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Mobile & Ad Hoc Networks

Irwan Prasetya Gunawan, Ph.D


Informatics Engineering, Bakrie University ipg@bakrie.ac.id

01: Introduction
Version: February 14, 2014

Prepared for Postgraduate Studies of Telecommunications Engineering, ITTelkom

About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Contents
01: 02: 03: 04: 05: 06: 07: 08: 09: 10: 11: 12: 13: Introduction Mobile Communications Evolution Overview of Ad Hoc Networks Medium Access Control Routing, Scheduling Quality of Services Performance Analysis Power Management Service Discovery Security Technology Platform Applications Future Development
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

About the course

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

About the course


Course description: understand mobility factors, mobile trafc, ad hoc network and future development, design mobile network and services considering performance and capacity

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

About the course


Course description: understand mobility factors, mobile trafc, ad hoc network and future development, design mobile network and services considering performance and capacity Pre-requisite: Information Theory & Coding, Stochastic, Telecom. Network Performance, Network Mathematics, and Data Network Protocol.

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

About the course


Course description: understand mobility factors, mobile trafc, ad hoc network and future development, design mobile network and services considering performance and capacity Pre-requisite: Information Theory & Coding, Stochastic, Telecom. Network Performance, Network Mathematics, and Data Network Protocol. References (tentantive):
Andrea Goldsmith, Wireless Communications, Cambridge University Press, 2005 Other papers on mobile communications and ad hoc networks from IEEE, ACM, Springer, etc
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

Evaluation
Grades:

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

Evaluation
Grades: Mid Test: 25% Final Test: 25% Pop test / quiz: 15% Assignment: 20% Others (presentation, paper): 15%

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

Evaluation
Grades: Mid Test: 25% Final Test: 25% Pop test / quiz: 15% Assignment: 20% Others (presentation, paper): 15% Note:
Late submission of assignment/homeworks/etc: 25% discount

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

Evaluation
Grades: Mid Test: 25% Final Test: 25% Pop test / quiz: 15% Assignment: 20% Others (presentation, paper): 15% Note:
Late submission of assignment/homeworks/etc: 25% discount Quiz will not be announced beforehand; so, always be prepared!

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Details Evaluation

Evaluation
Grades: Mid Test: 25% Final Test: 25% Pop test / quiz: 15% Assignment: 20% Others (presentation, paper): 15% Note:
Late submission of assignment/homeworks/etc: 25% discount Quiz will not be announced beforehand; so, always be prepared!

Warning
No other types of grade will be given. There will not be any extra assignments once the Final Test has been conducted
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Why mobile communications?

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Why mobile communications?

Largest SW/HW/networked system

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Why mobile communications?

Largest SW/HW/networked system Largest number of subscribers

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Why mobile communications?

Largest SW/HW/networked system Largest number of subscribers Mobile devices dominate the Internet

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Why mobile communications?

Largest SW/HW/networked system Largest number of subscribers Mobile devices dominate the Internet Mobile applications dominate Internet usage

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Why mobile communications?

Largest SW/HW/networked system Largest number of subscribers Mobile devices dominate the Internet Mobile applications dominate Internet usage New possibilities, new threats

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Why mobile communications?

Largest SW/HW/networked system Largest number of subscribers Mobile devices dominate the Internet Mobile applications dominate Internet usage New possibilities, new threats Technology fully integrated into everybodys life almost 24/7, almost anywhere

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication

1896 Guglielmo Marconi

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication

1896 Guglielmo Marconi


wireless telegraphy (digital!)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication

1896 Guglielmo Marconi


wireless telegraphy (digital!) long wave transmission

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication

1896 Guglielmo Marconi


wireless telegraphy (digital!) long wave transmission

1907 Commercial transatlantic connections

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication

1896 Guglielmo Marconi


wireless telegraphy (digital!) long wave transmission

1907 Commercial transatlantic connections 1915 Wireless voice transmission NY-SF

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication

1896 Guglielmo Marconi


wireless telegraphy (digital!) long wave transmission

1907 Commercial transatlantic connections 1915 Wireless voice transmission NY-SF 1920 Discovery of short waves (Marconi)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication

