Experience.

Social Work and Human Services
» Human Services » Justice Administration » Social Work » Double Degrees

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Experience. The Difference.

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Welcome.
Choosing to study at UniSA means you’ll graduate with more than just a degree. You’ll be ready to progress in the profession of your choice. You’ll have gained an international network. And you’ll have the skills to make an immediate and lasting contribution to society. We look forward to welcoming you. Professor Peter Høj Vice Chancellor and President, University of South Australia

Three reasons to choose UniSA: » Fieldwork represents up to 20 per cent of our program and is an important component of the educational development of all health service students » UniSA students have access to professional networks and contacts through the South Australian chapter of the Australian Association of Social Workers which was initiated by staff at UniSA » The undergraduate Social Work program is offered at our campuses in Whyalla and Mount Gambier, with a particular focus on the social problems that affect regional communities.
According to Graduate Careers Australia, over 88 per cent of Social Work graduates find full-time work after completing their studies (2007 stats). The average starting salary is $44k.

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Experience. Social Work and Human Services

Social workers and human service professionals are concerned with promoting human rights and social justice. In particular, they are involved in the planning and provision of services for individuals, families, groups and communities who experience disadvantage or personal and social difficulties. UniSA’s Bachelor of Social Work and Bachelor of Social Science programs allow students to gain skills in developing policy, lobbying for social change, providing counselling, mediation and advocacy, administering community programs and researching social issues. Intensive fieldwork assignments throughout the program will provide for experience working with children, youth, adults and older people who may be experiencing difficulties.

Graduates are in high demand and career opportunities are plentiful. Employment is available in both regional and city-based locations in roles that include case managers, counsellors, rehabilitation officers, community development officers, child protection advocates, researchers, social policy makers, educators and family therapists.

Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services) Bachelor of Social Science (Justice Administration) Bachelor of Social Work Double Degress Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies), Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services) Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies), Bachelor of Social Work Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services), Bachelor of Psychological Science Bachelor of Social Work, Bachelor of Arts (International Studies) Regional Degrees Bachelor of Social Work – Mount Gambier, Whyalla Entry Requirements

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For the most up-to-date and detailed information visit www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/programs and enter the four-letter UniSA program code.

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Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services)
Open Day information sessions Sunday, 17 August 2008 1.30 pm, room HH 4-08 City West campus www.unisa.edu.au/openday Program information sessions Tuesday, 9 September 2008 Tuesday, 2 December 2008 Magill campus Register at www.unisa.edu.au/infosessions Registrations essential Program overview Human service professionals are concerned with social problems. In particular, they are involved in the development and provision of services for individuals, families, groups and communities who experience disadvantage and/or personal and social difficulties. Employment opportunities are diverse and challenging. The Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services) focuses on the behavioural and social sciences, human service practice, human service management and social policy. What will I study? While the first- and second-year courses are consistent with the Bachelor of Social Work, this program differs through its strong emphasis on human service management. Students will focus on the management of effective service delivery at both individual and project level, on policy and program analysis, and on the social and behavioural sciences. This program is designed to produce professional human service workers who can be work effectively in demanding environments. To prepare students for work in these environments, the program includes consistent participation in a range of potentially challenging classroom, assessment and field placement activities. In the final year of the program students undertake two field placements of 20 days and 40 days respectively, supervised by field staff and arranged, monitored and assessed by UniSA staff. The field education courses are invaluable, providing an opportunity for students to engage in professional practice. Many students are offered employment by the agencies in which they do their placements. Please note Some work placements require a current driver’s licence and a recognised first aid certificate. All students are required to undertake training on child-safe environments prior to placement. All students preparing for placement will require evidence of a current police check before commencing placement. What does it take? Human service professionals must have well developed interpersonal skills, sound analytical and evaluation skills, and the ability to work effectively as part of a team in a variety of demanding contexts. A strong interest in, and commitment to, social justice and ethical action is also required.

UniSA program code: SATAC code: CRICOS code (international students only): TER (February 2008 cutoff): Program length: Home campus: Program fees: Program fees (international students only): Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: Accepts Special Entry (STAT): External study available: Part-time study available: TAFE credit available: Honours study available: Scholarships available:

MBSS 444101 002497J 56.70 3 years Magill Commonwealth supported A$15,000 per annum None None Yes No Yes Yes Yes www.unisa.edu.au/scholarship

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Who will employ me? Human service graduates enjoy excellent employment prospects and typically develop quickly into leadership and management positions. Graduates may work in a range of service fields including family and youth services, aged care, community development, correctional services, disability services, rehabilitation services, mental health services, unemployment services and government departments. Human service graduates may be employed as case managers, community workers, counsellors, project officers or managers, policy development officers, policy advocates, community development officers or researchers. Honours Graduates of the Bachelor of Social Science with an interest in research can proceed to the Bachelor of Social Science (Honours) if they meet the entrance requirements for the honours degree. Professional recognition Graduates of the Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services) are eligible for full membership of the Australian Institute of Welfare and Community Workers. Program requirements FIRST YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Provision Communication for Human Service Sociology 1 Lifespan Diversity Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Governance and Citizenship in Australia Group Work Philosophy of Knowledge and Ethics Psychology 1B SECOND YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Intervention Political Economy and Social Policy Social Enquiry Methods Human Service Interviews Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Mental Health and Mental Wellbeing Australian Social Policy Human Service Workers and the Law Working with Community THIRD YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Managing Professional Practice Human Service Field Education A Social Analysis and the Human Services Managing Individualised Service Delivery Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Human Service Field Education B Human Service Project Management Indigenous Australians and the Human Services

Helen Feist
Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services) (Honours)

‘At UniSA, you get theoretical knowledge and also valuable practical skills in areas like managing projects and research policy. You also have the opportunity to develop that practical base and your theoretical knowledge through field education. UniSA staff are really supportive, they are interested in me as a person and my career goals. Being able to connect to work opportunities through staff is also very useful. I’ve made lifelong friends from my time at UniSA and lifelong career choices too – it’s been valuable and a very supportive study environment.’

