly to produce a consensus viewpoint on the need for a formal fair 
fares policy and the specific objectives that would support such a framework. 

The survey was conducted on the Internet and had an open URL (anyone with the URL 
could respond). The link was emailed to personal associates, Translink, QR, those bus 
operators with a publicly available email address (Southern Cross Transit, Hornibrook, 
Kangaroo Bus Lines, Bus Link Qld, Mt Gravatt Coaches, Brisbane Buslines, Surfside and 
Veolia) and community organisations including ‘Rail Back on Track’ (an online forum) and 

   
Page 12 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

‘Communities Advocating Sustainable Transport’ (an online mailing list) seeking 
responses to the survey and referral to personal and professional associates. 

As can be seen in the diagrams below there was a slight bias in the gender of respondents 
with 61% being male and 39% female and slightly more respondents in their twenties. 

Gender of  Age of 
Respondents  Respondents 

Male 
Female 

Teens  20s  30s  40s  50 and 


over 
   
 

5.1.1 Section 1 ‐ Use of public transport and payment method 
When asked about the frequency of payment types 53% respondents either ‘always’ or 
‘frequently’ paid for services by cash.  Only 14% of respondents never pay by cash.  In 
response to the same question 48% ‘always’ or ‘frequently’ pay by ‘pre‐purchased ticket 
(10 trip, weekly, monthly or other)’ however 48% said they ‘never’ pay ‘by Go card’.   

Therefore a large proportion of the survey respondents could become regular Go card 
users. Many of these people currently do not own or frequently use that method of 
payment.  Although not quantifiably supported, a theme of dissatisfaction with Go card 
during the initial months of implementation (due to pricing and technical difficulties) was 
raised in the open text responses throughout the survey.  This is contrasted with a 
generally positive outlook on the potentials of the Go card. 

Comparative Frequency of Method of 
Travel 
Ferry 
Taxi 
Bicycle 
Car 
Train 
Bus 
Walking 
 
In response to the question ‘How frequently do you use each of the following methods to pay 
for public transport services in South East Queensland?’ the following responses were 
received: 

   
Page 13 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

Payment by  By Pre­
Cash (when  By Go Card  purchased 
boarding or on  Ticket 
the platform) 

Always  Always  Always 


Frequently  Frequently  Frequently 
Sometimes  Sometimes  Sometimes 
Never  Never  Never 
     
 

The following open text responses were received in response to the question ‘What factors 
contribute to your choice to use either Go card, cash or pre­purchased tickets?.  

– Reliability 
Respondents indicated that they were holding off using Go card while the system bugs 
were being resolved, and those who were currently using the system were dissatisfied 
with the number of errors and penalty fees 

– Finances 
Respondents indicated a desire to have a fixed monthly outlay or daily or weekly limits. 

– Confusion 
Some respondents found the system in general confusing to use, and had difficulties 
tagging on and off as well as difficulties using the ticket vending machines 

5.1.2 Section 2 ‐ Fare Policy Principles 
The survey proposed that Translink should create a ‘fair fares’ policy that was based upon 
the following four principles: 

1. Fair fares 
2. Fares that encourage the use of public transport 
3. Smart fares 
4. Financially secure funding for improved services. 

Each of these principles listed a number of components all of which had a high average 
level of support by the survey respondents. In this section of the survey, respondents were 
asked to indicate their level of support from ‘Strongly Agree’ through to ‘Strongly 
Disagree’ on a five point Likert scale. 

   
Page 14 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

5.1.2.1 Principle 1. Fair fares 
The table below lists the statement made, the averaged score between 1 to 5 across the 
participants (where 1 represents ‘Strongly Agree’ and 5 represents ‘Strongly Disagree’) 
and the combined percentage of respondents who chose either ‘Strongly Agree’ or ‘Agree’. 

‘Strongly
Statement Score Agree’ or
‘Agree’
Concessions for youth, students, pensioners and low income earners 1.413 95.19%
Fares offer value-for-money and are affordable to the community 1.456 87.38%
Stable fares with price increases maintained at or below CPI 1.544 89.32%
Passengers are promoted to use smart card with better deals and not 1.602 87.38%
punished for using paper tickets
 

The following is an overview of the open text responses to the ‘fair fares’ principle: 

– Fare increases above CPI may be supported in certain circumstances 
Most respondents indicated a high level of support for the statement that fare increases 
should be kept as low as possible and no greater than the consumer price index, however 
some respondents acknowledged the immense task at hand and thought that increases 
above CPI may be warranted as long as these were clearly tied to service improvements. 
Such a rise would also need to be demonstrated within the context of an increasing 
government subsidy. 

– Fares should encourage the use of public transport over the private motor vehicle 
Respondents indicated a strong desire that the historic underfunding of public transport, 
and continuing overfunding of public roads should be addressed. Many respondents 
indicated that the benefits of public transport are often ignored along with the hidden 
costs of road usage (carbon emissions, death toll, congestion etc). 

– Low income people should receive concession fares 
Students, youth, pensioners and low income earners should all receive concession fares 
while children should receive free fares. 

– Short journeys are currently too highly priced 
Most journeys by car are very short, yet short journeys by public transport are very 
expensive a possible solution to this could involve inner zones of free travel in the centres 
of Brisbane, Gold Coast, Redcliffe etc based upon the Perth free travel zone. 

– Go card needs to offer equivalent discounts as current daily, weekly and monthly 
paper tickets as passengers are unwilling to shift to Go card and pay higher costs 
Go card should charge all equivalent paper ticket discounts such as daily, weekly and 
monthly 

– Financial incentives are important in gaining a significant and early uptake of Go 
card. 
Service efficiencies on buses should pay for discounts on tickets. Users, Translink and 
operators all benefit from customers using Go card, and thus significant discounts should 
be used to promote users to switch to Go card. 

5.1.2.2 Principle 2. Fares that encourage the use of public transport 
‘Strongly
Statement Score Agree’ or
‘Agree’

   
Page 15 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

A payment system that is easy to use and understand 1.308 99.04%


Discounts for higher use and longer journeys 1.398 94.17%
Price guarantee – travelling by smart card will always be the 1.461 87.25%
cheapest alternative
New and improved frequent user scheme for pre-paid smart cards 1.578 81.37%
Cheaper off-peak travel 1.712 83.65%
New monthly post-paid ‘caps’ and other fare packages 1.728 78.64%
Special offers 1.971 73.79%
 

The following is an overview of open text responses about the ‘fares that encourage public 
transport usage’ principle: 

– Go card must be cheaper than paper equivalents to promote its uptake and usage 
– Go card requires a daily cap 
– Go card should guarantee to be the cheapest method of payment for public 
transport services 
It needs to be easy for the community to use, this doesn’t mean it can’t offer different 
types of product (such as daily, weekly, monthly etc) 

– Infrequent but consistent users should receive a discount 
Old users of 10 Trip Saver tickets such as students, working mothers, part time workers 
who travel four to eight times a week deserve a discount yet under the initial fare 
structure did not receive any discount. This has been addressed in the August 2008 
changes to the Frequent User Scheme that extended the equivalent discount of 10 trip 
tickets to all users of Go card – in effect a geographic expansion of the 10 trip discount. 