1896 Guglielmo Marconi


wireless telegraphy (digital!) long wave transmission

1907 Commercial transatlantic connections 1915 Wireless voice transmission NY-SF 1920 Discovery of short waves (Marconi) 1926 Train-phone on the line Hamburg-Berlin

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II


1928 many TV broadcast trials (across Atlantic, color TV, news)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II


1928 many TV broadcast trials (across Atlantic, color TV, news) 1933 Frequency Modulation (E. H. Armstrong)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II


1928 many TV broadcast trials (across Atlantic, color TV, news) 1933 Frequency Modulation (E. H. Armstrong) 1958 A-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz, no handover)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II


1928 many TV broadcast trials (across Atlantic, color TV, news) 1933 Frequency Modulation (E. H. Armstrong) 1958 A-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz, no handover) 1972 B-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II


1928 many TV broadcast trials (across Atlantic, color TV, news) 1933 Frequency Modulation (E. H. Armstrong) 1958 A-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz, no handover) 1972 B-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz) 1979 NMT at 450MHz (Scandinavian)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II


1928 many TV broadcast trials (across Atlantic, color TV, news) 1933 Frequency Modulation (E. H. Armstrong) 1958 A-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz, no handover) 1972 B-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz) 1979 NMT at 450MHz (Scandinavian) 1982 Start of GSM specication

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II


1928 many TV broadcast trials (across Atlantic, color TV, news) 1933 Frequency Modulation (E. H. Armstrong) 1958 A-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz, no handover) 1972 B-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz) 1979 NMT at 450MHz (Scandinavian) 1982 Start of GSM specication 1983 Start of American AMPS (analog)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication II


1928 many TV broadcast trials (across Atlantic, color TV, news) 1933 Frequency Modulation (E. H. Armstrong) 1958 A-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz, no handover) 1972 B-Netz in Germany (analog, 160MHz) 1979 NMT at 450MHz (Scandinavian) 1982 Start of GSM specication 1983 Start of American AMPS (analog) 1984 CT-1 standard (Europe)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III


1991 DECT

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III


1991 DECT
used to be Digital European Cordless Telephone; now: Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III


1991 DECT
used to be Digital European Cordless Telephone; now: Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications 18801900MHz, 100500m range, 120 duplex channels, 1.2Mbit/s data transmission, voice encryption, authentication, up to several 10000 user/km2 , used in more than 50 countries

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III


1991 DECT
used to be Digital European Cordless Telephone; now: Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications 18801900MHz, 100500m range, 120 duplex channels, 1.2Mbit/s data transmission, voice encryption, authentication, up to several 10000 user/km2 , used in more than 50 countries

1992 GSM

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III


1991 DECT
used to be Digital European Cordless Telephone; now: Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications 18801900MHz, 100500m range, 120 duplex channels, 1.2Mbit/s data transmission, voice encryption, authentication, up to several 10000 user/km2 , used in more than 50 countries

1992 GSM
fully digital, 900MHz, 124 channels

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III


1991 DECT
used to be Digital European Cordless Telephone; now: Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications 18801900MHz, 100500m range, 120 duplex channels, 1.2Mbit/s data transmission, voice encryption, authentication, up to several 10000 user/km2 , used in more than 50 countries

1992 GSM
fully digital, 900MHz, 124 channels automatic location, hand-over, cellular

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III


1991 DECT
used to be Digital European Cordless Telephone; now: Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications 18801900MHz, 100500m range, 120 duplex channels, 1.2Mbit/s data transmission, voice encryption, authentication, up to several 10000 user/km2 , used in more than 50 countries

1992 GSM
fully digital, 900MHz, 124 channels automatic location, hand-over, cellular roaming in Europe now worldwide in more than 200 countries

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication III


1991 DECT
used to be Digital European Cordless Telephone; now: Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications 18801900MHz, 100500m range, 120 duplex channels, 1.2Mbit/s data transmission, voice encryption, authentication, up to several 10000 user/km2 , used in more than 50 countries

1992 GSM
fully digital, 900MHz, 124 channels automatic location, hand-over, cellular roaming in Europe now worldwide in more than 200 countries services: data with 9.6kbit/s, FAX, voice, ...
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication IV