(08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW study@unisa.edu.au

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Bachelor of Social Science (Justice Administration)
Open Day information sessions Sunday, 17 August 2008 1.30 pm, room HH 4-08 City West campus www.unisa.edu.au/openday Program information sessions Tuesday, 9 September 2008 Tuesday, 2 December 2008 Magill campus Register at www.unisa.edu.au/infosessions Registrations essential Program overview The Bachelor of Social Science (Justice Administration) provides students with the opportunity to develop their human service knowledge base, with an emphasis on criminal justice and organisational theory and practice. This program can be completed in one year of full-time study (or equivalent) and provides a final-year degree in social science for those who have already studied the Diploma in Correctional Administration, the TAFESA Associate Diploma of Justice Administration, or the Advanced Diploma in Policing, and have two years’ justice work experience. Graduates of the UniSA Diploma in Correctional Administration and the TAFE Diploma or Advanced Diploma in Policing may be granted 72 units (two years) credit in this program. What will I study? This program focuses on social science and human service knowledge relevant to work in justice administration and covers areas such as social policy, research, sociology and organisational analysis. Students can expand their existing professional knowledge and experience through engagement with key debates in criminal justice, organisational theory and social policy. Students develop a sound understanding of social research methods, expand their understanding of the legal context of justice work and explore key issues in criminal justice. In particular, they explore the forces shaping the emergence of restorative justice; analyse the relationship between economic and social policy; develop knowledge of organisational theory and explore the competing influences on human service organisations. Students also identify the context in which human service project management occurs and the skills and processes needed to contribute to human service projects. What does it take? To succeed at tertiary study, students need to be motivated, well organised and dedicated, with a genuine desire to learn more about their field of study. Students are expected to be experienced in basic teamwork and communication skills.

UniSA program code: SATAC code: TER (February 2008 cutoff): Program length: Home campus: Program fees: Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: Accepts Special Entry (STAT): External study available: Part-time study available: TAFE credit available: Honours study available: Scholarships available:

MBJA 444121 See entry requirements 1 year Magill Commonwealth supported See entry requirements See entry requirements Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes www.unisa.edu.au/scholarship

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Who will employ me? This program provides further career opportunities for people who are or have been employed in justice agencies such as South Australia Police, Department for Correctional Services, the South Australian Courts Authority and the Attorney-General’s Department. Entry requirements To gain entry into this program students will have completed the Diploma in Correctional Administration at the University of South Australia or the Advanced Diploma of Policing or the Diploma of Justice Administration with TAFE and will normally have at least two years’ employment experience in an area of justice work. Program requirements First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Social Enquiry Methods Political Economy and Social Policy Issues in Criminal Justice Community and Restorative Justice Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Human Service Project Management Organisation of Human Service Delivery Human Service Workers and the Law BUGE Elective

(08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW study@unisa.edu.au

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Bachelor of Social Work
Open Day information sessions Sunday, 17 August 2008 1.30 pm, room HH 4-08 City West campus www.unisa.edu.au/openday Program information sessions Tuesday, 9 September 2008 Tuesday, 2 December 2008 Magill campus Register at www.unisa.edu.au/infosessions Registrations essential Social Work Knowledge Students develop their knowledge of social work approaches, to working with individuals, families, communities, groups and organisations. Diverse theoretical approaches to social work practice are studied and students may also specialise in areas such as interpersonal violence, rural social work, cultural diversity, health care, child protection, aged care and many other areas of practice. Social Work Practice Students engage in two 15-week, supervised work placements in their third and fourth years, where they apply their knowledge, skills and experience to practical situations. Students benefit from the close supervision of experienced practitioners and regular support from the University during these valuable learning opportunities. Students gain experience working directly with individuals and families, for example, working with young parents who need help with parenting skills and supportive social networks. Additional placement opportunities allow students to take on a broader project focus, working with community groups or organisations, immigrants or people in detention centres. Policy and research placements meet the learning needs of some students. Placement opportunities are provided in rural, remote and international contexts. International relationships in India and Canada have provided many placement opportunities and new opportunities continue to emerge. Social Policy Students study the conditions leading to disadvantage and the marginalisation of individuals and sectors of society. They learn to identify social policies that affect people’s lives, the forces that shape these policies, and the strategic ways that social workers may influence these policies. Research A central focus of the program is to prepare practitioners with knowledge and skills grounded in sound research. The ability to use, evaluate and construct research is developed throughout the program. High performing students may undertake an Honours program in their final year. Please note Some work placements require a current driver’s licence and a recognised first aid certificate. Prior to placement, all students are required to undertake training on child-safe environments and provide evidence of a current police check. What does it take? Social work requires a strong commitment to, and passion for, working for social justice and human rights. Social workers enable people and communities to achieve their full potential, often against great odds. All forms of professional social work require effective interpersonal skills, a disciplined objective approach and adherence to the profession’s ethics and values. Social workers may be required to work in settings where resources and assistance are limited, and often work with individuals, families, organisations and