– System errors need to be resolved 

5.1.2.3 Principle 3. Smart fares 
‘Strongly
Statement Score Agree’ or
‘Agree’
Service improvements planned with better information about 1.440 95.00%
passenger demand
An integrated system of payment across trains, buses, ferries and 1.534 90.29%
in future, taxis
A growing funding base to meet growing demands 1.578 87.25%
Smart fares promote greater community use of public transport 1.598 83.33%
A system that manages demand by giving discounts for off-peak 1.693 83.17%
travel and re-allocates resources in real-time
 

The following is an overview of the open text responses to the ‘smart fares’ principle: 

– Taxis could be included in the future 
The convenience of Go card would only increase by allowing for the metered balance of 
taxis in South East Queensland to be paid for by pre­paid credit stored on the Translink 
Go card. 

– Government subsidy should continue to be the major source of revenue, not fares 
The goal of public transport fares should not be to pay outright for the operation of 
services as these should be predominantly funded through government subsidy as all 
users of the transport system benefit from the operation of public transport (ie those who 

   
Page 16 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

use cars and drive trucks benefit from those who catch the bus and as such should 
contribute to the financial operation of public transport services) 

5.1.2.4 Principle 4. Financially secure funding for improved services 
‘Strongly
Statement Score Agree’ or
‘Agree’
Secure funding for an improving system 1.475 93.07%
Ease of administration and reduced cash handling costs 1.696 85.29%
A stronger negotiation position with service providers 1.743 81.19%
Inter and intra-generationally responsible funding 1.792 77.23%
Reduced ticket fraud and fare evasion 1.892 74.51%
 

The following is an overview of the open text responses to the ‘financially secure funding’ 
principle: 

– Secure funding is important to maintain services and implement service 
improvements 
– Fare evasion needs to be dealt with sensitively and not punitively 
Fare evasion needs to be controlled however the method of which this occurs needs to be 
dealt with sensitively.  Large amounts of money should not be spent enforcing and 
policing a low level of fare evasion as those funds could be better spent on service 
improvements. Passengers do not like to be made to feel like criminals and most 
recognise their responsibility to have a valid ticket. 

5.1.3 Section 3 ‐ Fare Policy Aims 
Respondents to the survey were asked to rank in order of importance the following aims 
of any public transport fares policy.  The aims are listed below in the overall order ranked 
by respondents.  The online survey tool randomised the list for each different respondent, 
so what was at the top of the page for one respondent could have been at the bottom of the 
page for the next respondent. Thus there is no bias from respondents simply numbering 
the boxes in order displayed on the page. 

Rank Public transport fare policy aim Averaged


rank from 1
to 8
1st Provide affordable and financially equitable access to public transport 3.16
services
2nd Promote public transport as a viable alternative to private motor 3.51
vehicle travel
3rd Improve service quality, efficiency and reliability (particularly of 3.70
buses) via cashless boarding
4th Deliver integrated ticketing across all modes of public transport 4.56
including trains, buses, ferries as well as metered taxis
5th Achieve radical gains in the mode-share usage of public transport 4.88
6th Secure a stable and growing revenue base to fund an improving public 5.07
transport network
7th Achieve user input in policy formation and service improvements (eg 5.35
community consultation regarding 'fair fares')
8th Improve the quality of customer service via internet, phone and other 5.66
methods to improve community perceptions of public transport
  

   
Page 17 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

5.1.4 Section 4 ‐ Actions for Implementation 
The following table includes the actions that were suggested for implementation of the 
fares policy.  Each of these actions was listed by the survey and has come from either 
existing policy documents or obvious problems with the initial implementation and fare 
structure on Go card. The survey sought to determine which actions supporting the 
previously discussed principles had the most support.  As such they have been ranked 
below from most highly supported to least. The list of these actions was randomized by 
the online survey tool and as such this order accurately reflects the consensus view point 
of the survey respondents without bias. It should be noted that a score of 3 is neutral, 1 is 
‘Highly Supported’ and 5 is ‘Highly Opposed’. 

Rank Actions that should be considered for implementation by Averaged


Translink level of
support
from 1 to 5
1st Reduce the cost of travel for smart card users with further discounts 1.480
for high-use and off-peak passengers
2nd Install smart card top-up and balance machines at all busway 1.551
stations and major interchanges
3rd Develop and offer for sale a larger range of fare packages on smart 1.571
card
4th Explore options for free fares where the service arrives significantly 1.612
late
5th Integrate Airtrain payment with Go card (either at existing cost or 1.649
preferably renegotiate contracts to allow integration with the zonal
system – perhaps at zone 17 or 18)
6th Implement a daily travel cap on smart card based on the zones and 1.729
journeys travelled that day
7th Maintain equitably priced paper tickets until smart card is broadly 1.732
accepted by the community, functioning at the required level and
offering a suite of products that match current and future user
demands)
8th Maintain paper ticket price increases close to or below CPI 1.765
9th Implement a refund and contact process via the web portal and 1.806
ensure all valid refunds are processed within 15 business days
10th Improve usability of the 'value adding and ticket machines' 1.823
especially for use by bus passengers
11th Allow the sale of weekly paper tickets via the 'value adding and 2.062
ticket machines'
12th Expand Go card payment across all regional Qconnect public 2.031
transport networks
13th Rapidly develop and implement a post-paid monthly 'cap' option 2.156
(this could be based on mobile phone caps where a user selects their
cap value and receives a bigger discount the bigger the value, as
such this would not be zone dependant)
14th Introduce smart card (Go) payment for metered taxis in the 2.505
Translink coverage area
 

5.1.5 Section 5 ‐ Additional Open Text Question Responses 
How can Translink promote users to switch to Go card over the next 2‐3 years 

– Daily Caps 
– Weekly, Monthly travel cards or caps 
– Discounts for regular but intermittent users 

   
Page 18 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

– Go card needs to be attractive in terms of cost, not just convenience to users to be 
widely accepted 
Additional comments about Translink and the quality of services in the region 

– Translink must progress the existing planned busway network as quickly as 
possible. If this means funding is diverted from road construction then that should 
occur. 
– Translink needs to fund additional and new rolling stock for the railways and 
progress extensions to the rail network 
– Translink must purchase and operate more buses 
– Translink needs to communicate with the community more clearly and needs to 
respond quickly and accurately to complaints and comments 
– Translink needs to improve late night services so that users do not need a car 
– The issues of unreliability, infrequency and overcrowding need to be dealt with 
promptly 
– Community desire to see light rail in the inner city 
– Government needs to recognise public transport as an investment rather than cost 
and needs to prioritise funding for public transport over roads 
– Translink needs to engage the community when forming policy that affects them 
5.1.6 Survey Summary 
The survey indicates a high level of support within the community for the need to resolve 
all outstanding issues with the Go card implementation and to formalise via community 
consultation, a formal Translink ‘Fair Fares’ Strategy. 