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication IV


1996 HiperLAN (High Performance Radio Local Area Network)
ETSI, Std 1: 5.155.30GHz, 23.4 Mbps Std 2 and 3 (5GHz) and 4 (17GHz) as wireless ATM-networks (up to 155 Mbps)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication IV


1996 HiperLAN (High Performance Radio Local Area Network)
ETSI, Std 1: 5.155.30GHz, 23.4 Mbps Std 2 and 3 (5GHz) and 4 (17GHz) as wireless ATM-networks (up to 155 Mbps)

1997 Wireless LAN IEEE 802.11


IEEE standard 2.4 2.5 GHz and infrared 2 Mbps

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication IV


1996 HiperLAN (High Performance Radio Local Area Network)
ETSI, Std 1: 5.155.30GHz, 23.4 Mbps Std 2 and 3 (5GHz) and 4 (17GHz) as wireless ATM-networks (up to 155 Mbps)

1997 Wireless LAN IEEE 802.11


IEEE standard 2.4 2.5 GHz and infrared 2 Mbps

1998 Spec. GSM successors


UMTS (European proposal for IMT-2000) Iridium
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication V

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication V


1999 Standardization of additional wireless LANs
IEEE standard 802.11b, 2.42.5GHz, 11Mbps Bluetooth, 2.4GHz, < 1Mbps IMT-2000: UMTS, cdma2000, DECT, . . . Start of WAP

rst step unied Internet/mobile mobile phone for access to many services

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication V


1999 Standardization of additional wireless LANs
IEEE standard 802.11b, 2.42.5GHz, 11Mbps Bluetooth, 2.4GHz, < 1Mbps IMT-2000: UMTS, cdma2000, DECT, . . . Start of WAP

rst step unied Internet/mobile mobile phone for access to many services

2000 GSM with higher data rates


HSCSD: up to 57.6 kbps rst GPRS trials up to 50 kbps (packet oriented) bankruptcy of Iridium

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication V


1999 Standardization of additional wireless LANs
IEEE standard 802.11b, 2.42.5GHz, 11Mbps Bluetooth, 2.4GHz, < 1Mbps IMT-2000: UMTS, cdma2000, DECT, . . . Start of WAP

rst step unied Internet/mobile mobile phone for access to many services

2000 GSM with higher data rates


HSCSD: up to 57.6 kbps rst GPRS trials up to 50 kbps (packet oriented) bankruptcy of Iridium

2001 Start of 3G systems


Cdma2000 in Korea UMTS tests in Europe Foma (almost UMTS) in Japan
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication VI

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication VI


2002 WLAN hot-spots started to spread

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication VI


2002 WLAN hot-spots started to spread 2003 DVB-T started to replace analog TV

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication VI


2002 WLAN hot-spots started to spread 2003 DVB-T started to replace analog TV 2005
WiMax started as DSL alternative rst zigBee products

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication VI


2002 WLAN hot-spots started to spread 2003 DVB-T started to replace analog TV 2005
WiMax started as DSL alternative rst zigBee products

2006
HSDPA started WLAN draft for 250 Mbps (802.11n) using MIMO WPA2 mandatory for Wi-Fi WLAN devices

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication VI


2002 WLAN hot-spots started to spread 2003 DVB-T started to replace analog TV 2005
WiMax started as DSL alternative rst zigBee products

2006
HSDPA started WLAN draft for 250 Mbps (802.11n) using MIMO WPA2 mandatory for Wi-Fi WLAN devices

2008
real internet availability on mobile phones 7.2 Mbps HSDPA, 1.4 Mbps HSUPA rst LTE tests (>100 Mbps)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication VI


2002 WLAN hot-spots started to spread 2003 DVB-T started to replace analog TV 2005
WiMax started as DSL alternative rst zigBee products

2006
HSDPA started WLAN draft for 250 Mbps (802.11n) using MIMO WPA2 mandatory for Wi-Fi WLAN devices

2008
real internet availability on mobile phones 7.2 Mbps HSDPA, 1.4 Mbps HSUPA rst LTE tests (>100 Mbps)

2009 netbooks, iphones, VoIPoWLAN, . . .