UniSA program code: SATAC code: CRICOS code (international students only): TER (February 2008 cutoff): Program length: Home campus: Program fees: Program fees (international students only): Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: Accepts Special Entry (STAT): External study available: Part-time study available: TAFE credit available: Honours study available: Scholarships available:

MBSW 444111 000537M 56.15 4 years Magill Commonwealth supported A$15,000 per annum None None Yes No Yes Yes Yes www.unisa.edu.au/scholarship

Program overview The social work profession promotes advocacy, social change, positive human relationships and the empowerment of people to enhance their wellbeing. Principles of human rights and social justice are fundamental to social work, an increasingly important profession in today’s rapidly changing world. The Bachelor of Social Work provides a sound knowledge of the political, behavioural and social sciences. It prepares students for a range of professional social work job opportunities in areas such as health care, legal and court services, domestic violence,

child protection, services for youth, families, children and communities, drug and alcohol programs, services for Aboriginal families and communities, and refugee assistance. Applicants who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree in a relevant social science or human service degree may be eligible for up to two years’ credit for prior learning. What will I study? This program has been developed around four major areas of study: Social Work Knowledge, Social Work Practice, Social Policy and Research.

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communities under stress, or in situations where there is conflict or uncertainty. Who will employ me? Social workers have excellent employment opportunities. The demand for graduates is high and graduating students quickly find employment in the fields of aged care, domestic violence, child and youth welfare, multicultural services, health care, community development, legal and court services, correctional services, disability services, social planning and administration, research and private industry. There are also strong employment opportunities overseas, particularly in the United Kingdom. Honours The degree may be awarded with Honours. Professional recognition Graduates are eligible for membership of the Australian Association of Social Workers. Program requirements FIRST YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Provision Communication for Human Service Sociology 1 Lifespan Diversity Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Governance and Citizenship in Australia Group Work Philosophy of Knowledge and Ethics Psychology 1B SECOND YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Intervention Political Economy and Social Policy Social Enquiry Methods Human Service Interviews Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Mental Health and Mental Wellbeing Australian Social Policy Human Service Workers and the Law Working with Community THIRD YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Social Work Field Education 1 and Social Work Practice Strategies or Social Work Field Education Practicum (International Students) Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Planning and Evaluation in the Human Services Contemporary Practice Approaches Organisation of Human Service Delivery Indigenous Australians and the Human Services FOURTH YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Contemporary Social Work Issues Honours Dissertation Options - 3 from: Aged Care and Social Work Practice Applied Social Research Case Management Family and Child Practice Interpersonal Violence: Research, Policy and Practice Mediation Process, Concepts and Skills A Rural Social Work Social Work and Cultural Diversity Social Work Practice in Health Care Social Work in Indigenous Contexts Statutory Responsibility in Social Work Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Social Work Field Education 2 and Professional Development or Social Work Field Education Practicum (International Students)

Jocelyn Yim
Bachelor of Social Work Graduated with Master of Conflict Management

‘I completed two work placements where I worked four to five days a week coupled with a half-day class at University, where we discussed our placements with lecturers. I did my first placement in a hospital in Malaysia as a medical social worker where I focused on counselling and discharge planning. The online aspect of UniSA’s teaching enabled me to stay in contact with my lecturers during this time, which was very important.’

(08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW study@unisa.edu.au

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Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies), Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services)
Open Day information sessions Sunday, 17 August 2008 3.00 pm, room BH 2-16 1.30 pm, room HH 4-08 City West campus www.unisa.edu.au/openday Program information sessions Tuesday, 9 September 2008 Tuesday, 2 December 2008 Wednesday, 3 December 2008 Magill campus Register at www.unisa.edu.au/infosessions Registrations essential Human Services is focused on the behavioural and social sciences, human service practice, human service management and social policy. Courses have a strong emphasis on human service management with particular focus on the management of effective service delivery at both individual and project level, on policy and program analysis, and on the social and behavioural sciences. Students will also undertake 500 hours of supervised work placement. These placements enable students to develop a working knowledge of specific human services areas and practise the skills they learn in class. Placements also improve students’ understanding of Indigenous experiences in Australia, and give further insight into complex, crosscultural communications. Please note Some work placements may require students to hold a current driver’s licence and a recognised first aid certificate. Students will be required to attend work placements generally, but not exclusively, during normal working hours in both teaching and non-teaching weeks, for between three and five full days per week. Overseas work placements may also be available. What does it take? Students need a strong interest in working in human services organisations, particularly those linked to Indigenous services. Students also need skills in interacting with others from diverse cultural backgrounds and an understanding of different social contexts. Students should have an inquiring mind, the desire to explore different organisational concepts and patterns of management, and the desire to understand issues confronting Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in management and policy-making and its implementation. Who will employ me? This program develops graduates’ knowledge and analytical abilities, enabling them to work in public and private sectors, statutory bodies, community-based human services organisations, Indigenous organisations and enterprises or Indigenous agencies working in international settings. Graduates are involved in social services, project management, developing policy, acting as advocates, lobbying for social change, counselling, administering community programs, and undertaking research into social issues. They can work in a range of jobs in all human service fields including correctional services, family and youth services, aged care, community development, rehabilitation, disability services, health, mental health and unemployment. According to Graduate Careers Australia, over 88 per cent of Social Work graduates find fulltime work after completing their studies (2007 stats). The average starting salary is $44k.