This survey was limited in extent and is likely to have various biases either in the socio‐
economic status, interest or geographic location of respondents. If these biases exist they 
do not invalidate the qualitative value that may be gained from the survey data. Indeed no 
community consultation activity is ever fully representative and instead this survey 
sought to elucidate qualities or thoughts that may apply across various people. 

It would therefore be relevant to undertake broader community engagement in 
developing a fares strategy to ensure that any proposed changes to fares respond to issues 
of social equity not in some vague sense, but in the everyday application of policy and the 
price levels at which fares are set.  It is clear to the community that the initial and ongoing 
implementation of Go has seriously failed this criterion.  The original stealth fare increases 
of 25% to 30% clearly did not constitute a fair implementation of a payment system that 
should bring about significant savings to both users and government.  When combined 
with the misleading advertising approach undertaken by the organisation this did little 
but undermine trust the community has in the institution. 

It should be noted that Translink has made positive (if limited) changes to the application 
of fares since this survey was first conducted. These changes have reinstituted the 
discount that had effectively been removed without warning. There is still a need to 
provide off‐peak and monthly ticketing on Go card. 

   
Page 19 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

An overview of some of the key points raised in the survey is available in the chart below: 

Financially secure 
Fares that encourage 
Fair fares  Smart fares  funding for improved 
use of public transport  services 
• Concessions for youth,  • Fares should be easy to  • Service improvements  • Secure funding for an 
students, pensioners  understand and pay  planned with better  improving system 
and low income  • More frequent users  information about  (price rises above CPI 
earners  and longer journeys  passenger demand  may be supported 
• Fares offer value‐for‐ should get discounts  • An integrated system of  given demonstrable 
money and are  • Price guarantee –  payment across trains,  improvements in 
affordable to the  travelling by smart  buses, ferries and in  service) 
community  card will always be the  future, taxis  • Ease of administration 
• Stable fares with price  cheapest alternative  • A growing funding base  and reduced cash 
increases maintained  • Off‐peak travel should  to meet growing  handling costs 
at or below CPI  be cheaper than peak  demands  • A stronger negotiation 
• Passengers are  travel  • Smart fares promote  position with service 
promoted to use Go  • Monthly travelcards  greater community use  providers 
card with better deals  and caps are desired  of public transport  • Inter and intra‐
and not punished for  along with other fare  • A system that manages  generationally 
using paper tickets  packages  demand by giving  responsible funding 
• Special offers could be  discounts for off‐peak  • Reduced ticket fraud 
given with Go card  travel and re‐allocates  and fare evasion 
resources in real‐time 

5.2 Key stakeholder interviews 
Several town planners and transport planners were interviewed to seek their response to 
questions about public transport.  Some of the key outcomes are listed below. These 
outcomes were determined from short conversations with a range of professionals.  The 
interview question sheet that guided these discussions is available as Appendix Two. 

The key issues raised included: 

– Public transport is an important community service that is essential in any city to 
support the growth of the city and ensure that all people regardless of age or 
physical disability have access to work, education, entertainment and social 
activities. 
– Public transport is more efficient than roads and cars at moving large numbers of 
people cheaply, quickly and in a manner that is environmentally sensitive.  Given 
that cities have limited space and funds to invest in transportation systems, the 
cost‐effectiveness of public transport should not be overlooked. 
– Demographic shifts in our community mean that more and more people will be 
unable to access private forms of travel. To ensure these people have freedom of 
movement it is important that we build the systems that will support mass transit. 
– Public transport should cover all urban areas and offer a higher level of service 
that is related to the density and mix of use of that location. For denser more 
populated areas service level should be higher.   
– Public transport has immense possibilities to positively influence urban outcomes.  
Public transport must therefore be planned into our communities along with 
walkable neighbourhoods so that people can easily access transit.  Offering true 
walk‐transit combinations may well have extremely positive health impacts on our 
community. 
– It is highly important that public transport offers a level of service that can 
compete with private modes. Currently transit only captures a small section of the 
market and this is why it is failing.  People are unable to use public transport if it 
does not go to where they need or if it is full. 

   
Page 20 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

– More services to meet demand need to be provided. Services should be fast and 
reliable.  The provision of more services will require more road space and or 
alternatives. 
– Public transport must be affordable to the community. This is not just in relation to 
fares but also in external costs. It is difficult to articulate many of the benefits of 
public transport as they are not always easily quantified into a cost benefit 
analysis. This does not make these benefits of little value. Similarly, many other 
modes externalise costs that public transport internalises and this makes it hard to 
make a cost comparison. 
– It is important for the community to be involved in a bottom up approach that 
demands better service provision and governance.  This movement should be 
assisted by professionals. 
– Public transport has limited budgets and is likely to need innovative approaches to 
deliver outcomes.  Raising fares may offer an opportunity to increase revenue but 
may also reduce demand given no change in quality of service.  People will 
ultimately weigh up their own values and make their own decisions.  Lower fares 
may well drive small increases in use, however at peak hour the system is already 
at capacity and cannot take more passengers.  It will be important to consider 
equity implications of both service and fare levels. 
– Development and private finances should contribute to the cost of providing public 
transport infrastructure.  Government could make this more attractive to industry 
however it will be important to weigh up the intricacies that this will add to 
capturing public versus private benefit  

6 Summary Analysis 
6.1 Key values of importance for PT 
The consultation and research undertaken for this paper has revealed the same issues 
often addressed in either planning policy or literature. These key issues relate to the need 
for additional capacity, improved reliability, and the need for services to be affordable yet 
high quality.  Other issues that were consistently raised included the need for high 
frequency and quick services. 

This research did not seek to determine exactly how affordability is defined, indeed this is 
a highly complicated question as it is intrinsically linked with issues such as housing 
affordability. 