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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

A brief history of wireless communication VI


2002 WLAN hot-spots started to spread 2003 DVB-T started to replace analog TV 2005
WiMax started as DSL alternative rst zigBee products

2006
HSDPA started WLAN draft for 250 Mbps (802.11n) using MIMO WPA2 mandatory for Wi-Fi WLAN devices

2008
real internet availability on mobile phones 7.2 Mbps HSDPA, 1.4 Mbps HSUPA rst LTE tests (>100 Mbps)

2009 netbooks, iphones, VoIPoWLAN, . . . 2010 LTE became more available


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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Aspects of Mobile Communications

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Aspects of Mobile Communications Mobile networks: ad-hoc and infrastructure networks as well as communication properties, protocols, data formats and concrete technologies

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Aspects of Mobile Communications Mobile networks: ad-hoc and infrastructure networks as well as communication properties, protocols, data formats and concrete technologies Mobile hardware: mobile devices or device components

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Aspects of Mobile Communications Mobile networks: ad-hoc and infrastructure networks as well as communication properties, protocols, data formats and concrete technologies Mobile hardware: mobile devices or device components Mobile software: characteristics and requirements of mobile applications

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Major Driver: Computing

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Major Driver: Computing Computers are integrated (95% embedded systems!)


small, cheap, portable, replaceable -no more separate devices

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Major Driver: Computing Computers are integrated (95% embedded systems!)


small, cheap, portable, replaceable -no more separate devices

Technology is in the background


computer are aware of their environment and adapt (location awareness) computer recognize the location of the user and react appropriately (e.g., call forwarding, fax forwarding, context awareness)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Major Driver: Computing Computers are integrated (95% embedded systems!)


small, cheap, portable, replaceable -no more separate devices

Technology is in the background


computer are aware of their environment and adapt (location awareness) computer recognize the location of the user and react appropriately (e.g., call forwarding, fax forwarding, context awareness)

Advances in technology
more computing power in smaller devices at, lightweight displays with low power consumption new user interfaces due to small dimensions more bandwidth per cubic meter multiple wireless interfaces: wireless LANs, wireless WANs, regional wireless telecommunication networks

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth:

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections .

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers.

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers. Wireless LANs: higher speed, inexpensive but very limited range.

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers. Wireless LANs: higher speed, inexpensive but very limited range. Security standards:

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers. Wireless LANs: higher speed, inexpensive but very limited range. Security standards: Dependent on public networks, hence careful use of VPN.

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers. Wireless LANs: higher speed, inexpensive but very limited range. Security standards: Dependent on public networks, hence careful use of VPN. VPN can easily be attacked

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers. Wireless LANs: higher speed, inexpensive but very limited range. Security standards: Dependent on public networks, hence careful use of VPN. VPN can easily be attacked Power consumption:

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers. Wireless LANs: higher speed, inexpensive but very limited range. Security standards: Dependent on public networks, hence careful use of VPN. VPN can easily be attacked Power consumption: Mostly rely on battery power

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers. Wireless LANs: higher speed, inexpensive but very limited range. Security standards: Dependent on public networks, hence careful use of VPN. VPN can easily be attacked Power consumption: Mostly rely on battery power Expensive batteries due to compact size of mobile devices
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Comms Insufcient bandwidth: Mobile Internet access (using GPRS, EDGE, HSDPA, HSUPA 3G networks) is generally slower than direct cable connections . Available within range of commercial cell phone towers. Wireless LANs: higher speed, inexpensive but very limited range. Security standards: Dependent on public networks, hence careful use of VPN. VPN can easily be attacked Power consumption: Mostly rely on battery power Expensive batteries due to compact size of mobile devices Battery life
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Computing (contd)

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Computing (contd) Transmission interferences: Weather, terrain, and the range from the nearest signal point Reception in tunnels, some buildings, and rural areas

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Computing (contd) Transmission interferences: Weather, terrain, and the range from the nearest signal point Reception in tunnels, some buildings, and rural areas Potential health hazards: Distractions whilst driving Not clear whether banning mobile device use while driving reduces accidents or not Interference with sensitive medical devices Signals causing health problems

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Why mobile communications? Brief history Aspects of Mobile Communications Limitations