UniSA program code: SATAC code: CRICOS code (international students only): TER (February 2008 cutoff): Program length: Home campus: Program fees: Program fees (international students only): Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: Accepts Special Entry (STAT): External study available: Part-time study available: TAFE credit available: Honours study available: Scholarships available:

DBAH 424421 040635M 56.00 4 years City West Commonwealth supported A$13,900 per annum None None Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes www.unisa.edu.au/scholarship

Program overview The Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies), Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services) double degree prepares students for the planning, implementation and management of human services for Indigenous peoples and communities, as well as for employment in the wider human services sector. The degree aims to produce graduates who can apply an understanding of Indigenous cultures to human services practice principles and respond effectively and ethically in diverse settings for the wellbeing of Indigenous peoples.

What will I study? Students can undertake courses in the social sciences, human services and Indigenous affairs, and the program also provides an opportunity for students to undertake a second major in another area of study. The Aboriginal Studies component of the degree encompasses an analysis of social and political systems in Australian contexts and explores contemporary Indigenous issues which affect organisations and society. Courses primarily focus on policy and management in Indigenous contexts but are also relevant to all Australian contexts.

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Professional recognition Graduates of the Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services) are eligible for full membership of the Australian Institute of Welfare and Community Workers. Program requirements FIRST YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Provision Communications Concepts: Research and Application Aboriginal Cultures Lifespan Diversity Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Psychology 1B Governance and Citizenship in Australia Group Work Contemporary Aboriginal Issues SECOND YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Political Economy and Social Policy Computers and Information Management Human Service Intervention Human Service Interviews Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Australian Social Policy Social Research Methods Indigenous Studies elective Indigenous Studies elective THIRD YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Aboriginal Policy and Organisations Managing Individualised Service Delivery Global Knowledges and the Social Sciences Identity and Representation Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Working with Community Indigenous Australians and the Human Services Human Service Workers and the Law Mental Health and Mental Wellbeing FOURTH YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Field Education A Managing Professional Practice Comparative Indigenous Studies Indigenous Studies elective Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Human Service Field Education B Human Service Project Management Cultural Perspectives on Health

(08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW study@unisa.edu.au

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Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies), Bachelor of Social Work
Open Day information sessions Sunday, 17 August 2008 3.00 pm, room BH 2-16 1.30 pm, room HH 4-08 City West campus www.unisa.edu.au/openday Program information sessions Tuesday, 9 September 2008 Tuesday, 2 December 2008 Wednesday, 3 December 2008 Magill campus Register at www.unisa.edu.au/infosessions Registrations essential contemporary understanding of reconciliation, human rights and self-determination. Students cover key areas such as the examination of Indigenous cultures and Australian society; representations of Indigenous Australians and Indigenous writing; archaeology and its role in Indigenous heritage issues; Indigenous histories and colonialism; and core concepts of social work theory and social policies. Students also undertake a variety of work placements which reinforce the knowledge learned in class, and develop their social work skills in the workplace. Students engage in two intensive, supervised field placements, in which they apply their knowledge, skills and experience in practical situations, and develop their professional identity. Please note Some work placements require a current driver’s licence and a recognised first aid certificate. All students are required to undertake training on child-safe environment prior to placement. All students preparing for placement will require evidence of a current police check before commencing placement. under stress or in situations where there is conflict or uncertainty due to change. Social workers may be required to work in settings where resources and assistance are limited. Who will employ me? The program provides graduates with both a social work qualification and also the specific skills and knowledge required to work with Indigenous communities. Employment prospects for social workers are considered good, with high vacancy levels according to the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations. Social workers may undertake a variety of roles which may involve: » assessing and recommending resources for health, welfare, recreation, housing, employment and other community services » providing leadership and assistance to implement community projects » liaising with various organisations, agencies and voluntary groups to review, improve and develop new services » providing client assistance and referral to resolve personal problems. Graduates may find employment in the fields of aged care, domestic violence, child and youth welfare, multicultural services, health care, community development, correctional services, disability services, social planning and administration, research and private industry.

UniSA program code: SATAC code: CRICOS code (international students only): TER (February 2008 cutoff): Program length: Home campus: Program fees: Program fees (international students only): Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: Accepts Special Entry (STAT): External study available: Part-time study available: TAFE credit available: Honours study available: Scholarships available:

MBAS 444151 040841E 74.30 5 years Magill Commonwealth supported A$15,000 per annum None None Yes No Yes Yes Yes www.unisa.edu.au/scholarship

Program overview This double degree provides students with a unique opportunity to gain a social work qualification while developing knowledge of Indigenous cultures and practices relevant to working with Indigenous peoples and communities. The program enables students to contribute to social justice and social change; develop an understanding of issues central to contemporary Indigenous society and their relevance to the Australian community; gain skills and knowledge necessary for employment as a social worker in human service professions; work with skilled staff and peers who will share a commitment and

contribution towards a better society; and develop critical thinking, reflective practice and a range of intervention strategies. What will I study? This program prepares students for social work practice by developing knowledge and skills based in social, political and behavioural sciences theory. In addition, the program places a strong emphasis on social work knowledge and skills embedded in an understanding of Indigenous people’s experiences of the historic, economic, cultural, social and political context of post-colonial Australia. The program aims to produce culturally sensitive graduates who can reflect a

What does it take? Students require well developed interpersonal skills, an inquiring mind, the desire to explore diverse social and cultural concepts, and a keen interest in exploring and understanding Honours issues confronting Indigenous The Bachelor of Social Work may be awarded with honours. and non-Indigenous Australians. Social work often involves working with individuals, families, organisations and communities