6.2 Decision Approach 
The following two diagrams overviews the decision and option evaluation approach taken 
in developing the recommendations: 

   
Page 21 
   
 
 
 
 

 
 
!"#$%&'(

)&*+,-',(./01,#(2%+(34(

chart below: 
',+5$*,'(

)6"+%5,0(',+5$*,'7(
1+,-#,+('%*$-8(,9/$#:7( ./%''%0*34%!
8,''(*%&1,'#$%&7(.,##,+( 3/4%-*)%/*!
*%'#(,22,*#$5,&,''(

E/$3D%$&!*>+*!
;+%6(6/8#$"8,( +663*3#/+$!-%(430%-!
@3$$!/#*!(%+0>!
-""+%-*<,'($&*8/0$&1(
"#$%$&!'(#)!9(34+*%! /',+(*<-+1,'7( 0+9+03*&!+*!$%+-*!3/!
"#$%$&!'(#)!*+,%-! "#$%$&!'(#)!5-%(!0>+(1%-! 9%+D!9%(3#6-!5/6%(!
3/4%-*)%/*! 1%5,+&6,&#('/.'$0:(
-&0("+$5-#,( %,3-*3/1!
03(05)-*+/0%-;!+$$!
$&5,'#6,&#(
'(%%!0+9+03*&!3-!
5*3$3-%6!

Page 22 
 
 
David Bremner n5777038 

F%0(%+-%!<561%*!'#(!
G%%9!<561%*!-*+<$%!
78!-%(430%-!
./0(%+-%!78!
0#)9#/%/*!#'! 3+%.-.8:(#<,(6%'#(
./0(%+-%!*+,%-! ,22,*#$5,(-'(*%'#'(
%,3-*3/1!*+,%-!:%1! C,3-*3/1!(%15$+*3#/!
1%/%(+$$&!
Research Project –DBP415 Research Project 

'(#)!(#+6-;!'5%$! =%/80(.,('<-+,0(-'(
?#5$6!(%650%!6%)+/6! @#5$6!/%%6!*#!<%!
-5<-36&!%*0=! *31>*%/%6;!0#5$6!$%+6!*#! -+,(.,&,>$#'?(@$88(
+663/1!)#(%!0#/1%-*3#/! +,9/$+,(&%#(%&8:(
#(!+$$#@!+663*3#/+$! '5(*>%(!$#--!#'!95<$30! "#03+$$&;!
<%/%B3*!*#!9(34+*%! $&*+,-','($&(/',+(
3/4%-*)%/*!*#!3)9(#4%! *<-+1,+'7($&*+,-',0( %/43(#/)%/*+$$&!+/6!
A5+$3*&!+/6!3/0(%+-%! 3/*%(%-*-;!?#5$6!3)9(#4%! $#/1!*%()! H#(-%/3/1!-%(430%-!
%'B303%/0&!#'!/%*@#(D;! '/.'$0:7($&*+,-',0(
6%)+/6;!0#5$6!>+4%! +,1/8-#$%&7(./#(=$88( %0#/#)30+$$&! 5/6%(!9#95$+*3#/!
 
 

/%1+*34%!-#03+$!%A53*&! ?#5$6!)+D%!78!-%(430%-! 5/*%/+<$%!65%!*#! 1(#@*>!+/6!->3'*!


)#(%!(%-9#/-34%!*#! &,,0(#%(0,6%&'#+-#,(
0#-*-!#(!<%/%B3*-! 3/0(%+-%6!(#+6!0#-*-;! *#@+(6-!78!3/!>+(6!
05-*#)%(!6%)+/6-! $6"+%5,6,&#'(#%(
',+5$*,'7(+,8$-.$8$#:( 0#/1%-*3#/;! %0#/#)30!*3)%-!
-&0(2+,9/,&*:?( 9#$$5*3#/;!*3)%;!
2%1+*34%! .)9(#4%6!78! 6%+*>-;!/#3-%!%*0!
0#))5/3*&! #5*0#)%-;!(%650%6!
(%+0*3#/!*#! #5*0#)%-!'(#)!
3/0(%+-%6!*+,%-! +$*%(/+*34%!

Further details about the possible choices in relation to fares and taxes are available in the 
!
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

Possible changes to public transport fares  Possible changes to taxes 

Increase  Increase general 
•  Could slow demand  •  Politically unpopular 
•  Would be bad for off‐peak patronage  •  Hard to do 
•  Could increase funding from peak services  •  Money has to come from somewhere 
which are at capacity  •  Impact on community 
•  Additional funds could be invested in services to 
improve quality and capacity 
•  Imrpoved services would support prosperity, 
environmental and social equity outcomes 

Decrease PT share 
•  Entirely unsustainable and will not deliver 
desired outcomes 

Decrease 
•  Could minorly drive demand 
•  Peak services are already at capacity and 
reduced fares would simply undermine revenue  Increase PT share with same 
•  Reduced revenue would worsen quality further  overall level of taxes 
•  Could drive off‐peak demand and actually 
increase revenue from these currenlty under‐ •  Possibility to re‐direct road funding 
utilised services  •  Possibility to re‐direct fuel subsidy 
•  Possibly seen as unpopular although if PT 
services improve because of it perceptions 
might change 
•  Additional funds could improve PT 
•  More PT could reduce GHG emissions under 
modal shift 
•  Could improve geographic access to quality 
PT 
•  Could drastically improve social equity 
outcomes  

Increase motoring charges 
•  Congestion tax, parking charges, changes to 
registration charges 
•  More accurate rejlection of costs could 
contribute to more sustainable behaviours and 
additional funds to invest in public transport 

7 Recommendations 
This research has four major recommendations. 

1. Translink should undertake community engagement in developing a fares strategy. This 
is imperative in order to get the community discussing the tradeoffs they are willing to 
make. 

2. Research should be undertaken on the topic of ‘affordability’ in relation to public 
transport. Given that transport costs are inextricably tied with housing costs, this would 
require a sophisticated approach to examine how location, income, car ownership, public 
transport access and use result in geospatial inequities across the city. Such research will 
be key to determining evolving policy, particularly in regards to affordable fares and 
improving public transport. 

3. New products such as value based monthly caps should be investigated. 

   
Page 23 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

4. Interim actions that could be taken while the community is engaged in a discussion 
about desired standards of service and how much (and how) they are willing and able to 
pay for those services. 

Each of these recommendations is discussed in more detail below. 

7.1 Community engagement  
Community engagement is a cornerstone of good planning. It is rather remarkable to think 
that Translink’s approach to date has only incorporated market research and no active 
community engagement. 

It is recommended that Translink develop a ‘fair fares’ strategy with regard to this initial 
research as well as the outcomes of further engagement with users and non‐users alike. 
The fare strategy must adequately address pricing issues, equity, the implementation of Go 
card and deliver a sustainable fare base (under the assumption that Government subsidy 
should continue to provide the majority of operational funds for a public system that 
benefits the entire community and not just users). 

7.2 Housing and transportation affordability research 
This research has predominantly focussed on qualitative inputs into determining 
recommendations to Translink to the creation of a fares strategy to support improved 
public transport outcomes in South East Queensland. 