Limitations of Mobile Computing (contd) Transmission interferences: Weather, terrain, and the range from the nearest signal point Reception in tunnels, some buildings, and rural areas Potential health hazards: Distractions whilst driving Not clear whether banning mobile device use while driving reduces accidents or not Interference with sensitive medical devices Signals causing health problems Human interface with device: Smaller screen and keyboards Alternative input: speech, handwriting, etc
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T personal communication using GSM/UMTS/LTE

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T personal communication using GSM/UMTS/LTE position via GPS

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T personal communication using GSM/UMTS/LTE position via GPS local ad-hoc network with vehicles close-by to prevent accidents, guidance system, redundancy

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T personal communication using GSM/UMTS/LTE position via GPS local ad-hoc network with vehicles close-by to prevent accidents, guidance system, redundancy vehicle data (e.g., from busses, high-speed trains) can be transmitted in advance for maintenance

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T personal communication using GSM/UMTS/LTE position via GPS local ad-hoc network with vehicles close-by to prevent accidents, guidance system, redundancy vehicle data (e.g., from busses, high-speed trains) can be transmitted in advance for maintenance

Emergencies

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T personal communication using GSM/UMTS/LTE position via GPS local ad-hoc network with vehicles close-by to prevent accidents, guidance system, redundancy vehicle data (e.g., from busses, high-speed trains) can be transmitted in advance for maintenance

Emergencies
early transmission of patient data to the hospital, current status, rst diagnosis

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T personal communication using GSM/UMTS/LTE position via GPS local ad-hoc network with vehicles close-by to prevent accidents, guidance system, redundancy vehicle data (e.g., from busses, high-speed trains) can be transmitted in advance for maintenance

Emergencies
early transmission of patient data to the hospital, current status, rst diagnosis replacement of a xed infrastructure in case of earthquakes, hurricanes, re etc.
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Applications Vehicles
transmission of news, road condition, weather, music via DAB/DVB-T personal communication using GSM/UMTS/LTE position via GPS local ad-hoc network with vehicles close-by to prevent accidents, guidance system, redundancy vehicle data (e.g., from busses, high-speed trains) can be transmitted in advance for maintenance

Emergencies
early transmission of patient data to the hospital, current status, rst diagnosis replacement of a xed infrastructure in case of earthquakes, hurricanes, re etc. crisis, war, ...
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

More Applications...

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

More Applications... Traveling salesmen


direct access to customer les stored in a central location consistent databases for all agents mobile ofce

18 / 27

About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

More Applications... Traveling salesmen


direct access to customer les stored in a central location consistent databases for all agents mobile ofce

Replacement of xed networks


remote sensors, e.g., weather, earth activities exibility for trade shows LANs in historic buildings

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

More Applications... Traveling salesmen


direct access to customer les stored in a central location consistent databases for all agents mobile ofce

Replacement of xed networks


remote sensors, e.g., weather, earth activities exibility for trade shows LANs in historic buildings

Entertainment, education, ...


outdoor Internet access intelligent travel guide with up-to-datelocation dependent information ad-hoc networks formulti user games
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Location dependent services

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Location dependent services


Location aware services
what services, e.g., printer, fax, phone, server etc. exist in the local environment

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Location dependent services


Location aware services
what services, e.g., printer, fax, phone, server etc. exist in the local environment

Follow-on services
automatic call-forwarding, transmission of the actual workspace to the current location

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Location dependent services


Location aware services
what services, e.g., printer, fax, phone, server etc. exist in the local environment

Follow-on services
automatic call-forwarding, transmission of the actual workspace to the current location

Information services
push: e.g., current special offers in the supermarket pull: e.g., where is the Black Forrest Cheese Cake?

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Location dependent services


Location aware services
what services, e.g., printer, fax, phone, server etc. exist in the local environment

Follow-on services
automatic call-forwarding, transmission of the actual workspace to the current location

Information services
push: e.g., current special offers in the supermarket pull: e.g., where is the Black Forrest Cheese Cake?

Support services
caches, intermediate results, state information etc. follow the mobile device through the xed network

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Location dependent services


Location aware services
what services, e.g., printer, fax, phone, server etc. exist in the local environment

Follow-on services
automatic call-forwarding, transmission of the actual workspace to the current location

Information services
push: e.g., current special offers in the supermarket pull: e.g., where is the Black Forrest Cheese Cake?