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Professional recognition Graduates are eligible for membership of the Australian Association of Social Workers. Program requirements FIRST YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Provision Communications Concepts: Research and Application Aboriginal Cultures Lifespan Diversity Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Psychology 1B Governance and Citizenship in Australia Group Work Contemporary Aboriginal Issues SECOND YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Political Economy and Social Policy Australian Society and Cultures Global Knowledges and the Social Sciences Computers and Information Management Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Australian Social Policy Aborigines, History and Colonialism Communication, Culture and Indigenous Australians Social Research Methods THIRD YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Comparative Indigenous Studies Identity and Representation Human Service Intervention Human Service Interviews Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Rights and Racism Human Service Workers and the Law Mental Health and Mental Wellbeing Working with Community Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Planning and Evaluation in the Human Services Contemporary Practice Approaches Indigenous Australians and the Human Services Aboriginal Studies Option x 1 to be selected from: Indigenous Australians, Human Rights and International Law Cultural Perspectives on Health FIFTH YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Social Work in Indigenous Contexts Contemporary Social Work Issues Honours Dissertation or Options x 2 to be selected from: Aged Care and Social Work Practice Applied Social Research Case Management Family and Child Practice Interpersonal Violence: Research, Policy and Practice Mediation Process, Concepts and Skills A Rural Social Work Social Work and Cultural Diversity Social Work Practice in Health Care Statutory Responsibility in Social Work Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Social Work Field Education 2 Professional Development FOURTH YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Social Work Field Education 1 Social Work Practice Strategies

Sharyn Dixon
Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies), Bachelor of Social Work, Graduated with Honours

‘I found the double degree fascinating and studying at UniSA has opened many doors for me. During the degree, I did my placement at a domestic violence service. It brought together the theory I had learned and gave me a sense that social workers actually help people in crisis.

(08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW study@unisa.edu.au

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Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services), Bachelor of Psychological Science
Open Day information sessions Sunday, 17 August 2008 12 noon, room BH 2-09 1.30 pm, room HH 4-08 City West campus www.unisa.edu.au/openday Program information sessions Tuesday, 9 September 2008 Tuesday, 2 December 2008 Thursday, 4 December 2008 Magill campus Register at www.unisa.edu.au/infosessions Registrations essential Program overview This double degree provides integrated studies in psychology and human services, offering a balance of courses in behavioural and social sciences, the understanding of human behaviour, critical and analytical skills, research and data analysis skills, practice skills, project management skills and social policy. This program prepares graduates to be effective human service professionals with a strong understanding of psychology and, on completion, students will be able to: » work in a range of challenging human services careers » apply psychological knowledge about individuals and social contexts to their work » develop further as informed and skilled human services professionals. What will I study? This unique program offers a combination of courses from Psychology and Social Science (Human Services), including two supervised work field education placements. The combination of these two areas of study greatly enhances the employability of graduates in a richly diverse, complex and dynamic field. In the final year of the program Students undertake two field placements of 20 days and 40 days respectively, supervised by field staff and arranged, monitored and assessed by UniSA staff. They also incorporate regular tutorial sessions and enable students to integrate and apply their learning in work situations. The field education courses are invaluable for providing real-life work experience, and an opportunity for students to engage in professional practice. Many students are offered employment by the agencies in which they do their placements. Please note Some work placements require a current driver’s licence and a recognised first aid certificate. All students are required to undertake mandatory notification training on child-safe environment prior to placement. All students preparing for placement will require evidence of a current police check before commencing placement. What does it take? This program is ideally suited for students who have an interest in: » understanding human behaviour » understanding how social contexts shape human behaviour » managing themselves and their own identities » managing projects » the legal environment » social policy development and implementation » thinking critically and problem solving » working practically and professionally » working with people to help them solve problems. Who will employ me? The combination of psychological understanding and human service expertise uniquely prepares graduates for a range of positions in human service project management and research, and in practice areas such as youth work, family support work, community development, case management, court liaison, domestic violence work, refugee resettlement, policy development and counselling.

UniSA program code: SATAC code: CRICOS code (international students only): TER (February 2008 cutoff): Program length: Home campus: Program fees: Program fees (international students only): Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: Accepts Special Entry (STAT): External study available: Part-time study available: TAFE credit available: Honours study available: Scholarships available:

MBSP 444241 055257J 60.35 4 years Magill Commonwealth supported A$15,000 per annum None None Yes No Yes Yes Yes www.unisa.edu.au/scholarship

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Graduates of the double degree will be eligible for all of the employment options open to graduates of both social science (human services) and undergraduate psychology degrees. The combination of human service and comprehensive psychology knowledge with a strong research orientation further enhances the attractiveness of graduates to a range of human service employers. Honours Based on academic merit, graduates of this program will be eligible to apply for Honours in both Psychological and Social Science. Professional recognition Australian Psychology Accreditation Council Graduates will have completed an (APAC) accredited undergraduate sequence which will allow them to go on to further study in psychology to satisfy the requirements for registration as a psychologist and eligibility for membership of the Australian Psychological Society. Graduates will be eligible for full membership of the Australian Institute of Welfare and Community Workers. Program requirements FIRST YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Provision Sociology 1 Psychology 1A Communication: Rhetoric and Reasoning L Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Group Work Governance and Citizenship in Australia Psychology 1B Philosophy of Knowledge and Ethics SECOND YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Political Economy and Social Policy Human Service Interviews Developmental Psychology Research Methods 1 Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Australian Social Policy Human Service Workers and the Law Cognition and Perception Social Psychology A THIRD YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Managing Individualised Service Delivery Human Service Intervention Personality and Individual Differences Clinical and Abnormal Psychology Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Working with Community Human Service Project Management Research Methods 2 Biological and Learning Psychology FOURTH YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Managing Professional Practice Human Service Field Education A Indigenous Australians and the Human Services Psychology elective 1 Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Human Service Field Education B Psychology elective 2 Psychology elective 3