Consistently it has been identified that additional funds are required to improve the public 
transport system.  Given that the current opportunities to increase funding are limited, it 
is likely that fare increases will play a role in increasing the funds available to invest in 
new and improved services and capacity. 

Consultation with the community and stakeholders has identified a key value of the 
transport system as affordability. This research has not however sought to define 
affordability.  It is noted that the concept varies wildly for people of different socio‐
economic situations and geographic location. 

Therefore this research recommends that further quantitative research is undertaken in 
regards to housing and transport affordability and spatial inequity across the region.  Such 
research will be needed to inform decision‐makers about the true costs of transport 
investment as well as the costs of not investing in the public system. 

This research uncovered a Housing and Transport Affordability Index that is used in the 
United States of America.  This index gives a better overview of ‘affordability’ is it does not 
solely view either transport or housing and instead combines them given the interrelated 
nature of the two criteria. Such an approach may provide a suitable method for a study in 
SEQ. 

7.3 Creation of new products 
Over the longer term it is expected that Go card will offer innovative new ways to both 
charge passengers for the service they are receiving and innovative new products that suit 
individuals’ needs. 

It is recommended that value based monthly caps may offer an innovative product type to 
suit various users’ needs.  This ‘cap’ would be an alternative, not a replacement to zone 
based monthly travelcards. The product could be designed in a similar format as mobile 
phone caps. This way users could pick the amount they pay each month to suit their usage 
patterns, distance, and budget. 

   
Page 24 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

7.4 Opportunities for immediate changes to pricing 
The following opportunity has been structured to reflect a compromise position in regards 
to the values uncovered through the consultation, desired outcomes and real need for 
additional funds. It is one suggested approach out of many that may address these needs 
and values. It should be noted that this approach focuses on describing short term and 
overdue changes required to fares and absolutely supports further engagement with the 
community to resolve the balance between affordability and quality as well as the social 
and geographic inequities between who benefits and who pays.  

7.4.1 Fare increases 
It seems obvious that the only method of improving capacity, reliability and frequency (in 
addition to reduced urban congestion) is that an overall increase in the funding base for 
public transport is required. 

There are of course a number of options to achieve this including increasing taxes, more 
effectively leveraging private funds and advertising revenue, however it is likely that 
increasing user charges will play a crucial role in combined with any other alternatives. 

Given that peak demand currently exceeds supply in both road and public transport, it is 
believed that an ‘affordable’ increase in user charges would actually allow improved 
services via increased operational and infrastructure investment budgets. This is not seen 
as a method of proportionally reducing government subsidy or to moderate demand but a 
necessary component of improving funding overall.  It is noted that current economic 
difficulties, the poor quality of service and relatively consistent demand for private travel 
will be significant barriers to increasing fares even if over time this may produce a more 
sustainable and even socio‐economic and geographic spread of benefits over time. It is 
also noted that in the longer run, changes to the way costs are recouped in private car use 
should also be considered. 

7.4.2 Indexing 
Prices should be indexed each year to ensure they float (both up and down) with the cost 
of living. In the past indexing has not been applied each year and when it has been applied 
it has been applied to the previous indexation rounded to the nearest 10c (as operators 
require fares to be priced as such for ease of change handling). After only a few iterations 
of compounded rounding and indexation, errors have undermined the regularity of zonal 
costs. As such, it is argued that fares should be indexed against 2004 single ticket prices by 
changes in the Consumer Price Index since June 2004. 

It is recommended that over the next two to three years this annual indexation against CPI 
is accompanied with a rise of 10% in real terms. Despite allowing for additional 
investment in services and infrastructure this rise will likely need significant discussion 
with the community as to why it is important before it is implemented, especially as 
service improvements will be gradual and unlikely to quickly address geospatial 
inequities. 

This single ticket price adjustment should be accompanied with two important changes to 
Go card. Firstly with the introduction of zone based Monthly travelcards and secondly 
with the long overdue implementation of off‐peak singles on Go card.  These changes 
would in effect be the carrot to drive Go card use, while improving peak service capacity 
will allow more people to switch to public transport. 

7.4.3 Zone based monthly travelcard on Go card 
Zone based monthly travelcards could work in combination with prepaid credit stored on 
the Go card.  The zones of travel would have to be selected in advance, similar to a paper 
monthly ticket now. Travel beyond those zones would require single journey ‘extensions’ 

   
Page 25 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

for the zones not covered by the travelcard that are charged to the prepaid cash stored on 
the card.  The cost of the Go card monthly would be equal to the cost of a paper monthly. 
Paper monthly tickets should be maintained at least in the short term as these do offer 
some customers greater ease of use. 

7.4.4 Off‐peak ticketing on Go card 
Off‐peak singles should be made available on the Go card as currently the lack of any off‐
peak ticketing, even on the weekend, is a significant disincentive to use Go card.  It is likely 
that off‐peak singles should receive the same level of discount as the current paper based 
off‐peak dailies, that is a reduction of 1/3 of the cost. However, as there is significant 
capacity in many parts of the network in off‐peak periods, an increase in ridership 
achieved by a greater incentive, for instance a 2/3 price reduction off a peak single ticket 
may be appropriate. It should be noted that further study in regards to the cost and policy 
effectiveness of such a change should be undertaken. 

Off‐peak fares should be calculated by the commencement time of each trip leg of a 
journey taken.  Where one leg is commenced before peak time and next leg of the journey 
is commenced in peak time, the initial leg should be charged as per the single off‐peak fare 
and the adjustment made according to the relevant component of the full priced single 
fare.  It is recommended that the definition of peak hour is changed to make it more 
feasible for commuters to change their habits outside of peak time, for instance by leaving 
home after 9am and by leaving work before 4pm or after 6pm. Off‐peak tickets should 
therefore be available between 9am and 4pm and after 6pm (rather than from 9:30am to 
3:30pm and after 7pm). 

7.4.5 Cancel frequent user scheme 
It is recommended that in introducing both off‐peak discounts and monthly ticket benefits 
to Go card, the ‘Frequent User Scheme’ be discontinued. The scheme originally offered a 
50% discount on all full priced singles after the 6th journey in a week Monday to Sunday, 
however in Aug 2008 the scheme was amended to become a 50% discount to full priced 
single journeys after the 10th journey. Given that passengers who consistently travel 
‘frequently’, the level of discount is effectively greater on a monthly ticket.  This is 
especially true when most journeys after the 10th commencing on Monday are often on the 
weekend and if not subject to monthly inclusion would still receive an off‐peak discount of 
one to two thirds of the ticket price under this recommendation where such journeys are 
denied an off‐peak discount then reduced by 50% and still cost more than free on a 
monthly paper ticket. 

