Summer Session 2014 June 30–August 8 Instructor: Ian G.

Grimmer Online Office Hours: by appointment for conversations using Skype E-mail: igrimmer@uvm.edu

History 118: Postwar Europe

This course will explore changes and continuities in European societies following the devastation of the Second World War with the intention of placing the present in historical context. Topics to be discussed will include: the origins and impact of the Cold War; efforts to ―come to terms‖ with the Nazi past; decolonization; the student revolt of the late 1960s; transformations of capitalism; and the revolutions of 1989. We will draw on a variety of sources from films and primary documents to novels and memoirs. Particular attention will be devoted to dissident perspectives from both sides of the Iron Curtain.

Requirements 1. Viewing the podcast lectures each week 2. Participation in each of the threaded discussions 3. Completion of the midterm and final essays before midnight on July 18 and August 8 respectively

Required Books Albert Camus, The Fall Timothy Garton Ash, The Magic Lantern Heda Margolius Kovály, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968 Angelo Quattrocchi, The Beginning of the End J. Robert Wegs and Robert Ladrech, Europe Since 1945

Additional Required Readings (available on Blackboard) Brezhnev, Leonid. ―The Brezhnev Doctrine,‖ In From Stalinism to Pluralism, edited by Gale Stokes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991 Churchill, Winston S. ―The Sinews of Peace.‖ In Winston S. Churchill: His Complete Speeches, 1897−1963, vol. 7, edited by Robert Rhodes James. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1974. Cohn-Bendit, Daniel, and Gabriel Cohn-Bendit. Obsolete Communism: The Left-Wing Alternative. San Francisco: AK Press, 2000. Fanon, ―Algeria Unveiled.‖ In Studies in a Dying Colonialism, translated by Haakon Chevalier. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1965. Hall, Stuart. ―Brave New World.‖ Socialist Review 91, no. 1 (1991): 57–64. Havel, Václav. ―The Power of the Powerless.‖ In From Stalinism to Pluralism, edited by Gale Stokes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991 Khrushchev, Nikita. ―Nikita Khrushchev‘s ‗Secret Speech‘ to the Twentieth Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.‖ In The Structure of Soviet History: Essays and Documents, edited by Ronald Grigor Suny. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. Moeller, Robert G. ―Remembering the War in a Nation of Victims: West German Pasts in the 1950s,‖ In The Miracle Years: A Cultural History of West Germany, 1949– 1968, edited by Hanna Schissler. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2001. Molotov, V. M. ―Excerpts from Molotov‘s Speech on the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Revolution of November 7, 1947.‖ In The Origins of the Cold War, edited by Thomas G. Paterson. Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath and Company, 1970. Nagy, Imre. ―Reform Communism.‖ In From Stalinism to Pluralism, edited by Gale Stokes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991. L‘Internationale Situationniste and Students of Strasbourg, ―On the Poverty of Student Life.‖ In Beneath the Paving Stones: Situationists and the Beach, May 1968. Edinburgh, U.K.: AK Press/Darkstar, 2001. Solidarity, ―Solidarity‘s Program,‖ In From Stalinism to Pluralism, edited by Gale Stokes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Stalin, Joseph. ―Stalin Interview with Pravda on Churchill.‖ In The Origins of the Cold War, edited by Thomas G. Paterson. Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath and Company, 1970. Truman, Harry S. ―Special Message to the Congress on Greece and Turkey: The Truman Doctrine, March 12, 1947.‖ In The Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Harry S. Truman: Containing the Public Messages, Speeches, and Statements of the President, January 1 to December 31, 1947. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1963. Vaculík, Ludvík. ―Two Thousand Words,‖ In From Stalinism to Pluralism, edited by Gale Stokes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Final Grades will be based on: Online Discussion Participation 35% Midterm Exam: 30% Final Exam 35%

Discussion Guidelines In addition to viewing the online lectures and doing the reading assignments, participating in the weekly threaded discussions will constitute an important component of your weekly responsibility as a student in this course. You will be expected to have completed the readings by Tuesday so as to be able to post a response to the discussion board by Wednesday (at midnight at the latest). Each student is then expected to read each other‘s posts and to follow up again by Thursday (at midnight). These twice-weekly posts are the minimum expectation—more are certainly encouraged. Your online discussion participation grade will partially reflect the quantity of your posts, but even more importantly, the quality. Here are my expectations for participation worthy of an ―A‖ letter grade: Your initial posts and follow-ups are always on time, and you often contribute more frequently than the minimum requirement. Your comments are based on a close reading of the assignments, often referring to specific passages in the reading to back up your interpretations and views. Your comments are also able to spark interesting conversations with the other students in the course.

COURSE SCHEDULE THE “ZERO HOUR” Origins of the Cold War Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 1–22 Churchill, ―The Sinews of Peace,‖ 7285–93 Stalin, ―Interview with Pravda on Churchill,‖ 5–8 Truman, ―Special Message to the Congress,‖ 176–80 Molotov, ―Speech on the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Revolution,‖ 24–26.

WEEK 1 (June 30–July 4)

WEEK 2 (July 7–11)

STALINISM & MEMORIES OF WWII Eastern Europe Under Stalin Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 27–42 Kovály, Under a Cruel Star, 1–163 The Nazi Past Remembered: West and East Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 45–60. Moeller, ―Remembering the War in a Nation of Victims,‖ 83–109

WEEK 3 (July 14–18)

POSTWAR CULTURE Western European Culture and Society in the 1950s Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 61–77, 310–13 Camus, The Fall, 1–147 Film Clip: Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (UK, 1960)

JULY 18

Midterm Essay Due

WEEK 4 (July 21–25)

SOCIAL ORDER & DISCONTENT Decolonization Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 80–99. Fanon, ―Algeria Unveiled,‖ 35–64

“De-Stalinization” and the Hungarian Revolution Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 102–17 Khrushchev, ―Secret Speech,‖ 340–58 Nagy, ―Reform Communism,‖ 82–87

WEEK 5 (July 28–Aug 1)

THE YEAR OF REVOLT: 1968

The Student Movements of 1968 Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 196–204. Quattrocchi, The Beginning of the End, 1–83 Cohn-Bendit, Obsolete Communism, 225–31 Situationists, ―On the Poverty of Student Life,‖ 1–27 Film: Confrontation: Paris 1968 (United States, 1970) Détente, The Brezhnev Era, and Prague Spring Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 205–13. Kovály, Under a Cruel Star, 164–92. Vaculík, ―Two Thousand Words,‖ 126–30. Brezhnev, ―The Brezhnev Doctrine,‖ 132–34. Film: Oratorio for Prague (Czechoslovakia/France, 1968)

WEEK 6 (August 4-8)

REFORM & DISSOLUTION OF COMMUNISM

Eastern European Dissent and the Revolutions of 1989 Wegs, Europe Since 1945, 216–49. Havel, ―The Power of the Powerless,‖ 168–74. Ash, The Magic Lantern, 11–167. Film: People Power (United States/Great Britain, 1998)

AUGUST 8

Final Essay Due

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