(08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW study@unisa.edu.au

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Bachelor of Social Work, Bachelor of Arts (International Studies)
Open Day information sessions Sunday, 17 August 2008 1.30 pm, room HH 4-08 3.00 pm, Mercury Cinema City West campus www.unisa.edu.au/openday Program information sessions Tuesday, 9 September 2008 Monday, 1 December 2008 Tuesday, 2 December 2008 Magill campus Register at www.unisa.edu.au/infosessions Registrations essential Students undertake two substantial field placements in the first half of fourth year and the second half of fifth year. Each placement is for approximately 15 weeks full-time and is supervised by a professional social worker and supported by the University. These placements provide a great opportunity to integrate social work knowledge and skills with an international perspective. Placements also allow students to gain practical experience in areas such as international aid and social development, to work oneto-one with individual clients, and to be involved in community development work, research or policy formulation. A number of students will also have the opportunity to undertake one placement overseas, with options for international field education placements existing in the UK, United States, Canada, India and Kenya. Please note Some work placements require a current driver’s licence and a recognised first aid certificate. Prior to placement, all students are required to undertake mandatory notification training and provide evidence of a current police check. What does it take? Students should have an inquiring mind, good verbal and written communication skills, and an interest in current world affairs, particularly with regard to Australia’s place in an international context. Students also require a strong commitment to, and passion for, working for social justice and human rights. All forms of professional social work require effective interpersonal skills, a disciplined, objective approach and adherence to the profession’s ethics and values. Social workers may be required to work in settings where resources and assistance are limited, and often work with individuals, families, organisations and communities under stress, or in situations where there is conflict or uncertainty. Who will employ me? The demand for professionally qualified social workers continues to be very high. Graduates work in positions across the health, welfare and educational sectors both in government, non-government and local government agencies. Graduates will develop expertise to work in areas such as international aid, foreign affairs, diplomacy and international social development. They will work with communities from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds; child and family welfare; refugees and asylum seekers; migrants; torture and trauma survivors; mental health and community support agencies; detention centres; hospitals; people with intellectual or physical disabilities; the aged; or adolescents. Professional recognition Graduates are eligible for membership of the Australian Association of Social Workers. Graduates may apply for membership, at an appropriate level, of the Australian Institute for International Affairs, the Australasian Political Studies Association, and the Royal Australian Institute of Public Administration.

UniSA program code: SATAC code: CRICOS code (international students only): TER (February 2008 cutoff): Program length: Home campus: Program fees: Program fees (international students only): Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: Accepts Special Entry (STAT): External study available: Part-time study available: TAFE credit available: Honours study available: Scholarships available:

MBSI 444231 057386F 58.55 5 years Magill Commonwealth supported A$15,000 per annum None None Yes No Yes Yes Yes www.unisa.edu.au/scholarship

Program overview This double degree will appeal to students who are interested in working as a professional social worker as well as gaining a broader international perspective. The program covers all of the requirements for graduates to become professional social workers as well as a range of topics including world politics and cross-cultural studies. Through this unique combination of degrees, students gain a strong foundation in contemporary social work knowledge and analytical skills in international, cross-cultural and multicultural contexts.

Applicants who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree in a relevant social science or human service degree may be eligible for up to two years’ credit for prior learning. What will I study? This program combines the Social Work program with key courses of the International Studies program, allowing students to develop an international perspective to social work. The Social Work courses include studies in society, ethics and social work practice and include organisational, research and policy analysis.

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Honours Based on academic merit, graduates of the program will be eligible for honours in either Social Work or International Studies. Honours in Social Work may be undertaken by double degree students who complete Social Work courses with a high credit grade point average. Honours in International Studies may be undertaken by double degree students who complete an International Relations professional major with a high credit grade point average. Program requirements FIRST YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Provision Communication for Human Service Introduction to International Relations Lifespan Diversity Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Psychology 1B Governance and Citizenship in Australia Group Work Global Societies SECOND YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Political Economy and Social Policy World Order: Theoretical Interrogations Global Governance: Utopia and Reality Globalisation and Regionalism Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Australian Social Policy Mental Health and Mental Wellbeing Islam and World Politics International Studies Option THIRD YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Social Enquiry Methods Human Service Intervention Human Service Interviews International Studies Option Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Human Service Workers and the Law Working with Community Global Security and Sustainability Contemporary International Political Economy FOURTH YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Social Work Practice Strategies Social Work Field Education 1 Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Planning and Evaluation in the Human Services Contemporary Practice Approaches Indigenous Australians and the Human Services Organisation of Human Service Delivery FIFTH YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Contemporary Social Work Issues Social Work and Cultural Diversity Applied Social Research Honours Dissertation OR International Studies Option x 2 Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Social Work Field Education 2 Professional Development