7.4.6 Improve penalty fares approach 
It is also suggested that before the ‘introductory period’ penalties for not correctly 
touching on or off are replaced by the higher fee that route specific penalty fares be 
applied and tested for situations where customers do not (or cannot) tag off.  For instance 
if a passenger boards an outbound bus in zone one that terminates in zone three, the 
maximum penalty should be a three zone fare. Rail services should have a set penalty due 
to different operating constraints.  This is generally reflective of how penalties are 
changed on Perth’s smartcard.  Changes to the refund process where there is inoperable 
equipment also need to be streamlined. Ideally there should be a web based form 
submission via the secure Go card web portal. 

It is suggested that any changes to Go card or paper ticket pricing do not prevent 
innovative fare structures such as value based Monthly Caps from being investigated and 
launched in the future.  Such differing fare structures may be able to be offered under 
bulk/retail approaches used in telecom, water and electricity industries where effective 
monopolies (of which regulated public transport is equivalent to) support different 
charging frameworks and products.

   
Page 26 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

Suggested adult ticket pricing structure 
#
Go Card Fare^  Paper Fare  
     Zones 
Fare  Peak  Off‐peak  Monthly Peak  Off‐peak  Monthly
Daily  Weekly 
Type  Single  Single  *  Single  Daily  * 
1  $2.00  $1.33  $80.00  $2.50  $5.00  $3.30  $20.00  $80.00 
2  $2.40  $1.60  $96.00  $3.00  $6.00  $4.00  $24.00  $96.00 
3  $2.80  $1.87  $112.00  $3.50  $7.00  $4.70  $28.00  $112.00 
4  $3.20  $2.13  $128.00  $4.00  $8.00  $5.30  $32.00  $128.00 
5  $3.68  $2.45  $147.20  $4.60  $9.20  $6.10  $36.80  $147.20 
6  $4.08  $2.72  $163.20  $5.10  $10.20  $6.80  $40.80  $163.20 
7  $4.48  $2.99  $179.20  $5.60  $11.20  $7.50  $44.80  $179.20 
8  $4.88  $3.25  $195.20  $6.10  $12.20  $8.10  $48.80  $195.20 
9  $5.28  $3.52  $211.20  $6.60  $13.20  $8.80  $52.80  $211.20 
10  $6.08  $4.05  $243.20  $7.60  $15.20  $10.10  $60.80  $243.20 
11  $6.45  $4.30  $258.00  $8.60  $17.20  $11.50  $64.50  $258.00 
12  $6.72  $4.48  $268.80  $9.60  $19.20  $12.80  $67.20  $268.80 
13  $6.89  $4.59  $275.60  $10.60  $21.20  $14.10  $68.90  $275.60 
14  $7.54  $5.03  $301.60  $11.60  $23.20  $15.50  $75.40  $301.60 
15  $8.26  $5.50  $330.20  $12.70  $25.40  $16.90  $82.55  $330.20 
16  $8.91  $5.94  $356.20  $13.70  $27.40  $18.30  $89.05  $356.20 
17  $9.56  $6.37  $382.20  $14.70  $29.40  $19.60  $95.55  $382.20 
18  $10.21  $6.80  $408.20  $15.70  $31.40  $20.90  $102.05  $408.20 
19  $10.86  $7.24  $434.20  $16.70  $33.40  $22.30  $108.55  $434.20 
20  $11.51  $7.67  $460.20  $17.70  $35.40  $23.60  $115.05  $460.20 
21  $12.16  $8.10  $486.20  $18.70  $37.40  $24.90  $121.55  $486.20 
22  $12.81  $8.54  $512.20  $19.70  $39.40  $26.30  $128.05  $512.20 
23  $13.46  $8.97  $538.20  $20.70  $41.40  $27.60  $134.55  $538.20 
* It should be noted that the Go card monthly is costed the same as the Paper monthly 
despite Go card singles being cheaper than Paper singles. This is due to when the discount 
is applied – for Go this is on a single ticket basis, however for paper tickets the discount is 
only applied to weekly and monthly tickets. 

^ It should also be noted that Go card does not, either currently or under this 
recommendation, offer daily, off‐peak daily or weekly ticket products. 

# It should be also be noted that paper ticketing does not offer the off‐peak single as 
offered under Go card, as this would complicate and slow boarding times. 

   
Page 27 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

7.4.7 Comparison of 2009 Suggested Adult Fares with 2004 and 2008 Prices 
Zones  Single Ticketing Comparison (to 2009 Go Option)  Monthly Ticketing Comparison (to 2009 Go Option) 
2004  2008  2009  04‐09 %  08‐09 %  2004  2008  2009  04‐09 %  08‐09 % 
Go  Option  change  change  Option  change  change 
1  $2.00   $1.92   $2.00   0.0%  4.2%  $64.00  $76.80  $80.00   25.0%  4.2% 
2  $2.40   $2.32   $2.40   0.0%  3.4%  $76.80  $92.80  $96.00   25.0%  3.4% 
3  $2.80   $2.72   $2.80   0.0%  2.9%  $89.60  $108.80  $112.00   25.0%  2.9% 
4  $3.20   $3.04   $3.20   0.0%  5.3%  $102.40  $121.60  $128.00   25.0%  5.3% 
5  $3.60   $3.44   $3.68   2.2%  7.0%  $115.20  $137.60  $147.20   27.8%  7.0% 
6  $4.00   $3.84   $4.08   2.0%  6.3%  $128.00  $153.60  $163.20   27.5%  6.3% 
7  $4.40   $4.16   $4.48   1.8%  7.7%  $140.80  $166.40  $179.20   27.3%  7.7% 
8  $4.80   $4.56   $4.88   1.7%  7.0%  $153.60  $182.40  $195.20   27.1%  7.0% 
9  $5.20   $4.88   $5.28   1.5%  8.2%  $166.40  $195.20  $211.20   26.9%  8.2% 
10  $6.00   $5.60   $6.08   1.3%  8.6%  $192.00  $224.00  $243.20   26.7%  8.6% 
11  $6.80   $5.85   $6.45   ‐5.1%  10.3%  $204.00  $234.00  $258.00   26.5%  10.3% 
12  $7.60   $6.16   $6.72   ‐11.6%  9.1%  $212.80  $246.40  $268.80   26.3%  9.1% 
13  $8.40   $6.37   $6.89   ‐18.0%  8.2%  $218.40  $254.80  $275.60   26.2%  8.2% 
14  $9.20   $6.89   $7.54   ‐18.0%  9.4%  $239.20  $275.60  $301.60   26.1%  9.4% 
15  $10.00   $7.48   $8.26   ‐17.4%  10.4%  $260.00  $299.00  $330.20   27.0%  10.4% 
16  $10.80   $8.06   $8.91   ‐17.5%  10.5%  $280.80  $322.40  $356.20   26.9%  10.5% 
17  $11.60   $8.78   $9.56   ‐17.6%  8.9%  $301.60  $351.00  $382.20   26.7%  8.9% 
18  $12.40   $9.30   $10.21   ‐17.7%  9.8%  $322.40  $371.80  $408.20   26.6%  9.8% 
19  $13.20   $9.82   $10.86   ‐17.7%  10.6%  $343.20  $392.60  $434.20   26.5%  10.6% 
20  $14.00   $10.53   $11.51   ‐17.8%  9.3%  $364.00  $421.20  $460.20   26.4%  9.3% 
21  $14.80   $11.05   $12.16   ‐17.8%  10.0%  $384.80  $442.00  $486.20   26.4%  10.0% 
22  $15.60   $11.64   $12.81   ‐17.9%  10.1%  $405.60  $465.40  $512.20   26.3%  10.1% 
23  $16.40   $12.22   $13.46   ‐17.9%  10.1%  $426.40  $488.80  $538.20   26.2%  10.1% 
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K 

