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EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.

EDU 517-410-5264

EMILY WAUGH
INTERIOR DESIGN PORTFOLIO

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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RESTAURANT SPACE: ALTITUDE 42 RETAIL SPACE: AESOP MOROCCAN CULTURAL COMMUNITY CENTER

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER: ADDIES ACRES

IND 339: STUDIO III SPECIAL USER GROUPS

INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER: ADDIES ACRES

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

PROJECT SCOPE
The goal of this project was to create an intergenerational center that combined an assisted living facility and a childrens day care center, for an actual client in DeWitt, MI. Research from the Eden Alternative and Green House concepts were applied to create a residential feel in a commercial space. Up to 120 residents could be accommodated in the space for either long or short term care. The facility was largely influenced by nature and the Arts & Crafts era. This was a team project that was worked on by a total of three students.

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

ABOVE
The schematic block plan was inspired by the shapes and organization of the Petoskey Stone.

RIGHT
The final block plan was consolidated to consist of six residential pods connected to a larger activity-based portion of the facility.

BLOCK PLANS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Electrical receptacles were placed, at minimum, every 12 to meet code. Various receptacles were placed as needed.

ELECTRICAL PLANS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Pathways were arranged to eliminate dead end corridors, to support mobility and exercise throughout the space and to minimize agitation for residents, having Alzheimer's.

FLOOR PLANS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Residential pod arrangements were designed using the Green House Concept of larger elder care facilities, with the feel of a small home to provide a sense of comfort and personalized care.

FLOOR PLANS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

TOP RIGHT
Bamboo flooring provided a warm, residential feel throughout the facility. As a safety precaution, carpeting in the resident bedrooms was selected to be a softer surface where the majority of falls occur for the elderly.

BOTTOM RIGHT
Cut lines in carpeting were strategically placed to minimize material waste and additional cuts.

FLOORING DIAGRAMS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Water columns were strategically placed to be concealed from users of the space.

PLUMBING PLANS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Supply and air returns were placed for even heating and cooling throughout the facility.

REFLECTED CEILING PLANS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

TOP LEFT
EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264 A reception area was placed in the main lobby to serve as a point of contact for residents and visitors.

TOP RIGHT
An accommodating Directors office was provided for meeting with clients, encompassing the feel of the Arts and Crafts era.

BOTTOM LEFT
Elements of light and nature were incorporated, by large Arts & Crafts style windows and wildlife art, to bring creativity and learning to children in the Day Care Center

BOTTOM RIGHT
A town-square feel was created through indoor recreational areas resembling the exterior look of a downtown shop. This helped to promote community building and encourage residents to interact outside of their own rooms.

SCHEMATIC SKETCHES

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

TOP LEFT
Group areas were maximized to promote opportunities for social interactions and to build a sense of community among residents.

TOP RIGHT
Usable outdoor gardens and nature paths were implemented, inspired by Eden Alternative research, to promote health, vitality and exercise,

BOTTOM LEFT
The Arts and Crafts period was emphasized through the use of residential detailing in architecture, furnishings, and finishes, to correspond to the concept of bringing the outdoors in, as wells as creating a warm, convivial atmosphere.

PRESENTATION BOARDS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

TOP LEFT
Versatility was provided in resident rooms through the usage of moveable walls, to allow the accommodation of different resident statuses, such as economic or marital.

TOP RIGHT
Southern exposure was achieved in resident rooms through the use of clerestory windows and facing rooms to the south, to promote a regulated circadian rhythm.

BOTTOM LEFT
Non-obstructed views of nature were granted in resident rooms, by positioning the pods and windows outward from the facility to eliminate views of parking lots, in order to enrich the overall aesthetic environment for each resident.

PRESENTATION BOARDS

THE INTERGENERATIONAL CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

TOP/BOTTOM LEFT
The space was subdivided by custom storage pieces that created smaller areas encouraging elements of play and child development.

BOTTOM RIGHT
Separate napping areas provided versatility and privacy to children in the Day Care center.

PRESENTATION BOARDS

IND 437: STUDIO IV CONTRACT

RESTAURANT SPACE: ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

PROJECT SCOPE
The goal of this partnered project was to create an upscale restaurant in a historic building that could seat over 250 people for dinner. Altitude 42 encompassed the vibrant mountain city of Denver, CO. The design incorporated strong layered angles that echoed the dramatic ranges found in the natures landscape. By contrasting warm and cool colors, with various textures and finishes, an inviting modern atmosphere was created. Altitude 42 was influenced by the Italian Renaissance Revival style of the late 19th century. Built in 1885, The Marshall Field Warehouse in Chicago, IL, served as inspiration for the exterior fenestration, brickwork and arches. Altitude 42 brought new life to historical elements through the mixture of industrial and naturalistic elements.

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

TOP LEFT
The main entry to the restaurant is emphasized through a significant arch reminiscent of the Italian Renaissance Revival style.

BOTTOM LEFT
The side of the building continued the influence of 19th century storefronts with tiers of windows that mix various shapes and sizes from bottom to top.

EXTERIOR ELEVATIONS

ALTITUDE 42

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TOP RIGHT
The second level of the restaurant provides a variety of seating types to be able to accommodate a range of party sizes. EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

BOTTOM LEFT
Angled openings provided customers opportunities to enjoy the comprehensive views of the restaurant and of Denver.

BOTTOM RIGHT
The fourth level holds a secondary bar and lounge area for a nightlife atmosphere. The fourth floor also has rooftop access for a seasonal bar and dance area.

FLOOR PLANS

The main level of the restaurant hosted a large bar and lounge area for customers to enjoy while waiting for their table.