(08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW study@unisa.edu.au

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Bachelor of Social Work
– Mount Gambier, Whyalla
Open Day information sessions Friday, 22 August 2008 10.00 am, Whyalla campus. Friday, 19 September 2008 1.00 pm, Mt Gambier. www.unisa.edu.au/openday Program information sessions Thursday, 11 September 2008 Whyalla campus & Mt Gambier. www.unisa.edu.au/infosessions Social Work Knowledge This field introduces the core concepts of race, ethnicity, age, culture, gender and class. Students develop their knowledge of social work approaches, working with individuals, families, communities, groups and organisations. Students may also specialise in areas such as interpersonal violence, rural communities, cultural diversity, health care, child protection, aged care and many other areas of practice. Social Work Practice Students engage in two 15-week supervised field placements in their third and fourth years, where they apply their knowledge, skills and experience to practical situations. Students often say that their best learning experiences are while on placement, and many use this opportunity to secure permanent employment. In third year, students experience working with individuals and families, for example, working with young parents who need help with parenting skills and supportive social networks. In fourth year, students take on a broader project focus, working with community groups or organisations, immigrants or people in detention centres. Students also have the opportunity to undertake one of their field placements overseas, with programs established in both India and Canada, allowing students to focus on issues of poverty, access to nutrition and clean water, and improving opportunities for a better life. Please note Some work placements require a current driver’s licence and a recognised first aid certificate. Police checks are required by many placement agencies, especially those involving contact with minors (under 18 years of age) and for any placements undertaken in schools Social Policy This field addresses the conditions leading to disadvantage and the marginalisation of individuals and sectors of society, enabling students to identify social policies that affect people’s lives, the forces that shape these policies, and the strategic ways social workers may influence these policies. Research A central focus of the program is to prepare practitioners with knowledge and skills grounded in sound research. The ability to use, evaluate and construct research is developed throughout the program. What does it take? Social work requires a strong commitment to, and passion for, working for social justice and human rights. Social workers enable people and communities to achieve their full potential, often against great odds. All forms of professional social work require effective interpersonal skills, a disciplined objective approach and adherence to the profession’s ethics and values. Social workers may be required to work in settings where resources and assistance are limited, and often work with individuals, families, organisations and communities under stress, or in situations where there is conflict or uncertainty.

UniSA program code: SATAC code: CRICOS code (international students only): TER (February 2008 cutoff): Program length: Home campus: Program fees: Program fees (international students only): Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: Accepts Special Entry (STAT): External study available: Part-time study available: TAFE credit available: Honours study available: Scholarships available: Program overview The social work profession promotes advocacy, social change, positive human relationships and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance their wellbeing. Principles of human rights and social justice are fundamental to social work, an increasingly important profession in today’s rapidly changing world. The Bachelor of Social Work provides a sound knowledge of the political, behavioural and social sciences. It prepares students for a range of professional social work job opportunities in areas such as health care, legal and court services, domestic violence,

WBSW 474041 (Mount Gambier) 464081 (Whyalla) 045413G 56.20 (Mount Gambier) 56.10 (Whyalla) 4 years Mount Gambier, Whyalla Commonwealth supported A$15,000 per annum None None Yes Yes (Whyalla only) Yes Yes Yes www.unisa.edu.au/scholarship child protection, services for youth, families, children and communities, drug and alcohol programs, services for Aboriginal families and communities, and refugee assistance. The Whyalla and Mount Gambier Social Work programs prepare students for professional social work practice, and provide an additional focus on rural and regional issues, thus graduates can work competently in both urban and rural locations. What will I study? This program has been developed around four major areas of study: Social Work Knowledge, Social Work Practice, Social Policy and Rural Practice.

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Who will employ me? Social workers have excellent employment opportunities. Current vacancy levels are very high according to the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations. There are also strong employment opportunities overseas, particularly in the United Kingdom. Graduates may find employment in the fields of aged care, relationship and personal counselling, domestic violence, child and youth welfare, multicultural services, health care, community development, legal and court services, correctional services, disability services, social planning and administration, research and private industry. They work as sole workers or as one of many social workers, as well as in multidisciplinary teams including occupational therapists, psychologists, physiotherapists, nurses and doctors. Honours The degree may be awarded with honours Professional recognition Graduates are eligible for membership of the Australian Association of Social Workers. Program requirements FIRST YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Provision Communication for Human Service Sociology 1 Psychology 1A Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Governance and Citizenship in Australia Group Work Philosophy of Knowledge and Ethics Psychology 1B SECOND YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Human Service Intervention Working with Community Social Enquiry Methods Human Service Interviews Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Australian Social Policy Social Work Practice Strategies Human Service Workers and the Law Mental Health and Mental Wellbeing THIRD YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Social Work Field Education 1 Professional Development Workshops 1 Second Half Year Reflective Social Work Practice Planning and Evaluation in the Human Services Organisation of Human Service Delivery Indigenous Australians and the Human Services FOURTH YEAR First Half (Study Period 1, 2 or 3) Advanced Social Work Practice Honours Dissertation Options: (x3) Applied Social Research* Rural Social Work Statutory Responsibility in Social Work Mediation Process, Concepts and Skills A Aged Care and Social Work Practice* Family and Child Practice* Second Half (Study Period 4, 5 or 6) Social Work Field Education 2 Professional Development Workshops 2 * These electives are only available at Magill.