As can be seen in column E of the table above, the suggested 2009 Go card fares differ only 
slightly from 2004 fares up to zone 10, and are reduced for longer distance travel. 

As can be seen in column F of the table above, the price change from 2008 to 2009 is from 
3‐10%, inclusive of the 10% price rise. This reflects corrections of previous rounding 
errors. 

As can be seen in column J of the table above, Monthly prices will have increased roughly 
25% from 2004 to 2009. This is due to CPI over that period of roughly 15% plus the 10% 
real price rise. Despite this, the price change (column K) from 2008 to 2009 is only 3‐10% 
(again reflecting corrections of previous rounding errors). 

   
Page 28 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

7.4.8 Summary  
The following chart overviews the interim steps recommended for fares in South East 
Queensland: 

Cash fares 

• Take 2004 single Translink fares 
• Index for change in CPI since 2004 
• Add 10% real price rise 
• Round to nearest 10c 

Go card fares 

• Take 2009 cash single fares 
• Apply 20‐35% discount 
• Introduce off‐peak single (discount of 1/3) 
• Amend dejinition of off‐peak to '9am to 4pm and after 6pm' 
• Introduce zonal monthly ticket 
• Investigate value based monthly cap 

Desired outcomes 

• Higher use of Go card 
• Reducing use of cash 
• Benejits to boarding times, travel data etc 
• Equity across short distance and longer distance passengers 
• Additional funds to reinvest in the system 
• More use of off‐peak services 

8 Conclusion 
This research has engaged with users and non‐users of public transport, planners and 
transport planners and produced recommendations to support the implementation of a 
‘fair fares’ strategy for SEQ.  The research recommends that further engagement is 
undertaken by Translink, that housing and transport affordability research is undertaken, 
and that innovative fare products such as monthly caps are investigated.  It also 
recommends changes to the prices of tickets to: create incentive to use Go card as the 
payment method of choice over cash; increase funding to improve public transport 
services and infrastructure, and; promote non‐users to switch by offering enhanced ease 
and convenience. 

   
Page 29 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

9 References 
Brisbane City Council. (2007). Transport Plan for Brisbane 2008­2026, Brisbane: Brisbane 
City Council. 

Department of Infrastructure and Planning. (2008). Draft South East Queensland Regional 
Plan 2009­2031, Brisbane: Queensland Government. 

Moore, T. (2009, 21 April 2009) Cheaper fares proposal by mid‐year: Translink, Brisbane 
Times, (accessed from http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/cheaper‐fares‐
proposal‐by‐midyear‐translink‐20090420‐ackt.html). 

Office of Urban Management. (2005). South East Queensland Regional Plan 2005­2026, 
Brisbane: Queensland Government. 

Queensland Transport.(1997). Integrated Regional Transport Plan for South East 
Queensland, Brisbane: Queensland Government. 

Queensland Transport. (2001). A Community Service Obligation Framework for Public 
Transport in South East Queensland, Brisbane: Queensland Government. 

Queensland Transport. (2007). Moving People, Connecting Communities: a passenger 
transport strategy for Queensland 2007­2017, Brisbane: Queensland Government. 

Queensland Transport. (2008). Queensland Transport Corporate Plan 2008­12, Brisbane: 
Queensland Government. 

Translink. (2007). Translink Network Plan: 10 year plan 2004/05­2013/14, 4 year program 
2004/5­2013/14, Brisbane: Queensland Government. 

Transport Operations (Passenger Transport) Act (Qld). 1994. 
http://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/T/TranstOpPasTA94.pdf 
(accessed March 13, 2009). 

Transport Operations (Translink Transit Authority) Act (Qld). 2008. 
http://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/T/TrantOpTLAA08.pdf 
(accessed March 13, 2009). 

Websites: 

Metlink – Your guide to public transport in Melbourne and Victoria (accessed 
http://www.metlinkmelbourne.com.au/) 

Myki – its’ your key (accessed http://www.myki.com.au) 

Translink – Public transport information (accessed http://www.translink.com.au/) 

Transperth Homepage (accessed http://www.transperth.wa.gov.au/) 

True Affordability and Location Efficiency: The H+T Affordability Index (accessed 
http://htaindex.cnt.org) 

   
Page 30 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

10 Appendix One – Summary of Interviews 
Section 1: Values in relation to public transport (PT) 

Importance of PT 

– We’re all part of a community – we all expect and demand services 
– PT is important to any city, especially major cities 
– PT is more efficient at getting people around than roads and cars 
– PT has positive impacts in regards to the overall cost of infrastructure provision, GHG 
emission/noise/pollution reductions  
– PT is within the realm of significantly contributing to truly sustainable communities 
(socially, economically, environmentally) 
– PT is very important to reduce GHG, dependence on peak oil  
– It is more efficient to invest in PT than roads overall – it can therefore save the 
community money 
– PT is massively important to social equity and affordable access across disadvantaged 
groups in the community including young, old and mobility impaired 
– An aging population will become more and more reliant on PT when they can no longer 
drive 
– PT is an essential public service needed for cities across scales 
– Equity is important – PT provides accessibility to those who don’t have cars or can’t drive 
– people need to be able to achieve their daily functions without a car 
 

Characteristics of desired PT system 

– It should cover city and region and service quality should match the type of settlement, ie 
denser environments should have better service provision 
– Must focus on walkability as a key component of transit use 
– Must be reliable, frequent, high quality – ie clean etc 
– PT must service all people, not those who just live centrally or on growth corridors 
– It is important to avoid a ‘divided city’ 
– Should be seamless, integrated fiscally, service planning, provision, ease of access to info 
for decision‐making, a ‘customer’ not passenger focus 
 