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

TOP LEFT
The maitred station served as focal interest and a first point of contact for customers.

TOP RIGHT
Leveled lounge seating was implemented in order to create a relaxed sitting area.

BOTTOM LEFT
The strong, layered angles of the levels echoed the views of mountains in the distance, while creating spacious openings to the restaurant below.

SCHEMATIC SKETCHES

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

LEFT
The space was inspired by the combination and layering of naturalistic and sleek, modern elements.

RIGHT
Rich textures and patterns provided an industrial sleek aesthetic appeal throughout the space.

SCHEMATIC PRESENTATION BOARDS

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Dramatic openings and varied ceiling heights provided contrast throughout the historic building.

SECTION

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

TOP LEFT
Glass railings help to create non-obstructed views of the Denver skyline.

TOP RIGHT
Comprehensive openings created expansive ceiling heights on the main level.

BOTTOM LEFT
A varied angled floor line on the fourth level creates greater openings and views to the floor below.

SECTION

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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The exterior of the restaurant is highlighted with up-lighting and sleek restaurant signage, in order to draw attention and attract customers.

RENDERINGS

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Strong angles of the wall covering reinforced the mountain concept, while contrasting with softer elements throughout the first floor lounge.

RENDERINGS

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Lighted glass beads above the booths provided a subtle, sparkling lighting effect.

RENDERINGS

ALTITUDE 42

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Streamlined furniture pieces retained the modern concept of the space, while contrasting with the historical elements in the building.

RENDERINGS

IND 437: STUDIO IV CONTRACT

RETAIL SPACE: AESOP

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

PROJECT SCOPE
The goal of this project was to develop a new retail store design for the skin, hair and body company, Aesop. The Aesop brand favors clean lines and minimal forms in order to create a proportional and arresting display of products. Streamlined shelving complements the polite order of Aesops product display and gently guide visitors through the store. The repurposing of items throughout the space is achieved through reclaimed wooden boxes, antiqued pedestal sinks, and concrete flooring. The mixture of sleek modern displays and rustic wood creates an inviting and dynamic atmosphere.

AESOP

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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In many existing Aesop retail stores, modern and clean forms are contrasted by natural materials to create warmth with a sense of whimsy.

EXISTING AESOP INSPIRATION

AESOP

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Large glass windows allow light and views of the interior to be seen from the street, in order to attract customers. Minimalism and clean lines help to reinforce the Aesop brand.

RENDERINGS

AESOP

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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Sleek shelving and displays are contrasted with warm, wooden elements to retain the brands identity and to add visual variety.

RENDERINGS

AESOP

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BELOW
EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264 An open floor plan provides customers with navigational ease through spacious traffic flow and wall-mounted displays.

RENDERINGS

Demonstration sinks allow customers the opportunity to try out products in-store, and to learn about application techniques from sales associates.

AESOP

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

BELOW
Wooden crate-like boxes create a whimsical and architecturally interesting display for products, while embracing the Aesops contrasting design aesthetic of modern mixed with antique.

RENDERINGS

AESOP

NORTH ELEVATION

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

SOUTH ELEVATION

ABOVE
Streamline built-in storage allows products to be shown off as much as possible and encourages customers to interact with the product.

RENDERINGS

IND 439: STUDIO V SENIOR THESIS

MOROCCAN CULTURAL COMMUNITY CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

PROJECT SCOPE
The goal of this project was to create a Moroccan Cultural Community Center to serve as a civic gathering place for community members throughout the greater Houston, Texas area. Visitors of the center will gain knowledge and understanding through participating in the arts of the Moroccan culture. The center draws influence from the architecture of Morocco, while tying in contrasting modern elements. Intricate Moroccan mosaic tile designs serve as inspiration for the building layout. Geometric shapes and symmetry are reflected throughout the spaces, in order to create a cohesive and peaceful space for all patrons to gather. Opportunities to gain cultural experiences and learning are promoted through the incorporation of educational classrooms, art gallery spaces, a performance space, community library, a meditation room, and a spacious outdoor courtyard. The rich, vibrant colors of Morocco also serve as an inspiration for the color palette throughout the community center. Neutral tones will be a canvas to showcase bold colors and detailed patterns. The Moroccan Cultural Community Center will be an oasis for visitors to explore and become immersed in the celebration of Moroccan culture.

MOROCCAN CULTURAL COMMUNITY CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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The design of the community center was inspired by the traditional Moroccan architectural forms with a mixture of modern, streamline elements.

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The market creates a space to explore the experience of shopping in a Moroccan Bazaars and allow opportunities to become immersed in the local culture through handcrafted goods.

RENDERINGS

MOROCCAN CULTURAL COMMUNITY CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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The layout of the facility was inspired by the geometric shapes of Moroccan mosaics and symmetry often found in Moroccan art.

Total Building Square Footage: 34,077 sq. ft

FLOOR PLAN

MOROCCAN CULTURAL COMMUNITY CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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The arching and mosaic tile work provides visual representation of architectural elements found in traditional Moroccan courtyards, symbolic of the cultural heritage.

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The library design was inspired by the colorful patterns and textures found in Moroccan textiles, and was contrasted by a modern take on Moroccan symmetry.

RENDERINGS

MOROCCAN CULTURAL COMMUNITY CENTER

EMILY WAUGH WAUGH1E@CMICH.EDU 517-410-5264

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The space serves as an outlet for cultural performance art, while allowing for versatility through the use of moveable seating to accommodate various events.

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Sustainable materials and products were selected throughout the facility as much as possible. Recycled rainwater was also repurposed to be utilized to flush toilets, irrigate the ground, and to run the courtyard fountain.

RENDERINGS