Leesha Spreadborough
Bachelor of Social Work, Whyalla campus

‘I found the open–door policies, and smaller class sizes at the Whyalla campus have really benefited my studies, especially as a mature–age student and parent. You’re not just treated as a number but as an individual. Studying regionally is a much more personal experience and the facilities are extremely accessible and modern. I really enjoy the diversity of the social work profession. You get to help people from all sorts of cultural backgrounds and experiences and each day is different.’

(08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW study@unisa.edu.au

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Entry requirements
For Undergraduate Bachelor Degrees and Associate Degrees Applicants are required to have one of the following qualifications: » Qualified for SACE; and – Recorded achievement in five SACE subjects taken at stage 2 level; and – Included at least four Stage 2 subjects which are approved Higher Education Selection Subjects (HESS); and – Obtained a competitive TER » Completed interstate or overseas qualifications that the University considers equivalent to the SACE » Completed the International Baccalaureate Diploma » Completed or partly completed a recognised higher education program at a recognised higher education institution » Completed at least four Open Universities Australia (OUA) courses at the appropriate level » Completed an award from TAFE or from another registered training organisation at Australian Qualifications Framework Certificate IV or above » Qualified for Special Entry and completed the Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT). A personal competencies statement and/or employment experience may also be considered » Completed the University Foundation Studies program. Please note that some programs have prerequisites. Applicants should check all entry requirements before applying. For some programs, applicants may also be required to attend an interview or present a folio. For more information on entry requirements, visit www.unisa.edu.au/future Equity and special access UniSA offers various programs and services to assist rural and/or socio-economically disadvantaged students, Indigenous Australians and people with a disability to apply to UniSA. For more information, contact (08) 8302 2376 or 1300 UNINOW or email study@unisa.edu.au Student contributions Student contributions are the amount you pay towards the cost of your program. The University determines the amount that you contribute within a range set by the Australian Government. The contribution that applies depends on which courses you choose to study and the contribution band in which those courses are classified. The amount of your student contribution also depends on the unit value of your courses of study (the equivalent full-time student load [EFTSL] value of the course).

As per the Australian Government guidelines, the student contribution amounts for 2008 are:
Band National priorities Band 1 Fields of study Nursing, education Humanities, behavioural science, social studies, foreign languages, visual and performing arts Mathematics, statistics, computing, built environment, health, engineering, science, surveying, agriculture Law, accounting, commerce, administration, economics, dentistry, medicine, veterinary science Student contribution A$4,077 A$5,095

Band 2

A$7,260

Band 3

A$8,499

Note: these amounts are for 1 EFTSL in 2008 For more information visit www.unisa.edu.au/future/fees

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Glossary
What will you study? Associate degree – An award for completing a two-year (or parttime equivalent) tertiary program. Direct Entry – Programs for which applications are not processed through SATAC but are made direct to UniSA. Bachelor degree – A program of three or more years’ duration (or part-time equivalent). Bachelor degree programs provide the relevant qualifi cations for many professions. Honours – An additional year of study in a bachelor degree during which students specialise in a chosen area of study. Graduate Certificate – An award for completing a postgraduate program of at least six months in duration (or part-time equivalent). Graduate Diploma – An award for completing a postgraduate program of at least one year in duration (or part-time equivalent). Masters degree – A postgraduate degree undertaken after completion of a bachelor degree (normally with honours) which focuses on one area of specialisation. PhD – Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programs normally extend over three years (or parttime equivalent) and involve significant research work. How does your program work? Major – A set of related courses which comprises 36 units of study within a bachelor degree. Sub-major – A set of related courses which comprises between 1 and 35 units of study within a bachelor degree. In some programs these may be called ‘general studies sub-majors’. Minor – A set of related courses which comprises up to 18 units of study within a bachelor degree. In some programs these may be called ‘cognates’. Program – Award in which you are enrolled, eg Bachelor of Arts. Course – A component of study within a program (previously known as a ‘subject’). Unit – A value assigned to a course which measures the amount of work involved in that course. Full-time students normally undertake 36 units of study per year (18 units per study period). UniSA glossary Assumed knowledge – Some first-year courses require knowledge of certain SACE Stage 2 subjects. BUGE – Broadening Undergraduate Education (BUGE) A course chosen from any on offer outside your Division, provided that individual course prerequisites are met. BUGE courses are designed to broaden your knowledge and skills beyond your professional field of study. CRICOS code – Code identifying that a UniSA program has been registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS). Division – UniSA is split into four academic Divisions – Business; Education, Arts and Social Sciences; Health Sciences; and Information Technology, Engineering and the Environment – each offering a range of specialised programs and courses. SATAC Guide – A publication that lists every program offered by South Australian higher education institutions. The SATAC Guide provides information about the selection process and includes instructions on how to apply and is available every year from newsagents Australia-wide. Special Entry (STAT) – Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT) is an alternative tertiary admissions test for people who do not have a recent Year 12 certificate. TER (Tertiary Entrance Rank) – A ranking of all students who have completed SACE in a particular year. The minimum TER required for the previous year is often a guide to how well you will need to perform to gain entry into a particular program. TERs can vary from year to year and should be used as a guide only.

Experience. The Difference.

Ask UniSA Get answers 24/7 at www.unisa.edu.au/future Telephone 08 8302 2376 or freecall 1300 UNINOW Email study@unisa.edu.au The University of South Australia reserves the right to alter, amend or delete any program, fee, course, admission requirement, mode of delivery or other arrangement without prior notice. For information specific to international students please visit www.unisa.edu.au/ international/default.asp Information correct at time of printing June 2008 CRICOS provider number 00121B.

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