Barriers to implementation 

– The major barriers to higher use of PT relate to three main factors – reliability, frequency 
and quality 
– People don’t like the uncertainty of waiting, they don’t like wet seats on rainy days and 
leaky buses 
– People’s behaviours – to integrate PT into your day you have to be organised and have 
access to the right information, you can’t just come and go as you please like you can in a 
car 
– So much money is needed for new infrastructure – in the current economy this is going 
to be difficult 
– Legibility and ease of use 
– Funding imbalance to roads and tunnels 
– Political will is the primary barrier – politicians seem to chase the short term predictably 
popular vote rather than the longer term solutions 
– Vested interests in lobby groups, motoring consortia etc 

   
Page 31 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

– Too many agencies that can’t always agree are involved 
– There is conflict between government expectations and private enterprise 
– Locational/geographic constraints – eg where do you put the service 
– Political – road space not to be removed for alternative modes 
– Cost recovery is poor and if you can’t fund services you can’t fund them 
– It is difficult to get PT to stack up in a Cost‐Benefit‐Analysis given externalities 
– It is important to think and articulate benefits in a triple bottom line 
 

Opportunities to overcome barriers 

– Addressing service and vehicle quality – for instance airconditioning buses is extremely 
important 
– Some research into user/non‐user top issues and address these in order 
– People also need to be educated about how to act and what to expect with mass transit – 
it isn’t necessarily reasonable to always expect a seat or not have to stand especially in 
peak periods 
– The community needs to lead a bottom up approach that demands better services from 
government. This should be supported by professionals through knowledge, discussion, 
leading the debate, contributing to change – this needs to be more than just research or 
publication but be radical, be out in the community, using the media, billboards, the 
internet etc 
– Democratic action is the only way to address illegitimate political power 
– Financial and regulation structures – commercial operators have a customer focus and 
drive that is greater than government, they have to be more responsive to customer 
demands – this could result in improved outcomes 
– Interagency work – resolution of political issues and single coordinated approach across 
Translink, DTMR, BCC (internally as well) 
 

Section 2: Charging/ PT fares 

Are more funds needed 

– Fares are about attracting people to PT and at the end of the day people weigh up their 
own values and make decisions in a personal context 
– Government needs to look at opportunity costs of PT, rather than simply service 
provision costs 
– PT is more than just buses, trains and ferries, PT includes all sorts of community 
alternatives such as retirement minivans, RSL minivans, football club services, employer 
based services, bikes etc 
– Absolutely 
 

Where will these funds come from 

– Effective marketing of the system may improve use 
– Cheaper fares may lead to increased use overall and increased finances 
– Additional services will allow more people to travel and will allow increased fare revenue 
– Lots of additional models exist in the world other than just fares and government 
provision – gov is incapable at the local level to provide the required service 
– Need to think outside the box – ride sharing programs, car share etc 
– It requires a focus on those people who don’t currently but feasibly could use PT… more 
customers is the ultimate way to address the problems – these must be attracted and 

   
Page 32 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

planned for Development could also contribute to the cost of infrastructure 
 

What barriers are there to increasing funding 

– Different levels of government will have to work together – in itself this is a major 
challenge 
– People are sensitive to price changes and make their own decision about what is 
reasonable given a whole host of factors including alternatives, budget 
– Level of taxation is always a political issue 
– Long timeframes for funding and paying off infrastructure and short political terms 
– There needs to be a paradigm shift – having people in cars looks cheap to the 
government but it is not in the longer term and it is not for people themselves 
– It is hard to make bus services look good financially, they make a loss 
– Success breeds need for further investment which may not be available 
 

Other ways to fund PT 

– Perhaps advertising or alternative revenues like that 
– Developers could provide funding although this will be difficult to negotiate 
– PPPs can be very difficult but may be able to provide infrastructure investment funds – it 
will be difficult to ensure public benefit not just private benefit 
– Congestion charging raises strong views in the community against additional taxes 
– Private businesses and entrepreneurs  ‐ for instance Go get car share 
– Employers could provide bicycles to employees for free 
– Lots of creative alternatives out there 
– Requirement through development assessment – ie requiring a GHG assessment over the 
life of the development, requiring a transport plan, charging development for PT 
– Congestion charging, although not politically desirable will in the longer term have to be 
part of the solution – costs of modes should be reflected in their charging, this is 
ultimately what will change people’s behaviours 
– Possibility for premium PT services that cost more 
– PPPs could contribute funds for infrastructure just like roads 
– Need economies of scale 
 

Section 3: Impacts of fare changes 

Increasing fares 

– Patronage may drop reducing revenue and contributing to more congestion 
– People still wouldn’t be deterred from living further from where they work as there are a 
host of factors 
– Increased fares could push people to return to other modes such as their cars which 
would just add more pressure to the roads, decrease PT quality and impact negatively on 
GHG etc 
– Reduction in people using it 
– Greater congestion 
– Social equity implications – not everyone has alternatives, nor can afford 
– A two tiered approach of standard and premium services may allow for more 
sophisticated financial models that return a better rate on investment and open new 
markets 
 

   
Page 33 
   
  Research Project –DBP415 Research Project   
  David Bremner n5777038   

Decreasing fares 

– Patronage may increase, particularly if fares were free, however services are already 
overcrowded and therefore more people in peak times wouldn’t be able to travel 
– People may be more forgiving of bad quality if it was free 
– Revenue would decrease which would prevent new services etc 
– Free zones may attract people to certain catchments, live close to the station etc, 
however there are a host of factors in choosing living location 
– Greater PT use may improve health outcomes, even if at short term cost to health budget 
– Slightly less congestion 
– Less money to spend on priorities 
– May lead a short term increase to PT but in peak it is already at capacity… decreases are 
likely to be a good approach for off‐peak to drive uptake of product 
 

Section 4: Final comments 

Additional comments 

– Individuals make their own choices based on their own budgets and preferences 
– Rising cost of fuel was a major mode shift factor and contributed to pressure on PT last 
year – this was an external lever 
– There is lots of latent demand for services and a new focus on potential markets may 
lead to greater mode shift 
– BCC trialled over school holidays 5‐10yrs ago a $2 flat fee – it would be interesting to see 
how effective this was seen to be 
– PT needs to be charged for at a level that is commensurate with service 
– If fares were to increase above CPI there would need to be tangible benefits in service 
quality to allow people to make their own choices 
– Demographic shifts are occurring that service providers will need to be aware of and 
respond to 
 

Who must be consulted 

– Professional organisations such as UDIA, Property Council etc 
– Government (Translink, DTMR, private bus operators, Ministers, Lord Mayor, Council) 
– Government agencies, Department of Families and Communities as PT is an essential 
accessibility tool and downstream impacts of fare rises would be felt by the most 
vulnerable 
 

   
Page 34