Support services
caches, intermediate results, state information etc. follow the mobile device through the xed network

Privacy
who should gain knowledge about the location
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Effects of device portability

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Mobile Devices

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Wireless networks in comparison to xed networks

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Wireless networks in comparison to xed networks


Higher loss-rates due to interference: emissions of engines/lightning

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Wireless networks in comparison to xed networks


Higher loss-rates due to interference: emissions of engines/lightning Restrictive regulations of frequencies: frequencies have to be coordinated, useful frequencies are almost all occupied

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Wireless networks in comparison to xed networks


Higher loss-rates due to interference: emissions of engines/lightning Restrictive regulations of frequencies: frequencies have to be coordinated, useful frequencies are almost all occupied Lower transmission rates: local some Mbit/s, regional currently, e.g., 53kbit/s with GSM/GPRS or about 150 kbit/s using EDGE soon Mbit/s with LTE

22 / 27

About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Wireless networks in comparison to xed networks


Higher loss-rates due to interference: emissions of engines/lightning Restrictive regulations of frequencies: frequencies have to be coordinated, useful frequencies are almost all occupied Lower transmission rates: local some Mbit/s, regional currently, e.g., 53kbit/s with GSM/GPRS or about 150 kbit/s using EDGE soon Mbit/s with LTE Higher delays, higher jitter: connection setup time with GSM in the second range, several hundred milliseconds for other wireless systems - soon in ms range with LTE

22 / 27

About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Wireless networks in comparison to xed networks


Higher loss-rates due to interference: emissions of engines/lightning Restrictive regulations of frequencies: frequencies have to be coordinated, useful frequencies are almost all occupied Lower transmission rates: local some Mbit/s, regional currently, e.g., 53kbit/s with GSM/GPRS or about 150 kbit/s using EDGE soon Mbit/s with LTE Higher delays, higher jitter: connection setup time with GSM in the second range, several hundred milliseconds for other wireless systems - soon in ms range with LTE Lower security, simpler active attacking: radio interface accessible for everyone, base station can be simulated, thus attracting calls from mobile phones
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Wireless networks in comparison to xed networks


Higher loss-rates due to interference: emissions of engines/lightning Restrictive regulations of frequencies: frequencies have to be coordinated, useful frequencies are almost all occupied Lower transmission rates: local some Mbit/s, regional currently, e.g., 53kbit/s with GSM/GPRS or about 150 kbit/s using EDGE soon Mbit/s with LTE Higher delays, higher jitter: connection setup time with GSM in the second range, several hundred milliseconds for other wireless systems - soon in ms range with LTE Lower security, simpler active attacking: radio interface accessible for everyone, base station can be simulated, thus attracting calls from mobile phones Always shared medium: secure access mechanisms important
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Areas of research in mobile comms

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Areas of research in mobile comms


Wireless Communications
transmission quality (BW, error rate, delay) modulation, coding, interference media access, regulations ...

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Areas of research in mobile comms


Wireless Communications
transmission quality (BW, error rate, delay) modulation, coding, interference media access, regulations ...

Mobility
location dependent services location transparency QoS support (delay, jitter, security) ...

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Examples Services Devices Research areas

Areas of research in mobile comms


Wireless Communications
transmission quality (BW, error rate, delay) modulation, coding, interference media access, regulations ...

Mobility
location dependent services location transparency QoS support (delay, jitter, security) ...

Portability
power consumption limited computing power limited sizes of display usability ...
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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Network protocols Layered Model Overlay Networks

Network protocol model

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Network protocols Layered Model Overlay Networks

Layered model of mobile communications

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About the Course Introduction Applications Protocols

Network protocols Layered Model Overlay Networks

Overlay Networks

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Assignment Find 2-3 papers in the IEEE/ACM journals on mobile & ad hoc networks Write up short report on these papers, up to 4 pages Report should be written in English as a review paper Cite/mention the papers detail clearly in the report
A Report format: L TEX, Word, or pdf

Papers and report must be submitted by email to ipg@bakrie.ac.id Email Subject: [MANET] Report 01 < Name >< StudentNo > Due date: by Thursday, 27 February 2014, 23:59 WIB Notes No two students should discuss/review the same paper! Doing so will incur discount on your mark